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FREE! AUGUST–OCTOBER 2021

your life on the Crystal Coast FUN & FREE

THINGS TO DO INSIDE ON PAGE 8

Outer Banks Wildlife

WATER FOR WILDLIFE

2021 Event

BEAUFORT PIRATE INVASION

NC Museums

TRAVEL THROUGH HISTORY

ALIVE AT 5 CONCERTS | ASK THE AQUARIUM | DIVING | WHAT’S IN A NAME?


AU G U ST – O C TO B E R 2 0 2 1

Inside This Issue your life on the Crystal Coast

18 Water for Wildlife! It’s summer and that means it’s going to get hot! Our backyard visiting wildlife can go for awhile without food, but like us, they need water much more regularly. Find out how to help ensure the survival of our local wild species this summer.

20 Alive At Five Concert Lineup Downtown Morehead City is delighted to

18 WILDLIFE SHELTER: Water for Wildlife! FREE!

AUGUST–OC

TOBER 2021

t stal Coas on the Cry your life E

FUN & FRE

GS THIN TO DO INSIDE ON PAGE 8

eums

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2021 Even

NC Mus

TRAVELH THROUGY HISTOR

RT s Wildlife BEAUFO WATER PIRATE SION FOR NAME? E INVA T’S IN A NG | WHA WILDLIF M | DIVI AQUARIU

Outer Bank

ALIVE AT

THE TS | ASK 5 CONCER

August–October 2021

ON THIS SEASON’S COVER On this month’s cover are Chris and Jessica Kalt, with their children Porter and Chrisley Rae. Chris and Jessica are the proud owners of Kalt Life Custom Golf Carts, with locations in Cape Carteret and Peletier. We are proud to have these guys on our cover!

announce that, after losing out last year due to COVID, the Alive At Five concert series is returning this summer, with an amazing lineup of live music talent, all free to the public.

22 Beaufort Pirate Invasion This year’s invasion will be held at Gallants

Channel Complex in Beaufort from August 13–15. The event will be packed with ticketed events, reenactors, demos, shows, pirates, mermaids, and much more.

41 Travel Through History The North Carolina history museums, including

our own NC Maritime Museum in Beaufort, have joined together to create a fun-filled family adventure across the state and away from screens. Earn souvenirs and discounts by participating!

41 What’s In A Name? Maritime Museum intern Kara Nunnally takes

a deep dive into some of our local place names. Ever wonder why they call it Gallants Channel, or who the “Harker” of Harkers Island was? Many mysteries are solved, and one...isn’t.

22 PIRATE INVASION Beaufort will be invaded August 13–15.

41 TRAVEL THROUGH HISTORY A fun-filled family adventure across the state away from screens.

LOCAL INTEREST

Things To Do................................................ 8 Rebecca’s Corner. . ....................................... 21 Ask the Aquarium: Dragonflies...................... 40 An Island Church Perspective....................... 42 Diving Our Coast.. ....................................... 44

CarolinaSalt.com » August–October 2021 CAROLINA SALT 5


PUBLISHER

WILL ASHBY C R E AT I V E D I R E C TO R

C H E V Y K AY LO R B E C O M E A C O N T R I BU TO R

Submit your letters to the editor, photos, community listings and articles to will@carolinasalt.com. The editorial deadline for the next issue is October 16. The next issue publishes November 7.

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Carolina Salt is a great way to reach out to your local customers, as well as our seasonal visitors.

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Call us to find out how we can help you grow your local business. FROM THE PUBLISHER

Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt magazine, all about our life here on the Crystal Coast. Our articles are written by locals. Every month we look to our readers to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote or an interesting local photograph, send them our way. Participation is welcomed and appreciated. Reader contributions are the founding principle of the magazine. If you like what you see, tell people about it— especially our advertisers. For questions, concerns or more information, send e-mail to will@carolinasalt.com or call 252-723-7628. For up-to-date info, be sure to look us up on Facebook!

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THINGS TO DO

✪ = FREE

AUGUST–OCTOBER

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

Morehead City Alive at Five

Alive at Five is a free to the public, family-friendly music series is hosted at Jaycee Park, 807 Shepard Street, from 5 to 8 p.m., on the waterfront in downtown Morehead City. Beverages will be available for purchase and no coolers or outside beverages are allowed inside the concert area. August 20................ The Soul Psychedelique Orchestra September 2......................................................... Night Years September 16........................................................Band of Oz October 14............ The Embers featuring Craig Woolard

Sunset Serenades

Sunset Serenades will be held on Saturdays twice monthly at Jaycee Park. All concerts are free and open to the public. Location: 807 Shepard Street, Morehead City. Free to the public. Time: 7 to 8:30 p.m. August 14..................................................... Built For Comfort August 28................................................................Revolution September 11........................................... Jan Michael Fields September 25............................................................Freeway October 9.................................................................... 4EverAll October 23............................................................. Local Boys

Atlantic Beach Music Fest

The 7th annual AB Beach Music Festival takes place on the boardwalk at The Circle on Saturday, August 7, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. This year’s festival will feature The Band of Oz, Jim Quick and The Coastline Band, The Embers, and The Mighty Saints of Soul. Admission is free, tickets are not required, and pets and glass containers are prohibited. Food trucks will be serving. Location: 115 Atlantic Boulevard, Atlantic Beach.

SwanFest Sundays

It’s a Sunday night relaxing thing to do, down by the waterfront in beautiful Swansboro. Musicians of many genres will take the Pugliese Pavilion stage this summer. Bring your lawn chair to the Pavilion at Olde Town Square from 6:30 to 8 p.m. August 8........................................................... Spare Change August 15..................Captain Dick and the Lost Seamen August 22.........................................Polar Bear Blues Band August 29....................................................................Freeway September 5................... Gary Lowder and Smoking Hot September 12............Justin Castellano and Eddie Profit

EmeraldFest Thursdays

The 2021 EmeraldFest Concert Series takes place at 6:30 p.m. at the Western Ocean Regional Access. Free outdoor concerts will be held each Thursday evening throughout the summer. Bring your blanket or chair and come on out and enjoy some great music with us! No alcohol, please. July 15..................................................... Pure T Mommicked July 22........................................................Wicked Shimmies July 29.........................................................................Big Drink August 5...................................................... Justin Castellano August 12...............................................Scearce and Ketner August 19...........................................................Naked Knees 8

SPECIAL EVENTS

Olde Beaufort Farmers’ Market

The Olde Beaufort Farmers’ Market is open for business! Every Saturday morning from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. the courthouse grounds are filled with friendly farmers offering beautiful, locally grown veggies, meats, eggs, honey and other farm products and bakers’ tents are filled with delectable desserts, breads, muffins, and ready-to-eat dishes. A bevy of talented artisans offer a diverse range of work including pottery, jewelry, soap, candles, paintings, and many other quality creations. Join in the fun, come shop in our safe outdoor venue, support local small businesses, and experience the best of coastal small town life! Location: 300 Courthouse Square, Beaufort. Free to the public. AUGUST 27

Casino Night at 34 North

Join us for a fundraising event to benefit the Crystal Coast Habitat for Humanity on Friday, August 27, at 34 North at 1102 Cedar Point Boulevard, Cedar Point. Tickets are $100 per person and $175 per couple. Tickets include hors d’oeuvres, $5,000 starter poker chips and two drinks. Purchase tickets at habitatcasinonight. rsvpify.com All proceeds to benefit Crystal Coast Habitat for Humanity OCTOBER 22–23

Tuna Relay 200

The Tuna Relay 200 is an amazing, overnight relay adventure in which you and your team will run 200 scenic miles across North Carolina, finishing at the beach. Enjoy some tuna and your beverage of choice after a job well done. The Tuna Relay 200 begins just outside of Raleigh at Lake Benson Park in Garner and finishes in Atlantic Beach. From casual joggers to serious racers, this event is great fun for everyone. Teams are made up of 4 to 12 people who split 36 legs. Each team will provide support vans to drop off and pick up runners at designated exchange points along the 200-mile route. For more information visit www. malakseries.com/tuna-200 OCTOBER 23–25

Crystal Coast Grand Prix World Championship Join us for the return of the Crystal Coast Grand Prix World Championship, inspired by a boyhood passion that has become an extremely popular event on the Morehead City Waterfront. For more information visit www.lookoutshootout.com OCTOBER 30

Emerald Isle Marathon, HalfMarathon and 5K Races

This is our 8th annual race in Emerald Isle! Join us for a beautiful run with beach views and one of the flattest and fastest courses! We are a Boston Qualifier and are sanctioned and certified! For more information visit www.emeraldislerun.com

CAROLINA SALT August–October 2021 » CarolinaSalt.com

OCTOBER 30

Core Sound Run

A family-friendly 10K, 5K and Fun Run on one of North Carolina’s most beautiful islands, Harkers Island. The Core Sound Run begins and ends “at the end of the road”—at the edge of Core Sound. High-quality, long-sleeve T-shirts provided to each 5 and 10k participant. Also, prizes provided per age group and overall winners of the 5 and 10k races. For more information visit www.runtheeast. com/race-info/?id=15826 AUGUST 13–15

FESTIVALS

Beaufort Pirate Invasion

This year’s event will be held at the Gallants Channel Complex at the foot of the Beaufort Bridge. The admission fee is $10 for adults and children will enter free. Evening events will start at 8 p.m. and be ticketed separately. Evening ticket price is $25 per person for dinner and show and $10 for movie and Parlay. Our flotilla will be free to watch from shore in many spots in Beaufort as well as Gallants Channel. Location: 293 West Beaufort Road Extension, Beaufort. For tickets and event info visit beaufortpirateinvasion.com OCTOBER 1–3

NC Seafood Festival

The North Carolina Seafood Festival takes place on the Morehead City Waterfront. The largest three-day festival in North Carolina, its highlights are an endless variety of seafood prepared in a multitude of ways, street dances, concerts, arts and crafts (about 200 vendors), Flounder Fling and an international award-winning chef ’s tent, Southern Outer Banks boat show, educational exhibits, hands-on programs for kids and rides and games. Saturday night fireworks are enjoyed by festival goers and neighbors alike. The festivities are spread from the North Carolina State Port to 11th Street on the beautiful Morehead City waterfront. Free parking is available at the port on Saturday and Sunday with shuttles transporting festival-goers to the fun. Admission is always free, but bring cash for all the extras that will tempt your wallet! Location: Downtown Morehead City. For event info and the most up-to-date information visit ncseafoodfestival.org OCTOBER 9–10

Swansboro Mullet Festival

The Swansboro Mullet Festival, the oldest festival on the Crystal Coast, began in 1954. The weekend centers around the small, bony fish that appears as having a purplish-blue tint. Swansboro natives remember days long ago when mullets were hauled to shore in nets hooked to tractors along the beach. In 1954, mullet fed the workers building the White Oak River Bridge that later became a vital link between Onslow and Carteret counties. Upon its completion, the concept of the Mullet Festival began. It was a way to celebrate the arrival of the modern era in bridge form. The event started as a


✪ = FREE

AUGUST–OCTOBER

potluck-type event with the town coming together and contributing to the celebration and is now in its 67th year. If you’re a southern seafood fan, then you’re going to love the annual Mullet Festival of Swansboro. This two-day affair features a wealth of ways to enjoy this local Crystal Coast staple, as well as plenty of games and activities that celebrate the food, flavor, and all around fun of the heart of Swansboro and the North Carolina coastline.

AUGUST 7

OCTOBER 23

Kayak the Salt Marsh

Crystal Coast Highland Games

This will be a day of family fun for all ages, there will be demonstration Scottish dancing, Heavy Athletics, Scottish vendors, a kids’ area, clan tents and of course the sound of bagpipes. Bring the family for a look at Scottish heritage. Location: Gallant’s Channel Event Space 293, West Beaufort Road Extension, Beaufort. Price of admission $15 in advance and $20 at the gate. Time: 9 a.m to 4 p.m. For more information find them on Facebook or email nchighlandgames@gmail.com FISHING TOURNAMENTS SEPTEMBER 16–19

NC Kingfish Mayhem

Jack’s Waterfront Bar in Morehead City will be hosting this tournament series. The Kingfish Mayhem Pro Series is world-class, competitive, and high paying. Welcome to the big leagues. In 2020 we hosted more than 500 teams with over $1,000,000 in payouts. For more information visit www.meatmayhemtournaments.com SEPTEMBER 18

Emerald Isle Fishing Tournament

The 3rd annual Emerald Isle Fishing Tournament will be a family-friendly King Mackerel tournament where elite and sport fishermen alike can compete and provide a positive environment for young anglers. 100% of the entry fees are paid directly to the participants in the forms of prizes and other awards. For more information visit emeraldislefishingtournament.com OCTOBER 2–23

King Mackerel Tournament

The Atlantic Beach King Mackerel Fishing Tournament is the revival of the original AB King Mackerel Tournament with all proceeds going to the Atlantic Beach Fire Department. For more information visit abkingmack.com AT THE NC MARITIME MUSEUM

The N.C. Maritime Museum and the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center, both located on Front Street in downtown Beaufort, are open year-round on the same schedule. Monday–Saturday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday: Closed. Admission to both sites is free. Donations are appreciated. For more information visit www.ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com

SEPTEMBER 23

Traditional Skiff Rally

[ 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. ] Each year during the museum’s August traditional skiff sailing event, boaters race around the islands for the Shanghai Trophy. Event organized by the Traditional Small Craft Association, FoM Chapter. For information or to register, call 252-728-2762. AUGUST 10 | SEPTEMBER 22 | OCTOBER 8

[ 9 a.m. to Noon ] Learn about the benefits of salt marshes while on the water. Basic kayak instruction and safety lessons on shore are followed by a relaxing paddle through a salt marsh. Under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Participants must know how to swim; some kayak experience is recommended. Cost is $30 ($20 with own kayak). Pre-registration required by 2 p.m. the day prior. To register, call 252-504-7758. AUGUST 13

By Hook or By Crook

Wreck of the Seychelle [ 11 a.m. ] The whaler Seychelle, out of Provincetown, Massachusetts, was set to operate off the North Carolina coast when it happened to fall victim to the Great Beaufort Hurricane of August 1879, later known as Old Cook’s Storm. The presentation, by Associate Education Curator Benjamin Wunderly, will examine some of the pelagic whaling operations that occurred off our state during a time when most whaling activity along North Carolina was shore based. Accounts of one of the area’s most devastating storms will also be revealed. The free program is part of the museum’s Maritime Heritage Series, informal lectures held in the museum’s auditorium and simulcast via Facebook and Zoom. Registration is not required for the in-person program. To register for the Zoom program, go to ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com. SEPTEMBER 25 | OCTOBER 23

Carolina Maritime Model Society Meeting

[ 2 p.m. ] Focusing on the female pirates Anne Bonny and Mary Read, this presentation held in the museum auditorium explores the lives of misbehaving women of the 18th century. Bonny and Read used creative means of deception to overcome the limited options for women during their time. Free, no registration required.

[ 2 p.m. ] The Carolina Maritime Model Society exists to promote the production of high-quality ship models and encourage members and the public to participate in a craft that is as old as shipbuilding itself. The group meets in the museum’s auditorium and is open to the public.

SEPTEMBER 2

The Post Civil War Migration

[ 11 a.m. ] Join Maritime Historian David Bennett to explore the migration of northern entrepreneurs and fishermen into North Carolina following the end of the Civil War. These men introduced new fishing boats, equipment, and methods that resulted in the rapid expansion and increased profitability of North Carolina’s commercial fishing industry. The free program is part of the museum’s Maritime Heritage Series. Registration is not required for the in-person program. To register for the Zoom program, go to ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com. SEPTEMBER 9

Acid-Base Reductions in Archaeological Conservation

THINGS TO DO

OCTOBER 3

Annual Seafood Festival Rally [ 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.] Traditional skiffs sail prior to the festival’s Blessing of the Fleet. Launch/ rig from the Watercraft Center on Front Street and sail from Beaufort to the Morehead City waterfront and enjoy shrimp burgers at 11 a.m. The sail/race to Beaufort starts at noon. Organized by the Traditional Small Craft Association, FoM Chapter. For information or to take part, call 252-728-2762. OCTOBER 7

Carteret County’s Emergence as a Leader in Commercial Fishing

[ 11 a.m. ] Acid-Base chemistry is fundamental to understanding archaeological conservation, both in terms of why some things deteriorate while others are preserved while buried in the ground and in terms of why conservators choose the materials and treatments that they do. Join museum conservator Michelle Crepeau as she explores how conservators interpret, react to and manipulate acid-base chemistry to their advantage. The free program is part of the museum’s Maritime Heritage Series, informal lectures held in the museum’s auditorium and simulcast via Facebook and Zoom. Registration is not required for the in-person program. To register for the Zoom program, go to ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com.

[ 11 a.m. ] David Bennett, Curator of Maritime History, will give a broad overview of the history of commercial fishing in North Carolina with a focus on Carteret County. The talk will explain how Carteret County rose from a small, subsistence fishing community in the colonial period to the leader of the state’s commercial fishing industry in the 20th century. The free program is part of the museum’s Maritime Heritage Series, informal lectures held in the museum’s auditorium and simulcast via Facebook and Zoom. Registration is not required for the in-person program. To register for the Zoom program, go to ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com. Fall In-the-Water Meet

CarolinaSalt.com » August–October 2021 CAROLINA SALT 9


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OUTER BANKS WILDLIFE SHELTER LINDA BERGMAN–ALTHOUSE

Water for Wildlife!

I

t’s summer! So, that means it’s going to get hot! We’ve already seen the 90s, and triple-digit heat waves are not far off. Our North Carolina wild creatures can live for extended periods of time without food, but like us, they need water much more regularly. Providing a convenient supply of clean water can make a huge difference to the survival of local wild species, like birds and butterflies as well as small and larger mammals, during times of extreme heat and possible drought. Lacking the ability to sweat, birds have developed some fascinating mechanisms for keeping cool, but hotter temperatures naturally drive up that need to cool down. Heatwaves have a negative impact on animals, especially during nesting season for birds. A study shows that overheated birds have less viable eggs and smaller offspring, and those that make it to birth may have lower chances of survival. So, while we humans are reveling in the hot, sunny and sticky days of summer, our garden wildlife might not be having such a good time. As the midsummer heat bears down on us, we get to choose our preferred

method of cooling down, such as leaping into a pool, taking a cold shower, or retreating to the air conditioning, but for birds and other wild creatures that inhabit urban landscapes, where water and shade may be diminished, the choices are few to none. There is always the ongoing debate: should you or should you not put out additional water sources during extreme heat—because you may attract some animals that you are not too keen on. But we are the Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter in Newport, North Carolina, and wildlife welfare and well-being is our priority. Many of our smaller creatures like cottontails, squirrels and opossums that live close to our homes or workplaces are not very wide-ranging and therefore, less likely to head off to local bodies of water, while more mobile species can become dehydrated due to lack of proximity to water. Sudden hot conditions and prolonged drought throw wildlife off their normal routines and most definitely put them at risk, but you can help that situation and make a real difference to animals (wild and domestic) and even the plant life in your area. Here are ten simple pointers in a wet direction.

18 CAROLINA SALT August–October 2021 » CarolinaSalt.com

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

1 Make a special effort to keep your birdbaths full or think about getting one if you don’t already have one. Dipping into water and shaking droplets through their feathers is a process that keeps birds clean, and cools them down. Not only does a birdbath offer the basic necessity of water, it also affords you great entertainment. Shade is vital and instrumental in both keeping water cool and also, food edible. 2 If you don’t have a birdbath and don’t plan on getting one, shallow, wide tubs and saucers of water spread around the yard, close to the ground and in the shade so the water stays cool, will be a welcome sight. 3 If they aren’t coming to the birdbath, hang a “drip jug” over it—a basic plastic milk jug filled with water with a tiny hole in the bottom. The birds will hear the drip and it will attract them for a cool bath and a drink. There are a number of terrific ways to enhance your garden with water features, including misters, bubblers and more. 4 Put out some additional water-filled containers, ideally in the shade. Placing a couple of containers (one shallow and one a little deeper) on the ground to help other creatures such as ground and tree


LINDA BERGMAN–ALTHOUSE

5

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squirrels, raccoons, opossums, cottontails and others. Remember to keep these shallow water troughs clean by changing out the water daily and scrubbing before any algae can develop. Use water-conserving garden practices such as generous amounts of mulch to cover garden beds. This will help insects, worms and other invertebrates. Water the plants in your garden to keep them healthy with natural moisture, and the droplets are a favorite of bees and butterflies. Don’t forget the hummingbirds. They rely on nectar from plants. Summer conditions can dry up natural supplies that a good hummingbird feeder can help replace. You can make your own nectar from water and sugar. If your community puts watering restrictions in place during times of drought, this is a good time to capture water that might otherwise go to waste. One thing many folks do is put a bucket (or two) in their shower. While you bathe, the bucket fills with drinkable water for wildlife that would otherwise go down the drain. (Make sure soap doesn’t get in the bucket.) Many communities encourage residents to install backyard rain barrels that gather rainfall from the roof and store it for drier times. For those of you with pools in your backyard, you might consider providing an island or incline for animals to crawl out if need be. Hot animals trying to beat the heat or quench their thirst can drown in pools so providing an exit can save lives. Did you know that if you offer a garden providing food, water and shelter for local wild creatures, large or small, it makes a terrific National Wildlife Federation Wildlife Habitat that can be certified? It’s easy, fun and purposeful.

OUTER BANKS WILDLIFE SHELTER

Providing sources of water that are high up and also low to the ground will allow many thirsty creatures the opportunity to refresh themselves. And if you offer a garden providing food, water and shelter for wild creatures, you can become a National Wildlife Federation Habitat that can be certified. It’s easy, fun and purposeful!

We homeowners and wildlife enthusiasts can turn our own backyards into cool respites for wildlife, and although transforming our gardens into shaded landscapes may take a bit of effort, it’ll pay off in the long run for wildlife seeking cooler resting places and for all of us who delight in watching our indigenous creatures, especially our garden birds. It just takes a few simple measures like topping off your birdbath and keeping it clean, creating a make-shift pond from a washing tub, or putting down a saucer filled with water. These little but important things can offer a vital lifeline to some of our garden favorite critters who are already fighting against decline. Let’s do this thing – drinks for everyone! €

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CarolinaSalt.com » August–October 2021 CAROLINA SALT 19


LOCAL EVENTS MOREHEAD CITY

Announcing This Year’s Free Alive At Five Concert Lineup!

D

owntown Morehead City is excited to announce the return of the Alive at Five concert series! The free, family-friendly music series is hosted at Jaycee Park, 807 Shepard Street, from 5 to 8 p.m., on the waterfront in downtown Morehead City. “Downtown Morehead City, Inc., is thrilled to host this staple concert series after taking a break last year during COVID,” said Lisa Rueh, Executive Director for Downtown Morehead City, Inc. “Alive at Five has grown to be a staple of downtown over the years. There will be three summer Friday night concerts and three fall Thursday night concerts. We look forward to hosting the band lineup we were supposed to have for 2020. It will be great to enjoy time with locals and visitors and showcase all that our downtown area has to offer. Hopes are that after the concert, folks will grab a bite to eat or drink in one of our many restaurants and bars.”

FRIDAY, JULY 16 The Bounce Party Band From Burlington, North Carolina, The Bounce Party Band takes center stage with a six-piece, high-energy group complete with male and female vocalists playing all your favorite dance songs from the last 40 years. The Bounce Party Band is an eclectic group of musicians with years of experience, tremendous talent and unmistakable chemistry. They always get the crowd moving!

FRIDAY, AUGUST 20 The Soul Psychedelique Orchestra The Soul Psychedelique Orchestra band features a horn section, string quartet, full rhythm section and a disc jockey. The band has decades of experience in the music industry, ranging from major artist tours to television appearances on the Tonight Show and Good Morning America. The Orchestra has an extensive music library than spans style from the 1940s Big Band sounds to beach music, R&B, rock, reggae, Latin and the best of today’s music. A crowd favorite, The Soul Psychedelique concert is sponsored by Coastal Bank & Trust.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 Night Years The Night Years’ 9-piece band features two dynamic lead vocalists on the frontline and a backline of international musicians and entertainers which includes a three-piece horn section and multiple backup vocalists. That, combined with a multi-decade range of music, state-of-the-art light show and studio-quality live sound is a guaranteed recipe for the ultimate dance party!

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 Band of Oz The Band of Oz was formed in 1967 as a part-time band playing fraternity parties and high school proms all over the South. In 1977, the band went on the road full time and since that time, the band has made a big name for itself throughout the Southeast playing top clubs and corporate parties. For several years, the band has participated in major beach concerts in the Carolinas, Virginia and Georgia. The band features a full horn section and a dynamic group of entertainers. They have a huge following of beach music lovers! The Band of Oz concert is sponsored by Linda Rike Realty. 20 CAROLINA SALT August–October 2021 » CarolinaSalt.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14 The Embers featuring Craig Woolard This musical institution has left their mark on listeners with numerous albums and single releases that span decades. Having been inducted into the South Carolina Rhythm and Blues Hall of Fame and the South Carolina Beach Music Hall of Fame, The Embers are honored to carry the moniker of North Carolina’s Official Ambassadors of Music. In 2007 and 2008, The Embers traveled throughout South Korea to perform “Christmas with the Embers” on American military bases for America’s troops and were awarded Military Coins of Excellence for their distinguished service. They will put joy in your step, love in your heart and beach music in your soul! The Embers concert is sponsored by Cape Lookout Family Dental. The 2021 Alive at Five Concert Series is sponsored by Moore’s Old Tyme Barbeque and West Town Bank Mortgage. Beverages are sponsored by Adams Beverage/Landshark. The concerts are hosted by Downtown Morehead City, Inc. and the Town of Morehead City. Downtown business sponsors include Ace Marine Rigging, Atlantic Bay Mortgage, BG Digital, Chalk & Gibbs, Ginny Gordon’s, Jack’s Waterfront Bar and Sea Classics Trading. Beverages will be available for purchase and no coolers or outside beverages are allowed inside the concert area. Downtown Morehead City is the premier year-round waterfront community in Eastern North Carolina, known for its coastal lifestyle for residents and visitors. Downtown Morehead City, Inc. fosters a healthy downtown by promoting assets and maximizing economic opportunities while preserving our coastal lifestyle. For more information about Alive at Five or DMC, Inc. visit downtownmoreheadcity.com and follow them on social media. €


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THE NATURE ISSUE

Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt magazine, all about life on the Crystal Coast.

Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter

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OF THE SS CARIBSEA

Try Your Hand At A Spinning Workshop

he day ended at sunset with a boat ride on the Calico Jack’s II, a 24-foot US Coast Guard inspected Small Passenger Vessel, over to the sandbar oyster bed which Keeping OurisShore situated on the Newport River. Captain Monty guided Species Safe the boat to the sandbar and stopped. I waded shin deep Crystal into the water to Con see a real working oyster farm. Coast Returns! It began in 2009 as Drs. Niels Lindquist and Joel Fodrie at the Bogue Banks UNC Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences recruited David Sea Salt “Clammerhead” Cessna to work as a Commercial Fisherman THINGS Raise A Glass 2015 Mullet TO DO to figure out new ways to promote oyster growth and To Charity Collaborator Festival restore/create estuarine habitats. The idea worked, and produced some very tasty premium FREE! green gill oysters, which I got to eat. I did not get one with a pearl, though. Formation of a natural pearl begins when a foreign substance slips into the oyster. It is like the oyster getting a splinter and its natural reaction is to cover up that irritant to protect itself. But that “irritation” when left alone for a while can become a valuable pearl. If you are 2017 irritated by every rub, how will you be polished? Often it is the deepest pain which inspires you to grow into your highest self. If you want a pearl, you must work for it. There are treasures in pain. Remember that an oyster who was not injured, will never produce pearls, because the pearl is a healed wound. Our wounds are often the openings into our best self. € THINGS TO DO Glow Run Evening Race

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Participation is welcomed and appreciated. Reader contributions are the founding principle of the magazine.

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CarolinaSalt.com » August–October 2021 CAROLINA SALT 21


LOCAL EVENTS BEAUFORT

PIR ATE INVASION AUGUST 13–15 | GALLANTS CHANNEL COMPLEX

22 CAROLINA SALT August–October 2021 » CarolinaSalt.com


BEAUFORT

LOCAL EVENTS

Ahoy! Proclamations and Ye Schedule of Events

T

MORE INFORMATION THIS YEAR’S INVASION will be held at Gallants Channel Complex in Beaufort from August 13–15. The admission fee is $10 for adults, and children who can ‘walk under The Plank’ are admitted free. TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE at 252-241-9049. For event information and updates, visit beaufortpirateinvasion.com

here have been many questions about this year’s Invasion. We have secured an alternate site for our 2021 Beaufort Pirate Invasion to be held on August 13 to 15. This year’s event will be at the Gallants Channel Complex at the foot of the Beaufort Bridge on Highway 70 as you come into Beaufort from Morehead City. We are also planning to Invade Beaufort with our second annual Pirate Flotilla as we did last year and we invite you to sign up to join us. The Town of Beaufort is exercising caution going forward due to the second year of The Plague, as our event drew over 15,000 visitors to downtown Beaufort in 2018 and 2019. That’s a lot of mates rubbing elbows! We agree that’s just too many people right now for a safe event in an uncontrolled area. Downtown is open and has been a free event and there is no way to control the numbers who attend. Our solution is a large open area that is gated and visitors can purchase an armband or ticket to enter. The admission fee is reasonable at $10 for adults. Children who can “walk under The Plank” will enter free. Without cheating of course! Only a true pirate scoundrel would do such! This will greatly help in controlling our numbers and also help to fund this event. Considering the challenges of the past season of The Plague, we are working on a new Invasion with all the awe and excitement of the past. Almost 200 professional performer are slated for this year to include professional magicians, swordfighters, pirate musicians too many to count, bullwhip demos, black powder demos with cannons, cannons and more cannons, family-friendly comedy show, living history displays and reenactments, stilt walkers, mermaids, peg-legged pirates, blacksmithing, axe and knife throwing and so much more … and that is a show to see, mates. There are two separately ticketed event nights: a movie/ parlay and a dinner, show and parlay. Events will start at 8 p.m. Evening ticket price is $25 per person for dinner and show and $10 for movie and parlay. Our flotilla will be free to watch from shore in many spots in Beaufort as well as Gallants Channel. New and past vendors and local food trucks will be on site with unique items and delicious food to satisfy any pirate. And sea battles, bigger than ever! For those wanting to cool off, take a break and visit some of our local restaurants and shops downtown, your tickets are good throughout the weekend. And do not think for a moment there won’t be pirates downtown! Our most wanted pirates will be in key spots for your delight and terror, and they like to roam away from our encampment sometime. Ye shall have to raid the town as well as Gallants Point where Blackbeard himself awaits. Tickets are available at 252-241-9049. A schedule of events will be posted as we get closer. Stay tuned for updates! For tickets, event info and updates visit beaufortpirateinvasion.com. € CarolinaSalt.com » August–October 2021 CAROLINA SALT 23


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ASK the AQUARIUM

Q

My son and I saw a lot of dragonflies while fishing at a pond near our home. He asked if dragonflies could hurt you. I’d never thought about it. Are dragonflies harmful to humans?

With gorgeous gossamer wings and brilliant colors, dragonflies are a delight to see hovering over ponds and streams. PHOTO COURTESY OF EMMETT WESTBROOK FOR THE NC AQUARIUMS

A

Not unless you’re a small insect or fish – then you’re a potential meal. Dragonflies can’t sting – although that’s one of the enduring myths – nor can they sew your ears together, another myth that gave then the nickname “devil’s darning needle.” Dragonflies and damselflies look very much alike and both belong to the order Odonata. Dragonflies are larger than damselflies and fly faster. Dragonflies also hold their wings spread when they alight, unlike the damselfly that folds its wings over its back. Both are ravenous feeders, and the dragonfly nymph is one of the most voracious pond predators. Both like similar environments and dragon and damselfly nymphs are important food sources for fish in ponds, swamps and streams. The dragonfly begins life breathing through gills under water for about a year before it matures and leaves the water for a few glorious weeks in flight feeding and mating. Of all the winged insects that flit about a summer pond, the dragonfly is the largest. It’s also the oldest. Huge dragonflies with 2½-foot wingspans were around 300 million years ago when the brontosaurus roamed the Earth. Dragonflies hatch from eggs laid in ponds or streams. As nymphs they spend about a year eating and trying to avoid being eaten. They breathe air through internal gills and, if escape becomes necessary—say from a giant water bug— they can expel water forcefully and propel themselves forward. Nymphs usually hunt by ambush, using their large eyes and binocular vision to locate other small nymphs or fish. The pursuer then flips forward a hinged lower lip equipped with hooks, grabs the prey and pulls it back to the jaws. Dragon and damsel flies must grow by molting their hard, external nymph shells (external skeletons, really) several times. Finally, in about a year for most species—three years for some—the nymph is ready to begin its metamorphosis into an adult. One night in spring or summer, the dragonfly nymph climbs out of the water onto a stalk of grass. Over a period of several hours it wiggles out of its larval form and emerges as a creature of the air, its wings folded on its back. It begins to dry as blood rushes into the wings and organs, and in about half an hour the dragonfly is airborne. Between its maiden flight and death, the dragonfly has about eight weeks to fulfill its chief purpose: mating and reproduction. It is well prepared to survive, with two pairs of wings, each controlled separately, enabling it to swoop, hover, rise and dive rapidly. Wings beat 25 to 40 times per second and it can fly up to 60 miles per hour when it spies an especially juicy meal. The dragonfly’s head is almost all eyes and revolves on its thorax to see in all directions up to 120 feet. Its six bristly legs form a basket for carrying prey for the dragonfly to eat in midair. €

Discover more fascinating facts about North Carolina’s aquatic environments and inhabitants by visiting the aquarium in Pine Knoll Shores. Call 1-800-832-FISH for more information. 40 CAROLINA SALT August–October 2021 » CarolinaSalt.com


EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA

SUMMER EDUCATIONAL CHALLENGE

Travel through history with North Carolina museums NC MARITIME MUSEUM BEAUFORT

NC MARITIME MUSEUM SOUTHPORT

GRAVEYARD OF THE ATLANTIC

MOUNTAIN GATEWAY MUSEUM

MUSEUM OF THE CAPE FEAR

NC MUSEUM OF HISTORY

MUSEUM OF THE ALBEMARLE

T

he North Carolina History Museums have joined together to create a fun-filled family adventure across the state and away from computer screens. And the North Carolina Maritime Museums are included in the stops. The “Skip the Screen” initiative starts at ncmuseumofhistory.org/skip-the-screen. From there, you will get all the information and tools needed to explore and connect with family-friendly opportunities during July and August in one of three specific ways: Time Travel Ticket, Read through History and History Anywhere, Anytime. Travel across the state and use the Time Travel Ticket to earn some rewards. To participate, print off a ticket or pick one up at participating museums: North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort, North Carolina Maritime Museum at Southport, Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in Hatteras, Mountain Gateway Museum in Old Forks, Museum of the Cape Fear in Fayetteville, North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh and Museum of the Albemarle in Elizabeth City. When you visit a listed museum, complete the activity provided and collect the rewards. One museum visit and completed activity wins a small souvenir, two different museums can win you a souvenir and a museum store discount on one item, and three or more visits to different museums win a souvenir and a museum store discount on your total purchase. Please note that discounts, which must be used on the day of the visit, are not applicable at the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum store in Hatteras. One discount is allowed per family, and some exclusions on items and restrictions may apply. If you travel to the different museums or prefer to stay closer to home, Read through History invites visitors to open a book and explore North Carolina culture, stories and history. The list of books, many of which are available at our museum gift shops, includes titles appropriate for readers of all ages. If traveling isn’t in your summer plans, take a journey whenever you want with History Anywhere, Anytime. Discover how you can go on a journey—in your home, across town, or on the road—with the following activities: Hands-on History, Treasure Hunt, Artifact or Arti-Fiction?, Bake-Off/Cookout, and No Plugs, No Batteries. So no matter how you explore this summer, there’s a bit of North Carolina history waiting to be discovered. About the N.C. Maritime Museums The North Carolina Maritime Museum system is comprised of the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in Hatteras, the North Carolina Maritime Museum at Beaufort and the North Carolina Maritime Museum at Southport. All three museums are part of the Division of State History Museums in the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. The system website is www.ncmaritimemuseums. com. About the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources The N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (NCDNCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state’s natural and cultural resources to build the social, cultural, educational and economic future of North Carolina. NCDNCR’s mission is to improve the quality of life in our state by creating opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history, libraries and nature in North Carolina by stimulating learning, inspiring creativity, preserving the state’s history, conserving the state’s natural heritage, encouraging recreation and cultural tourism, and promoting economic development. NCDNCR includes 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, two science museums, three aquariums and Jennette’s Pier, 39 state parks and recreation areas, the N.C. Zoo, the nation’s first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the State Archives, the N.C. Arts Council, State Preservation Office and the Office of State Archaeology, along with the Division of Land and Water Stewardship. For more information, call 919-807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov. €

CarolinaSalt.com » August–October 2021 CAROLINA SALT 41


A MOMENT OF REFLECTION

PAUL ORTIZ

LOOK AT THE REAL DEAL AN ISLAND CHURCH PERSPECTIVE

O

ver the course of the last many years, the outcry against God and Christianity has become louder and louder. There is a great rebellion against the God of the universe. A lot of this discord may have to do with the poor representation of Christ that is seen by those that claim His name, but do not grab hold of His godly traits and nature. And there is the time that we live in. Hundreds of Biblical prophecies have already come to pass already. However, the Bible spells out so much about the times we are living in: “But you, beloved, ought to remember the words that were spoken beforehand by the apostles of our Lord Jesus Christ, 18 that they were saying to you, “In the last time there will be mockers, following after their own ungodly lusts” JUDE 17-18. Of course, we could generalize that passage, but that is one of many. But the point is, this is very attitude of the world we live in. “But understand this, that in the last days there will come times of difficulty. For people will be lovers of self, lovers of money, proud, arrogant, abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy, heartless, unappeasable, slanderous, without self-control, brutal, not loving good, treacherous, reckless, swollen with conceit, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God, having the appearance of godliness, but denying its power” 2 TIMOTHY 3:1-4. My intention is not to incite fear, but rather to enlighten against an ignorance that has overtaken the attitude of the world. “Do not be deceived: God is not mocked, for whatever one sows, that will he also reap. 8 For the one who sows to his own flesh will from the flesh reap corruption, but the one who sows to the Spirit will from the Spirit reap eternal life. 9 And let us not grow weary of doing good, for in due season we will reap, if we do not give up” GALATIANS 6:7-9. What is so wonderful about all of this, is that there is a great hope and there is no reason to live fearfully. Fear is what is found when we are not in right relationship with God. Evidence of that is all around us. The world is on fire and fear runs rampant. Without the hope of Christ, this is what is left. A world looking to its own devices for salvation from all the ails that come against it. In referring to Christ Jesus “…salvation is found in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given to mankind by which we must be saved” ACTS 4:12. Now for those that dismiss the God of the universe I have a challenge for you. First of all, if you dismiss and speak against the God of the universe based only on what you have experienced or seen from mere man who claims His name, I would like to offer a challenge. In fact I would implore you to instead look to God and not those that claim they are Christian. For too many Christians, their walk with God is based on another man. How is that person walking with God? Where do they go to worship? What did they do? Christians should base their relationship with God on Christ. “Whoever says he abides in him ought to walk in the same way in which he (Jesus Christ) walked” 1 JOHN 2:6. In schools and universities, I have seen and heard such disdain for Christians and conservative. Often the disdain is more against the representation rather than the represented. God is rarely mentioned, and the argument is more against those claiming His name. Which begs the question, what kind of representatives of God have we been? If you have disdain toward God, is it because of what another person did? Is it because of what someone else said or told you about God? Is it because you have simply not searched for God on your own? I would challenge you to look for yourself. Search the Bible! Ask the God of the universe to reveal Himself to you! Look to Christ who “is the radiance of the glory of God and the exact imprint of His nature, and He upholds the universe by the Word of His power” HEBREWS 1:3. Stop looking at mere man who is simply a poor representation. “The times of ignorance God overlooked, but now He commands all people everywhere to repent, because He has fixed a day on which He will judge the world in righteousness by a man whom He has appointed; and of this He has given assurance to all by raising Him from the dead.” ACTS 17:30-31. €

42 CAROLINA SALT August–October 2021 » CarolinaSalt.com

THE ISLAND CHURCH PASTOR PAUL ORTIZ

Paul Ortiz is a follower of Jesus Christ, not religion. A husband and father, he is pastor of The Island Church in Emerald Isle. Reach him at paul@TheIslandChurchEI.org


CARTERET COUNTY

LOCAL LANDMARKS

What’s in a name? BY KARA NUNNALLY NORTH CAROLINA MARITIME MUSEUM, BEAUFORT

“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” Maybe you recognize that little snippet from William Shakespeare’s play, Romeo and Juliet. It sparks a unique question: what IS in a name? This past summer, I was an intern at the Maritime Museum in Beaufort and the Beaufort Historical Association. As a native of southern Virginia, Carteret County place names were all new. In my research work at the museum, I had to orient myself by looking at maps ranging from the early 18th century to modern day. John Lawson’s 1709 map of the area really caught my eye. I realized the names of some of the places around here were inconsistent. So, I began to do a little research at local libraries, the Register of Deeds, the UNC-Chapel Hill Documenting the American South collection, and by talking to residents. I started with the state, and then focused on Carteret County. North Carolina. No, it’s not named for Neil Diamond’s hit single “Sweet Caroline,” but in honor of King Charles I (1600-1649), from Carolus which is Latin for Charles. Some say it was in honor of King Charles II (1630-1685), but the Province of Carolina was chartered in 1629, so it must have been for the then present King Charles I. It became North Carolina after the colony split in 1729. Carteret County. Named for both Sir George Carteret, Lord Proprietor and his heir, John Carteret, Earl of Granville. Most would say one or the other, but Sir Carteret was one of the original eight proprietors of Carolina, and the earl was the only heir of said originals not to sell the land back to the crown. Newport, Originally called Bells Corner, the Quakers changed it to Newport in honor of the city in their native state, Rhode Island. Morehead City. (Shepard’s Point until 1861) Named for John Motley Morehead, the 29th governor of North Carolina, in office from 1841-1845. Morehead, “the father of modern North Carolina,” supported public schools and transportation. Morehead bought coastal land for the railway system; thus the namesake in this very location. Gallants Channel. Named for John Galland, an original settler of the area, but the “d” was changed to a “t” and, as seen in other area names, the apostrophe is lost. Beaufort. It was named in honor of Henry Somerset, Duke of Beaufort, and one of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. It was built upon an Native American village, Wareiock, which has been said to mean “Fish Town,” the town’s original name. Harkers Island. Named for Ebenezer Harker who bought the island from Sparrow (Thomas, not Jack) in 1730. It was known as Craney Island until the island was split between Ebenezer and his brothers Zachary and James in 1783, though it was not incorporated until 1957. Core Sound. For the Coree Indians that inhabited this area long before European contact. Little is known about this tribe.

Gloucester. Settled at the turn of the 18th and 19th centuries and named for the town in Massachusetts, which is also named for the English city of Gloucester. Marshallberg. Matthew Marshall, a rural mail carrier, decided to name it after himself in the early 1800s. One favorite name from long ago was Promontorium Tremendum, a Latin name meaning “horrible headland” or something that fearfully juts out. That’s the modern day Cape Lookout. To me, it sounds like a spell from Harry Potter. But one place has intrigued me more than the others: Bogue. It has banks, a sound, and an inlet: it’s a pretty big deal. But where does it come from? Immediately, I thought a person. Or something French. Yet there was no solid answer in my research. When I first came across the name, there was speculation that it was a Choctaw word that refers to a water passage. That made sense for the inlet. Or maybe a Spanish term that was used for navigational purposes meaning to lay leeward, or side opposite the wind; that makes sense for the banks and especially since they visited (more like raided) the area frequently. One source said it was named for Josiah Bogue, who settled the area in the early 1700s, but I found out that he was born in Perquimans County in 1704 or 1705. The map by Lawson named it Bogue in 1709; clearly, this couldn’t have been named after some child that was not even in the area. I was stumped. So, I went to the County Register of Deeds to see if Bogue could have somehow owned land near the area or something. Still nothing. It was like he never existed anywhere near Carteret County and more specifically the banks. I had to find something on the family. Luckily, Hardy Zachary Bogue did a family history in 1986, and it was in the Beaufort library. Hardy also did not know why nor how Bogue Banks, Sound, and Inlet got their names. He explored all the options as well, including the possibility of a Robert Bogue that went missing from Perquimans in 1690, and possibly could have been in the area when Lawson mapped it. The answer: there is no answer. However, the mystery of it strengthens my curiosity and appreciation of the little that is still unknown in a world that seems to have an answer for everything. So “what’s in a name” you ask, Shakespeare? History, stories, hardship, love, loyalty, mystery; these banks that we find ourselves on today have lured people here for hundreds of years. They have an essence that is found nowhere else in this world. They hold secrets and taunt us with their wisdom. That, my friends, is what is in a name. € CarolinaSalt.com » August–October 2021 CAROLINA SALT 43


DISCOVERY DIVING

LEE MOORE

DIVING OUR COAST W H A T ’ S U N D E R W A T E R I N FA L L

O

ctober is going to see the water temperatures in the mid to upper 70s on the offshore and inshore wrecks. Game fish will still be on the wrecks, as well as the tropical fish. The diversity of marine life in combination with the wrecks are what draw divers from around the world to the Crystal Coast. The air temperatures in October are beginning to get cooler and some divers are ending their dive season, but other divers are switching to thicker wetsuits to continue to enjoy the wrecks off of the Crystal Coast.

GEAR FOR COOLER WATERS During the summer months, most divers wear a 3mm wetsuit. This provides protection from the wrecks and provides warmth without overheating the diver. Even though the water in the summer is around 80 degrees, a diver can still can get chilly if they are in there long enough. As the water begins to cool off, most divers will begin wearing 5mm wetsuits. These are slightly thicker than the 3mm wetsuits worn in the summer, and provide more warmth for the diver. The 5mm wetsuits can be worn in water as cold as 60 degrees. When divers begin wearing thicker wetsuits, they also need to start wearing hoods and thicker gloves. The gloves can range from 3mm to 5mm. Thicker gloves provide more warmth, but they also restrict movement. Hoods also come in different thicknesses. Some hoods are made of thin materials like thermoprene but are able to keep the diver’s head warm. Other hoods are made of the standard neoprene and come in 3mm and 5mm thicknesses. Hoods also come in different lengths. Some are long and have a bib that covers the diver’s neck and covers the ‘upper chest, while other hoods just come down to cover the neck. There are also some that are called skull caps that cover the head and have a chin strap. These are for divers that do not like anything on their neck. When the water gets below 60 degrees, divers will wear a 7mm wetsuit or a drysuit. A drysuit doesn’t keep you warm; it keeps you dry. The clothes that you wear under the drysuit keep you warm. Drysuits are made out of three different materials: neoprene, trilaminate/laminate, and vulcanized rubber. The neoprene drysuits fit more like a wetsuit, but you can still wear clothes underneath to stay warm. Trilaminate/laminate drysuits are lightweight and allow the diver to move easier than the other two types of drysuits. This type of drysuits doesn’t fit the diver as tightly as the neoprene drysuit. Since this type of drysuit is thinner, it requires the diver to wear thicker clothes underneath to stay warm. The last type is the vulcanized rubber drysuit; which is used for commercial diving. It is heavy duty rubber that gives the diver limited movement. Like the trilaminate/laminate drysuits, it requires the diver to wear thicker clothes underneath to stay warm. When the air and the water begin to cool off, the diving does not have to stop when you wear the proper suit and accessories. If you want to learn how to dive in a drysuit or want to go diving in the fall and winter months, contact Discovery Diving at dive@discoverydiving.com, 252-7282265, or like us on Facebook to see what classes and events are coming up in the near future. €

44 CAROLINA SALT August–October 2021 » CarolinaSalt.com

JOIN DISCOVERY CONTACT

Discovery Diving at 252-728-2265 or visit them on Facebook to see what classes and events are coming up. You can also visit them online at discoverydiving.com.

JOIN ECARA ECARA

works to continue sinking ships to create artificial reefs here in North Carolina, but their resources are limited. To get involved, visit carolinareef.org.


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Profile for Will Ashby

Carolina Salt August – October 2021  

Your Life On the Crystal Coast

Carolina Salt August – October 2021  

Your Life On the Crystal Coast

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