Carolina Salt Issue No. 2 | 2022

Page 1

FREE! ISSUE NO. 2 | 2022

local fun

THINGS TO DO on the crystal coast wildlife shelter

SUPERSIZE SQUIRRELS

your life on the Crystal Coast safety brief

SEE THE LIGHT, MOVE TO THE RIGHT emergency vehicles

all about our fox squirrels

local lore

WHAT’S IN A NAME?

local products

HAVE YOU SEEN THE VEGGIE VAN?

REBECCA’S CORNER | ASK THE AQUARIUM | A MOMENT OF REFLECTION



FOL LOW U S ON S O C I A L M E DI A FOR EV E N TS & DA I LY S PEC I A L S

A casual island eatery with a touch of class.

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SEAFOOD ♥ STEAKS ♥ SANDWICHES 311 Mangrove Drive Across from CVS in Emerald Isle 252.354.7775 • facebook.com/flipperzemeraldisle



I SSU E N O. 2 | 2 0 2 2

Inside This Issue your life on the Crystal Coast

12

Big, Beautiful Fox Squirrels Most people are very familiar Eastern gray squirrels and the tiny Southern flying squirrels. But the supersized squirrel, the fox squirrel is rarely sighted.

13

40

The lineup of the Alive at Five concert series has been announced! The free, family-friendly music series is at Jaycee Park, 807 Shepard Street, from 5 to 8 p.m., on the waterfront in downtown Morehead City.

SAFETY BRIEFING:

See the Light, Move to the Right

15

Have You Seen the Veggie Van?

18

What’s In A Name?

16

Things To Do In Swansboro

FREE!

ISSUE NO.

2 | 2022

t stal Coas on the Cry your life f safety brie

E SEE THO M VE LIGHT,TH E TO T H RIG vehicles

local fun

THINGS DO TO coast the crystal on

wildlife

IZE SUPERS LS UIRfoxRE SQ squirrels all about our

ucts

local prod

local lore

WHAT’S IN A NAME? ’S CORNER REBECCA

Summer 2022

ON THIS MONTH’S COVER

emergency

shelter

| ASK THE

U HAVE YO E SEEN TH VAN? VEGGIE M| AQUARIU

A MOMENT

ECTION

OF REFL

Alive At Five Concert Series

Summer is here, and the water is perfect along the beaches of the Crystal Coast. Visitors, take advantage of all the fun seaside activities that are on offer out there this year!

Carteret Local Food Network finds locations in Carteret County to provide a place for their Veggie Van Mobile Market to set up. The Veggie Van is open to the public and accepts cash, credit, debit and SNAP/EBT. . A deeper look into some of the odd origins of some Carteret County place names. Swansboro, also known as “The Friendly City by the Sea,” lives up to the nickname with its friendly, laidback atmosphere and water activities like kayaking, boating and fishing.

40 See the Light, Move To the Right It’s a simple prompt that will help you remember Read on for ten common sense steps to follow when you see oncoming emergency vehicles. 13 ALIVE AT FIVE Morehead City concert series lineup announced

14 ASK THE AQUARIUM Are dragonflies dangerous to people?

LOCAL INTEREST

Things To Do................................................ 8 Ask The Aquarium: Dragonflies...................... 14 A Moment of Reflection............................... 42 Diving Our Coast.. ....................................... 44

CarolinaSalt.com » ISSUE No. 2 | 2022 CAROLINA SALT 5


on THE beaufort waterfront PUBLISHER

WILL ASHBY C R E AT I V E D I R E C TO R

C H E V Y K AY LO R B E C O M E A C O N T R I BU TO R

Submit your letters to the editor, photos, community listings and articles to will@carolinasalt.com. The editorial deadline for the next issue is October 16. The next issue publishes November 7.

B E C O M E A N A DV E RT I S E R

Carolina Salt is a great way to reach out to your local customers, as well as our seasonal visitors.

252-723-7628

AT FRONT STREET TACO, WE HONOR MEXICAN CUISINE AND HOPE TO HELP YOU EXPAND YOUR CONCEPT OF WHAT MEXICAN FOOD REALLY IS. WE INVITE YOU TO ENJOY OUR MEXICAN SPECIALTIES CREATED WITH AN EMPHASIS ON AUTHENTIC PREPARATION AND FRESH INGREDIENTS.

300 FRONT STREET BEAUFORT

252.777.taco

300 FRONT STREET = BEAUFORT, nc

252.777.taco (8226)

Call us to find out how we can help you grow your local business. FROM THE PUBLISHER

Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt magazine, all about our life here on the Crystal Coast. Our articles are written by locals. Every month we look to our readers to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote or an interesting local photograph, send them our way. Participation is welcomed and appreciated. Reader contributions are the founding principle of the magazine. If you like what you see, tell people about it— especially our advertisers. For questions, concerns or more information, send e-mail to will@carolinasalt.com or call 252-723-7628. For up-to-date info, be sure to look us up on Facebook!

WE DEPEND ON OUR READERS! Call 252-723-7628 if you’re interested in submitting an article or photo. Our local content is what keeps our magazine fresh and relevant. PUBLISHED BY CRYSTAL COAST OUTDOORS PUBLICATIONS P.O. Box 572, Morehead City, NC 28557 | 252-723-7628



THINGS TO DO

JULY AT THE BEAUFORT MARITIME MUSEUM Call 252-504-7758 or visit ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com for more information or to register. JULY 18–19 | 9AM–NOON

Boats + Models

Students entering grades 3 and 4 will build a model of a sportfishing boat at the museum’s Watercraft Center. Museum exhibits and field trips will demonstrate the boats used for offshore charter fishing and some of the fish targeted by fishermen aboard these uniquely designed vessels. Cost is $90 per child. Advance registration is required. JULY 18–20 | 9AM–2PM

Coastal Adventures

Students entering grades 7 through 10 will examine environmental conservation issues relevant to our region, such as marine debris and protected species. Through field observations and data gathering at local nature preserves, students will learn how scientists and natural resource managers deal with conservation challenges. Cost is $120 per child. Advance registration is required. JULY 21 | 1PM ✪

Maritime Matinee: ‘Wild Caught’

Join us in the museum auditorium at 1 p.m. on July 21 for a free showing of “Wild Caught: The Life and Struggles of an American Fishing Town,” which chronicles commercial fishermen in the nearby town of Sneads Ferry and their struggles in the industry. Films selected in the Maritime Matinee series engage visitors on topics of maritime history, culture and the natural environment of coastal North Carolina. Free, no registration required. JULY 22 | 6PM

15th Annual Crab Cake Cookoff

Taste delicious crab cakes made by four volunteer guest chefs and vote on your favorite at this museum fundraiser at the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center. The event also has a slaw taste-off. Space is limited at this ticketed event. For information or tickets, call 252-728-1638 or visit maritimefriends.org. JULY 26 | 9AM–NOON

Exploring Coastal Habitats

Discover the various plants and animals of the salt marsh and tidal flats at the Rachel Carson Reserve. A guided hike will take you through the different habitats found on Town Marsh and Bird Shoal. The terrain will be sandy, muddy and wet. $20. Under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Pre-registration 8

✪ = FREE

SUMMERTIME, SUMMERTIME, SWEET SWEET SUMMERTIME

required by noon day prior. JULY 28–29 | 9AM–NOON

Pirates!

Students entering grades 1 and 2 will work with their fearless captain to learn how pirates like Blackbeard lived. The pirate crew will set the rules of the ship and go on a pirate worthy hunt through the museum to locate hidden treasure. Cost is $90 per child. Advance registration is required. .

AUGUST AT THE BEAUFORT MARITIME MUSEUM Call 252-504-7758 or visit ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com for more information or to register. AUGUST 3–5 | 9AM–NOON

Seashore Life II

Students entering grades 5 and 6 will investigate estuarine habitats, plants and animals through field and lab studies. This three-day course includes a field trip to the Rachel Carson National Estuarine Research Reserve, water quality testing, plankton identification and many more activities. Advance registration required. Cost is $120 per child. Advance registration is required. AUGUST 5 | 8AM–2PM

Traditional Skiff Rally

Each year during the museum’s August traditional skiff sailing event, boaters race around the islands for the Shanghai Trophy. Event organized by the Traditional Small Craft Association, FoM Chapter. For information, call 252-728-2762. AUGUST 10 | 9–10AM

Merry Time for Tots Summer Science School

Children entering preschool are invited to learn a bit about our marine environment during Merry Time for Tots Summer Science School. The program includes a story, estuarine critter observation and a related craft. Cost is $5 per child. Advance registration is required. AUGUST 11 AND 20 | 9:30AM–4:30PM

Boat in a Day Class

Each participating team assembles a prepared kit for a small flat-bottomed plywood boat suitable for paddling in this course, held in the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort’s Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center. The boat is 12' long, 32" wide and weighs about 40 lbs. Each boat will be completed to a watertight condition and ready to take home for paint or varnish. Teams are limited to a maximum of 4 persons, at least one of whom must be an adult. Minimum age is 8 years old. Course fee is $630 ($567 for Friends of the Museum). Course size is limited and advance registration is required.

CAROLINA SALT ISSUE No. 2 | 2022 » CarolinaSalt.com

AUGUST 11 | 9AM

Ocean Infants

The program, designed for infants (0–2 years) and their caregivers, involves maritime items such as whale bones, shark teeth and pirate hats! This program, offered every second Thursday, is designed to give the caregiver and infant the chance to bond, learn and socialize. Pre-registration required; $5 per participating child (Friends of the Museum members $2). AUGUST 11 | 1PM ✪

Maritime Matinee: ‘The Carolina Brogue’

Join us in the museum auditorium at 1 p.m. on August 11 for a showing of “The Carolina Brogue,” which documents the language and life of the North Carolina Outer Banks. Films selected in the Maritime Matinee series engage visitors on topics of maritime history, culture and the natural environment of coastal North Carolina. Free, no registration required. AUGUST 17 | 8:30AM–12:30PM

Hiking and History On Shackleford Banks

Experience Outer Banks history and wildlife with a guided hike on Shackleford Banks, part of the Cape Lookout National Seashore. Participants will take a ferry to an undeveloped barrier island. This field trip requires hiking through sandy terrain for long distances. $30. Under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Pre-registration required by noon day prior. AUGUST 23 | 9AM–NOON

Exploring Coastal Habitats

Discover the various plants and animals of the salt marsh and tidal flats at the Rachel Carson Reserve. A guided hike will take you through the different habitats found on Town Marsh and Bird Shoal. The terrain will be sandy, muddy and wet. $20. Under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Pre-registration required by noon day prior. AUGUST 30 | 9AM–NOON

Kayak the Salt Marsh

Learn about the benefits of salt marshes while on the water. Basic kayak instruction and safety lessons on shore are followed by a two-mile paddle through the salt marsh. Under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Participants must know how to swim; some kayak experience is recommended. $35 ($25 with own kayak). Preregistration required by noon day prior. SEPTEMBER

SEPTEMBER AT THE BEAUFORT MARITIME MUSEUM Call 252-504-7758 or visit ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com for more information or to register.


✪ = FREE SEPTEMBER 7 | 8:30AM–12:30PM

Hiking and History On Shackleford Banks

Experience Outer Banks history and wildlife with a guided hike on Shackleford Banks, part of the Cape Lookout National Seashore. Participants will take a ferry to an undeveloped barrier island. This field trip requires hiking through sandy terrain for long distances. $30. Under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Pre-registration required by noon day prior. SEPTEMBER 8 | 9AM

Ocean Infants

The program, designed for infants (0–2 years) and their caregivers, involves maritime items such as whale bones, shark teeth and pirate hats! This program, offered every second Thursday, is designed to give the caregiver and infant the chance to bond, learn and socialize. Pre-registration required; $5 per participating child (Friends of the Museum members $2). SEPTEMBER 10–11 | 9AM–4:30PM

Introduction to Wooden Boat Building

Explore the art of boat building from start to finish during a two-day, hands-on course at the North Carolina Maritime Museum’s Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center. The course begins with the design and lofting of boats and moves on to the setup, steam bending and different methods of creating the backbone of small boats. Additional topics include how to make planking systems, both carvel and lap strake and all the appropriate fastening systems. By the end of the course, students will have the knowledge and skill to choose a design and style of boat to build on their own and the confidence to take on the job. Course fee is $ 180 ($162 for Friends of the Museum). Course size is limited and advance registration is required. SEPTEMBER 13 + SEPTEMBER 28 | 9AM–NOON

Kayak the Salt Marsh

Learn about the benefits of salt marshes while on the water. Basic kayak instruction and safety lessons on shore are followed by a two-mile paddle through the salt marsh. Under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Participants must know how to swim; some kayak experience is recommended. $35 ($25 with own kayak). Preregistration required by noon day prior. SEPTEMBER 14 | 10AM

Merry-Time for Tots

Preschoolers (ages 2–5) and their caregivers participate in a maritime themed hands-on experience, craft and activity. Topics rotate between pirates, sharks, whales and fish with a focus on both experience and exposure. Each program is 45-60 minutes long. Caregivers are asked to stay for entire program, which

SUMMERTIME, SUMMERTIME, SWEET SWEET SUMMERTIME

is offered every second Wednesday. Preregistration required; $10 per participating child (Friends of the Museum members $5). SEPTEMBER 22 | 9AM–NOON

Exploring Coastal Habitats

THINGS TO DO

information, call 252-728-2762. OCTOBER 5 | 8:30AM–12:30PM

Hiking and History on Shackleford Banks

Discover the various plants and animals of the salt marsh and tidal flats at the Rachel Carson Reserve. A guided hike will take you through the different habitats found on Town Marsh and Bird Shoal. The terrain will be sandy, muddy and wet. $20. Under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Pre-registration required by noon day prior.

Experience Outer Banks history and wildlife with a guided hike on Shackleford Banks, part of the Cape Lookout National Seashore. Participants will take a ferry to an undeveloped barrier island. This field trip requires hiking through sandy terrain for long distances. $30. Under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Pre-registration required by noon day prior.

SEPTEMBER 24 | 2PM ✪

SELECT DATES | 11AM ✪

Maritime Heritage Series

Carolina Maritime Model Society Meeting

The Carolina Maritime Model Society exists to promote the production of high-quality ship models and encourage members and the public to participate in a craft that is as old as shipbuilding itself. Meetings, which are open to the public, are held in the museum auditorium. SELECT DATES | 11AM ✪

Maritime Heritage Series

Come learn about North Carolina’s rich maritime history, coastal environment and culture at these informal lectures. Specific topics are listed in the “Calendar at a Glance” under “MHS” and on the museum website. Free, no registration required. Attend in person in the museum auditorium or watch online via the museum’s Facebook page or Zoom. Sign up for Zoom at ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com/ sign-up-for-virtual-programs/. September 29......................Would You Like a Tums? Acid–Base chemistry is fundamental to understanding archaeological conservation, both in terms of why some things deteriorate while others are preserved when buried in the ground and in terms of why conservators choose the materials and treatments that they do. Join museum conservator Michelle Crepeau as she explores how conservators interpret, react to and manipulate acid-base chemistry to their advantage.

OCTOBER AT THE BEAUFORT MARITIME MUSEUM Call 252-504-7758 or visit ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com for more information or to register. OCTOBER 2 | 8AM–2PM

31st Annual North Carolina Seafood Festival Rally

Traditional skiffs sail prior to the festival’s Blessing of the Fleet. Launch/rig from the Watercraft Center; sail from Beaufort to the Morehead City waterfront; and enjoy shrimp burgers at 11 a.m. Sail/race to Beaufort starts at noon. Organized by the Traditional Small Craft Association, FoM Chapter. For

Come learn about North Carolina’s rich maritime history, coastal environment and culture at these informal lectures. Specific topics are listed in the “Calendar at a Glance” under “MHS” and on the museum website. Free, no registration required. Attend in person in the museum auditorium or watch online via the museum’s Facebook page or Zoom. Sign up for Zoom at ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com/ sign-up-for-virtual-programs/. October 6................North Carolina’s Mullet Fishery David Bennett, Curator of Maritime History, will examine the history of the mullet fishery in North Carolina. During the 19th century, North Carolina’s mullet fishery was one of the largest saltwater fisheries in the South and it continued to be a popular fishery into the 20th century. It was a staple of the diet for many in North Carolina and in the South. This talk explores North Carolina’s historic mullet fishery. October 13...... Our Sperm Whale Skeleton “Echo” Museum Natural Science Curator Keith Rittmaster will present on “Echo,” the Museum’s 33½-foot-long sperm whale skeleton. When the adolescent whale came ashore at Cape Lookout in 2004, his bones and heart were preserved for study and display. Keith will cover the step-by-step process of retrieving, preserving and displaying the specimen that now resides in the museum gallery. October 19. North Carolina’s Outer Barrier Islands Most of our Countries eastern seaboard and Gulf states are lined with coastal barrier islands, but none so unique as the famed Outer Banks of North Carolina. The fascinating cultural history, fragile geologic nature and diverse flora and fauna, attract and fascinate millions of people every year. Associate Museum Curator Benjamin Wunderly will examine these remarkable sand islands through maps and images to reveal the natural and cultural history of the remarkable coastline. October 31....................... Maritime Myths + Legends Happy Halloween! Join Associate Museum Curator Christine Brin to learn about some of the most popular maritime myths, legends and ghost stories in this special Halloween presentation. Christine will also discuss the history and possible origins of each story.

CarolinaSalt.com » ISSUE No. 2 | 2022 CAROLINA SALT 9


THINGS TO DO

✪ = FREE

SUMMERTIME, SUMMERTIME, SWEET SWEET SUMMERTIME

OCTOBER 12 | 10AM

Merry-Time for Tots

Preschoolers (ages 2-5) and their caregivers participate in a maritime themed hands-on experience, craft and activity. Topics rotate between pirates, sharks, whales and fish with a focus on both experience and exposure. Each program is 45-60 minutes long. Caregivers are asked to stay for entire program, which is offered every second Wednesday. Preregistration required; $10 per participating child (Friends of the Museum members $5). OCTOBER 13 | 9AM

for candy from approved vendors. Free; preregistration required for “trunks.”

Rock, Top 40, Motown and all the standards that crowds love.

OCTOBER 28 | 6-8PM

FRIDAY, AUGUST 26 | 5PM–8PM ✪

Trail of Terror

The Film Club from East Carteret High School and the staff of the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort partner to create a spooky haunted hayride at the Museum’s Gallants Channel property. As the night gets darker, the ride gets spookier. Cost is $5 per rider; children under 8 are free. Proceeds benefit the ECHS Film Club and the museum.

Ocean Infants

The program, designed for infants (0-2 years) and their caregivers, involves maritime items such as whale bones, shark teeth and pirate hats! This program, offered every second Thursday, is designed to give the caregiver and infant the chance to bond, learn and socialize. Pre-registration required; $5 per participating child (Friends of the Museum members $2).

The Night Years nine-piece band features two dynamic lead vocalists on the frontline and a backline of international musicians and entertainers, including a three-piece horn section and multiple backup vocalists. That, combined with a multi-decade range of music, state-of-the-art light show and studio-quality live sound, is a guaranteed recipe for the ultimate dance party! THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 | 5PM–8PM ✪

Band of Oz

The Band of Oz was formed in 1967 as a part-time band playing fraternity parties and high school proms all over the South. In 1977, the band went on the road full time and since then it has made a big name for itself throughout the Southeast, playing top clubs and corporate parties. For several years, the band has participated in major beach concerts in the Carolinas, Virginia and Georgia. The band features a full horn section and a dynamic group of entertainers. They have a huge following of beach music lovers!

OCTOBER 15 | 1PM–4PM ✪

Fall In-The-Water Meet

Traditional Small Craft Association hosts this gathering at the Gallants Channel docks. All small boats are welcome. Free boat rides for the public. Pig Pickin’ included with ticket. For information, call 252-728-2762.

ALIVE AT FIVE CONCERT SERIES 2022

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13 | 5PM–8PM ✪

At Jaycee Park, 807 Shepard Street, Morehead City, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the waterfront.

OCTOBER 22 | 2PM ✪

Carolina Maritime Model Society Meeting

The Carolina Maritime Model Society exists to promote the production of high-quality ship models and encourage members and the public to participate in a craft that is as old as shipbuilding itself. Meetings, which are open to the public, are held in the museum auditorium. OCTOBER 28 | 4 – 7PM ✪

Boo-fort Trunk or Treat

Night Years

Wear your favorite costume and cruise between different ports (trunks) to gather treats or play tricks on those who are unprepared! This event will be held at the museum in a traditional trunk or treat atmosphere where participants walk through a safely lit area and trick or treat

The Embers Featuring Craig Woolard

FRIDAY, JULY 22 | 5PM–8PM ✪

Liquid Pleasure

The six-man Liquid Pleasure Band have been playing for more than 20 years, touring with national acts like Hootie and the Blowfish and REM. Other notable bands Liquid Pleasure has paired with include Chuck Berry, Whitney Houston, the Temptations and Aretha Franklin. Liquid Pleasure has performed at high-profile events, including the Inaugural Ball for both Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush and for professional sports teams, including the Ravens, Panthers and the Hornets. Liquid Pleasure will get you dancing with their extensive song list encompassing Beach Music,

AT FRONT STREET TACO, WE HONOR MEXICAN CUISINE AND HOPE TO HELP YOU EXPAND YOUR CONCEPT OF WHAT MEXICAN FOOD REALLY IS. WE INVITE YOU TO ENJOY OUR MEXICAN SPECIALTIES CREATED WITH AN EMPHASIS ON AUTHENTIC PREPARATION AND FRESH INGREDIENTS. 10 CAROLINA SALT ISSUE No. 2 | 2022 » CarolinaSalt.com

This musical institution has left their mark on listeners with numerous albums and single releases spanning decades. Having been inducted into the SC Rhythm and Blues Hall of Fame and the SC Beach Music Hall of Fame, The Embers are honored to carry the moniker of North Carolina’s Official Ambassadors of Music. In 2007 and 2008, The Embers traveled throughout South Korea to perform “Christmas with the Embers” on American military bases for America’s troops and were awarded Military Coins of Excellence for their distinguished service. They will put joy in your step, love in your heart and beach music in your soul! €

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POSSUMWOOD ACRES WILDLIFE SANCTUARY LINDA BERGMAN–ALTHOUSE

Big, Beautiful Fox Squirrels!

M

ost people are very familiar with fast and furious Eastern gray squirrels that visit our yards daily and the tiny gliders, Southern flying squirrels, who rid our night skies of pesky insects. But the supersized version of squirrel, the fox squirrel, although present in our state, is rarely sighted unless you are lucky enough to live where a population resides or visit somewhere they call home. The fox squirrel is the largest tree squirrel in North Carolina, twice the size of our common gray. Including the tail, which is half their length, fox squirrels can measure from 20 to 30 inches long (about as long as the average house cat). Despite their length, fox squirrels weigh only two to three pounds—the same as a bunch of bananas or as many as three gray squirrels! I guess I’ve got my point across … they are big! There are 12 subspecies of fox squirrels. Three or four of those species, identified by size and beautiful multi-colors, fall into the category of “Southeastern fox squirrel” and are known to live in Eastern North Carolina. Some are grayish with various patches of black on the head and feet and white patches on the nose, paws and ear tips or are almost totally black with dark gray patches, while others are reddish brown and cream colored with accents of black, such as Watson. Oh! Let me introduce you to a famous and rather handsome fox squirrel, Watson, who has lived at Possumwood Acres Wildlife Sanctuary in Hubert, North Carolina, since 2017. His story is one of resilience, staying strong and rising above the tragic circumstance life dealt him as a youngster. New to the world in 2017, Watson had just begun his squirrel journey in the town of Grifton, and was as curious and playful as any young squirrel could be when his

path crossed with a dog and unfortunately, he was severely injured. Good-intentioned humans did manage to rescue him from jaws that could very well have ended his life. But the rescuers kept him and tried to treat his badly mangled paw themselves. That wait for proper medical attention was too long—a nasty, life-threatening gangrenous infection developed. (For this reason, it is imperative to transport all injured wildlife immediately to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator who can administer appropriate medication and provide the treatment necessary for all medical conditions or injuries.) By the time Watson was transported to a wildlife rehabilitator, the only way to save his life was amputation, but that meant he could never be returned to the wild. Watson did lose his left front paw and part of his leg, but during his recovery and recuperation, the wildlife rehabilitator in Grifton observed his fervent will to live and his pleasant disposition. She called Possumwood Acres to talk about placing him as an Education Ambassador and the sanctuary welcomed him with open arms. If the injury had to happen, it was to his advantage that he was so young when it did. He learned to adapt quickly. He deals with his disability so well now that most people don’t immediately realize that he is handicapped or “paw-dicapped.” Watson has been serving as an Education Ambassador for Possumwood for years now and is definitely an example of courage and perseverance that everybody wants to meet! In Onslow County we have military members who have come back from war missing limbs and Watson is a subtle life coach and a comfort to them as well. Watson bestows a lesson of immense value to our visiting war veterans and children: Life is not over because something bad or tragic happens to you! You,

12 CAROLINA SALT ISSUE No. 2 | 2022 » CarolinaSalt.com

too, can adjust and be accepted as you are. Also, it is important to teach children and adults alike that the only reason we have wildlife Education Ambassadors is that they are non-releasable animals who have demonstrated a temperament suitable for education use in a public setting. Care in captivity is a focus for all our education residents, and that includes providing the foods they need and like! Food habits of fox squirrels depend largely on geographic location. They often forage on the ground several feet from the nearest tree stand and will commonly occupy forest edge habitat. They like to store high-fat, shelled foods, such as acorns and nuts, because they are less likely to spoil than non-shelled foods and high energy density. They will also eat fruits and berries on the spot for a well-rounded and nutritionally sound diet. One of the big differences in food preparation and presentation for Watson is how his food is shaped for easy maneuverability in view of his disability. For example, his apple pieces are not cut into chunks like prep for other squirrels at the sanctuary, but in strips like French fries so he can hold one like a popsicle! He has also learned to hold food, such as shelled nuts, between his paw and shoulder for easier consumption! It was amazing to watch him teach himself these tricks to become self-sufficient. He prefers to eat seeds from pinecones but never snubs his nose at nuts and acorns. In the wild, fox squirrels have two types of shelters: leaf nests called dreys and tree dens, and most often they have more than one so they can move their two or three babies from home to home to keep them safe from predators or if damage occurs to a nest. Watson lives in a roomy enclosure with

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14


ALIVE AT FIVE IN MOREHEAD CITY

FUN + FREE

Alive at Five Summer Concert Line-Up Announced Free waterfront concert series returns!

D

owntown Morehead City, Inc., is excited to announce the lineup of the Alive at Five concert series! The free, family-friendly music series fundraiser is hosted at Jaycee Park, 807 Shepard Street, from 5 to 8 p.m., on the waterfront in downtown Morehead City. “Downtown Morehead City, Inc., is thrilled to host this popular concert series for the 2022 season,” said Lisa Rueh, executive director. “Alive at Five has grown to be a staple of downtown over the years. There will be three summer Friday night concerts and two fall Thursday night concerts. It will be great to enjoy time with locals and visitors and showcase all that our downtown area has to offer. Hopes are that after the concert, folks will stay downtown and grab a bite to eat or drink in one of our many restaurants and bars.” The 2022 Alive at Five concert series is sponsored by Moore’s Old Tyme Barbeque and West Town Bank and Mortgage. Beverages are sponsored by Adams Beverage/Landshark. The concerts are hosted by Downtown Morehead City, Inc. and the Town of Morehead City. Downtown business sponsors include Ace Marine Rigging, Atlantic Bay Mortgage—Sherri Smith and Girls with Power Tools, Chalk & Gibbs, Cirila Cothran Real Estate, Dee Gee’s Gifts & Books, Floyd’s 1921 Restaurant, Ginny Gordon’s, Jack’s Waterfront Bar, J. M. Davis Oil, Robby Oakes Mortgage Group and Z&Z Designs. Ice is provided by Twice the Ice and storage is provided by Capps Trailers. FRIDAY, JULY 22 | 5PM–8PM

Liquid Pleasure

The six-man Liquid Pleasure Band have been playing for more than 20 years, touring with national acts like Hootie and the Blowfish and REM. Other notable bands Liquid Pleasure has paired with include Chuck Berry, Whitney Houston, the Temptations and Aretha Franklin. Liquid Pleasure has performed at high-profile events, including the Inaugural Ball for both Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush and for professional sports teams, including the Ravens, Panthers and the Hornets. Liquid Pleasure will get you dancing with their extensive song list encompassing Beach Music, Rock, Top 40, Motown and all the standards that crowds love. FRIDAY, AUGUST 26 | 5PM–8PM

Night Years

The Night Years nine-piece band features two dynamic lead vocalists on the frontline and a backline of international musicians and entertainers, including a three-piece horn section and multiple backup vocalists. That, combined with a multi-decade range of music, state-of-the-art light show

and studio-quality live sound, is a guaranteed recipe for the ultimate dance party! THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 | 5PM–8PM

Band of Oz

The Band of Oz was formed in 1967 as a part-time band playing fraternity parties and high school proms all over the South. In 1977, the band went on the road full time and since then it has made a big name for itself throughout the Southeast, playing top clubs and corporate parties. For several years, the band has participated in major beach concerts in the Carolinas, Virginia and Georgia. The band features a full horn section and a dynamic group of entertainers. They have a huge following of beach music lovers! THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13 | 5PM–8PM

The Embers Featuring Craig Woolard

This musical institution has left their mark on listeners with numerous albums and single releases spanning decades. Having been inducted into the SC Rhythm and Blues Hall of Fame and the SC Beach Music Hall of Fame, The Embers are honored to carry the moniker of North Carolina’s Official Ambassadors of Music. In 2007 and 2008, The Embers traveled throughout South Korea to perform “Christmas with the Embers” on American military bases for America’s troops and were awarded Military Coins of Excellence for their distinguished service. They will put joy in your step, love in your heart and beach music in your soul! €

ON THE MOREHEAD CITY WATERFRONT AT JAYCEE PARK ON THE WATERFRONT FROM 5-8PM

CarolinaSalt.com » ISSUE No. 2 | 2022 CAROLINA SALT 13


ASK the

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12

AQUARIUM My son and I saw a lot of dragonflies near a pond near our home. He asked if dragonflies could hurt you. Can they?

N The adorable, indomitable, one-armed Watson. enrichment provided routinely so he has opportunity to explore, discover and get plenty of exercise. Although fox squirrels are not the speedy scurriers their Eastern gray cousins are, they are impressive jumpers, easily spanning 15 feet in horizontal leaps and free-falling 20 feet or more to a soft landing on a limb or trunk, so Watson needs room to do as much of that as he safely can. In the wild, he would have to be leery of natural predators such as bobcats, foxes, red-tailed hawks, red-shouldered hawks, great horned owls, barred owls and coyotes, but as a resident of Possumwood, we will keep him safe from their threats. Nestlings and young fox squirrels are particularly vulnerable to climbing predators such as raccoons, opossums, snakes and in Watson’s case, dogs, although that attack occurred on the ground. A fox squirrel’s maximum life expectancy is typically 12.6 years for females and 8.6 years for males, but in captivity, fox squirrels have been known to live 18 years, and that is what we plan for Watson— the longest, safest and healthiest life possible. To meet our little man, Watson and learn more about fox squirrels, visit the sanctuary in Hubert at 119 Doe Drive. We offer daily guided tours. €

ABOUT P.A.W.S

POSSUMWOOD ACRES HAS LOTS TO SEE! Wildlife • Friendly Goats • Perky Pigs Elegant Peacocks • Giddy Guineas We offer daily guided tours at the sanctuary, located at 119 Doe Drive in Hubert. For information or to schedule a tour, call 910-326-6432 or email education@possumwoodacres.org. You can also visit possumwoodacres.org to become a sponsor, adopt one of our fabulous education animals or donate to their care and wellbeing.

14 CAROLINA SALT ISSUE No. 2 | 2022 » CarolinaSalt.com

ot unless you’re a small insect or fish—then you’re a potential meal. Dragonflies can’t sting, nor can they sew your ears together, a myth that gave them the nickname “devil’s darning needle.” Dragonflies and damselflies look very much With gorgeous gossamer wings and brilliant alike and both belong colors, dragonflies are a delight to see hovering to the order Odonata. over ponds and streams. Dragonflies are larger than damselflies and fly faster. PHOTO COURTESY OF Dragonflies also hold their EMMETT WESTBROOK FOR THE NC AQUARIUMS wings spread when they alight, unlike the damselfly that folds its wings over its back. Both are ravenous feeders, and the dragonfly nymph is one of the most voracious pond predators. The dragonfly begins life breathing through gills underwater for about a year before it matures and leaves the water for a few glorious weeks of in-flight feeding and mating. Of all the winged insects that flit about a summer pond, the dragonfly is the largest. It’s also the oldest. Huge dragonflies with 2½-foot wingspans were around 300 million years ago. Dragon and damselflies grow by molting their hard, external nymph shells several times. Finally (in about a year for most species, three years for some) the nymph is ready to begin its metamorphosis into an adult. One night in spring or summer, the dragonfly nymph climbs out of the water onto a stalk of grass. Over a period of several hours it wiggles out of its larval form and emerges as a creature of the air, its wings folded on its back. It begins to dry as blood rushes into the wings and organs, and in about half an hour the dragonfly is airborne. Between its maiden flight and death, the dragonfly has about eight weeks to fulfill its chief purpose: mating and reproduction. It is well prepared to survive, with two pairs of wings. It can fly up to 60 miles per hour when it spies an especially juicy meal. The dragonfly’s head is almost all eyes and revolves on its thorax to see in all directions up to 120 feet. Its six bristly legs form a basket for carrying prey for the dragonfly to eat in midair. €

ABOUT THE AQUARIUM

Information provided by the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores. The facilities are designed to inspire appreciation and conservation of North Carolina’s aquatic environments. For more information, log onto ncaquariums.com, or call 1-800-832-FISH.


Have You Seen the Veggie Van?

C

arteret Local Food Network (CLFN) is a 501(c)(3) educational nonprofit organization with the goal of strengthening your relationship with your local farmers. CLFN partners with host locations to provide a place for their Veggie Van Mobile Market to set up within many different communities in Carteret County, such as the Broad Street Clinic, Muttigan’s in Emerald Isle, the Aquarium in Pine Knoll Shores, Mill Creek Feed and Finds and Beau Coast, to name a few. The Veggie Van is open to the public and accepts cash, credit, debit and SNAP/ EBT and offers a variety of incentives for their customers. Check out their website at carteretlocalfoodnetwork.org to stay up to date on Mobile Market locations or follow them on social media.

FARM-TO-TABLE DINNERS CLFN is also planning several Farms, Food and Friends farm-totable style dinners at locations throughout Carteret County this season. The dinner on June 18 was hosted by The Market at Cedar Point and featured guest chef Kim Chase. The next two dinners are scheduled for July 30 at Hollow Tree Farm in Beaufort and September 24 at Ocean Natural Farm in Ocean. Updates and more information are available on their website.

Have you thought about signing up for a CSA Produce Bag subscription? Become a member of this program and receive a portion of multiple local farms’ harvests. Members are responsible for showing up at their selected pickup site each week to pick up their share of freshly harvested produce. You will generally receive at least $ 25 of a combination of vegetables, fruits, cut flowers, eggs, etc. There are 4 and 12-week subscriptions, and full and weekly payment options. PRODUCE BAG SUBSCRIPTIONS Have you signed up for your CSA produce bag yet? There’s still time! Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) is a relationship between local farms and customers. Rather than simply purchasing food, customers become members of this program and receive a portion of multiple local farms’ harvests. Members are responsible for showing up at their selected pickup site each week to pick up their share of freshly harvested produce. You will generally receive at least $25 of a combination of vegetables, fruits, cut flowers, eggs, etc. There are 4 and 12-week subscriptions, and full and weekly payment options. This year they are offering pickups on Saturdays and at these partner locations: Starbucks, MHC................................................................................ 11:30 am to 2:30 pm Reed’s Coffee Shop, MHC.........................................................................9 am to 2 pm Beaufort Club, Beaufort...............................................................................11 am to 3 pm Salty Catch, Beaufort...................................................................................11 am to 5 pm Mill Creek Feed & Finds.............................................................................10 am to 1 pm Muttigan’s, Emerald Isle............................................................................ 10 am to 5 pm Lettuce Shack, Bogue.................................................................................11 am to 4 pm Willis Farm Stand, Newport........................................................................11 am to 4 pm Willis Farm Stand, Cedar Point................................................................ 10 am to 6 pm Blue Ocean Market, Atlantic Beach ��������������������������������������������������������������� 12 - 5 pm

Carteret Local Food Network (CLFN) partners with host locations to provide a place for their Veggie Van Mobile Market to set up in different communities in Carteret County. The Veggie Van is open to the public and accepts cash, credit, debit and SNAP/EBT and offers a variety of incentives for their customers. Check out their website at carteretlocalfoodnetwork.org.

Want to visit these farms yourself ? Check out the Visit NC Farms app, available for both Apple and Android devices. The Visit NC Farms app connects the dots in communities across North Carolina. Using mobile phone technology, residents and visitors can find farms closest to them with products and activities that interest them. Residents can use the app to explore farms, farmers markets and local restaurants that are off the beaten path and unique to each community. €

CarolinaSalt.com » ISSUE No. 2 | 2022 CAROLINA SALT 15


EXPLORE THE COAST THE FRIENDLY CITY BY THE SEA

The Best Things To Do In Swansboro This Summer

T

he North Carolina coast is a unique place full of charming port towns, fascinating history and gorgeous beaches. Located five miles from Emerald Isle, you’ll find the coastal town of Swansboro, also known as “The Friendly City by the Sea.” This picturesque seaside town lives up to the nickname with its friendly, laidback atmosphere and water activities like kayaking, boating and fishing. Whether you want to paddle the waterways or explore the historic downtown, there are endless things to do in Swansboro!

WATER ACTIVITIES IN SWANSBORO Since Swansboro is bordered by the Intracoastal Waterway and the White Oak River, it’s no surprise that water activities are one of the most popular things to do here. Explore the water with kayaking, canoeing, paddleboarding, tours and fishing adventures.

HAMMOCKS BEACH STATE PARK Hammocks Beach State Park is easily accessible from Swansboro via ferry or paddling the canoe trails. Bear Island features some of the most unspoiled beaches and maritime forests on the Atlantic coast. Rent a kayak from PaddleNC and explore the water on your own or join one of their Hammocks Beach tours instead.

FISHING AND CRUISES Anglers will love fishing on the North Carolina coast. Swansboro charters offer inshore, nearshore and deep water fishing opportunities. Nancy Lee Fishing Charter and Pogies are the most popular options. For a different way to get on the water, join Lady Swan Boat Tours for a scenic sunset cruise or a historical tour of the Intracoastal Waterway.

HISTORIC DOWNTOWN SWANSBORO The port town of Swansboro has a significant maritime history that once

thrived on shipbuilding. Over 200 years later, the downtown area is full of sites on the National Register of Historic Places.Explore the charming architecture, boutiques and restaurants in downtown Swansboro.

SELF-GUIDED HISTORY TOUR The Swansboro Historic District features 30 sites you can see on a self-guided walking tour. Most of the district was developed betweenthelate1800sand early 1900s with architectural styles like Greek Revival, Bungalow and American Craftsman. Use the guide from the Swansboro Historical Association to plan your walking route.

SHOPPING Historic downtown Swansboro is home to dozens of boutiques you can explore during your visit. Bring home a piece ofSwansborowithhomedecor, gifts or antiques from Salt Marsh Cottage or Poor Man’s Hole. After a day downtown, stop at Candy

Edventure and satisfy your sweet tooth.You won’t be disappointed.

SWANSBORO FESTIVALS The quiet charm of Swansboro comes alive with annual festivals you can plan your vacation around. Celebrate talented local artists’ crafts and products during the Arts by the Sea annual event.Don’t miss the Seaside Arts Council’s “Swan Fest” summer concert series and the addition of the Pavilion in OldeTown Square. October brings the oldest festival on the Crystal Coast to Swansboro with the Mullet Festival, featuring seafood and live music.

VISIT THE FRIENDLY CITY BY THE SEA Discover all of the things to do in Swansboro and experience “The Friendly City by the Sea” for yourself ! You’ll find more great local suggestions for things to do, attractions, restaurants and more on our website at bluewaternc.com €

your life on the Crystal Coast WE DEPEND ON OUR READERS! CALL 252-723-7628 IF YOU’RE INTERESTED IN SUBMITTING AN ARTICLE OR PHOTO.

16 CAROLINA SALT ISSUE No. 2 | 2022 » CarolinaSalt.com


Make the most of your time on the Island!

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LOCAL KNOWLEDGE THE ODD ORIGINS OF CARTERET COUNTY PLACE NAMES

What’s In A Name?

W

BY KARA NUNNALLY

hat’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.’ Maybe you recognize that little snippet from Shakespeare. The quote sparks a unique question: what IS in a name? This past summer, I was an intern at the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort and the Beaufort Historical Association. As a native of southern Virginia, Carteret County place names were all new. In my research work at the museum, I had to orient myself by looking at maps ranging from the early 18th century to the modern day. John Lawson’s 1709 map of the area really caught my eye. I realized the names of some of the places around here were inconsistent. So I began to do a little research at local libraries, the Carteret County Register of Deeds, the University of North CarolinaChapel Hill Documenting the American South collection, and by talking to residents. I started with the state, and then focused on Carteret County. North Carolina. No, it’s not named for Neil Diamond’s hit single “Sweet Caroline,” but in honor of King Charles I (1600-1649), from Carolus which is Latin for Charles. Some say it was in honor of King Charles II (1630-1685), but the Province of Carolina was chartered in 1629, so it must have been for the then-present King Charles I. It became North Carolina after the colony split in 1729. Carteret County. Named for both Sir George Carteret, Lord Proprietor, and his heir, John Carteret, Earl of Granville. Most would say one or the other, but Sir Carteret was one of the original eight Proprietors of Carolina, and the Earl was the only heir not to sell the land back to the crown. Newport. Originally called Bells Corner, the Quakers changed it to Newport in honor of the city in their native state, Rhode Island. Morehead City. (Shepard’s Point until 1861) Named for John Motley Morehead, the 29th governor of North Carolina, in office from 18411845. Morehead, “The Father of Modern North Carolina,” supported public schools and the evolving means of transportation. Morehead bought coastal land for the railway system; thus the namesake in this very location. Gallants Channel. After John Galland, an original settler of the area. The d became a t and the apostrophe was lost. Beaufort. Named in honor of Henry Somerset, Duke of Beaufort and one of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. It was built upon an Native American village, Wareiock which has been said to mean “Fish Town,” the town’s original name. Harkers Island. Named for Ebenezer Harker who bought the island from Sparrow (Thomas, not Jack) on September 15, 1730. It was known as Craney Island until the island was split between Ebenezer, and his brothers Zachary and James, in 1783; it was not incorporated until 1957. Core Sound. For the Coree Indians that inhabited this area long before European contact. Little is known about them. Gloucester. Settled at the turn of the 18th and 19th centuries and named for the town in Massachusetts (which is named for the English city of Gloucester). Marshallberg. Matthew Marshall, a rural mail carrier, decided to name it after himself in the early 1800s. One favorite name from long ago was Promontorium Tremendum, a latin name meaning “horrible headland” or something that fearfully 18 CAROLINA SALT ISSUE No. 2 | 2022 » CarolinaSalt.com

juts out. That’s the modern day Cape Lookout. To me, it sounds like a spell from Harry Potter. But one place has intrigued me more than the others: Bogue. It has banks, a sound, and an inlet: it’s a pretty big deal. But where does it come from? Immediately, I thought a person. Or something French. Yet no solid answer emerged in my research. When I first came across the name, there was speculation that it was a Choctaw word meaning a water passage. That made sense for the inlet. Or maybe a Spanish term that was used for navigational purposes meaning to lay leeward. That makes sense for the banks—especially since they visited (more like raided) the area frequently. One source said it was named for Josiah Bogue, who settled the area in the early 1700s, but I found out that he was born in Perquimans County in 1704 or 1705. The map by Lawson named it Bogue in 1709; clearly, this couldn’t have been named after some child that was not even in the area. I was stumped. So, I went to the County Register of Deeds to see if Bogue could have somehow owned land near the area or something. Still nothing. It was like he never existed anywhere near Carteret County and more specifically the banks. I had to find something on the family. Luckily, Hardy Zachary Bogue did a family history in 1986, and it was in the Beaufort library. Hardy also did not know why nor how Bogue Banks, Sound, and Inlet got their names. He explored all the options as well, including the possibility of a Robert Bogue that went missing from Perquimans in 1690, and possibly could have been in the area when Lawson mapped it. The answer: there is no answer. However, the mystery of it strengthens my curiosity and appreciation of the little that is still unknown in a world that seems to have an answer for everything. So “what’s in a name” you ask, Shakespeare? History, stories, hardship, love, loyalty, mystery; these banks that we find ourselves on today have lured people here for hundreds of years. They have an essence that is found nowhere else in this world. They hold secrets and taunt us with their wisdom. That, my friends, is what is in a name. If you would like more information on these place names, I recommend William S. Powell’s The North Carolina Gazetteer and Roger L. Payne’s Place Names of the Outer Banks. €






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SAFETY BRIEF

THOMAS J. LAVEY | PARAMEDIC FIREFIGHTER

There is an ambulance coming! What do I do now?!

See the light, move to the right!

G

reetings again fellow Eastern North Carolinians, it is I your friendly neighborhood paramedic firefighter again helping you so you can help us. If you or your loved one is in need of emergency assistance you want help to get there in a timely manner. Now I am sure that many of you drivers who occupy the major thoroughfares of our great state have had a few run-ins with an emergency vehicle using their lights and sirens. For some of you who know what to do, Bravo Zulu, you help these emergency vehicles get to where they need to go. But as an emergency vehicle operator, I can attest to the difficulty that some other drivers put us through. It is stressful enough going to a call where a human life is on the line. Radio dispatch sometimes paints a very graphic picture of what awaits us. We want to get there in a timely fashion, but also safe and in one piece. We use our emergency lights and sirens so that other drivers on the road can acknowledge our presence and hopefully allow us the right of way and a safe path to our call.

AN EASY PROMPT

middle finger salute.

10 STEPS TO FOLLOW Here are ten easy steps to follow when you see oncoming emergency vehicles: q Stay calm and DO NOT slam on your brakes! If you do that, you become an instant steel barricades that the emergency vehicle must serpentine around—it’s extremely dangerous. w Signal right and slowly and safely pull to the right and come to a complete stop. e If you’re on a high-speed road or if there is no room to stop, slow down as much as possible. Never try to outrun an emergency vehicle. There is no trophy in it for you at the end—just a ticket. r If you are in the left lane, carefully merge to the right lane as traffic permits. t If you cannot move to the right because of another vehicle or obstacle, slowly come to a stop. Never pull over to the left! Your action will let the driver of the emergency vehicle know what you are doing and allow the driver to anticipate where to drive. y When an emergency vehicle approaches you from behind while you are stopped at an intersection due to a red light, stay where you are unless you can pull to the right. NEVER pull out into the intersection!

u If you are coming out of a parking lot or about to pull out on to the roadway and see an emergency vehicle, wait until the emergency vehicle passes. i On a 4-lane highway or street without barriers, both sides of traffic should pull to the right. o Be careful when driving by or around a motor vehicle accident or any situation where emergency vehicles are parked and emergency personnel are working. Drive slowly and follow officials who are guiding traffic around an accident scene. 1) Drivers should stay at least 500 feet behind emergency vehicles. The last thing I would like to cover is if EMS is transporting your loved one and you are going to meet them at the hospital, please DO NOT chase the ambulance. If we are running emergency traffic with lights and sirens this does not allow you to ride our bumper and go through intersections because your family member is in the back of the ambulance. First and most importantly it’s against the law! Second, how would your family member feel if you crashed your vehicle and were injured or even worse killed? And third, how would you feel if you killed or injured another innocent person? With these helpful steps you are helping us help you and everyone else, till next time have a safe blessed day. €

Move To the Right for Sirens and Lights is a simple prompt that will help you remember what to do. Some either don’t know what to do, or panic when they see approaching emergency vehicles. Panic can be the result not hearing the ABOUT THOMAS J. LAVEY sirens and seeing the lights. You can make it easier to hear the sirens by listening to music in THOMAS J. LAVEY currently works as a paramedic/firefighter and captain of EMS with your vehicle at a lower level and you’ll be more Western Carteret Fire/EMS Department. His passion is the medical field in the pre-hospital likely to see the lights if you check your mirrors setting and EMS education. He was the former Health Service Chief with the United States every so often. Coast Guard with over 22 years of active duty service, before retiring. His last tour he If you see multiple emergency vehicles served as the Chief of the Health Services Division for the Maritime Security Response Team around you, start signaling and pulling over to (MSRT). His other qualifications were Independent Duty Corpsman, Tactical Paramedic and their right. Please do not give these drivers the EMS Instructor, which he used to serve in a variety of roles throughout the USCG. 40 CAROLINA SALT ISSUE No. 2 | 2022 » CarolinaSalt.com



A MOMENT OF REFLECTION

PAUL ORTIZ

NEW YEAR, NEW DIRECTION AN ISLAND CHURCH PERSPECTIVE

I

want to go heaven.” That’s something I think all of us tell ourselves. I can’t imagine the idea of hell! Spending forever beyond this life in a place of isolation and eternal torment. Nope! And then there’s the question of why would a “so-called” loving God send anyone to this place of eternal damnation we know as hell? Hell is a scary idea and yet a very real one. There are over 160 references to hell in the New Testament. Jesus alone spoke about hell over 70 times. Why is the topic of hell covered so much in the Bible? I believe to ensure it is a reality and then to offer a warning to the listener and reader of said reality. However, I think if our focus for “accepting” Jesus or calling ourselves a “Christian” is merely to avoid the consequence of hell—then we have missed the point. We are not seeing the reality of our situation and the condition of our soul. First off, God doesn’t send anyone to hell. Here’s the secret! Once man fell into sin, we have been on a steady path to hell. It is of our own choosing. We have been careening out of control. We’ve rejected God, His mercy and His grace. We have chosen a one-way ticket to hell because of the unrighteousness in our lives. God is not sending anyone to hell. The fact is, we are headed to hell all on our own. Now this is what God does. Just at the right time, He steps into history to rescue us from hell by providing a better option. Why? “For God so loved the world, that He gave His only Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have eternal life.” John 3:16 ESV It’s this simple: you are on your way to hell and God steps in and literally provides a way out in the person Jesus Christ. You were out there all by yourself headed toward a forever alone and God comes in and says to you, “Here is a better option,” all because He loves you. Grace is God doing in you, through and for you what you could not do on your own. That is what God does! Now I know, this is where you jump in and say, “Hold on, why doesn’t God just do this from the getgo?” Simply, it comes down to choice! God doesn’t want you to have to choose Him. If nothing else, God loves you enough to let you make the choice. If there were no choice in the world, we would be nothing more than robots forced to do God’s bidding. This is good news, that God would step in to rescue us even after we have intentionally rejected Him. God doesn’t have to do anything! We rejected Him! Just think about how you would treat someone who treated you or your family badly? I am thankful God is not like us, otherwise we would all get what we deserve. God does something a lot of us can’t imagine. God comes in and through His Son Jesus Christ, He basically apologized to Himself for our rejection of Him. Wait! What? That’s right! God makes right what we’ve wronged. Again, He does for us what we could not do on our own. That’s grace! That’s mercy! Back to where we started. If you are focused on the consequence of hell and that is your reasoning for accepting Jesus or for rejecting Jesus; then you have once again missed the point. It’s not about a destination, it’s about a relationship. If Jesus’s life is about anything, it’s all about relationship! God desires to have a love relationship with you. To be clear, not in the way we think of love. It is in our fleshly nature to corrupt everything. God wants to have a real relationship with you that changes everything in your life. Everything God wants to do in your life will spill out from the overflow of a real love relationship with Him. If all you are looking for in God, is an escape from hell or blessings in this life; then you have missed out on the greatest gift of all… a meaningful and life changing relationship with the God who made you. If you are not in an authentic relationship with Jesus, why not begin a new journey today? Stop looking ahead toward a destination and start living the fullness of life now, found only in Jesus. €

THE ISLAND CHURCH PASTOR PAUL ORTIZ

Paul Ortiz is a follower of Jesus Christ, not religion. A husband and father, he is pastor of The Island Church in Emerald Isle. Reach him at paul@TheIslandChurchEI.org 42 CAROLINA SALT ISSUE No. 2 | 2022 » CarolinaSalt.com



DISCOVERY DIVING

LEE MOORE

DIVING OUR COAST W H AT ’ S U N D E RWAT E R I N S U M M E R

D

uring the summer, water temperatures will be in the upper 70s and low 80s along the Crystal Coast. These warm waters attract divers from all over the world to dive on our wrecks and see our diverse marine life. We have wrecks that are considered inshore (7 to 10 miles from the beach) and offshore (25 miles or more from the beach). For divers to reach these wrecks, they will need to go out on a boat. Boat etiquette is something every diver should know.

BOAT ETIQUETTE

Get to the boat before it is scheduled to leave. Usually, dive shops will tell you when the shop opens. Before getting on the boat, you will have to fill out a release. Get there early if you need to rent gear because you are not the only one that might needs it. Divers using enriched air (nitrox) will have to analyze their tanks. Only a couple of divers can be helped at one time. Boats leave early if everyone is on board and ready to go. If you wait and show up at departure time, the other divers will have been waiting for you and will not be too happy. You will also have to take the spot that is left, instead of being able to choose. Ask permission to board the boat. The captain has to perform checks to make sure the boat is ready to run every morning. Just because there aren’t any open hatches, doesn’t mean all of the checks are done. Once the captain says you can board, find a spot on the seats, bungee your tanks in place and stow your dive bag and weights under the seat. Set up your gear in your spot. Space is limited on dive boats, whether it is on a six-pack or a crew boat. Do not spread your gear out on the deck—it’s a safety hazard for the other divers and crew. Once you are finished with the first dive and you switch out your tanks, stow your fins and other gear under your seat while you are switching out your used tank for the full one. Listen to the roll call and briefing from the captain. When the captain is calling roll or is doing the briefing, remain silent. The roll is important because the captain needs to know who is on the boat. If they are not listed on the roster, the captain does not know if he is missing someone while offshore. The briefing at the dock tells the passengers who the captain and crew are, areas the passengers are allowed to go when the boat is running and any information about safety equipment on the boat. The briefing also includes the location of the head, the fresh water shower, the coolers for your food and drinks and the fresh water cooler. The briefing at the dive site includes the history of the wreck, where the anchor is tied in, entry points on the boats, how the lines are positioned under the boat and how to climb the fins on ladders when exiting the water. Use the correct bucket for your mask. Boats usually have one bucket for masks and one for cameras. The one for the cameras is usually bigger than the one for the masks because the defog used on the masks is harmful to the O-rings and lenses on the cameras. The mask bucket is to be used for dipping the mask, not a place to store your mask before or between dives. Divers that put defog on their mask and drop it in the mask bucket cause the clear fresh water to become cloudy and diluted. Using the fresh water shower. Boats have a limited amount of fresh water onboard. When the water is gone it is gone. The shower is for rinsing yourself off after a dive to remove the salt. It is not designed for a full length shower or to be used to wash your gear. There are hoses on the dock for you to use when you get back to shore to wash your gear. Be mindful of the other divers. Foul language is becoming common place in today’s society, but that does not mean it is proper. A lot of families come to the Crystal Coast to dive. This is their yearly vacation and they do not want to be on a boat where language could offend their children. Divers can be as young as 10. If you are very loud and use foul language, you may not be allowed back on the boat on future charters. Tip the crew. The crew makes you sure you get to and from the dive sites safely. They help you in and out of the water to make your day easier and will do anything they can to make sure you are able to do your dives. There is very little spare gear on the boats. If the need arises, the crew will let you use their gear so you can make the dives. This is one of the reasons you should check your gear and make sure it is functioning properly before you leave the dock. If you would like more information about diving on some of the best wrecks with some of the best marine life in the world, contact Discovery Diving at 252-728-2265 or at dive@ discoverydiving.com or like us on Facebook to see what events are coming up in the future. € 44 CAROLINA SALT ISSUE No. 2 | 2022 » CarolinaSalt.com

JOIN DISCOVERY CONTACT

Discovery Diving at 252-728-2265 or visit them on Facebook to see what classes and events are coming up. You can also visit them online at discoverydiving.com.

JOIN ECARA ECARA

works to continue sinking ships to create artificial reefs here in North Carolina, but their resources are limited. To get involved, visit carolinareef.org.


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BY REBECCA JONES AUTHOR OF ‘LOVE BRINGS YOU HOME’ & OTHER BOOKS

ea turtle nesting season is from May 1 through October. In our area around Atlantic Beach and the Bogue Banks, loggerheads are the most common turtles nesting on our beaches. Volunteers walk the beaches every morning looking for sea turtle crawls that indicate a nest has been laid. The nest is roped off until it hatches, and volunteers watch the nests in the evening to help ensure the hatchlings make it to the ocean. Since sea turtles spend most of their lives in the water, it is almost impossible to gather information on their behavior. Most of what is known about sea turtle behavior is obtained by observing hatchlings and females that leave the water to lay eggs. When the female comes to shore, they dig out a nest in the ground with their back flippers, bury their clutch of eggs and return to the ocean. After hatching, the young may take as long as 6 weeks to dig themselves out of the nest. They emerge at night and move toward the ocean. I have been watching and learning and have gathered some information on my own of the behaviors of sea turtles. • Life begins on the beach • Sometimes you have to dig yourself out of a hole you didn’t dig • Keep the faith you will make it • Never forget where you came from • Swim with the current • Travel at your own pace—you will arrive Although not scientific, you may have to admit it is something to think about. €

200

NORTH CAROLINA

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BOAT SERVICE OFFICIAL CITATION WEIGH STATION

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