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FREE! TAKE ONE! NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2013

your life on the Crystal Coast

5

LOOK INSIDE FOR FUN & FREE

THINGS TO DO ON THE CRYSTAL COAST MID–NOVEMBER THROUGH MID–DECEMBER page 8

WAYS TO

Winterize Your Pet!

MUSTACHES FOR KIDS!

Mustache Pageantry LOCAL GROWING

Know Your Food! HOLIDAY LIGHTS

Swansboro Christmas Flotilla OUR LOCAL HERITAGE

COMMUNITY THEATRE

OUTER BANKS WILDLIFE SHELTER

Core Sound Decoy Festival

Broadway at Its Best III

It’s the Annual Wildlife Party


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DECEMBER 7 & 14 • 5–9:30 PM The Cedar Point Festival of Lights will take place December 7 and 14 from 5–9:30 p.m. Businesses and residences will be decked out with holiday decorations and plenty of lights to wow and amaze. Maps and flyers will be available at Cedar Point Town Hall for those who wish to drive the route in the comfort of their own vehicles. The Coastal Outlet Trolley will be taking visitors along the festival route for those who wish to park and ride.

LIVE MANGER SCENE IN LITTLE TOWN OF BETHLEHEM

VISIT WITH SANTA AND MRS. CLAUS AT OCTAGON HOUSE

LOCAL BUSINESSES DRESSED FOR THE HOLIDAYS

Emmanuel Baptist Church will recreate the town of Bethlehem, complete with people dressed in robes, animals wandering the streets of Bethlehem, a real working marketplace and a blacksmith!

Don’t miss a special visit and photo opportunity with Santa and Mrs. Claus at the beautiful, historic Octagon House located at 301 Masonic Avenue in Cedar Point

Go local! Stop in at participating Cedar Points businesses decorated for the holiday and take part in a special treasure hunt where one winner will get a special prize (to be announced). For more information call

Call 252-393-7898 or visitfacebook.com/cedarpointfestivaloflights for additional event updates and the most up-to-date information!

THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS! All Pro Tire & Auto, BB&T, Carolina Salt Magazine, Call a Cab, Cedar Point Tavern, Coastal Outlet, Coastline Golf Carts, Crystal Coast Tent & Event, Dayngrzone Media, Sound Bank Bikes R In, Brigadoon Animal Hospital, Cedar Point Tire, Christina’s Wine Boutique, Edward Jones, Harrika’s Brew House, Java Post, Molly Maids, SOBX Tech, Sea Monkey’s by Bits and Pieces, Tropical Paradise and Outdoor Solutions.


M ID - NOV E M BE R TO MID-DECEMB ER 2 0 1 3

Inside This Issue TH E C RYS TAL COAST LI F EST YLE

F E AT U R E S 15 Know Your Food Do you know where your food comes from? Now it is more important to know the answers to these questions than ever!

16 Broadway at Its Best III Carteret Community Theater presents Broadway at its Best III, with a variety of songs from beloved Broadway shows.

17 Do I exercise when I’m sick?

15

RESOURCES FOR BUYING FROM LOCAL FARMERS FREE! TAKE ONE!

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2013

your life on the Crystal Coast

5

LOOK INSIDE FOR FUN & FREE

THINGS TO DO ON THE CRYSTAL COAST MID–NOVEMBER THROUGH MID–DECEMBER

WAYS TO

Winterize Your Pet! page 8

MUSTACHES FOR KIDS!

Mustache Pageantry LOCAL GROWING

Know Your Food! HOLIDAY LIGHTS

Swansboro Christmas Flotilla OUR LOCAL HERITAGE

COMMUNITY THEATRE

OWLS

Core Sound Decoy Festival

Broadway at Its Best III

It’s the Annual Wildlife Party

ON THIS MONTH’S COVER The Swansboro Christmas Flotilla takes place November 29 at 6 p.m. in downtown Swansboro. Decorated boats begin the parade at Emerald Isle Bridge and float down to downtown Swansboro where they deliver Santa to the town dock. We’re looking forward to visiting with friends & family (maybe a little eggnog).

It’s cold and flu season again! Just in time, a few simple guidelines to help you decide when to hit the gym and when to stay home.

20 Wildlife Party! Tickets to the OWLS fundraiser include meet and greets with Wildlife Ambassadors like Sweet Isabella, the adorable Virginia opossum.

21 Mustache for Kids It’s a mustache marathon fundraiser! This benefit event benefits kids, and you get a Mustache Competition, too!

23 Winterize Your Pets Our winters can be harsh! Here are some simple things to think about for your pets’ health and wellbeing this fall and winter. 20 OWLS PARTY Wildlife Ambassadors are ready for a night on the town.

23 WINTERIZE your pets!

You do it for you car or your lawnmower. Pets need it too!

The Regulars 8 Things to Do 18 Apple A Day: Healthy Holidays 20 OWLS: Wildlife Party 33 Ask the Aquarium 38 Parrot Heads 40 Diving the Coast 41 Tide Chart

25 Swansboro Christmas Flotilla An honored tradition that’s fun for the whole family! Gather along Swansboro’s waterfront and watch the boat parade!

31 Core Sound Decoy Festival If you live in Carteret County, it’s impossible not to know a little something about decoys and the rich waterfowl heritage of the county. N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3 | C A R O L I N A S A L T 5| 5


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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Linda Bergman–Althouse, Khristi T. Nunnally, Lee Moore, Gillian Ward, Ken Stone, Katie Dixon, Robin Hamm, Dea Daniels, Judy Hailey, Ron Butler, Coady Haga, Lindsay Parker, John Creech, Barbara Johnson, Tim Winters, Lainey Gottuso, Judy Long, Amie Talton, Sally Steele, Trish Forant. E D I TO R I A L S & A DV E RT I S I N G Please contact the publisher at will@crystalcoastoutdoors.com or 252-723-7628 for ad rates and editorial ideas. Ad and editorial deadline for the Mid-December to Mid-January issue is November 16, 2013. Email letters to the editor, photos, community listings and articles to will@crystalcoastoutdoors.com. Next issue will publish December 7, 2013.

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From the Publisher Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt magazine, published to depict your life here on the Crystal Coast. All articles are written by locals. We cover a wide range of topics including local history, outdoor sports, wildlife, special events and more. Every month we look to you, our readers, to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote, an interesting local photograph or just some good times stories to share, send them our way. Participation is welcomed and appreciated. Reader contributions are the founding principle of the magazine. We want to be a local resource for you, our readers. If you like what you see, tell people about it—especially our advertisers. For questions, concerns and more information about Carolina Salt, send e-mail to will@crystalcoastoutdoors.com or call 252-723-7628. For up-to-date info, be sure to look us up on Facebook!

We Depend On Our Readers! Call 252-723-7628 if you’re interested in submitting an article or photo. Our local content is what keeps our magazine fresh and relevant.

PUBLISHED BY CRYSTAL COAST OUTDOORS PUBLICATIONS P.O. Box 572, Morehead City, NC 28557 | 252-723-7628


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THINGS TO DO

MID–NOVEMBER TO MID–DECEMBER

✪ Veterans Day Parade

create silly snacks and fun foods for Thanksgiving. Cost is $15 per participant. Pre-registration and payment is required by November 20. Call Swansboro Recreation Center for more information at 910-326-2600.

[ 11 AM ] The annual parade honoring our American veterans past and present takes place in downtown Morehead City. Call 252-808-0440 for information.

Community Thanksgiving Feast

VETERANS DAY EVENTS NOVEMBER 9

NOVEMBER 9

✪ ‘Lest We Forget’ Veterans Day Program at Fort Macon

HO NO R O UR V E T E RA N S

✪ VETERANS DAY parades, programs and specials are listed directly to the right. Carolina Salt thanks our veterans for their sacrifice and patriotism.

[ 6–7 PM ] This special Veteran’s Day program at Fort Macon State Park includes reenactors dressed up in period uniforms, each giving a talk. The event concludes with an evening three-cannon salute. For more information call 252-726-3775. NOVEMBER 11

✪ Free Admission to the Aquarium for Veterans Day for Everyone! [ 9 AM–5 PM ] The Aquarium offers free admission to all on Veterans Day. No military affiliation, past or present, is required. Visitors are encouraged to return the favor and bring non-perishable food items to be donated to the local food pantry. The American Red Cross also will be accepting contributions to its blood drive. Donations to either effort are not required for free admission.

THANKSGIVING EVENTS NOVEMBER 21

✪ Giving Thanks to Our Commercial Fishermen

THAN K S GIV IN G

COMMUNITY FEAST at the Beaufort Historic Site is provided by some of the area’s finest restaurants on November 24. Call 252-728-5225 for information or reservations.

✪ = FREE

[ 4–7 PM ] Come say thank you to the men and women who have worked on the water and provided food for our tables. The Maritime Museum will offer catered hors d’oeuvres and show the film Core Sounders. Commercial fishermen, bring your appetites. Other guests, show your appreciation by donating towards the catering. This event is free. Please call the museum to sign up at 252-728-7317. NOVEMBER 23

Creative Chefs Kids’ Class [ 11 AM–2 PM ] It’s time to get creative in the kitchen with Swansboro Parks and Recreation. Children will

NOVEMBER 24 [ 11:30 AM–1 PM ] A traditional turkey dinner is provided by some of the area’s finest restaurants. Served at the Beaufort Historic Site, dinners are available for take-out or to enjoy under our tent. Admission fee. Call 252-728-5225 or email lindsay@ beauforthistoricsite.org. NOVEMBER 28

Pine Knoll Shores Turkey Trot [ 9 AM ] Thanksgiving morning Pine Knoll Shores invites everyone, including furry friends, to burn some calories before diving into their Thanksgiving feast. Pine Knoll Shores is sponsoring the fourth annual Turkey Trot and 3-mile bike ride. Registration begins at 9 a.m. at McNeil Park on Oakleaf Drive. The bike ride and run/ walk begins at 9:30 a.m. and hot chocolate and cider are provided. For more information, call Tina at 252240-2395.

CHRISTMAS EVENTS NOVEMBER 9

Mistletoe Magic Holiday Gift Show [ 9 AM–5 PM ] Exhibitors come to the Crystal Coast Civic Center in Morehead City to showcase their merchandise. Categories include floral, quilts, children’s items, dolls, clay items, fine art, glass and stained glass, jewelry, photography, pottery and ceramics, wearable art, scarfs, candles, wood and more. Admission is $3 (kids are free). For information call 252-247-3883. NOVEMBER 23

Gospel Christmas Show [ 7 PM ] At Joslyn Hall on the campus of Carteret Community College. This holiday extravaganza is two shows in one. The first half of the show will feature gospel songs. Then the stage transforms into Christmas. Tickets are on sale at The Kountry Kitchen in Morehead City or by calling CenterStage Entertainment at 919-915-1422.

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THINGS TO DO

MID–NOVEMBER TO MID–DECEMBER

NOVEMBER 29

DECEMBER 3–5

DECEMBER 7

✪ Swansboro Christmas Flotilla

Photos with Santa for People and Pets at a Christmas Beach Shack

✪ 7th Annual Atlantic Beach

[ 6 PM ] Kick off the 2013 Holiday Season with the Swansboro Christmas Flotilla in historic downtown Swansboro. Boats decorated in holiday regalia will begin the parade at the Emerald Isle Bridge and float down the Intracoastal Waterway to downtown Swansboro. Boats will deliver Santa Claus to the Town Dock. Santa will make his way to Front Street where he will meet with children to listen to their Christmas wishes. Music and holiday treats, such as funnel cakes, cider and hot cocoa, will be on offer. NOVEMBER 30

✪ Pine Knoll Shores Annual Christmas Flotilla [ 5 PM ] Pine Knoll Shores’ annual Christmas Flotilla begins at Brock Basin at at 4:30 p.m. Visitors are welcome to watch lighted boats take sail at McNeil Inlet beginning at sunset and back to Brock Basin. An after party will follow the flotilla with refreshments, marshmallows and a possible visit from Santa himself.

[ 2–9 PM ] Emerald Isle Realty hosts Santa at an authentic beach shack. Photographer Jeff Pennell will capture people smiles December 3–4; December 5 will be for pets. Santa is available by appointment only (a $10 non-refundable deposit will apply as a credit toward purchasing a photo package). Sitting fee is five cans of food or a five-pound bag of dog or cat food. Package prices start at $29.95. All food donations and half the profits will benefit Wounded Warriors and the Carteret County Humane Society. Call 252-354-6350 or email smcnally@emeraldisle-nc.org to schedule your child or fur-child’s professional photographs. December 3, 4.................................. People Photography December 5........................................... Pet Photography DECEMBER 4

✪ Festival of Trees at the Hospital

NOVEMBER 30

This annual holiday event is put on by Carteret General Hospital as a benefit for the hospice. Individuals, clubs and businesses sponsor a tree and decorate to dazzle.

✪ Emerald Isle Christmas Parade

DECEMBER 6

[ 3 PM ] The Emerald Isle Christmas Parade begins at Highway 58 and Emerald Drive. There will be only one Santa Claus in the parade and he will be riding in a float at the end. All other Santas will be sent back to the North Pole! After the parade there will be an official Christmas tree lighting at Merchant’s Park. Enjoy free refreshments, as well as a holiday caroling singalong as Santa Claus visits with the children. To enter a float in the parade, call Diane Schools at 252-354-2916.

✪ Art Gallery Walk & Tree Lighting at Katherine Davis Park

NOVEMBER 30

✪ Emerald Isle Annual Holiday

Arts & Crafts Fair

[ 8 AM–6 PM ] Emerald Isle Parks and Recreation hosts the 2nd Annual Holiday Arts and Crafts Fair in the gymnasium, featuring items from local artisans and crafters. If you are interested in participating in this event as a vendor or non-profit organization, contact Lainey Gottuso at 252-354-6350 or lgottuso@ emeraldisle-nc.org. There is no application deadline but space is limited and expected to fill up quickly.

In downtown Morehead City. Call 252-808-0440 or visitdowntownmoreheadcity.com for information. DECEMBER 7

✪ Christmas Open House with Santa and Live Entertainment [ 10 AM–4 PM ] Join Carolina Home and Garden at 4778 N Carolina 24 in Newport for a Christmas Open House. Entertainment by Kevin Siebold from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information call 252-393-9004. DECEMBER 7

✪ Pine Knoll Shores

Annual Christmas Parade [ 10 AM ] Numerous parade units, fabulous marching bands and decorative floats will be joining the one and only Santa as the Town of Pine Knoll Shores ushers in the holiday season with their annual Christmas parade. Parade starts at Magnolia Court.

Christmas by the Sea Event

[ 6 PM ] Beginning with a Christmas tree lighting, the event includes kids’ activities, local food, live music, door prizes, a canned food drive, face painting and photos with Santa. At the Atlantic Beach Town Park, located across from Atlantic Station Shopping Center. DECEMBER 7

✪ Indoor Holiday Craft Fair Fundraiser at The History Place [ 9 AM–4 PM ] The History Place at 1008 Arendell Street in Morehead City hosts a free indoor craft fair with more than 40 crafters. Crafts include holiday gifts, pottery, fabric dolls, clay seahorses, jewelry and gemstones, fused glass pendants, painted gourds, sculptures, birdhouses, hand-painted porcelain, beaded jewelry and much more. Popcorn, hot dogs and drinks will be available to purchase. DECEMBER 7

✪ Crystal Coast Christmas Flotilla [ 5:30–6:15 PM ] On the Crystal Coast, Santa arrives by boat. An evening parade of decorated and lighted boats bring him in to kick off the Christmas season. On both the Morehead City and Beaufort waterfronts at sunset, families gather to ring in the season as the brightly decorated boats slowly drift by in the Crystal Coast Christmas flotilla. Flotilla begins at 5:30 p.m. on the Morehead City waterfront and ends on the Beaufort waterfront at around 6:15 p.m. DECEMBER 7

✪ Life Celebration Tree Lighting [ 5 PM ] Crystal Coast Hospice House volunteers will light the Life Celebration Tree at Jaycee Park in downtown Morehead City.

ART | THEATRE | MUSIC THROUGHOUT NOVEMBER

✪ Public Library Art Gallery In November, Carteret County Public Library will showcase the artwork of local artists Jamison and J Ipock, who work in oils, watercolor, acrylic and pottery.

——SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9——

——SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23——

Kids Soft BB Turkey Shoot 1–3pm Live Music with Wild Honey 11am–2pm

Holiday table décor with —Stephanie 11am

——SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16——

——SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7——

Grapevine Christmas Tree Class 10am Live Music with Justin Castellan 11am–2pm Landscape Lighting with Casey 2pm

Christmas Open House featuring Santa 10–4 Live Music with Kevin Siebold on guitar 11am–2pm

4778 N CAROLINA 24 • NEWPORT

VISIT US ONLINE OR LIKE US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE INFORMATION ON EVENTS AND EDUCATIONAL SERIES.


THINGS TO DO

MID–NOVEMBER TO MID–DECEMBER

NOVEMBER 8–10, 15–17

Community Theatre Presents: Broadway at its Best The Carteret Community Theater presents Broadway at its Best at Joslyn Hall on the campus of Carteret Community College. Tickets will be on sale at Poor Richards Paint Store and at the door. Cost is $12 for adults and $8 for students. For more information call 252-247-5838.

resonates as she brings her poetry to life. Upstairs at Clawson’s Restaurant in Beaufort. Call 252-646-4657 for more information. NOVEMBER 18

Autumn Arts and Crafts Class

November 8, 9, 15, 16...........................................8 p.m. November 10, 17...................................................2 p.m.

[ 5:30 PM ] Let Swansboro Parks and Recreation help you decorate for fall! Learn to craft easy decorations. This program is geared towards adults but children are welcome. Cost is $10. Pre-registration and payment required by November 15. Call Swansboro Recreation Center for more information at 910-326-2600.

NOVEMBER 8, 15, 22, 29 | DECEMBER 6

NOVEMBER 20–21

Paint and Partake at BluSail [ 7–9:30 PM ] At Blu Sail Gallery at 903 Arendell Street in Morehead City. Join us Friday evenings for a fun-filled art and social experience where students paint their own interpretations of a workshop inspiration painting following easy, step-by-step instructions. At the end of the evening, take home your original 16” x 20” painting! Call 252-723-9516 to make a reservation. NOVEMBER 8

✪ Friday Free Flicks [ 7 PM ] At Emerald Isle Community Center, 7500 Emerald Drive. Movies are family oriented. Free and open to the public. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Popcorn and drink for $1. Please bring chairs and or blankets, but no outside beverages or snacks. Call 252-354-6350 for movie title one week prior to showing. NOVEMBER 16

Scrapbooking Workshop [ 10 AM–1 PM ] Scrapbooking Workshops with Linda Phelps will take place at Emerald Isle Parks and Recreation. Pre-registration is required, ages 12 and up. Fee is $5 with additional packages available. Use of tools and snack included. Fees payable at workshop. Call Linda Phelps at 910-326-6164 or email rphelps@ ec.rr.com for more information. NOVEMBER 16

Down East Folk Arts Society BluesJazz Concert with Ruth Wyand [ 8 PM ] With one foot in the blues bar and one foot in the jazz club, Ruth Wyand’s music is heartfelt and her vocal range seemingly limitless. Her slide guitar

✪ Community Theatre Auditions for Large Cast of ‘Annie’ The Carteret Community Theatre, in conjunction with West Carteret High School, is announcing auditions for Annie in Joslyn Hall on the campus of Carteret Community College. Seeking a very large cast of adult singers and actors (ages 16 and up) and eight orphans (ages 5–15) including Annie. For audition requirements please look for us on Facebook or at CarteretCommunityTheatre.org or call 252-726-8971. Wednesday, November 20......................................7 p.m. Thursday, November 21.........................................6 p.m. DECEMBER 6

✪ Classic Movie Night at

Emerald Isle Parks & Rec [ 6 PM ] Movies are classic films or movies based on classic novels. Free. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Parental guidance may apply to some films. Popcorn and drink for $1. Please bring chairs and or blankets, but no outside beverages or snacks. Call 252‑354‑6350 for movie title one week prior to showing. DECEMBER 7

✪ Movies in the Park: Rise of the Guardians (PG) [ 6:30 PM ] Free family movie series at Fort Benjamin, located at 100 McQueen Avenue in Newport) on a large screen. Don’t forget your blanket or chair. Concessions will be open for popcorn, candy and soft drinks. In case of inclement weather, the movie will be shown inside Fort Benjamin’s Recreation Center. For additional information call 252-222-5858.

✪ = FREE HISTORY | EDUCATION WEDNESDAYS IN NOVEMBER

✪ Kids Activities at the Library Preschool Storytime on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. and Time for Tots on Fridays at 10 and 11 a.m. at the Carteret County Public Library in Beaufort. VARIOUS DAYS IN NOVEMBER

Behind the Scenes at the Aquarium Visit food preparation areas, animal holding areas and labs and get an overhead view of the Living Shipwreck. Ages 5 and up. Cost is $8. For times and details call 252-247-4003 or visit www.ncaquariums.com/pineknoll-shores. SATURDAYS IN NOVEMBER

Aquarium Close Encounters [ 2–3:30 PM ] Visit labs and holding areas, help with food preparation and feed the animals in this thorough behind-the-scenes tour that includes a look at the Living Shipwreck from above. Ages 8 and up. Cost is $15. For details call 252-247-4003 or visit www. ncaquariums.com/pine-knoll-shores. NOVEMBER 4

✪ Let’s Talk About It [ 7 PM ] In the auditorium of the NC Maritime Museum at 315 Front Street, Beaufort, Anne Baker of North Carolina State University will discuss Marilynne Robinson’s “Housekeeping.” This is the final session of the Let’s Talk About It series, which deals with Picturing America: Making Tracks. NOVEMBER 13, 20 | DECEMBER 4

✪ Brown Bag Gam [ NOON–1 PM ] A gam is defined as a friendly conversation between whalers or a visit with another ship while at sea. Pack a lunch and come learn about North Carolina’s rich coastal environment and culture. For information call 252-728-7317 or visit ncmaritimemuseums.com. November 13..........The Seafood Business in Core Sound November 20......................Maritime Myths and Legends December 4................................ Duck Hunting and Decoy Carving of Down East

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MID–NOVEMBER TO MID–DECEMBER Carolina Home & Garden is located at 4778 N Carolina 24 in Newport. For information call 252-393-9004.

NOVEMBER 14

First Aid & CPR Certification Class [ 10 AM ] American Heart Association First Aid & CPR Certification provides training on how to correctly perform first aid and CPR on adults, children and infants. All students must pre-register and pre-pay. Class takes place at the Community Center, at 7500 Emerald Drive in Emerald Isle. Maximum class size is nine; minimum of six students required. Certification class fee is $34, due within 24 hours of registration. No textbook fees. Contact Sarah McNally at 252-3546350 or smcnally@emeraldisle-nc.org to register.

NOVEMBER 23

✪ Styling with Stephanie: Holiday Table Décor Class [ 11 AM ] Come to Carolina Home and Garden at 4778 N Carolina 24 in Newport for a just-in-time Holiday Table Décor class. For more information call 252-3939004.

WINING & DINING

NOVEMBER 15

MONDAYS IN NOVEMBER

Boatbuilding Past and Present [ 9:30–11:30 AM ] A look at boatbuilding of the past and today. Participants will visit the Watercraft Center where wooden boats are restored. Transportation will be provided to Jones Brothers Marine where modern methods of boat construction will be observed. Not suitable for children under 12. Reservations are $5. For information call 252-728-7317.

Succulent Seafood

FR EE SH O WIN G

[ 2–4 PM ] Visit the area’s top eateries to find out how expert chefs choose, prepare and serve fresh local seafood with a flourish. Sessions include a taste test! Ages 12 and up. Cost is $15. For details call 252-247-4003 or visit www.ncaquariums.com/pineknoll-shores.

NOVEMBER 16–17

NOVEMBER 10

Traditional Boatbuilding Carpentry

Craft on the Crystal Coast Festival for Craft Beer Lovers

A two-day class. Traditional techniques are taught in this hands-on workshop. Participants work as a team to construct a 12 to 14-foot version of a traditional “rack of eye” flat-bottomed skiff. In the process they learn how to set up the boat, spile and bend planks, plane bevels, erect framing and explore fastening options and the characteristics of traditional boatbuilding woods. Can be used as a prerequisite for 9 Day Boatbuilding. Class fee is $135. For information call 252-728-7317 or visit ncmaritimemuseums.com.

At the Crystal Coast Civic Center in Morehead City. The event will feature over 100 craft beers as well as a home brewers section and competition. No one under 21 admitted. Proceeds to benefit the Crystal Coast Hospice House. There are no early bird discounts. Processing and handling fees added to ticket costs at checkout. Military IDs will get a free T-shirt. For more information email robin.nelson@ crystalcoasthospicehouse.org.

HOME & GARDEN NOVEMBER 16

✪ Grapevine Christmas Tree and

Landscape Lighting Classes

[ 10 AM, 2 PM ] Join Carolina Home and Garden for a Grapevine Christmas Tree Class. Justin Castellan will be providing live music from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Landscape Lighting classes will begin at 2 p.m.

VIP Admission with Food [ 1–5 PM ]............................... $50 Standard Admission No Food [ 2–5 PM ]........................ $40 NOVEMBER 16

CCC’s 50th Anniversary Golden Celebration Dinner & Dance [ 6:30–11 PM ] Celebrate Carteret Community College’s 50 years of student and community success at the Crystal Coast Civic Center in Morehead

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THINGS TO DO

✪ RISE OF THE GUARDIANS plays at Fort Benjamin, at 100 McQueen Avenue in Newport on the large screen on December 7. Don’t forget a blanket or chair and dress for the weather. Call 252-222-5858 for more information.

AT TH E AQ U AR IU M

GO BEHIND THE SCENES with Aquarium Close Encounters Saturdays in November at the NC Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores. For ages 5 and up. Call 252-247-4003 or visit ncaquariums.com/pine-knollshores. SCAN HERE FOR CONTACT INFO!

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252-393-8561


THINGS TO DO

MID–NOVEMBER TO MID–DECEMBER City. Dinner provided by Longhorn Steakhouse and entertainment by The Embers. Register online at www. careteret50.com or mail payment to CCC Foundation, 3505 Arendell Street, Morehead City, NC 28557. For more information, contact Tiffany Taylor at 252-2226056 or taylort@carteret.edu. Individual Tickets......................................................$25 Reserved Seating [ Tables of 10 Only ]....................$250

✪ = FREE sarahp@nccoast.org. DECEMBER 7

Chowder & Cheer Crawl [ NOON–5 PM ] It’s holiday food fun for adults at the Chowder and Cheer Crawl, with about a dozen downtown Morehead City restaurants participating. Tickets available by calling 252-808-0440.

GET OUTDOORS

NOVEMBER 21

B I R D WAT C H IN G

BIRDING CRUISE with local expert Joanne Powell on the White Oak River in Swansboro. Take a powered ferry through the estuaries looking for resident and migrant species. Call 252-393-8185 for information.

✪ Giving Thanks to Our Commercial Fishermen

FRIDAYS IN NOVEMBER

[ 4–7 PM ] The Maritime Museum will offer free catered hors d’oeuvres and show the film Core Sounders. Commercial fishermen, bring your appetites. Other guests, show your appreciation by donating towards the catering. Call the museum to sign up at 252-728-7317.

[ 9 AM–NOON ] Learn to catch the big ones from the surf with expert instruction and hands-on experience (weather permitting). License requirement is covered; equipment and bait are provided. Ages 10 and up. Cost is $20. For details call 252-247-4003 or visit www. ncaquariums.com/pine-knoll-shores.

NOVEMBER 23

Creative Chefs Kids’ Class [ 10 AM–1 PM ] It’s time to get creative in the kitchen with Swansboro Parks and Recreation. Children will create silly snacks and fun foods for Thanksgiving. Cost is $15 per participant. Pre-registration and payment is required by November 20. Call Swansboro Recreation Center for more information at 910-326-2600. NOVEMBER 24

Community Thanksgiving Feast [ 11:30 AM–1 PM ] A traditional turkey dinner is provided by some of the area’s finest restaurants. Served at the Beaufort Historic Site, dinners are available for take-out or to enjoy under our tent. Admission fee. Call 252-728-5225 or email lindsay@ beauforthistoricsite.org. DECEMBER 6

F U N DIN IN G

✪ FREE OYSTER ROAST at the Backstreet Pub on Middle Lane in Beaufort, rain or shine! The event is free, but donations benefit the Coastal Federation. For more information call 252-393-8185 or stop by the pub.

✪ Oyster Roast at the Backstreet Pub in Beaufort Rain or Shine! [ 5 ] Head over to Backstreet Pub on Middle Lane in Beaufort to celebrate coastal North Carolina with local oysters, BBQ, music and craft beer. Though the event is free to attend, donations will be accepted to benefit the Coastal Federation’s education programs. Discounted federation membership will be offered! This event is outdoors and will be held rain or shine. For more information contact Sarah Phillips at 252-393-8185 or

Surf Fishing

SATURDAYS IN NOVEMBER

Early Bird Paddle Trip [ 9–11 AM ] Grab a paddle and have an adventure your family will never forget. Load up canoes or kayaks provided by the Aquarium and enjoy a leisurely ride through quiet backwaters to explore the diversity of the salt marsh, weather permitting. Ages 10 and up. Cost is $20. For details call 252-247-4003 or visit www. ncaquariums.com/pine-knoll-shores. NOVEMBER 9

✪ Kids Soft BB Turkey Shoot [ 1–3 PM ] Carolina Home and Garden hosts their Annual Kids Soft BB Turkey Shoot to benefit Martha’s Mission. Arrive early and enjoy live music in the gardens provided by Wild Honey from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Carolina Home & Garden is located at 4778 N Carolina 24 in Newport. For more information call 252-393-9004. NOVEMBER 10

Birding Cruise [ 10 AM–NOON ] Join local birding expert Joanne Powell for a birding cruise on the White Oak River in Swansboro. The group will be cruising on a covered ferry boat through the estuaries in and around the White Oak River and Bogue Sound, looking for resident

Salt

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MID–NOVEMBER TO MID–DECEMBER

birds as well as fall migrants. Participants will meet at Hammocks Beach State Park in Swansboro and are asked to bring their own binoculars as well as water and a snack. The program fee is $20 per person. All ages are welcome, though the program is geared toward adults and older children. Registration is required. For more information call 252-393-8185 or email sarahp@ nccoast.org.

WEDNESDAYS IN NOVEMBER

NOVEMBER 8

NOVEMBER 9

Kayak Fishing [ 9 AM–1 PM ] Learn the basics of saltwater trout fishing from a kayak (provided). Participant must have a fishing license and light tackle rod. For experienced paddlers only. Reservations are $55. For information call 252-728-7317 or visit ncmaritimemuseums.com.

SPORTS

JUST FOR FUN

✪ Kids Activities at the Library Preschool Storytime on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. and Time for Tots on Fridays at 10 and 11 a.m. at the Carteret County Public Library in Beaufort.

✪ Kids Soft BB Turkey Shoot [ 1–3 PM ] Carolina Home and Garden hosts their Annual Kids Soft BB Turkey Shoot to benefit Martha’s Mission. Arrive early and enjoy live music in the gardens provided by Wild Honey from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Carolina Home & Garden is located at 4778 N Carolina 24 in Newport. For more information call 252-393-9004. NOVEMBER 10

NOVEMBER 13, 20

Fun & Fitness for Kids [ 10:45–11:30 AM ] April Courie will lead this children’s exercise class with fitness games, dancing and stretching using balls, hula-hoops and much more. For ages 6 and up, $4 for the first child and $3 for each additional child. Pre-registration required. Call Swansboro Recreation Center for more information at 910-326-2600. NOVEMBER 23

Turkey Trot 5K and 1M Benefit Run This fundraiser for Newport Elementary School starts and ends at Town Hall in Newport. Entry fee is $10 per person. For more information call 252-223-4201. DECEMBER 7

Beaufort Pelican Run: 5K & 1M [ 8 AM ] Join this road race along the Beaufort waterfront, either for a 5K timed or 1-mile fun run. Proceeds benefit the Coastal Federation. Run begins and ends at Front Street Village at the east end of Front Street in Beaufort. Registration begins at 8 a.m.; run starts at 9 a.m. After the race, enjoy hot beverages and breakfast goodies. All registrants receive a fleece logo headband. Registration is $20 per person ($15 for federation members) or $50 for families ($45 for federation members).

Craft on the Crystal Coast Festival for Craft Beer Lovers At the Crystal Coast Civic Center in Morehead City. The event will feature over 100 craft beers as well as a home brewers section and competition. No one under 21 admitted. Proceeds to benefit the Crystal Coast Hospice House. There are no early bird discounts. Processing and handling fees added to ticket costs at checkout. Military IDs will get a free T-shirt. For more information email robin.nelson@crystalcoasthospicehouse.org. VIP Admission with Food [ 1–5 PM ]..........................$50 Standard Admission No Food [ 2–5 PM ]...................$40 NOVEMBER 19

✪ Free Family Fun Night at Fort Benjamin [ 5:30–7:30 PM ] Take a break from homework and come to Fort Benjamin Park at 100 McQueen Avenue in Newport for some old-fashioned family fun! Campfires for making s’mores, children’s activities, crafts and yard games, including corn hole, bocce ball and horseshoes. Call Carteret County Parks and Recreation for more information at 252-222-5858. NOVEMBER 23

✪ Historic Jumble Sale in Beaufort [ 9 AM–3 PM ] The Beaufort Historic Site turns into a

THINGS TO DO

community market with art, handmade crafts, holiday gifts, pre-loved treasures, antiques, clothing, food and much more. No admission fee. Vendor information is available. Call 252-728-5225 or email lindsay@ beauforthistoricsite.org NOVEMBER 29–30, DECEMBER 1

✪ Train Show at the Train Depot Trains, trains and more trains can be found on the corner of Broad Street and Pollock Street in Beaufort’s old Train Depot. The exhibit offers a glimpse into the past with antique working model trains and model trains of all sizes for kids of all ages. Free. Friday, November 29..........................................4–8 p.m. Saturday, November 30..........................9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, December 1..........................................1–4 p.m. DECEMBER 6–8

✪ Core Sound Waterfowl Weekend At Core Sound Waterfowl Musuem, 1785 Island Road, Harkers Island. Local waterfowl art, music, seafood, museum exhibits and more. It also includes educational displays, competitions, arts and crafts, community boatbuilding and a fellowship service. It’s the perfect way to experience the holiday season Down East. Call 252-728-1500 for information. DECEMBER 7–8

✪ Core Sound Decoy Festival Harkers Island comes to life the first weekend in December with the annual Core Sound Decoy Festival. Festival attractions include antique decoy exhibits and retriever demonstrations, as well as competitions in duck calling, loon calling and head whittling. There’s delicious food offered by Harkers Island Elementary School staff and volunteers and plenty of shopping opportunities.

ACTIVISM NOVEMBER 12 | DECEMBER 10

✪ Surfrider Foundation Meeting [ 6:30 PM ] Let’s give nature a present this year by keeping our coast beautiful. For the location and other information on the meeting please email SurfriderBogueBanks@gmail.com or check out Surfrider Foundation Bogue Banks Chapter on Facebook.


bringing the heat to

the crystal coast!

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1/2 PRICE LUNCH OR DINNER COMBO!

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From 11–2:30 Monday–Thursday. Limit one per table or party. Offer cannot be combined. Expires 12/7/13.

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From 11–2:30 Monday–Thursday. Limit one per table or party. Offer cannot be combined. Expires 12/7/13.

OPEN 7 DAYS!

LUNCH FOR TWO!

DAILY DRINK SPECIALS!

1 4 | C A R O L I N A S A LT | NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2013


COLORED EGG HOMESTEAD

A BALANCED LIFE ABOUT THE AUTHOR Khristi Nunnally of Colored Egg Homestead is a first generation self-taught urban farmer. She raises a mixed flock of laying hens and grows herbs and vegetables on her small city lot. Visit her Etsy shop at www.ktnunna.com.

connections between grower and eater. Your food has a story, a legacy, that you are now a part of.

Local food tastes better Have you noticed how bland a grocery store tomato is? Local foods are at peak freshness when they get to you, rather than being trucked in from who knows where. Freshness not only impacts the taste but also the nutritional benefits of the food.

Local food keeps us in touch with the seasons Eating with the seasons allows us to eat produce at peak freshness at minimal cost. It allows you to experience a variety of nutrient dense produce throughout the year.

Local food is better for the environment

KNOW YOUR FOOD Buying local produce supports our economy, keeps us in touch with the seasons and helps keep us healthy.

D

o you know where your food comes from? How far did that tomato have to travel to get to your plate? Where was that lettuce grown? Was the meat on your plate raised humanely? Now more than ever it is important to know the answers to these questions. Seems like every time you turn on the news there is some recall on the food we eat. Listeria in the cantaloupes and cilantro, Cyclosporiasis from salad greens, plastic particles in ground beef, E. coli in beef. I could go on, but honestly, I’m feeling a little sick to my stomach. The fewer steps there are between your food source and your table, the less chance there is for contamination. Know your farmer, know your food. Supporting your local food economy has many other benefits as well.

Local farming stimulates the local economy When you buy locally grown or produced foods, your food dollars stay within our local area, and more of the money you spend on food actually reaches the farmer who grew it.

Buying local creates community What a treat it is to visit the farmers market each week and begin to get to know the farmers and their family members by name. You are recreating the past tradition of

A well managed farm is like a tiny ecosystem. Cover crops are planted and soil is amended to replace lost nutrients, fields and pastures provide habitat for local wildlife, carbon emissions for processing and delivery are not required.

Seek out local food and vote with your fork Find local food in your area at websites like localharvest.org, eatwellguide.org and eatwild.com. If you are on Facebook, consider joining the Crystal Coast Homegrown Food Network group. The Crystal Coast Homegrown Food Network connects local farmers with families in the Jacksonville and surrounding areas along the Crystal Coast. They keep an updated directory of local food growers with contact information so consumers can find fresh, local produce, meats, eggs and honey. The group also serves as a discussion forum for those who are interested or currently raising or growing their own food. Find them at facebook.com/groups/crystalcoastfood. î Š

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P L AY B I L L C A R T E R E T C O M M U N I T Y T H E AT R E

y a w d a o r B I I I T S BES

AT IT

Carteret Community Theater is thrilled to have Katie Dixon directing Broadway at its Best for the third time. The show will feature a variety of songs from some of Broadway’s most beloved and popular shows like Music Man, Grease, Chicago and Little Shop of Horrors. The show opens Veterans Day weekend, and will include a military tribute. Broadway at its Best will be opening November 8, 9, 15 and 16 at 8 p.m. There will be matinees November 10 and 17 at 2 p.m. The show is performed at Joslyn Hall on the campus of Carteret Community College. Tickets will be on sale at Poor Richards Paint Store and at the door. Cost is $12 for adults and $8 for students. For more information call 252-247-5838.

1 6 | C A R O L I N A S A LT | NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2013

On Broadway

ACT 1

CHICAGO: All th at Jazz, All I Ca re About Is Love, We Both Reache d for the Gun, Mr. Ce llophane Music Man: 76 Trombones, Go odnight My Someone

BEAUTY & THE BEAST: Home, Beauty and the Beast

GREASE: Summ er Nights, Look at Me I’m Sandra Dee (Reprise), We Go Together

ACT 2

SECRET GARD EN: Lily’s Eyes, Wick, A Bit of Earth JEKYLL & HYDE : In His Eyes, A New Life, Someone Like You LES MISERABLE S: At the End of the Day, Little Peop le, Bring Him Ho me, Empty Chairs at Empty Tables, Master of the House LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS: Skid Row, Somewhere Th at’s Green, Sudd enly Seymour GYPSY: Everythi ng’s Coming Up Roses, This is M y Country


S TAY I N G S T R O N G

G I L L I A N WA R D

FAQ

Help! Do I exercise when I’m sick?

T

his winter many of us will battle seasonal colds or flu. People always ask me whether or not they should workout when they are sick. Here are some simple guidelines to help you determine whether exercise is appropriate while you are feeling down. If you know that your sickness is contagious, do everyone a favor and stay out of the gym. The gym ranks as one of the highest places to spread germs. If you are going to go, please heed the following advice. Carry a towel, your own clearly labeled water bottle and make sure that the gym has sanitizer on hand so you can wipe down the equipment that you touch. Wash your hands frequently and avoid partner exercises. The general rule of thumb is that if a cold is below your neck (in your chest) you should avoid rigorous activity. If respiration is compromised due to alveolar inflammation or restriction, you should take it easy and not exacerbate the condition. Intense activity can actually worsen the condition as it is possible for fluid to accumulate in the lungs. If your symptoms are severe or last longer than a week, I advise you to see a doctor.

Do not exercise if… 1. You are running a fever 2. Your breathing is compromised at rest 3. You are feeling lightheaded or dizzy 4. You are dehydrated 5. Your body is telling you to rest

You may exercise if… 1. Your cold symptoms are entirely above the neck (a head cold) 2. You are able to to simple tasks without becoming short of breath 3. Exercise makes you feel better and does not exacerbate symptoms such as coughing 4. You are well rested and hydrated In short, use your judgment. If you have difficulty breathing after climbing a flight of stairs, you should rest. Chances are that if you take a couple of days rest, you will be able to come back faster and closer to 100 percent. “Pushing through” illness may prolong it by increasing the stress on your immune system. If you do exercise when you are sick, pull back the intensity. View exercise as a therapeutic intervention to increase blood flow and circulation. Within a few days you will be back to yourself. If you do not feel like exercising while ill, that is your body telling you to rest. Listen to it. The benefits of exercise come from commitment over time. A day or two of missed workouts is not important in the scheme of things.  N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3 | C A R O L I N A S A L T |171 7


A P P L E A D AY

DEA DANIELS, R.N.

NATURALLY HEALTHY

Keeping healthy through the holidays

T

he holiday season is here again and with it come visions of Norman Rockwell-style family gatherings, foods that warm our hearts as much as our bellies, pumpkins, Christmas decorations and general merriness. Then come thoughts of all the shopping and preparation, of unresolved family conflicts or the absence of loved ones, financial strain, exhaustion … Take a breath and slow down. Just like breathing, you need to take life one step at a time and center yourself so that you may remember what is important. Remember the reason behind the holidays and put your focus on that instead of on a picture of how it all should look. Then proceed with kindness for yourself and others. That’s really what the holidays are about. That being said, it is also the season when colds, flu, indigestion from dietary indiscretions, stress, exhaustion and lack of sleep are as common as mullet in Bogue Sound. Let’s take a look at the cause and prevention of each. What causes colds and flu? Western science says microorganisms, mainly viruses. In Western medicine we attack the virus, but we don’t have very effective medicines for specific viruses and antibiotics work on bacteria, not viruses. Or we attempt to suppress symptoms such as fever, congestion or cough. Many Eastern sciences have a different perspective. They believe that pathogens enter the body when we are vulnerable and that it is the strength of the immune response that determines if you’ll get sick. The focus is on supporting the immune system and pushing out pathogens. Whichever approach you take, it just makes sense to strengthen your immune system. Nutritional intake, sleep, exercise, circulation, stress level and mental and spiritual state are all contributing factors. A good diet full of antioxidants from vegetables and fruits, healthy whole grains, like oats and rice and organic protein sources is a good first step to keeping strong health. Include plenty of garlic, onions and mushrooms in your diet. They have antioxidants to ward off illness. Soak some garlic in apple cider vinegar, tamari, cayenne pepper and honey for a few weeks. A spoonful of the strained vinegar will give you a fiery immune boost! Or try some Astragalus tea, a pleasant tasting root that is known to strengthen the immune system and may be taken daily. Processed foods, alcohol, sugars and poor-quality fats will undermine you. You may have to make some unhealthy choices during the holidays but if you eat healthy most of the time, a little cheating isn’t so bad. Get back on track ASAP! Don’t give up after a few bad choices. Exercise is necessary to feel alive and vital. Movement keeps your blood in circulation to bring oxygen to every cell. Your lymphatic system moves waste from those cells. and exercise pumps the system along. If you’re not the gym type, find something you love to do and move every day! Adequate sleep is essential. Much of the body’s restoration happens during sleep. Most people do best with eight solid hours of sleep. What gets in the way of a good night’s sleep? Overstimulation is a common cause of insomnia. Are you watching the news or stimulating TV shows late into the evening? Do you have a computer, TV or phone near your bed? When our brains 1 8 | C A R O L I N A S A LT | NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2013

can’t shut off, we have difficulty sleeping. Drugs for sleep may work for some people, but they deprive the brain of its deepest sleep levels, so restoration is incomplete. Try a warm bath and reading before bed. Maybe a cup of lemon balm, chamomile or passionflower tea before bed would be helpful. There are many helpful herbal formulas as well products like melatonin that are great sleep aids. Check with your healthcare practitioner. Indigestion from dietary indiscretion is not uncommon during holiday time. Make sure you are well hydrated and have not skipped meals before sitting down to a big holiday feast. Take your time chewing and tasting. As you savor every single mouthful, you enjoy your food more and slowing the eating process down will allow you feel when you are full. You might even try putting your fork down between mouthfuls, in order to slow down even more. If you do get indigestion, some ginger tea or ginger candy can soothe your tummy. A teaspoon of baking soda in water is a quick antacid. Make sure you don’t drink alcohol on an empty stomach and drink an equal amount of water for every drink of alcohol. Even better, add a splash of lime or fruit juice to some sparkling water for a healthy cocktail! If you do get a hangover, take a warm bath, drink plenty of water, get lots of minerals (try some coconut water) and try some extra Vitamin C to help break up the toxicity. Sleep is always helpful as well. Exhaustion is not uncommon at this time of year. Often we take on too much. A perfect holiday is one where there is peace, kindness and love. Begin by being kind and loving to yourself. Slow down and keep it all in perspective. Give yourself the time to rest, eat well and exercise. Organize yourself and set priorities. Include “having fun” as a top priority. So, remember to take a breath and smile. Take a breath and be grateful. Take a breath and be joyful. Keep everything in perspective. And proceed from there to make this a joyful, loving and healthy holiday season! S


Float your boat and let your light shine!

Santa arrives by boat! Christmas shopping! Hot cider!

NOVEMBER 29 AT 6PM D OW N TOW N S WA N S B O RO WAT E R F RO N T

Hi kids! I’ll see you in Swansboro!

—Santa

RAIN DATE SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30

| C1A0R V EIMV B EA RL / DSE C BER OL N A6 S-A7L T3 |7 To register or for information… S W A N S B O R O F E NSOT . ECMO M2 0 1•3 9 3I 2 19109


L I N D A B E R G M A N – A LT H O U S E

O U T E R B A N K S W I L D L I F E S H E LT E R

Sweet Isabella, our adorable Virginia opossum and long-time Wildlife Ambassador will be attending with some of her best feathered friends!

WILDLIFE PARTY! Baby season is winding down, just in time for a 25th anniversary celebration!

J

ust two things! Number one: We are very close to the end of wildlife baby season, so we can’t wait to celebrate. And we will, once we get the last of our flying straggler babies in the air and our late-season squirrels acclimated and ready to run up their first tree. Just when we thought we were close to getting a muchneeded break from the every 15 to 30 minute feedings for baby birds, surprise! More feathered babies were carried through the door at the Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter in Newport. This year a young catbird (brought home uninjured by a dog), a tiny house finch (whose story is still a mystery) and a tiny newborn Carolina wren (lone survivor of a cat attacked nest), all demanding our care, attention … and frequent feedings. Finally they are fully feathered, eating on their own and practicing their flying skills in outside enclosures at our shelter. Oh, I forgot to mention our baby pigeons and mourning doves. They are still with us. Fortunately, it doesn’t take long to fill their crops and they are rapidly picking up the knack of grain pecking and grazing. Our squirrels are coming along, too. They just don’t develop as quickly as birds do and they have to pack on weight and shift from their sweet baby role to some furious fierceness before we feel comfortable releasing them to the wild. So, it is with great relief that baby season, although still hanging on, is winding down. Number two: It has come around again! Every year we hold our biggest fundraiser during November which is a crazy fun and wild time. The OWLS Annual Art and Silent 2 0 | C A R O L I N A S A LT | NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2013

ABOUT O.W.L.S.

Take a tour of the facility at 100 Wildlife Way, Newport. To volunteer, call 252-240-1200. If your organization would like to learn more about wildlife, the O.W.L.S. non-releasable education animals jump at the chance!

Auction will be held on Friday, November 15, at the Civic Center in Morehead City. The money we earn from this event is spent to rehabilitate and release the thousands of animals admitted to our clinic each year and to teach fellow North Carolinians and tourists how to happily and peacefully coexist with wildlife. While OWLS has all the permits necessary to legally care for wild animals, we receive no state or federal funding. It is through the generosity of the public that we have been in business and continue to support a necessary service to the community since 1988. This year is our 25th anniversary, which makes this fundraiser even more special! Since our founding, OWLS has admitted more than 24,000 patients, facilitated educational programs for schools and civic organizations and provided a series of summer wildlife camps that are extremely popular with school-age children. All our programs and camp weeks allow campers to get up close (not too close!) and personal with some amazing animals that they may never see in the wild and learn how to help wildlife by going green. Tickets to our annual fundraising event are only $35 and include a scrumptious dinner, a happy open bar, excellent live entertainment and an exciting, nail-biting silent auction. Dinner will be provided by “Taste of Carteret” restaurants. You don’t want to miss this gala event. Please get your tickets today and celebrate with some of the Wildlife Ambassadors attending, such as Dinah our barred owl (who has fostered many baby barred owls over the years), Gabriel our American kestrel, Phoenix our peregrine falcon, Sweet Isabella our adorable Virginia opossum or one of our quartet of screech owls. Don’t worry, their human caretakers will be around, too! Call the shelter at 252-240-1200 if you need more information or to lock in your reservations! We sure hope to see you there. 


Mustaches for Kids Keeps On Growing! MUSTACHE PAGEANTRY GROWS ON CARTERET COUNTY

Each year, during the four weeks between Thanksgiving and Christmas, local growers sprout sweet, sweet mustaches. Per Mustaches for Kids bylaws, they shave their faces except for the mustache a minimum of one time per week and solicit donations from friends, family, coworkers and people in the community. It’s kind of like getting pledges to run a marathon (without the exertion, cramping or dehydration). Call it a facial hair marathon. At the end of the mustache growing season, each Mustaches for Kids chapter hosts a Mustache Competition, which is a cross between a beauty pageant, dog show and police lineup. During the competition, growers, often in mustache-enhancing costumes, are put through a test of mind, body and mustache and allow their facial hair to be evaluated by an independent panel of judges. At the end, one mustache is declared to be the “sweetest.” So the concept is really pretty simple: a mustache charity competition infused with meaningless pageantry. You can spare four weeks of your life for that! In the words of our founders, “Grow with us.” Help us make the mustache thrive, because its fate is uncertain. Unlike the beard, the mustache still carries plenty of baggage, invoking the social stigma of being too old-school Burt Reynolds or Magnum, P.I. And no one knows that fact better than the men who have grown one. Like fashion trends, grooming styles come and go in cycles. By that logic, the mustache, unpopular for about 20 years, would seem primed for a comeback. And coming back it is, as it’s growing season again for the Emerald Isle Chapter of the Mustache for Kids (EIM4K). Chapter founder Ron Butler of

Emerald Isle announced the first of five stops for clean-shaven faces to show up: Monday, November 4, at The Shark’s Den in Emerald Isle at 6:30 p.m. This kicks off the first meeting of 2013. “We had great success last year,” reported Butler. “We had about 15 growers and raised over $2,400 for The Brady Dauberman Memorial Scholarship Fund. We were able to give two Croatan High School seniors $1,000 scholarships for college.” Butler explained how the Mustache for Kids works. “Each year we have our four-week growing season. Starting with clean-shaven faces, we ask for guys to man up and grow mustaches. During the growing season the growers may shave except for the mustache. We meet once a week at different local businesses and take a weekly picture to show our progress. The growers solicit sponsors for their mustaches and seek donations from their friends, family, coworkers and others in the community. At the end of four weeks, we’ll host a friendly mustache competition called The Stache Bash. The mustaches are judged by a panel and one of our staches will be declared to be the sweetest. It’s simple really: mustache, charity, competition … with some meaningless pageantry thrown in.” “Last year we had quite a variety of mustaches and personalities,” said Ron of his follicle follies. “There was quite a bit of smack talking, but a lot of fellowship too.” There was a time when the mustache was an emblem of rugged masculinity, required equipment for outrunning Sheriff Buford T. Justice in a tractor-trailer full of contraband booze or driving a black Trans Am. But now, grow one and you’ll be treated to the frightened stares and stinging ridicule of friends and

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IS Y O U R FA M IL Y D R IV IN G YO U CRA Z Y A L R E A DY ?

Get out of the house and celebrate Thanksgiving at Mac Daddy’s! Check out our website for specials! 130 Golfin’ Dolphin Drive

CAPE CARTERET 252-393-6565

www.mymacdaddys.com

›› MUSTACHES CONTINUED FROM P21 coworkers. Not all the participants were able to withstand the mouth mane on their upper lip. Some of them found it difficult to keep the mustache for a month.” He continued, “A handful succumbed to the anti-mustache sentiment and shaved it off before the four weeks were up,” Butler reported with a bitter tongue. “We call them quitters.” Of those with weak lip and follicle fear, Butler says: “What, are you a lipstick model? Unless your job has specific grooming restrictions (and if they do, why the heck are you still working there?), your colleagues and managers are sure to see your mustache as a demonstration of your creativity, individualism and communityminded spirit.” “Last year our turnout was pretty small and the guys that participated did a great job,” says Butler who started the Emerald Isle chapter of M4K in 2009. “But this year, we are going big. Our goal is to raise $20,000 for the charities and with all the fun and participation we’ve had in the past, I believe we will have more growers and more sponsors.” When asked who his favorite mustached persona would be, Butler’s eyes gazed off into the distance and a warm smile came to his face as he answered. “My childhood hero was President Chester A. Arthur. The man had great facial hair—he had sideburns that joined his mustache. That was awesome.” Last year’s final event, hilarity and antics ensued as the night progressed and by the end it was downright competitive. This year, Butler hopes to have more mustache haikus with events such as beer foam retention tests, acts of mustache strength, kissing contests, power lifters, cowboys, joggers from the ’70s and Yanni impersonators. “This ought to be true insanity and all for a great cause,” says Ron. “Maybe we can get a few Ron Burgundys or Jack Black impersonators to show up at our finale. Of course we’ll have our Tom Sellecks,” reports Butler on the virtually guaranteed impersonators of Magnum, P.I. The Emerald Isle M4K kicks off at The Shark’s Den in Emerald Isle, November 4 at 6:30 p.m. Growers must be clean shaven for the first night. Meetings to monitor the caterpillars will be each Monday night thereafter. The grand finale and Stache Bash will occur on Monday, December 2 at The Shark’s Den. The local chapter has a Facebook page. Log onto Facebook and search Mustacheforkids EI for more information and updates. When asked about imitation mustaches or wannabe lip warmers, Butler responded, “It would probably be too expensive for most people to make a fake Magnum P.I. mustache from saffron, so for those who can’t or won’t grow, they can sponsor a grower or donate money to our cause.” “Believe in your mustache and it can do anything! I know mine can.” concluded Butler. 


C O A D Y A . H A G A , D . V. M .

P E T S A R E FA M I LY T O O ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Coady Haga is a veterinarian at AniMed Veterinary Hospital in Hubert. Visit AniMed on Facebook or their website at animedinc.com.

serious disease. Keeping up your monthly preventatives is essential to ensuring that your pets stay free of intestinal worms, heartworms, fleas and ticks.

4 Cars and your pet

WINTERIZE YOUR PETS A short guide to getting your pets, and your home, ready for the winter months.

S

horter days and cooler temperatures are here, and while many people go through a thorough winterizing program for their homes, cars and boats, a lot of folks don’t know that their pets need similar attention. While we don’t exactly have to break out the snow shovels around here, our winters can be harsh at some times and downright dangerous at others. Here are some simple things to think about for your pets’ health and wellbeing this fall and winter.

1 Shelter

If you have outdoor pets, first and foremost consider whether the environment they are in provides adequate shelter from the elements. Can your pets find sanctuary in a covered area, one that protects them from cold, wind, rain and snow? Is that area going to attract pests that may be seeking shelter themselves? Ideally, a raised doghouse with a sloped roof and a covered door should be supplied for each outdoor pet.

2 Food and water Keeping warm in cold weather burns energy, so your pets are going to require additional food and water to maintain body temperature. While it is obviously not a good idea to fatten them up, providing a little extra dinner can make chilly nights a little easier.

3 Heartworm and flea prevention Insects like fleas and mosquitoes are certainly less active in the winter, but don’t be fooled! They still pose a real threat to your pet’s health. A couple of unseasonably warm weeks in January are all that it takes to reignite the possibility of contracting

Cold winter temperatures mean that outdoor animals will be seeking warm places to curl up for the night … like the engine compartment of your car. It is always a good idea to knock on the hood of your car a couple of times to make sure no one gets a nasty surprise when you turn the key. The risks of antifreeze ingestion are fairly well-known, but it can’t hurt to stress them again. Even very small amounts can cause serious organ damage, even death. Take great care in collecting and disposing of antifreeze. There are newer nontoxic antifreezes available, and hopefully this concern will soon be a thing of the past.

5 Holiday stress The holiday season is known to bring on stress in people. Did you know the same is true for dogs and cats? Changing weather, guests and bustling activity around the house can all upset your pet’s comfortable routine. It is important to keep your pet on their regular diet. The few days after a holiday are always an active time for veterinarians dealing with everything from simple stomach upset to major abdominal surgery. This is why it is important to keep holiday foods off the menu for pets, and to dispose of leftovers, especially bones, in a manner that won’t tempt Sparky to get into the trash. Foods are not the only problem for pets. Holiday plants, decorations, toys, ribbons … all the trappings of holiday fun can be dangerous when adequate care is not used. For a list of toxic plants, visit the ASPCA’s website, and see if there is something around you house that may cause for concern. We love our pets, and think of them as members of the family. Show them you appreciate them and help them make it safely through another long, cold winter. 

| 23 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3 | C A R O L I N A S A L T 23


2 4 | C A R O L I N A S A LT | NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2013


The Swansboro Christmas Flotilla is an honored tradition and fun for the whole family! On the Friday after Thanksgiving, gather along Swansboro’s waterfront and watch as boats parade down the White Oak River. Music will fill the air and you can enjoy treats, such as funnel cakes, cider and hot cocoa as you enjoy the lights glimmering off the river. You’ll be amazed by the lights and décor of the boats and will even catch a glimpse of Santa Claus! Kick off the 2013 Holiday Season with the Swansboro Christmas Flotilla on Friday, November 29 at 6 p.m. in historic downtown Swansboro. Boats decorated in holiday regalia will begin the parade from the Emerald Isle Bridge and float down the Intracoastal Waterway to downtown Swansboro. Boats are expected to arrive at 6 p.m. and will deliver Santa Claus to the Town Dock. Santa will make his way to Front Street where he will meet with children to listen to their Christmas wishes. Boat owners are invited to participate in the Flotilla on Friday, November 29. (Rain date is November 30.) Applications can be downloaded from the festival website at swansborofestivals. com and can be brought to the Captains’ Meeting on November 30 9 a.m. at the Boro Café or can be mailed to P.O. Box 1214, Swansboro, NC 28584. The Swansboro Festival Committee is pleased to announce that the award amounts have been increased this year! First prize is $250, second prize is $150 and third prize is $100. The judging criteria is divided into two categories, large and small boat. Both are judged on a scale of one to ten on overall appearance (neat and organized), showmanship (audience appeal, music), originality/creativity (innovative idea or unique portrayal) and effort (transforming your boat into a float). So float your boat and let your lights shine in downtown historic Swansboro. Call 910-326-7370 or visit www.swansborofestivals.com for more information. 

| 25 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3 | C A R O L I N A S A L T 25


Something for Everyone: BHA Jumble Sale The Beaufort Historical Association offers something for everyone at its annual Jumble Sale, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on November 23, on the grounds of the Beaufort Historic Site. The Beaufort Historic Site, located in the 100 block of Turner Street, transforms into an old-fashioned community market filled with vendors selling a wide variety of items. Eventgoers can expect to find antiques and collectibles, fine art, pottery, vintage treasures, handmade jewelry, crafts, holiday items, candles, books, homemade food and more. Held rain or shine, it’s a great opportunity for holiday shoppers to find that one-of-a-kind gift and special bargains all in one location. “The Jumble Sale is a lot of fun for both vendors and shoppers,” says BHA Executive Director, Patricia Suggs. “It’s a great place to shop for handmade items and unique gifts. Paired with the BHA’s Community Thanksgiving Feast on Sunday, November 24, it makes for a great autumn weekend in historic Beaufort.” The Jumble Sale serves as a fundraiser for the restoration and education projects of the Beaufort Historical Association. Vendor spaces are still available. For more information or to download and submit a vendor application form, please contact the BHA at 252728-5225 or visit www.beauforthistoricsite.org.

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Caring for Carteret Food Drive’s goal: No empty plates in Carteret County! CEDAR POINT

Festival of Lights DECEMBER 7 & 14

2013 Festival of Lights The Cedar Point Festival of Lights will take place December 7 and 14 from 5–9:30 p.m. Businesses and residences will be decked out with holiday decorations and plenty of lights to wow and amaze. Residents in Cedar Point are encouraged to light up their neighborhoods and allow visitors to drive through and enjoy the Festival of Lights. Business owners in Cedar Point are encouraged to light up their businesses, stay open a little later and offer visitors a special treat for stopping in. Maps and flyers will be available at Cedar Point Town Hall. The Coastal Outlet Trolley will also be taking visitors along the festival route for those who wish to park and ride.

The Caring for Carteret countywide food drive will be November 22–23 at the Kmart–Food Lion Plaza at 4719 Arendell Street in Morehead City. Collection times are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. The goal of Caring for Carteret Food Drive is No Empty Plates in Carteret County. The drive will be in support of Martha’s Mission, Hope Mission, Loaves and Fishes of Beaufort and The East Carolina Church Storehouse and Pantry in Morehead City. Financial contributions and donations of canned, boxed and non-perishable goods will be distributed among these missions for persons in need in Carteret County. Area business sponsors include the Carteret News-Times, Carolina Salt Magazine, Kivett’s Happy House Realty, American Media Productions and Beasley Broadcasting (WNCT-AM and 95.7 FM) and other civic and business groups. The Kivett’s Happy House Moving Truck will be used to receive and deliver contributions. Civic clubs, the Boy Scouts, staff from the missions, storehouse and pantries, as well as other volunteers will be present to help. For more information, to volunteer or make contributions contact Frank Kivett at 252-342-9444. 

‘A Walk to Remember’ At Emmanuel Baptist Church there will be a live walkthrough nativity recreating the town of Bethlehem, complete with people dressed in robes, animals wandering the streets, a marketplace and a blacksmith. Families step back in time to walk through the little town of Bethlehem to the manger where Jesus is born and angels and wise men stand watch. Enjoy the wonderful live nativity scene of Mary and Joseph with baby Jesus.

Visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus Don’t miss a special visit and photo opportunity with Santa and Mrs. Claus at the Octagon House. Kids of all ages will be thrilled to talk to Santa and let him know what’s on their wish list this year. The Octagon House is a historic landmark in Cedar Point that has survived the Civil War. It will be open to the public and decorated for the holidays. Come out and explore the 60-acre waterfront estate.

Celebrate with local businesses Area businesses will be celebrating as well. The Shop Local holiday campaign will start off with a Secret Treasures Scavenger Hunt. Stop in to participating local businesses and take part in a special treasure hunt where one winner will get a special prize. Participating businesses will be competing in a decorating contest as well. Stores will be offering promotional giveaways, special services, discounts and much more! Bring out your family and friends in the spirit of the holidays and remember to go local this holiday season!  2 8 | C A R O L I N A S A LT | NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2013

Open auditions for ‘Annie’ Auditions for Annie open November 20–21 at 7 p.m. in Joslyn Hall on the campus of Carteret Community College. The theater is seeking a very large cast of adult singers and actors (ages 16 and up) and 8 orphans (ages 5-15), including Annie. The show will be directed by Judy Long, who directed CCT’s huge hit The Sound of Music, and produced by Alex Russell who recently directed CCT’s production of The Great American Trailer Park Musical. Jeffery Daniels will lend his many talents as Musical Director along with the award-winning WCHS band under the direction of Craig Everett. Deborah Belknap will lend her many talents and expertise as Technical Director. The auditions are open to everyone and all roles are available. For a complete list of characters, which songs to prepare for the audition and all the audition requirements please visit Carteret Community Theatre on Facebook, online at www.CarteretCommunityTheatre.org or by calling 252-726-8971. 


CLAY WHITTINGTON

A Walk To Remember: A Walkthrough Nativity

CHOIRMASTER & PIANIST

HOLIDAY HYMNPROV to BENEFIT COASTAL ACADEMY Music speaks to people when words can no longer express the emotions we feel. Music changes hearts every day. And music is a powerful tool in the hands of an artist. When Clay Whittington takes his seat behind the piano, those emotions take hold and the music speaks volumes. When he begins to play audiences expect nothing short of excitement and amazement. Clay has performed throughout the United States. He is currently touring his original show ‘Hymnprov,’ an improvisational piano concert based on the melodies of popular hymns, including Christmas favorites.

Hymnprov H O L I D A Y

NOVEMBER 15 AT 8 PM

AT THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1604 ARENDELL STREET IN MOREHEAD CITY

ADVANCE TICKETS $15 OR $20 AT THE DOOR ONLINE AT CLAYWHITTINGTON.ME/HHMOREHEAD/ OR CALL 252-241-1152 PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE NEW TECHNOLOGY LAB AT THE COASTAL ACADEMY (FORMERLY CAPE LOOKOUT HS)

Dress warmly for your journey and gather your family and friends to start your Christmas season on the right foot. Share the wonder and excitement of Christmas. You will travel by foot as Mary and Joseph did some 2,000 years ago with only the light of a torch to guide your way. Your first destination will be the city of Bethlehem. See and smell the fresh bread of the baker as he comforts the weary travelers after their long day’s journey. The city is buzzing with news: a decree of Caesar Augustus says that the entire world should be taxed. Be careful of the smith’s hot forge as he tries to keep up with the travelers’ demand for iron swords and knives. The carpenter’s shop is also a busy place. The smell of cedar and pine perfume the air, but wait! We must gather your group together, for it’s time for you also to enter the city of David, called Bethlehem. Make haste! The word on the street is, The Savior of the World is born! This free event runs from 6 to 8:30 p.m. December 6–7 and 13–14 at Emmanuel Independent Baptist Church at 120 Bell Street in Cedar Point. The church is located behind Sound Furniture. There will be hot cider and cookies for all. This event was started as an outreach ministry by the teens of Emmanuel Baptist Church. This teen club which meets on Wednesday nights is called TRAC Club (Teens Redeemed and Called). For more information on the production or TRAC Club, call 252-393-7330. 

Emerald Isle’s annual Holiday Arts and Crafts Fair and Christmas parade On Saturday, November 30, you can enjoy a day of shopping and good cheer in Emerald Isle. Start at the Parks and Recreation gymnasium for a Holiday Arts and Crafts Fair featuring handmade items from local artisans and crafters. There will be over 30 vendors! Doors are open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eighty percent of the vendor fees are donated to a local non-profit animal rescue. At 3 p.m., the 10th Annual Emerald Isle Christmas Parade begins. Festive entries and floats from all over the Crystal Coast will participate. Note to all entrants: There will be only one Santa Claus in the parade and he will be riding in a float at the end. After the parade the official Christmas Tree Lighting will take place at Merchant’s Park. Enjoy free refreshments as well as a holiday caroling sing-a-long as Santa Claus visits with the children. First and second place prizes will be awarded in both business and non-profit float categories. If you are interested in participating in the Emerald Isle Christmas Parade, contact Diane Schools at 252-354-2916 or dschools1@gmail. com. Anyone interested in a vendor spot at the Arts and Crafts Fair should contact Lainey Gottuso at 252-354-6350 or lgottuso@ emeraldisle-nc.org. The deadline for parade entries is November 25. There is no deadline for vendor applications, but space is limited and expected to fill up quickly.  | 29 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3 | C A R O L I N A S A L T 29


Oyster Roast and Pelican Run benefits the Coastal Federation

Enjoy a catered community Thanksgiving served in a historic home in support of Beaufort Historical Association Each year the Beaufort Historical Association sets aside a special time to give thanks. The Community Thanksgiving Feast, held on the grounds of the Beaufort Historic Site, is a unique old-fashioned gathering of friends, neighbors and visitors who promote a sense of community while dining on an amazing meal. The Thanksgiving Feast will be held on Sunday, November 24, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the grounds of the Beaufort Historic Site at 130 Turner Street. Prepared and donated by fine Beaufort restaurants, the feast is a delicious traditional turkey dinner with all the trimmings. This year’s participating restaurants include Aqua Restaurant, Beaufort Grocery Co., Blue Moon Bistro, Boardwalk Café, The Cedars Inn and Restaurant, Clawson’s 1905 Restaurant, The Coffee Shop, The Dock House Restaurant, Finz Grill, Front Street Grill at Stillwater, The General Store, Old Salt Restaurant, Queen Anne’s Revenge, Ribeyes Steakhouse, Roland’s Barbecue, Royal James Café and the Spouter Inn. The National Charity League, a mother/ daughter organization, welcomes guests and bakes homemade pies to benefit the BHA’s ongoing preservation and educational programs. Served from the Victorian-style Josiah Bell House, dinner will consist of roast turkey with gravy and dressing, ham, seafood bisque, chili, succotash, collards, mashed potatoes, green bean casserole, sweet potatoes, scalloped potatoes, corn bread, cranberry sauce, assorted pies, ice cream, iced tea and coffee. Meals may be packed to take home or eaten on the grounds of the Historic Site under a tent—heated, if necessary. The event is held rain or shine. Tickets for the Thanksgiving feast are $18 in advance and $20 the day of the event. Tickets are limited to 300 and sell out quickly. For more information or to purchase your ticket, call 252-728-5225, stop by the Welcome Center located at 130 Turner Street or visit beauforthistoricsite.org.  3 0 | C A R O L I N A S A LT | NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2013

Calling all lovers of the coast! Join the NC Coastal Federation for a great weekend of events in downtown Beaufort on Friday and Saturday, December 6–7. Celebrate the coast all weekend with North Carolina food and beer on Friday afternoon and the Pelican Run on Saturday. Proceeds from both events support the federation’s restoration and education programs along the central coast. On Friday, December 6, starting at 5 p.m., head over to Backstreet Pub on Middle Lane in Beaufort where to celebrate coastal North Carolina with great local oysters, local music and local craft beer. Federation memberships will be offered at a special discount. On Saturday, December 7, start your morning off with a 5K timed or 1-mile fun run at Front Street Village. When you return, hot cider and biscuits will be waiting. Registration for the Pelican Run begins at 8 a.m. and the run begins at 9 a.m. Don’t forget Saturday is also Beaufort’s Christmas Parade and evening Boat Parade. For more information about the Pelican Run or the Oyster Roast or to register for Saturday’s run, visit nccoast.org or call 252-393-8185. 


The 26th Annual Core Sound Decoy Festival celebrates local waterfowl heritage B Y A M I E TA LT O N

If you live in Carteret County, live close to Carteret County or just visit Carteret County from time to time, it’s impossible not to know a little something about decoys and the rich waterfowl heritage of the county. Carteret County is a stopping point for migratory waterfowl and it is also a major hunting destination for sportsmen from all over the world. As a result, many local watermen worked as guides and decoy makers, which created a tradition of decoy craftsmanship, which led to the creation of the Core Sound Decoy Carvers Guild in 1987. The guild is one of the largest and most prestigious decoy artists guilds on the East Coast and is home to some of the best carvers in the world. The guild started as an idea. Wayne Davis and David Lawrence, natives of Harkers Island, had talked forming one for years. They both carved decoys, as did many others Down East and throughout Carteret County, and they had traveled to the decoy shows in Virginia Beach; Chincoteague, Virginia; and Currituck, North Carolina, among others. They wondered if there would be enough interest to get together with other local carvers on a regular basis to swap techniques and carving tips and have a little decoy show once a year. After much deliberation, Wayne and David finally decided on a date for the show. Other decoy shows across the area were already scheduled for nearly every weekend from the end of August through December, but the first full weekend in December was open. They decided it would be the perfect date for their first show. Since there was no way to plan and execute a show in just two short months, the first Core Sound Decoy Festival was planned for December 3 and 4, 1988. The Core Sound Decoy Festival was originally called the Core Sound Waterfowl Festival, but the name was too similar to a wellestablished festival in Easton, Maryland, known as The Waterfowl Festival. The name was officially changed to the Core Sound Decoy Festival. And here we are, a short 26 years later, with the 26th Annual Decoy Festival right around the corner! Hosted by the Core Sound Decoy Carvers Guild, the Decoy Festival is held the first full weekend in December (December 7–8 this year) and is North Carolina’s largest decoy festival. Harkers Island will be bustling with activity, but the real action takes place at Harkers Island Elementary School, where over 100 exhibitors will be displaying and selling decoys and waterfowl artifacts. The festival is full of fun for all ages and will be a jam-packed two days. The show opens at 9 a.m. on Saturday. Shortly after that judging gets underway for the decoy competition. Other activities include children’s decoy painting, retriever demonstrations and the live decoy auction, where old and new decoys and artifacts will be offered to the highest bidder. Don’t forget to check out the duck calling competitions sponsored by local company Allen Bliven Calls. Be sure to pick up a T-shirt, hat and poster. All of these items and more festival merchandise will be available to purchase. The artwork for the posters and apparel was the winning entry submitted during the guild’s annual poster contest, held in February and March. If you get hungry, stop by the cafeteria and try a delicious shrimp burger, clam chowder or the best banana pudding in the county, courtesy of the lovely ladies of Harkers Island Elementary School.

Sunday the show opens at 10 a.m., and in addition to children’s decoy painting and retriever demonstrations, there will be a head carving contest, the world-famous Loon Calling Competition, an awards presentation, announcement of the 2014 Featured Carver and the raffle drawings for the shotgun, decoy and print. Sunday will also be Youth Day, complete with the youth decoy competitions and free admission for children 17 and younger. Each year the guild chooses one carver (or carving team) to honor as the Featured Carver. This honor is one which is bestowed on someone who is recognized both as a fine carver and as one who has made valuable contributions of time and effort to the Decoy Guild or has contributed to the improvement of decoy carving as a whole. The tradition began at the very first Core Sound Decoy Festival in 1988. Similarly, every year a new bird is chosen to be the featured decoy. To date there has never been a decoy repeated. The featured carver for the 2013 festival is Jack Gardner, Jr., of Beaufort and the featured decoy is the Surf Scoter. The decoy to be raffled is a Surf Scoter, hand carved by Jack Gardner, Jr. The Festival hours are from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday. Admission is $8 daily and children under 12 are free. For more information about the festival or about the Core Sound Decoy Carvers Guild, including a complete festival schedule of events and decoy competition entry forms, please visit the Core Sound Decoy Carvers Guild website at decoyguild.com.  N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3 | C A R O L I N A S A L T |313 1


We will be closing for the season Saturday, November 30th THANK YOU FOR A WONDERFUL 2013! HAPPY HOLIDAYS

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A S K T H E AQ UA R I U M

N C AQ UA R I U M S . C O M / P I N E - K N O L L - S H O R E S

FAQ

At the surfline

Q

We found a turtle on the soundside beach at Cape Lookout. Its skin was grayish with dots. Was it a young sea turtle?

A

YOUR GOOD DESCRIPTION FITS A DIAMONDBACK TERRAPIN. The diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin), a skittish, semiaquatic turtle, is found in brackish backwater marshes. You were lucky to get a close-up look at this secretive reptile. Although known to sometimes bask on exposed mudflats, terrapins are extremely elusive and will head for the water at the slightest disturbance. Diamondbacks live in our sounds and estuaries and were once so abundant they were considered a nuisance. By 1920 harvesting of their succulent meat gave rise to breeding farms, with the turtles selling for as much as $90 a dozen. One such facility operated in Beaufort in Carteret County. After World War I, the market declined because of overharvesting of wild populations. Although their numbers have recovered in some areas, diamondbacks are listed both statewide and federally as a Species of Special Concern. Their life span can be as long as 40 years. These reclusive turtles feed on fish, crabs, snails and other mollusks and will also eat insects, carrion and occasionally plants. Strong swimmers with powerful jaws, they are feisty if harassed or handled. Their attractive upper shell has prominent circular rings that help distinguish them from other turtles. Females are larger than males and reach sexual maturity at about age seven. Mating takes place in the water. Females typically nest several times from April through July, digging a nest cavity above the high tide line and depositing four to 18 oblong eggs. Hatchlings emerge in autumn at just over an inch long. Newborns may spend their first years upstream in brackish creeks or relatively fresh water. As they age, they move to salt marshes where food and nesting sites are plentiful. Terrapins can be found along the East Coast of the United States from as far north as Cape Cod to the southernmost Florida Keys and up the Gulf Coast to Texas. Current threats include coastal development and entrapment in recreational crab pots. Terrapins, like all turtles, are air breathers. When crab pots are left unattended or abandoned, terrapins often get trapped inside and drown. A simple turtle excluder device can be installed to allow them to escape. Natural predators include alligators, raptors, otters, sharks, toadfish, crabs and raccoons that frequently dig up nests to feast on the eggs. Discover more fascinating facts about North Carolina’s aquatic environments by visiting the aquariums on Roanoke Island, at Fort Fisher and at Pine Knoll Shores, or Jennette’s Pier in Nags Head. 

Diamondback terrapins are shy and secretive but very sociable among their own kind. (Photo courtesy of Emmett Westbrook, Foto FX)

about the

AQUA R I U M Information provided by the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores. The state operates three public aquariums; one in Pine Knoll Shores, another at Fort Fisher and a third on Roanoke Island, as well as Jennette’s Pier in Nags Head. The facilities are administered by the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources and are designed to inspire appreciation and conservation of North Carolina’s aquatic environments. —F O R M O R E I N F O —

For more information, call 1-800-832-FISH or visit ncaquariums.com.

| 33 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3 | C A R O L I N A S A L T 33


The Holiday Season Begins at Jack’s! SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9 Avalanche 9:30pm–1:30am

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29

The Mikele Buck Band 9:30pm–1:30am

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7 Backyard Groove 9:30pm–1:30am

HOLIDAY KICKOFF CELEBRATIONS IN DOWNTOWN MOREHEAD CITY ON SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7 Chowder and Cheer Crawl Adults can get in on the holiday food fun at the Chowder and Cheer Crawl from noon to 5 p.m. About a dozen downtown restaurants are participating. Tickets are available at 252-8080440. At 5 p.m. Crystal Coast Hospice House volunteers will light the Life Celebration Tree at Jaycee Park.

Crystal Coast Chrismas Flotilla Celebrate with Jack’s with an evening parade of decorated and lighted boats to kick off the Christmas season on the coast. Parade begins on the Morehead City waterfront at 5:30

See you at Jack’s. WINTER HOURS Mon & Tue CLOSED • Thu & Fri 4pm-2am Saturday 12pm-2am • Sunday 12pm-9pm

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4650-E ARENDELL STREET

your ultimate

(Beside Circa 81) We will be closed for part of November but our phone line is open for you to place your Thanksgiving, Christmas and all other special orders.

252-622-4688 OUR ANNUAL GINGERBREAD DAY IS SATURDAY, DEC 7

8201 Emerald Drive

—ACROSS FROM JORDAN’S SEAFOOD—

252-354-1287

Fri 10am–8pm • Tues–Sat 10am–5pm Sunday 11am–4pm


T H E 1 0 TH A N N U A L

Emerald Isle

CHRISTMAS PARADE FREE

REFRESHMENTS VISIT WITH

SANTA

HOLIDAY

CAROLING

AND FUN SINGA-LONG

To participate in the Emerald Isle Christmas Parade, contact Diane Schools at 252-354-2916 or dschools1@gmail.com. Deadline for entries is Nov. 25. EMERALD ISLE PARKS & REC GYMNASIUM HOSTS THE SECOND ANNUAL …

Arts & Crafts Fair All handmade and hand-authenticated items from 30 vendors. Doors are open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. For vendor spots, contact Lainey Gottuso at 252-354-6350 or lgottuso@ emeraldisle-nc.org. Space is limited and is expected to fill quickly.


KEN STONE

PA R R O T H E A D S

FALL I N ’ I N TO FAL L PARTYING WITH A PURPOSE ON EMERALD ISLE

november

B I R T H DAY S Happy birthday to our November Parrot Heads Paula Stout, Kevin Miller, Steven Johnson, Raquel Clark, Lee Ott, Jason “Spot Captain” Holland, Kim Armstrong, Bobbi “DJ” Raub, Lucy Gray, Rita “Treasurer” Babich, Melinda Gray, Gale “Twin” Tutor & Dale “Twin” Tutor, Pam Moren, Pat Tantum, “Pretty Marj” Browder, Jane Ewan, Pat Thomas, Dave Shew, Greg Szczepaniak, Vickie King, Jeannine Patane, Nancy Johnston, Jim Rackenhauser, Bernie Auth, Kathy “Build it!” Ruge, Sharon “Neighbor” Ambrose, Ginger Aitken, Katue Pliscofsky, Donnie Fowler and Mike Creech.

JOIN THE CLUB To keep up with what’s going on in the Parrot Head nation, visit them online at emeraldisleparrotheads.com or find them on Facebook. Better yet, become a member of the Phlock. All it takes is a fun-loving soul and a desire to give something back to your community.

S

ummer’s starting to slide on out of here but that just means a slight shift in emphasis for the Parrot Head crew. Still plenty of great days on the beach, fewer folks about town, fishing’s picked up, windows are open and life is good on the Crystal Coast. So … time for the first annual chili cook-off at our regular PHirst PHriday PHlocking. After the ballots were cast, Mr. Jack Synan took home first place with his delicious chicken chili. Other scrumptious entries vowed with laughter and full bellies to best Jack next year. Guess it’ll be an annual event from now on. Then it was time to get the tunes cranked up with Scearce and Ketner, including a demonstration in insanity from a few unnamed (but infamous) Parrot Heads doing the turtle/ alligator/roach/whatever to the music. We may be growing older, but not up. A pumpkin decorating contest and a 50/50 raffle rounded out the evening. The raffle, won by our Jim Tuttle, netted $180 to be donated to Hope for the Warriors in our area. Generous Jim donated his half back, kicking the donation up to a total of $360. Not slowing down over the weekend, we chugged up to Beaufort to board the Crystal Coast Lady for a cruise and brunch with history of the area, beautiful scenery, good food and lots of laughter with a great group of fellow Parrot Heads. Some of us even went on to check out the Seafood Festival after the cruise. Many thanks to our organized organizers Jane and Chuck Sewell for working so hard to ensure a fun-filled day on the water. There’s been lots of talk and carrying on about our latest Parrot Head antics, namely PHlash PHlockings, where Parrot Heads on the spur of the moment send out a missive and descend on a local business to PHlock (a.k.a. show up and have a good time). So far we’ve flown into Rucker John’s, Flipperz, Harrika’s, The Shark’s Den and Senor Dick’s. It’s just good to support the locals who support us in our efforts all year round. More of these to come in the future. A fun time for everyone involved! What else is on the horizon? A Halloween party that will be over by the time you read this, but Parrot Heads will be in a variety of outfits for our November PHlocking. I’m sure there’ll be some pictures and stories coming out of this. While we mention pictures and stories, be sure to bring your cameras to the town’s Christmas parade the Saturday after Thanksgiving for some shots of the Parrot Head float. This year’s entry (top secret!) promises to be one of our most creative. The Parrot Head Express is going to be a massive marvel of Parrot Head engineering. After we get past the initial basic construction, the crew expands with lots of Parrot Head worker bees all pitching in. Then the day of reckoning—having a ball throwing out candy and bling along the parade route. We hope to hear all y’all hoot and holler and cheer and yell as we motor on by. The annual parade is always a must-see! That’s all the Parrot Head poop. We leave you with this final thought: “You have been given the gift of another day. One more sunrise, one more sunset, one more day to choose how you live. You can choose to bring peace, joy and love to yourself and those around you or not. Choose wisely.” 

Designated Driver Taxi

D.D.

Taxi Services

Outstanding service, friend

NEED A RIDE? CALL US! 252-39 ly drivers. 3-6015 Emerald Isle | Cape Carteret | Swansboro

3 8 | C A R O L I N A S A LT | NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2013


A

t Carteret Animal Hospital, we take a personal approach to veterinary medicine, and enjoy getting to know you and your pets. Our goal is to treat you as we would like to be treated, and to treat our clients’ pets as though they were our own.

• • • •

A full service veterinary hospital Full surgery and dentistry Boarding and basic grooming NEW! We now have an emergency line to answer questions or give advice after hours! Call 252-725-1928!

Winter specials for animal Lovers! DOGS • CATS • FERRETS • RABBITS • GUINEA PIGS HAMSTERS • CHINCHILLAS • REPTILES • BIRDS*

50 15 12 %

OFF YOUR FIRST EXAM FOR NEW CLIENTS! With this coupon.

% $

OFF YOUR NEXT VISIT FOR EXISTING CLIENTS! With this coupon.

RABIES VACCINE!

Thru Nov. 30. New special in Dec.!

We’re here for your pets! 814 WEST BEAUFORT ROAD IN BEAUFORT JUST OFF HIGHWAY 101 • 252-728-7600 *Limited services for birds.

At Crystal Coast Gymnastics, children tumble, swing, vault, and somersault their way to a happy, healthy life! Join Our Fall Session Crystal Coast Gymnastics operates classes on an 8-week schedule. We run six sessions throughout the year. You can enroll your child at any time. Class type is based on your child’s age, experience, and ability. Our staff will work with you to determine the appropriate class for your child.

300 GREENFIELD DRIVE • NEWPORT

www.crystalcoastgymnastics.com

252-222-4961 (GYM1)

carteretanimalhospital.com

l Cal

us!


DISCOVERY DIVING

LEE MOORE

DIV I N G OU R COAST IN NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

N JOIN DISCOVERY Contact Discovery Diving at 252‑728‑2265 or visit them on Facebook to see what classes and events are coming up. You can also visit discoverydiving.com.

JOIN ECARA ECARA works to continue sinking ships to create artificial reefs here in North Carolina, but their resources are limited. To get involved with ECARA, visit carolinareef.org to check out their current project list.

ovember is when our offshore water begins to cool down. Temperatures will start to slip down into the low 70s and by the end of the month will be in the upper 60s. Charters will still be running, but weekend sports activities and the chill in the air keep most divers out of the water, although most boats have heat so divers getting out the water can find comfort in a warm cabin. The Crystal Coast is known all over the world for wreck diving, but it has natural dive sites called rock ledges or hard bottom (rock outcroppings three to four feet in height) as well. Diving charter boats only occasionally visit rock ledges because most divers come to the Crystal Coast for the wrecks. Spearfishers like the rock ledges because the fish there aren’t as skittish around divers. Underwater photographers like to visit the ledges because they teem with marine life that isn’t seen on the wrecks. Ledges can be inhabited by adult and juvenile queen angelfish, juvenile French angelfish, lionfish, squirrelfish, hogfish, flounder, schools of spadefish, sea turtles and grouper. Depending on depth, spiny lobsters can be found hiding in openings in the ledge. A rock ledge can span hundreds of yards. And unlike a wreck, ledges don’t always have a defined shape. After a while they all look the same, so captains keep their GPS numbers to themselves so they can revisit good spots. Just as navigating to a ledge is challenging, so can keeping track of where you are while diving one. Following the edge of a ledge is one way of navigating. If a diver ventures into a crack that runs away from the edge and intersects other cracks, the diver might have a difficult time returning to the edge where the anchor is located. Having the proper equipment is key. A wreck reel is essentially a spool with line on it that can be tied to a starting point and played out as the diver swims away from the starting point. When divers want to return, they simply turn around and start reeling in the line. When attaching the line at the starting point, it should be secured near the anchor, but not to the anchor line. If the anchor came loose, the wreck reel could be snatched out of the diver’s hand. Another piece of basic safety equipment is a safety sausage, also known as a surface marker buoy. This is a tall, cylindrical buoy, usually orange or yellow, attached to a diver’s wreck reel. It is carried rolled up and can be deployed either while divers are underwater or when they are on the surface but have drifted away from the boat. In the case of a safety sausage, bigger is better. The taller the safety sausage, the easier it is to see at a distance. Even three-foot seas can make it very difficult for the boat crew to spot a diver 100 yards away. Having the proper equipment makes diving the ledges off of the Crystal Coast safer and more enjoyable. If you are interested in trying a winter dive on the ledges, the Captain’s Lady runs year round and only needs four divers to run. It has an enclosed cabin with an excellent heater to keep passengers warm and comfortable on chilly days. 

Salt 4 0 | C A R O L I N A S A LT | NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2013

IT’S EASY TO ADVERTISE! C A L L U S AT 2 5 2 - 7 2 3 - 7 6 2 8 W W W. C A R O L I N A S A LT. C O M


T I D E C H A RT CAPE HATTERAS TIDES NOVEMBER 7 TO DECEMBER 7

Your Complete Bait &Tackle Shop

200 WET & OFFICIAL NC ETHANOLDRY SLIPS CITATION WILDLIFE FREE WEIGH SERVICE GAS AT THE BOAT STATION AGENT DOCKS! SERVICE The most complete bait & tackle marina on the East Coast. Extensive boat storage and a friendly staff make Dudley’s a one-stop shop for all your boating needs.

WWW.DUDLEYSMARINA.NET

HIGHWAY 24 EAST • SWANSBORO • 252-393-2204


Storm Shutters • Awnings • Professional Design • Installation Sunesta® retractable awnings, screens and shelters expand and enhance your living areas by shielding you from the elements on demand! ✔ CUSTOM MADE FOR YOU ✔ QUALITY DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION ✔ HUNDREDS OF OPTIONS AVAILABLE

Winter Installation Special! CALL NOW THRU DECEMBER 7 AND GET …

Free Estimate! 252-727-9040

10% OFF!

4101 Arendell Street • Morehead City www.atlanticbreezestormshutters.com


SEAFOOD • STEAKS • SANDWICHES 311 Mangrove Drive Across from CVS in Emerald Isle Closed Monday • Sun–Tue 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. • Fri-Sat 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.

A casual Island eatery with a touch of class. TUESDAY All-You-Can-Eat Crablegs Homemade Lasagna

WEDNESDAY Shrimp-n-Grits Chicken Cordon Bleu

THURSDAY All-You-Can-Eat Crablegs Homestyle Meatloaf

FRIDAY Flipperz Famous Prime Rib Chef’s Choice

facebook.com/flipperzemeraldisle

252.354.7775 • flipperz.net Flipperz FUDGE CO. & RETAIL

Just in time for Christmas!

Monogrammed Baskets & Christmas Stockings! Homemade Fudge • Large Assortment of T-Shirts


TRY OUR UNLIMITED SALAD BAR!

SIMPLY GRILLED… CHICKEN BREAST, BONELESS PORK CHOPS, SHRIMP, SCALLOPS, TUNA AND SALMON.

What’s on your plate tonight?

W W W. R I B E Y E S S T E A K H O U S E . C O M

THREE LOCATIONS ON THE CRYSTAL COAST 104 Golfin’ Dolphin Drive • Cape Carteret • 252.393.2509 502 Front Street • Beaufort • 252.728.6105 313 Pollock Street • New Bern • 252.288.5814


Carolina Salt November/December Issue