Page 1

FREE! FEBRUARY / MARCH 2017

your life on the Crystal Coast

SPORT LIFE

The EI Marathon CAMP ALBEMARLE

Is Your Child Ready for Camp? OUTER BANKS WILDLIFE

LOOK INSIDE FOR FUN & FREE

THINGS TO DO ON THE CRYSTAL COAST MID–FEBRUARY THROUGH MID–MARCH PG. 8

Armadillos Are Here! LOCAL WATERS

Our Artifical Reefs in NC


HOME OF THE CRYSTAL COAST STEAM POT!

GRILL & STEAM BAR

Now Serving!

FRESH LOCAL

OYSTERS! Wednesdays

Good food, good friends, great times!

10% OFF STEAM POTS! Thursdays

JAMAICAN ME THIRSTY

Starting at 4PM in the Boat Bar, CaribbeanStyle drink specials, Heineken & ShockTop $3

Fridays

RANDY’S FAMOUS ANGUS

PRIME RIB February 14

VALENTINE’S DINNER FOR 2 Two 9-ounce ribeyes with lobster tail, choice of vegetable and salad, plus two glasses of champagne and chocolate lava cake!

In the Boat Bar

ENTERTAINMENT! 2/11 ...Pure T Mommicked 3/4 ....4Ever All 3/11....Hank Barbee

8 GIANT FLAT SCREENS IN THE BOAT BAR!

Next to El’s • Look for the Big Fish!

3710 ARENDELL STREET • MOREHEAD CITY 252.240.1313 • SNAPPERZSTEAMBAR.COM

LUNCH, DINNER AND KIDS MENU ALL DAY!


Plus! JEWELRY • MONOGRAMMING EMBROIDERY • NOVELTIES HANDBAGS, TOTES & PURSES APPAREL & ACCESSORIES MUCH MORE!

20 Free! 10 BOGO — TUESDAY SPECIAL —

%

OFF

ALL OF OUR T-SHIRTS!

— WEDNESDAY SPECIAL —

Monogramming

with 50 Purchase $

— THURSDAY SPECIAL —

%

OFF

Excluding fudge, monogramming and wine.

— FRIDAY SPECIAL —

Buy one pound of fudge, get a half pound free!

Z E N Z I I | lost petal linens | EMMA’S CLOSET | PIKO mudpie | SCOUT In the K&V Plaza Next To Flipperz 311 Mangrove Drive ★ Emerald Isle ★ 252.354.7775


Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner All ABC Permits

Now Serving

OYSTERS!

BREAKFAST NOW SERVED UNTIL 2PM ON SATURDAY & SUNDAY!

8302 Emerald Drive • Emerald Isle • 252.424.8284 SUNDAY-THURSDAY • CLOSED TUESDAY

All you can eat

CRAB LEGS $ Only… 39.99 MONDAYS IN FEBRUARY

TriviaNight Starts at 6:30pm FEBRUARY 10

Howl at theMoonParty Party from 6:30–9:30pm with live music by Steven Compton FEBRUARY 13

Valen-wine’sDayDinner

HAVE NO FEAR, SPRINGTIME IS ALMOST HERE! Find us on Facebook or TheTradingPostEI.com for specials and upcoming events.

Six lovely courses and six wines, accompanied by the music of Dick Knight (formerly of the James Brown Band). Seatings at 5:30 and 8:30pm. $70 per person | reservations required


MID -FEBRUA RY TO M I D-M A RC H 2 0 1 7

Inside This Issue your life on the Crystal Coast

12 Is Your Child Ready for Camp? Camp Albemarle in Newport offers opportunities for children to learn, grow and “get back to nature.”

13 Armadillos Are Here! Our milder winters are more welcoming to the

nine-banded armadillo, which has been spotted in a few locations in North Carolina.

13

ARMADILLOS:

They’re here in North Carolina! FREE!

/ MARC FEBRUARY

February /March

H 2017

t stal Coas on the Cry your life

ON THIS MONTH’S COVER

LIFE SPORT

The EI Marathon E

MARL CAMP ALBE

ild Is Your Ch r Ready fop? Cam OUTER

WILDLIFE BANKS

os Armadillre! Are He LOCAL

E LOOK INSID & FREE FOR FUN

THINGS TO DO

WATERS

cal Our Artifi Reefs in NC

The Emerald Isle Marathon is poised to break all its fundraising records this year. Five Ethiopian runners await approval to run the race with us Carteret County folks!

COAST CRYSTAL GH ON THE Y THROU MID–FEBRUARARCH MID–M PG. 8

14 The Emerald Isle Marathon The EI Marathon is poised to break all its

fundraising records this year, as well as to welcome five runners from Ethiopia.

16 Our Artificial Reefs A radio interview with Jason Peters, the

coordinator of the NC artificial reef program, from September 2016.

18 Art From the Heart The Arts Council of Carteret County present

two popular art shows: Art From the Heart and a Student Art Show with art from the public.

LOCAL INTEREST

Things To Do................................................ 8 Hooked Up Fishing...................................... 19 Diving Our Coast.. ....................................... 20 Tides. . ........................................................ 21

12 CAMP ALBEMARLE Is your child ready for camp? Learn, grow, be outdoors.

14 EI MARATHON Raising funds as well as welcoming runners from abroad.

16 ARTIFICIAL REEFS A brief history and guide to our artificial reefs.

18 ART FROM THE HEART Annual art show in Morehead City. CarolinaSalt.com » February / March 2017 CAROLINA SALT 5


PUBLISHER

WILL ASHBY C R E AT I V E D I R E C TO R

C H E V Y K AY LO R C O N T R I BU T I N G W R I T E R S

Let us put the Leisure back into your most important day!

Sidney Hunter, Tom Hussmann, Lib Sawyers, Annita Best, Kim Murdoch, Lee Lumpkin, Dr. Bogus, Capt. Jeff Cronk, Lee Moore, Sherry White and Linda Bergman–Althouse.

B E C O M E A C O N T R I BU TO R

Submit your letters to the editor, photos, community listings and articles to will@carolinasalt.com. The editorial deadline for the next issue is February 16. The next issue publishes March 7.

B E C O M E A N A DV E RT I S E R

Carolina Salt is a great way to reach out to your local customers, as well as our seasonal visitors.

252-723-7628

Call us to find out how we can help you grow your local business. FROM THE PUBLISHER

Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt magazine, all about our life here on the Crystal Coast. Our articles are written by locals. Every month we look to our readers to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote or an interesting local photograph, send them our way. Participation is welcomed and appreciated. Reader contributions are the founding principle of the magazine. If you like what you see, tell people about it— especially our advertisers. For questions, concerns or more information, send e-mail to will@carolinasalt.com or call 252-723-7628. For up-to-date info, be sure to look us up on Facebook!

—Free Local Delivery—

Visit Our Showroom! 208-A Bogue Inlet Drive | Emerald Isle

252.354.8887

www.IslandEssentials.com

WE DEPEND ON OUR READERS! Call 252-723-7628 if you’re interested in submitting an article or photo. Our local content is what keeps our magazine fresh and relevant. PUBLISHED BY CRYSTAL COAST OUTDOORS PUBLICATIONS P.O. Box 572, Morehead City, NC 28557 | 252-723-7628


OUTFITTING SALTWATER ANGLERS & BOATERS FOR OVER 15 YEARS! Our knowledgeable staff can assist you with all your fishing and boating needs. AUTHORIZED DEALER

7802 EMERALD DRIVE • EMERALD ISLE TheReelOutdoors.com • 252-354-6692 RODS & REELS | BAIT & TACKLE | REEL REPAIR | MARINE SUPPLIES SUNGLASSES | APPAREL | SANDALS, SHOES & FLOPS

Join us for breakfast daily starting at 7am 7802 EMERALD DRIVE

EMERALD ISLE • 252.354.6592 VILLAGEMARKETOFEI.COM


THINGS TO DO

✪ = FREE

MID–FEBRUARY TO MID–MARCH

FEBRUARY 7, 21

Oyster Bagging Volunteers!

✪ FEBRUARY 10

FRIDAY FREE FLICKS

The Friday Free Flick of February is Alice Through the Looking Glass, at the Emerald Isle Community Center, 203 Leisure Lane, Emerald Isle. Popcorn and drinks available.

The NC Coastal Federation invites community members and volunteers to help bag oyster shells at our headquarters office in Ocean. During the event, volunteers will be filling mesh bags with oyster shells that will be used to build oyster reefs. The bags will be placed along shorelines to protect them from erosion and create valuable habitat. These events are suitable for adults and supervised children over the age of 12. There will be activities to accommodate a wide range of physical abilities and snacks are provided. Volunteers should dress in layers for the weather in clothes that are comfortable but that can also get dirty. Volunteers should also wear closed-toe shoes or boots that fully cover their feet. These oyster shell bagging events are part of a living shoreline project. For more information on living shorelines, check out livingshorelinesacademy.org.

FEBRUARY 8

Merry Time for Tots: Hatteras Jack [ 10–11 AM ] Preschoolers ages 2–5 and their

caregivers will hear the legend of the albino dolphin Hatteras Jack and learn more about the dolphins that frequent the North Carolina coast. This free class will include a craft, story and game. Ages 2-5. Space is limited, pre-registration is required. To register, call 252-728-7317. At the North Carolina Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. Visit them online at ncmaritimemuseums.com.

FEBRUARY 10

Friday Free Flicks: Alice Through The Looking Glass [ 7 PM ] February’s movie is Alice Through the Looking

✪ FEBRUARY 22

BROWN BAG GAM: OYSTERS

ERALD

IS

I

R

F

FA

EE

N

EM

LE

O

at the NC Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort, from noon to 1 p.m. Unlock the mystery of the amazing bivalve Crassostrea virginica, the eastern oyster.

8

TR

ADE

CO

F

Glass. Free and open to the public, children must be accompanied by an adult. Popcorn and drink for $1. Please bring chairs and or blankets, but no outside beverages or snacks. At Emerald Isle Community Center, 203 Leisure Lane, Emerald Isle.

Stir a little love into everything you do. coffee local baked goods gluten-free choices •

FEBRUARY 10, 22

Brown Bag Gam: Lunchtime Learning Lectures [ NOON–1 PM ] Enjoy a free educational talk during

your lunch hour. No advance registration. Bring your bagged lunch to North Carolina Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. 2/10: LOVE AT SEA. For thousands of years men and women have found love at sea. During this program Christine Brin, Museum Educator, will be sharing some memorable stories to celebrate Valentine’s Day, including the legend that inspired the 1972 hit song “Brandi” and the tragic love stories of two special couples resting in Beaufort’s Old Burying Ground. 2/22: HISTORIC OYSTER FISHERY. Unlock the mystery of this amazing bivalve. Participants will learn about the importance of the oyster, the history of harvesting them in North Carolina and what researchers and conservationists are doing today with Crassostrea virginica, the eastern oyster. FEBRUARY 11

Down East FolkArts Society Concert: Little Windows [ 7:30 PM ] Little Windows in concert! Mark Weems

hails from North Carolina and plays guitar, old time banjo, fiddle and piano, but is best known as a singer and composer. Julie Glaub Weems, also a native of North Carolina, studied literature and music at Wake Forest University before following her interest in Irish culture to work with the poor in Dublin for nearly seven years. In 2005, Mark and Julee realized that their harmonic blending was quite unique and formed Little Windows. At Joslyn Hall, Carteret Community College, 3505 Arendell Street, Morehead City. General admission is $16 (active duty military and Down East FolkArts Society Members $13, full-time students $10). For tickets, call or text 252-6464657 or email folkartsenc@gmail.com. Visit the Down East Folk Arts Society website for detailed information on performers at downeastfolkarts.org. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., show starts at 7:30.

february Special

macadamia nut

16oz.

latte $3.50

FRAPPY HOUR 12–2PM DAILY! HALF PRICE FRAPPéS!

open every day from 8am to 3pm•252.354. 2643• Emerald Plantation • 8700 Emerald Drive

CAROLINA SALT February / March 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

FREE


✪ = FREE ✪

MID–FEBRUARY TO MID–MARCH

FEBRUARY 12

Beaufort Historic Site’s Valentine Party

[ 2–4 PM ] In an effort to increase membership,

the Beaufort Historical Association opens the buildings of the Beaufort Historic Site on the 100 block of Turner Street for current and prospective members to explore. See how the BHA uses membership dollars to preserve and promote the rich cultural heritage of Beaufort and Carteret County. For more information call 252-728-5225 or email pr@beauforthistoricsite.org

FEBRUARY 14

The Heart of the Sea

[ 7 PM ] Come for a Valentine’s Day presentation

about the NC Maritime Museum’s beloved whale Echo (the 33½' sperm whale skeleton) and his preserved heart. When the adolescent male whale came ashore at Cape Lookout in 2004, his bones and heart were preserved for study and display. During the process, his heart was sent to the University of Tennessee for plastination. You will have the opportunity to touch and photograph the heart. Free admission. No advance registration required. At the North Carolina Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. Visit them online at ncmaritimemuseums.com.

FEBRUARY 17–MARCH 4

‘Art from the Heart’ Exhibit

The Arts Council of Carteret County announces the 28th annual show and sale of original artwork, Art From the Heart. This non-juried show is open to artists 18 or older who reside in Carteret, Craven, Onslow and Pamlico counties. Artist registration will be held February 10–11 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and February 12 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The show will be held in Morehead Plaza (in the 2900 block of Arendell Street in Morehead City) in the commercial unit between Snap Fitness and the Tractor Supply Store. Judging will be professional artist, teacher and gallery owner Nicole White Kennedy of Raleigh. To view her full resume and selections of her work visit nicolestudio.com. Ms Kennedy will conduct a critique and commentary session on February 13 at 6:30 p.m. Artists may sign up for that session during registration. The cost will be $10. Art From

THINGS TO DO

The Heart participants will be allowed to enter two pieces of original artwork for a fee of $10 per piece. All work must be for sale. Complete rules for entry and downloadable entry forms are available at artscouncilcarteret.org. FEBRUARY 18

Horszowski Piano Trio

[ 8 PM ] The American Music Festival (AMF)

continues its 27th season of classical music with the Horszowski Piano Trio performing Beethoven, Mendelssohn and Clarke. Hailed by the New York Times for “impressive musicianship,” success has come quickly to this astonishing trio. Grammynominated violinist Jesse Mills joins cellist Raman Ramakrishnan and concert pianist Rieko Aizawa make an impressive and polished trio. The Horszowski Trio are based at Columbia University and the Longy School of Music, Bard College. At 1008 Arendell Street, Morehead City. For more information call 252-728-6152. FEBRUARY 22

14th Annual ‘Empty Bowls’ Luncheon and Silent Auction

✪ FEBRUARY 14

THE HEART OF THE SEA

is a Valentine’s Day presentation about Echo, the NC Maritime Museum’s beloved sperm whale skeleton. Learn about the skeleton and plastinated heart preserved for display.

[ 11 AM–1 PM ] The 14th Annual Empty Bowls soup

luncheon, pottery selection and silent auction will take at the Crystal Coast Civic Center in Morehead City. Tickets are on sale now at Hope Mission. Tickets are $20 and can be purchased by calling 252-240-2359. Tickets can also be purchased at Handscapes Gallery in Beaufort, Webb Memorial Library in Morehead City and Cape Carteret Aquatic and Wellness Center. For more information call 252-240-2359. FEBRUARY 23

Emerald Isle Garden Club’s Annual Card Party Fundraiser [ 1–4 PM ] Emerald Isle Garden Club’s Annual

Card Party Fundraiser will be held at the Emerald Isle Parks and Recreation Center, 7500 Emerald Drive. Participants will enjoy card games such as bridge as well as other board and table games. Proceeds help to support the club’s ongoing community service and beautification projects. Tickets are $15 which includes entry into the event, a chance at a door prize, light party fare, desserts and beverages. Tickets will also be sold at the event for a 50/25/25 raffle as well as a baskets

✪ FEBRUARY 17–MARCH 4

ART FROM THE HEART

The 28th annual Art From the Heart nonjuried show takes place in Morehead Plaza on the 2900 block of Arendell Street in Morehead City. Visit artscouncilcarteret.org.

Nautical Collection E X C L U S I V E LY D E S I G N E D B Y

VERANDA SQUARE | EMERALD ISLE | CHURCHWELLS.COM 1-800-846-1961 | 252-354-7166

CarolinaSalt.com » February / March 2017 CAROLINA SALT 9


THINGS TO DO

✪ = FREE

MID–FEBRUARY TO MID–MARCH

raffle with winners chosen during the afternoon event. For more information or to purchase tickets contact Garden Club members Theresa ConnellyKavanagh at 252-764-0420, Ann Crane at 252764-2439 or Carol Wilkins at 703-244-9271.

FEBRUARY 23

Coffee With a Cop

Join your neighbors and police officers for coffee and conversation! No agendas or speeches, just a chance to ask questions, voice concerns and get to know the officers in your neighborhood. For more information contact interim police chief Tony Reese at 252-354-2021. This month’s event is at Village Market, 7802 Emerald Drive, Emerald Isle. FEBRUARY 24

✪ FEBRUARY 23

COFFEE WITH A COP

at Rucker Johns in the Emerald Plantation Shopping Center at 8700 Emerald Drive in Emerald Isle. Join your neighbors and police officers for coffee and conversation!

A Winter Taste of Core Sound

[ 6–7 PM ] There is no better time on Core Sound

than winter, and our annual Winter Taste of Core Sound is proof ! It will be a great night of old stories and wonderful seafood and game. The evening celebrates traditional Down East home cooking with a full local seafood dinner in high style, complete with music and entertainment. Menu includes stewed oysters, duck and rutabaga, scallop fritters, seafood casserole, collards and sweet potatoes, light rolls, fig cake and more! Make your reservations today by calling 252-728-1500, ext. 21. Members tickets are $75 (individual) and $100 (couple). Non-members are $100 (individual) and $125 (couple)—and the price includes an annual membership! FEBRUARY 25

Fisherman’s Post Hands On Saltwater Fishing School

[ 7:30 AM–5 PM ] Fisherman’s Post newspaper, the

free publication that covers all the saltwater fishing action along the Carolina coast, will be hosting its tenth annual full-day Hands On Saltwater Fishing School at the Crystal Coast Civic Center.

FEBRUARY 25

LA MYSTIQUE MASQUERADE

and Festival Fantastic at The Infusion Cafe in Morehead City from 7 to 10 p.m. Three courses of elegant fare, music, and masks. Call 252-240-2800 for tickets.

FEBRUARY 25

La Mystique Masquerade and Festival Fantastic [ 7–10 PM ] You are invited to join our cast of

performers at The Infusion Cafe for our fourth annual Festival Fantastic and La Mystique Masquerade! Italian festival masks—stunning

works of Venetian art made to hide one’s identity and create an aura of mystery and romance—will be the theme of the evening. The music will be big and bold, the food will be three courses of elegant and tasty, the costuming a swirl of formal, epic color that spans three centuries and the evening… it will be simply magical! So grab your mask and reserve your seats today for this evening of romance, music and merriment. Seating is limited. Tickets required. Call 252-240-2800 for seating and ticket information. At the Infusion Cafe, 1012 Arendell Street, Morehead City. FEBRUARY 28

Escoffier Chef Dinner Series The popular dinner series is back! Enjoy a fourcourse meal prepared by culinary students and top local chefs. Get a ticket for an individual dinner or the whole series, but act fast because they always sell out! This amazingly unique event supports the CCC culinary program, training tomorrow’s chefs. At 1901 West Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-222-6056. MARCH 1

Summer Job Fair Summer employers and applicants are brought together to begin working towards a successful summer season! Call 252-354-6350 for details. MARCH 4–5

Coastal Home & Garden Show Turn all of your home and garden dreams into a reality! With over 12,000 square feet of exhibits you’ll find the latest in products and services. See the latest trends in kitchen and baths, learn to complete a DIY project or speak to the area’s finest professional service providers. At the Crystal Coast Civic Center in Morehead City. MARCH 4

Art Unveiling and Wine Competition Join Beaufort Wine and Food as it unveils the signature 2017 painting during an evening celebrating the organization’s upcoming annual final round of wine judging. For more information visit beaufortwineandfood.org. €

your life on the Crystal Coast WE DEPEND ON OUR READERS! CALL 252-723-7628 IF YOU’RE INTERESTED IN SUBMITTING AN ARTICLE OR PHOTO.

10 CAROLINA SALT February / March 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com


Valentine’s Day Special

Come enjoy this romantic day at MacDaddy’s We are offering a nice dinner for two at $30.00. This dinner includes a spectacular Seafood Primavera Dish with shrimp, scallops and fresh vegetables tossed with linguine pasta in a creamy Alfredo pesto sauce. Enjoy a bubbly glass of champagne with a strawberry and end the night with some decadent cheesecake.

BUY 2 GAMES

OF BOWLING

252.393.6565

GET 1 FREE

130 Golfin’ Dolphin Drive Cape Carteret, NC 28584

Not Valid on Cosmic Bowling. Redeem this coupon to receive offer. Not valid with any other offers.

MyMacDaddys.com

CS

VISIT OUR

HUGE SHOWROOM! WE SPECIALIZE IN

EVERYTHING COASTAL!

Home Décor • Bedding Bathroom & Kitchen Accessories Pictures & Flags • Gifts Paint-Your-Own Buoys

LARGEST SELECTION OF GUY HARVEY T-SHIRTS ON THE EAST COAST! —Mon–Sat 10–5 • Sun 11–5—

1075 Cedar Point Boulevard 252.393.7200

CarolinaSalt.com » February / March 2017 CAROLINA SALT 11


Is Your Child Ready for Camp?

F

or over 100 years, resident and day camps have been providing opportunities for children and teens to learn and grow and “get back to nature.” Those original camping programs were born out of a sense that as the U.S. became more manufacturing based with growing urban populations, children would lose contact with the outdoors. Those original camp professionals saw great opportunities for children to learn to be selfreliant and more independent and to gain confidence as they learned new skills and made new friends.

FAST FACTS ABOUT OUTDOOR TIME AND CHILDREN • Children are spending half as much time outdoors as they did 20 years ago. (Juster et al 2004); (Burdette & Whitaker 2005); (Kuo & Sullivan 2001) • Today, kids 8 to 18 years old devote an average of 7 hours and 38 minutes using entertainment media in a typical day (more than 53 hours a week). (Kaiser Family Foundation) • In a typical week, only 6 percent of children ages 9 to 13 play outside on their own. (Children & Nature Network, 2008) • Children who play outside are more physically active, more creative in their play, less aggressive and show better concentration. (Burdette and Whitaker, 2005; Ginsburg et al., 2007) • Sixty minutes of daily unstructured free play is essential to children’s physical and mental health. (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2008) • The most direct route to caring for the environment as an adult is participating in wild nature activities before the age of 11. (Wells and Lekies, 2006)

SO, IS YOUR CHILD READY? Camps like Camp Albemarle not only give children the opportunity to get back in touch with the natural world, but is a place where children can also learn and grow in their faith. Summer camp can strip away all of those distractions—TV, social media, electronics (that 7 hours and 38 minutes a day noted above)—and really let children focus on developing friendships, living in community and thinking deeply about their faith. While at camp, children are supervised by well-trained, caring staff, most of whom were campers once themselves and really understand how to make camp great for the children we serve. Health staff are on duty at all times and great meals are prepared each day. Programs at Camp Albemarle include sailing, kayaking, stand up paddle boarding, creative arts, swimming, challenge activities (including our famous Technical Tree Climbing), Bible study, environmental activities and much more! Camp Albemarle has all kinds of different opportunities, both day camps and residential (overnight). We have day camps for preschoolers through middle school and residential camps for Kindergarten through Senior High. Camp lengths vary from 3 days to 10, with most programs being a week in length. In addition to our traditional camp programs, we offer opportunities for leadership development, adventure camps, service camps as well as opportunities to learn to sail and develop outdoor living skills. For complete information about our camps and other programs, check out campalbemarle.org. We would love to help you determine if your child is ready for camp. Give us a call at 252-726-4848 or contact us at office@campalbemarle. org. We hope to see you this summer! €

12 CAROLINA SALT February / March 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

“I'll only give you the paper if you promise not to let the news upset you.” News you don’t have to worry about.


LINDA BERGMAN–ALTHOUSE

OUTER BANKS WILDLIFE SHELTER

Armadillos Are Here! The state small mammal of Texas has been heading our way for a few years now and according to the North Carolina Wildlife Commission, some have made it! Armadillos were spotted in South Carolina in the late 90s, and word was they would not get as far as North Carolina because our winters are too cold for them to tolerate. Well, surprise! This nocturnal, omnivorous mammal covered in bony plates has dumbfounded biologists. The animal considered not intelligent enough to avoid traffic has made its way up U.S. Highway 17 along the coast into the Tar Heel state. Witnesses have observed an armadillo leaping three to four feet straight up in the air to avoid an oncoming car. There are different species of armadillo, but the one moving into our area is the Nine-Banded Armadillo. They have also been found in mountain counties in far western North Carolina, which makes us think if they can live in high elevations like the Smokies, they can live anywhere. There is debate on their method of arrival, though. Are they being transported, deliberately or not, or are they waddling their way up here? The biggest deterrent of armadillos is weather because they can’t endure prolonged cold and frozen soil. But our recent mild winters have opened the door for Nine-Banded Armadillo travel. Their presence is well established in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida and it was always believed the “armored” brownish-gray animal the size of an opossum or house cat could only thrive in warm, wetland habitats and preferably the arid landscape of Texas, but now we know, it ain’t so! Even farther north, Illinois and Indiana, are experiencing the arrival of these Nine-Banded Armadillos. Maybe the weather isn’t as important as the abundance of fresh water, forests, bugs and critters to eat, although frozen ground makes foraging for grubs almost impossible. Armadillos need to be able to forage steadily. Since they are coming and some are already here, the staff at the Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter in Newport need to become knowledgeable on the topic of armadillo rehabilitation and how to raise orphaned armadillos, so we have taken on the task to learn everything we can. As with all wildlife, we need to wear our personal protective equipment to ensure anything zoonotic will not be passed from animal to human. This prehistoric and exotic looking little creature with a bulbous snout that we are now learning about has been given quite a few nicknames; Texas Turkey, Armored Pig, Possum On a Half Shell, Hoover Hog and Rabbit Turtle (a name given them by the ancient Aztecs). They are also described as a “Platypus In a Conquistador Helmet.” The Nine-Banded Armadillo weighs between 5 and 14 pounds and is 25 to 42 inches long, including the tail. They have short legs, but can move rather quickly. Their body is covered by non-overlapping scales connected by flexible bands of skin. The shell or armor covers the back, sides, head, tail and outer sides of the legs. Their underbelly protection is comprised of thick skin and coarse hair and they have long, shovel like claws for digging. We now know the armadillo is a very adaptable animal that primarily feeds on invertebrates such as insects, snails and earthworms. They forage for meals while making snorting noises

by thrusting their snouts into loose soil and leaves and frantically dig to surface grubs, beetles, carrion with maggots, ants, termites and those juicy worms, which their sensitive noses can detect through eight inches of soil. They are amazing in their uniqueness! Although the Nine-Banded Armadillo can’t roll itself into a ball as other armadillos, such as the Three-Banded, can, it will inflate its intestines to float or dog-paddle across a river or it may choose to hold its breath for up to six minutes while sinking into the water and running underwater across the riverbed. Their teeth are similar to those of sloths and anteaters—all small molars, no incisors and no enamel. Armadillos live in eight-inch entranced burrows that can be seven feet deep and 25 feet long. They will mark their territory with urine, feces and excretions from scent glands found on their feet, nose and eyelids. If there is a territorial dispute, a bit of kicking and chasing will usually end it. Breeding takes place during July and August producing a litter of four. As reptilian as an armadillo may look, they are mammals and will nurse the infants for about three months before the youngsters begin foraging for food. They will stay with Mom, the sole provider, for up to a year. They are sexually mature at one year and will reproduce every year throughout their 12 to 15 year lifespan. That’s a lot of babies—and it could be one of the reasons for the species expansion north! Although Armadillos can wreak havoc with gardens and root systems while they forage or burrow, they also eat pesky bugs, create habitats for other wildlife and bring more songbirds to an area. Birds, such as warblers, will follow and hang out with armadillos. They capitalize on the armadillos’ unearthing of insects to supplement their own nutritional needs. Not many animals mess with armadillos in the wild, so they have few real predators, but although it’s not easy, alligators and panthers have been known to partake in an adult armadillo or two. Infant Nine-Banded Armadillos are at risk of predation by bobcats, coyotes and hawks. But of course, the greatest threat for an armadillo has treaded tires and rolls—in the form of trucks, cars and motorcycles. Like opossums, the armadillo has the unfortunate tendency to stare at approaching headlights, so although armadillos can jump, it’s not always high or fast enough to win the vehicular battle. These solitary, dinosaur-era animals may look a little funny or downright odd, but they are survivors and have been around for 50 million years! Okay, so they’re not cute balls of fluff. They still need protection, cover, water and loose soil for stirring up some food and North Carolina has all of that. We used to say, “They are coming!” but now we know “They are here!” €

ABOUT OWLS

TAKE A TOUR of the facility at 100 Wildlife Way in Newport. To volunteer, call 252-240-1200. If your organization would like to learn more about wildlife, the OWLS non-releasable education animals jump at the chance! CarolinaSalt.com » February / March 2017 CAROLINA SALT 13


LOCAL FUNDRAISING

THE EMERALD ISLE MARATHON

EI Marathon Poised for Record-Breaking Fundraising

F

or the fourth year in a row, the Emerald Isle Marathon, Half Marathon and 5K promises to be a big success and this year hopes to raise at least $30,000 for the local Crystal Coast Autism Center (CCAC) along with $30,000 for the bike path extension and maintenance, according to Candace Dooley, race director. “We would like to exceed the amount we were able to donate last year and raise at least $62,000 that will be split between the bike path and the Crystal Coast Autism Center,” she said. Proceeds from the first race in 2014 all went to complete the bike path in Emerald Isle. The second year, proceeds were split between the American Heart Association and the bike path and last year the proceeds were split between the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and the bike path. Each year, the choice of which non-profit will get half the proceeds changes, but always has a local tie and is health related. “There are so many great non-profits out there and we get a lot of requests, but we want to keep donating the funds to a health-related non-profit and one that has a local tie,” she said. This year’s local tie is with the race director herself. She has a twin sister, Catie, who was diagnosed with severe autism at age four. Dooley said she let the committee choose this year and the members chose autism awareness unanimously. “My sister was diagnosed at age four. She had symptoms starting at 18 months when she stopped walking and talking. My mom took her all over the country trying to find out what was wrong with her. This was 30 years ago so there wasn’t a lot known about autism,” Dooley said. “They did some early intervention and she enrolled in school. She started talking somewhere between age six and seven and she was able to graduate from high school, although she will always be 100 percent dependent on my parents.” Being the twin of a child with autism was tough and Dooley credits that with helping her become the strong, independent person she has become. Catie was difficult to bring out in public as her autism caused her to throw tantrums and to be quite vocal at inopportune times. “We couldn’t do normal things like other families. We could never go out to dinner with her. It was hard but I adore her now.” Catie will be attending this year’s race and already has an assignment. Volunteers from the CCAC will also be volunteering at the race. In fact, race volunteers are the heart and soul of the race. In addition to the volunteers from the local CCAC, several members of the Alpha Xi Delta sorority chapter from East Carolina University hope to participate as well since their national philanthropy is Autism Speaks and autism awareness related issues. At least 300 volunteers are needed to support all 14 CAROLINA SALT February / March 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

the turns and waters stations for the event so organizers are looking for many more volunteers. Those interested can sign up via the volunteer application Sign Up Genius at www.signupgenius.com/go/10c0849a8a923abf94-wonderful and then more information will be provided as the time draws near. In addition to the new volunteer sign-up application, the start times for the races were adjusted to minimize potential bottle necking during key portions of the races. The marathon will begin at 7 a.m., half marathon at 8:30 a.m. and the 5 K will start at 8:45 a.m. Additionally, the 5K route has been changed slightly to alleviate possible bottle necks at the finish line and offer something new for the runners. “We have five Ethiopian runners this year who have written and asked for visas to run. I have contacted the U.S. Embassy and now we are just waiting for approval. There are three women and two men, and we already have a family who has offered to host them while they’re here,” Dooley said. They chose the race because it is fast and mostly flat. The fact that one of them has a personal record of 2:05 for the marathon caused the race committee to rethink the previous start times and the route for the 5K. Between 1,600 to 2,000 total runners are expected to participate in this year’s race. Sponsors are still needed for the event. For more information go to the race website www.emeraldislerace.com or contact Candace Dooley at doolsgirl@gmail.com. €


CarolinaSalt.com » February / March 2017 CAROLINA SALT 15


NC ARTIFICIAL REEF PROGRAM

DR. BOGUS

Our Artificial Reefs: A Brief History and Guide Jim Francesconi, the coordinator of the AR Program from 2000 to 2014, passed away from a long bout with leukemia In July 2014. Jim was the heart and soul of the program during that time and he particularly loved AR-330. The ship was renamed the James J. Francesconi and sunk in his honor. A plate acknowledging that is permanently affixed to the ship. The following is a radio interview with Jason Peters, coordinator of North Carolina’s artificial reef program, in September 2016. It has been lightly edited for clarity.

T

oday I’m talking to Jason Peters, Coordinator of North Carolina’s Artificial Reef Program. Welcome, Jason! Can you give us a brief history of NCs AR program? Then we will talk about the new Artificial Reef Guide. So, I guess back in the 1940s and 1950s there was a lot of interest in fishing hard bottom but one of the major issues was the hard bottom habitat was so far offshore. So grass-roots efforts began to put material a little bit closer to shore. It was fairly disorganized and there was no real standard of what types of materials to use. There were bathtubs, washing machines and things like that and they worked for a couple of years, but then they would rust away and be gone. Then in the mid-1980s the state took over from the individual permits that existed out there and set a standard on how we would build artificial reefs. One of the things that we do preserve is the idea that we want to improve access so we try to build reefs that people can get to that they can fish. Since the 1980s we’ve been chugging along. We’ve been building lots of reefs—we’ve got 62 now, including the estuarine reefs—and we try to enhance anywhere from two to four a year by sinking ships of putting concrete pipe and things like that. One of the reefs that has been enhanced recently was AR-330, where you sank a ship renamed the James J. Francesconi in honor of Jim, the former coordinator of the AR Program. How did that sinking go? Well it’s always stressful when you sink a ship; there are so many things that can go wrong. There is even a potential for people to get hurt. But everything went off without a hitch—very, very well. Sank right to the bottom, didn’t roll or anything. We actually sank two vessels. They are both upright right in line as we planned. Clearance is about 17 feet,

so we meet all our permitting requirements and from what we hear there are tons of fish on them and the visibility is great. Now to the new Artificial Reef Guide. If you go to the NCDMF website or stop by their offices in Morehead City, they have it available. I’m holding in my hands the original AR guide, done by Stephen Murphey back in 1995! It has nice handdrawn pictures of boats and rubble and concrete pipes and LORAN numbers which have to be translated into some other language for us to understand them right now. The new guide, which was paid for by our Coastal Recreational Fishing License (CRFL) fees…can you give us an idea of what it looks like, how it’s organized? I’ll start off by saying we’re really proud of this. It’s been over 20 years since the last publication and there are a lot of people who put in a lot of time into this, particularly Amy Comer-Flowers and Rachel Love-Adrick. They really created this and edited it. It’s a spiralbound book and it’s got waterproof pages. We have every single artificial reef in North Carolina—all 62 of them. It’s broken down into sections by bays in the ocean. All the reefs in the Outer Banks are in one section; Raleigh Bay which is from Cape Hatteras to Cape Lookout; Onslow Bay; Long Bay and then our estuarine reefs. And if you go to any particular reef you get a table and you get a map. So the map is outlined reef patches that are based off of side scan sonar imagery that was collected in the last 5 or 6 years and an identifier. And that identifier number will link you back to the table where you can read about the material type, when it was deployed and get GPS coordinates for each one of those patches. On top of that for each reef, you get provided the magnetic direction and distance from nearby inlets. I noticed in the guide book that you can

16 CAROLINA SALT February / March 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

write in your own notes. Absolutely! We got a little note section so that as you’re fishing it as you decide which patches you like best or what you’re catching or different conditions you can write down your notes and go back and hopefully recreate the scenario the next time you fish. Now on these reefs you have ‘patches’ of stuff. How were those generated where you have clusters of pipes or ships? As I mentioned, each reef has been side scanned in the last 5 or 6 years. CRFL funds actually funded a staff member to outline each one of the patches in GIS (Geographic Information Systems) and that’s how we got those. What you see is actually what’s on the bottom. I noticed that it’s really up to date, since it even has the boats you sank this spring there at AR-330. You ran out there and did the final touchups before this got printed? Yes, we wanted it to be the most up-todate, the most accurate version that we could provide. I think the plan is every 5 or 6 years we’ll try to come up with an update. Not 20 years! No, not 20 years! We’ll try to be a little quicker than that. Another really big advantage, if you go to the Marine Fisheries website, is that the new guide links to a user-friendly interactive website, with simple-to-follow, short tutorials. Can you explain how that is set up and how the sonar side scan data is represented? We’re trying to keep up with the times, so we’ve gone digital with our reef guide. There’s an online interactive version that you can find on our website at portal.ncdenr.org/web/mf/ artificial-reefs-program. Essentially, you get all the information that you can get in the printed guide, and then in addition to that there are me


DR. BOGUS

NC ARTIFICIAL REEF PROGRAM

These pictures are from the late Jim Francesconi, former coordinator of the AR program at NCDMF. This was his favorite reef and he took these photos. The reef is around 65 feet in depth. Flounder patiently waiting for breakfast on top of a concrete pipe.

mapping tools that help you determine distances and distances between patches, for example. You can also create personalized maps of certain areas on reefs that you can print out. I noticed that you can create an outline around a particular area, mark that or print it out or preserve it. That’s exactly right. If there’s a certain portion of a reef you really like or you want to zoom in on you can zoom in on that and print it right out. It’s like a Google Maps, going in and looking at neighborhoods. That’s a good description! That’s actually the description that I use to explain it to people. It’s a lot like Google Maps where you can zoom in.

Reef balls at AR 330.

I also noticed that as I moved a cursor over spots, I got their GPS locations. That’s correct! If you find a patch you like, you can click on it and there will be a little pop-up window that will give you GPS information and material information. With some of the vessels there are links to the history of the vessel that was sunk there, so it you are a history buff you can get a little background information on that vessel. Also with the zooming tool, you can see individual pipes and reef balls and things like that. It’s real neat. So Jason, what are the future plans of the artificial reef program? We’re very, very active. We have a lot going on. This year we’re planning on sinking two vessels at AR-320 (that’s the Novelty ship site off Atlantic Beach). If all goes well we’ll get that done sometime late this fall or winter or in the early part of 2017 depending on how the cleaning process goes. We’re also looking at two brand-new artificial reefs that will be estuarine artificial reefs in Bogue Sound, one potentially in Cedar Point and one in Atlantic Beach, so we’re in the very early stages of planning that out. We’ve got an enhancement project down at AR-430 down off Oak Island that will be about 4,000 tons of concrete pipe and we’ve also got some work proposed at AR-372—that’s down off Wrightsville Beach—that’s again a concrete pipe project.

Sand tiger shark patrolling the concrete pipes at AR 330.

Concrete, that’s a great reef material. It really is. It provides great habitat—lots of nooks and crannies. And we’re also looking into a brand-new artificial reef site in the ocean off the Outer Banks. Would that be from the Bonner Bridge material? Actually no, this would be completely new and—pending a CRFL application that’s in right now and depending on whether or not that gets funded—there might be a new reef up there.

Ship poised to dump concrete pipe at AR 330.

So what will be the status of the Bonner Bridge remains as they tear down the old bridge for the new span? For the Bonner Bridge material we’re looking at sometime in 2018. Once the new bridge is constructed they will demolish the old one and we’ll and we’ll take that material and distribute among the four reefs on the Outer Banks.” That will make a lot of material! Yes, 80,000 tons!

That beats tires! Don’t even speak those words around here! €

CarolinaSalt.com » February / March 2017 CAROLINA SALT 17


LOCAL ART SCENE

ART FROM THE HEART

Van Gogh Re-wired (mixed media) by Walter Cole | Seen Many A Day (photography) by Sally Lumpkin | Meditation (watercolor) by Dixie Leibert

‘Art From the Heart’ Art Show in Morehead City

F

ebruary and March will be a special month for the arts in Carteret County. The Arts Council of Carteret County will present two very popular exhibitions, its 27th annual Art From the Heart event and a Student Art Show featuring artwork from the public, private and homeschooled students of the county. On Friday evening, February 17, 2017, The Arts Council of Carteret County (ACCC) will open its signature event, Art From The Heart , an exhibition and sale of original artwork created by artists from multiple eastern North Carolina counties. The location for Art From The Heart 2017 will be the west end of Morehead Plaza, in the 2900 block of Arendell Street in Morehead City, North Carolina, between Snap Fitness Center and The Tractor Supply Store. The gallery will be open for two weeks, opening with a reception and awards presentations at 5:30 pm on February 17th and closing on Saturday, March 4th at 5:00 pm. Admission to the gallery is free. Gallery hours will be Monday thru Wednesday, 10:00 am until 6:00 pm; Thursday thru Saturday, 10:00 am until 5:00 pm; and Sundays, noon until 5:00 pm. Art From the Heart is a non-juried presentation of the creative talents of adult artists at all levels of expertise. Artists from Carteret, Craven, Pamlico and Onslow counties may participate whether or not they are members of the Arts Council and artists from all other counties may participate if they are ACCC members.

Two and three-dimensional artwork in all media including oils, acrylics, pastels, charcoals, watercolors, collage, mixed media, woodturning, pottery, fiber art, jewelry, sculpture and photography will be on display and for sale in this show. Artist registration will be held on Friday and Saturday, February 10th and 11th from 10:00 am until 4:00 pm, and Sunday, February 12th from 9:00 until 1:00 pm. Rules for entry and entry forms can be viewed and downloaded from the ACCC’s website: www. artscouncilcarteret.org An opening reception with awards presentations for Art From the Heart will be held on Friday, February 17th from 5:30 until 7:30 pm. The public is invited to drop by, meet the artists and get an early viewing of the show. Admission to the reception is free. Artists who are awarded Awards of Excellence will each receive $200 and those receiving honorable mention recognition will be awarded $50. A People’s Choice award of $200 will also be given at the end of the show. In 2016, the ACCC awarded $5,600 to artists who won awards during the show. The judge for Art From the Heart 2017 will be Raleigh, NC artist, teacher and gallery owner, Nicole White Kennedy. Ms. Kennedy studied at Parson’s School of Design and School of Visual Arts in NYC pursuing an Ad Art Director career in print and TV. In 1996 she moved to Raleigh opening Caffe Luna with her husband and started painting full time to decorate and sell out of the restaurant. In 2000, she established Nicole’s Studio & Art

18 CAROLINA SALT February / March 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

Gallery, eventually representing many artists from local to national acclaim. According to her website, the Studio and Art Gallery is now the #1 gallery for art instruction in the Raleigh area. “I cannot remember when I didn’t draw,” says Ms. Kennedy. “My formative years were spent doodling in the margins. Having grown up around restaurateurs, I am by nature drawn to drama, storytelling and have acquired a lifelong habit of people watching. Which explains why I am particularly enamored with street scenes and beach people …subjects with a narrative flair. Recently I have been exploring the figure in movement and have created an ongoing series featuring the Carolina Ballet. Being part Italian, I am artistically seduced by colorful ‘al Fresco’ European lifestyles and attitudes captured on canvas.” Ms. Kennedy’s full resume and selections of her work can be viewed at her website: http:// www.nicolestudio.com/bio.html and http:// www.nicolestudio.com/images/nicoleart.html A critique and commentary session for artists will be conducted by Ms Kennedy at 6:30 pm on Monday, February 13th at the Art From The Heart gallery. Artists may sign up for the session at AFH registration or by contacting the Arts Council. The cost will be $10 per participant. According to ACCC board member and Art From the Heart 2017 co-chair Lee Lumpkin, last year’s Art From the Heart event was a tremendous success.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 22


CAPTAIN JEFF CRONK

HOOKED UP FISHING REPORT

WINTER OPPORTUNITIES A H O O K E D U P L O O K A T W H A T ’ S B I T I N G I N F E B R U A RY

F

ebruary and March can be tough months for fishermen due to the cold air and water temperatures but there should be some mild days that offer some excellent fishing opportunities. We have a few species that remain here along the Crystal Coast regardless of how cold it gets and they must eat! Our inshore waters and surf zone will be holding Speckled Trout, Redfish and even a few Black Drum throughout the month. Due to the cold temperatures, fish will definitely be schooled up and anglers will want to focus their efforts in the right areas.

SPECKLED TROUT Many of our larger speckled trout have moved into upriver situations. They migrate into the main channels up our rivers, into the deeper, protected creeks off our rivers and into smaller creeks or canals along the mainland sounds and ICW. The colder the weather, the faster and farther they go! There will still be many smaller trout with some good sized fish mixed in along the deep channels and creeks near our inlets as well as the surf zone. There are certain baits that work well in the areas with current and certain baits work better in areas with little to no current, such as our upper creeks. A general rule of thumb while trout fishing is to go light. Trout seem to respond more aggressively to baits that have long hang times or suspend times. I like to use ⅛-oz. to ₃⁄₁₆-oz jig heads with my Gulp baits or soft plastics while fishing the channels and creeks closer to our inlets that have currents. When I fish upper creeks or canals, I scale down to ₁⁄₁₆-oz jigheads. Some of my favorite soft baits to put on my jig heads include: Berkley Gulp’s 3" and 4" Pearl White Shrimp, 4" Smelt Minnow, 5" Jerkshad in Pink or White and Berkley Powerbait’s 3" Pro Grub or Pro Twitch Bait Minnow in Chartreuse Ice or Pink Ice. My favorite pre-weighted soft bait is Bett’s Perfect Sinker Shrimp and Halo Shad. These baits have a slow decent requiring about a 1 second pause for every 1 foot of depth I’m fishing. They produce vicious strikes and work very well in areas of little to no current.

REDFISH When looking for redfish this February, anglers should focus on the surf zone when we have sunny days with northerly, northwesterly or westerly breezes. The surf will lay down flat allowing anglers to approach the surf zone while, sunny skies will allow anglers to see through the water and spot schools of redfish moving along the surf. Once located, these fish will usually strike any soft bait cast into the school. I like a ½-oz. jighead tipped with a Berkley Gulp 4" Shrimp or Rippled Mullet. When we have multiple warm days some of these schools of redfish will move through the inlets and scour the shallow flats and bays behind our beaches in search of food. Anglers can spend time on the trolling motor, quietly moving through these shallow bays looking for reds. Once located, it’s usually no problem to hook up with dozens of reds ranging from 4 to 10 pounds. It’s important to use little to no weight with your baits because most of the shallow flats will have a thick, green algae covering the bottom during winter months. I like to rig a 4" Smelt Gulp Minnow on a ₁⁄₁₆-oz. jighead or a 5" Smelt Gulp Jerkshad on a weightless hook (weedless). Whether you’re looking for trout or reds this January one thing is true, the weather may slow many anglers down but the fish must eat! Keep an eye on the extended forecast and keep your boat ready to go. Remember, if you put the time in you can have a successful fishing trip this February. €

FISH’N 4 LIFE CAPTAIN JEFF CRONK

leads fishing and nature charters on the Crystal Coast. To get out on the water with him, call 910-325-8194. You can also visit him online at nccharterfishing.com.

CarolinaSalt.com » February / March 2017 CAROLINA SALT 19


DISCOVERY DIVING

LEE MOORE

DIVING OUR COAST W H A T ’ S U N D E R W A T E R I N F E B R U A RY

T

he weather in January seemed more like late fall with temperatures in the 60s and 70s, but there were days with temperatures in the 30s that reminded us that it was still winter. While the air temperatures fluctuated, the water temperatures were consistently in the 50s and 60s. Since the warmer water is further offshore, charters that are going out are heading south to the wrecks such as the Papoose, U-352, Aeolus or Spar. If you are going to dive on the wrecks of the Crystal Coast, you need to have the right equipment.

CRITICAL EQUIPMENT: DIVE KNIFE One of the first pieces of equipment that new divers get is a knife. Knives aren’t used as weapons, but are used primarily for cutting fishing line that causes entanglement on the wrecks and rocks. Most knives have a point on them, but some have a blunt tip. You don’t want the point to be so narrow that it will break off. It needs to be sturdy so it can be used for prying objects. The knife needs to have both a straight edge and a serrated edge, which can be used for sawing. Some knives have a fishing line cutter built into the blade. The blade doesn’t have to be very long. A short knife can usually do as much as a bigger knife.

CRITICAL EQUIPMENT: WRECK REEL When a diver explores a wreck off of the Crystal Coast, the layout of the wreck can make navigation difficult. If the wreck is spread out, a diver can get lost and might not be able to find their way back to the anchor and the boat. If the visibility is low, this could limit the diver’s ability to navigate a wreck. To alleviate this difficulty and assist in navigation, a diver can use a wreck reel. A wreck reel has polypropylene line on it that ranges in length from 150 to 600 feet. For ease of use, a wreck reel has a handle, a locking mechanism and a tension control. The locking mechanism keeps the reel from turning and releasing line. The tension control limits the rate at which the line can be played out. The reels need to have knobs that can be easily used while wearing gloves.

CRITICAL EQUIPMENT: SURFACE MARKER BUOY If a diver is unable to locate the anchor, the diver will have to surface by doing a free ascent, without a reference line. As the diver rises, current can cause the diver to drift away from the boat. Once the diver surfaces, they can be yards—even hundreds of yards—away from the boat. The farther the diver is away from the boat, the harder it is for the crew to see the diver. A diver can use a surface marker buoy, a tubular device that is inflated so that it extends out of the water. Surface marker buoys range in size from 3 to 6 feet and come in yellow, orange and yellow and orange.

CRITICAL EQUIPMENT: WHISTLE Being seen is one way to get the crew’s attention, being heard is another. A diver can easily carry a whistle and its sound carries well over the water. Another sound-generating device is an audible alarm that uses air from the diver’s tank to create a signal. The diver pushes a button and a piercingly loud signal that can be heard a mile away is produced. The device is designed so it can be integrated into a diver’s existing gear. These tools can help divers have a more enjoyable experience on the wrecks off of the Crystal Coast. All of these are easily carried by divers and are easily used if they are needed. If you need more information about any of these or other tools for diving on the Crystal Coast, contact Discovery Diving at 252-728-2265 or at dive@discoverydiving.com or like us on Facebook to see what events are coming up in the near future. €

JOIN DISCOVERY CONTACT

Discovery Diving at 252-728-2265 or visit them on Facebook to see what classes and events are coming up. You can also visit them online at discoverydiving.com.

JOIN ECARA ECARA

works to continue sinking ships to create artificial reefs here in North Carolina, but their resources are limited. To get involved, visit carolinareef.org. 20 CAROLINA SALT February / March 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com


FEBRUARY 7 TO MARCH 7

CAPE HATTERAS TIDE CHART

200

NORTH CAROLINA

WET & DRY SLIPS

WILDLIFE SERVICE AGENT

BOAT SERVICE OFFICIAL CITATION WEIGH STATION

The most complete bait & tackle marina on the East Coast. Extensive boat storage and a friendly staff make Dudley’s a one-stop shop for all your boating needs.

ETHANOLFREE GAS AT THE DOCKS

HIGHWAY 24 EAST • SWANSBORO • 252-393-2204 • DUDLEYSMARINA.NET


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18 “One hundred and seventy artists submitted work in 2016, thirty of whom had never entered our show before,” stated Mr. Lumpkin. “Last year, the show featured two hundred and ninety pieces of artwork, many of which were sold during the exhibition. Over the last decade, Art From the Heart has become one of the largest and most popular art shows in eastern North Carolina. Sales of artwork have increased each year as have the number of visitors to the gallery. An estimated twenty three hundred people visited the gallery in 2016.” Other events associated with Art From the Heart 2017 will include The Carteret County Chamber of Commerce’s Business After Hours reception to be held at the Art From The Heart gallery on Thursday, February 16th at 5:30 pm. This event will be sponsored by the Arts Council of Carteret County. Co-sponsors are Amos Mosquito’s Restaurant, Wells Fargo and Carteret Landing Assisted Living and Memory Care. Business After Hours at the Art From The Heart gallery has in past years drawn some of the largest indoor crowds for similar Chamber events. Tickets will be available for $5 each through the Chamber at 252-726-6350 and should be purchased in advance. The ACCC’s Student Art Show will be presented by the Arts Council immediately following Art From The Heart. On display will be artwork created by young artists from all public and private schools and homeschooled students in Carteret County. Last year, over twelve hundred paintings, drawings and three dimensional works were displayed by the students of Carteret County. The student art show will be open to the public at no charge from 4pm-6pm on Monday-Friday and 12 noon-4pm on Saturdays & Sundays. This show will also be held in Morehead Plaza in the unit between Snap Fitness and the Tractor Supply Store. The Art From The Heart Student Art Show will open on Friday, March 10th and close on Sunday, March 19th . A reception and awards presentation for the student show will be held on Thursday, March 17th from 5:30 until 7:30 at the gallery. The reception is open to the public at no charge. Sponsors of both Art From The Heart and the Student Art Show are Morehead Plaza, First Citizens Bank, Select Bank and Trust, Carteret Landing and Wells Fargo. The student art show will also be sponsored by the Arendell Room and Oceanana Resort. For more information regarding Art From the Heart 2017 and the student art show that follows, please visit the ACCC’s website at www. artscouncilcarteret.org. The Council can also be contacted at PO Box 2294, Morehead City, NC (28557) or by calling (252) 726-9156. €

HUMANE SOCIETY &Animal Shelter

Meet Todo! M

eet Todo! She came into the shelter in November when her owner’s landlord would no longer allow her to stay. Todo is around 2 years old, up to date on her vaccinations, and house trained. She is a social and lovable girl. Her coat is unique—it is like a black and brown mix. Stop by the shelter today and visit with Todo and give her back the home life she misses. PLEASE COME TO THE SHELTER and meet some of the wonderful cats that are up for adoption! Can’t adopt today? We’d love some toys, litter, or food (especially kitten food). Maybe you will have some time to snuggle and love on us while you’re here. It makes the cats’ time here more enjoyable to get love & attention. We need volunteers & foster homes! INTERESTING IN VOLUNTEERING? GIVE US A CALL! Would you like to help by making a donation? Scan the code for our Amazon Wish List—everything helps.

Adopt, don’t shop! 853 HIBBS ROAD, NEWPORT | 252-247-7744 22 CAROLINA SALT February / March 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

MON–FRI 10-1 & 2-5 | SAT: 10-4 | SUN: CLOSED


A casual island eatery with a touch of class. Lunch Specials TUESDAY Tacos Chef’s Choice

WEDNESDAY Gulf Stream Tuna Salad Chef’s Choice

THURSDAY Grilled Turkey & Brie Chef’s Choice

FRIDAY Shrimp Scampi Burger Chef’s Choice

Dinner Specials TUESDAY Shrimp & Grits Chef’s Choice

WEDNESDAY Meatloaf Chef’s Choice

THURSDAY Lasagna Chef’s Choice

FRIDAY Prime Rib Homemade Spaghetti

SEAFOOD ♥ STEAKS ♥ SANDWICHES 311 Mangrove Drive Across from CVS in Emerald Isle 252.354.7775 • flipperz.net • facebook.com/flipperzemeraldisle

Open Tuesday–Thursday 11am–8pm • Friday-Saturday 11am–9pm Sunday 11am–8pm • CLOSED MONDAYS


caribsearestaurant.com

EMERALD ISLE // NORTH CAROLINA

FISH

Sustainable local seafood utilizing modern cooking techniques. From local boats to our table– prepared with a Southern flair.

PRIME

Prime certified Angus® beef. Aged up to 36 days in-house for maximum flavor, and simply prepared, showcasing the best of American ranchers.

RAW

Special techniques in preparing seafood and beef ensure food safety and maximum flavor and texture.

JOIN US AT THE A ROOFTOP EXPERIENCE

Best Sunset on the Island

//

Bar Menu

//

Drink Specials

open for lunch & dinner // 8920 crew drive // emerald isle // 252.424.8400

Carolina Salt February 2017  
Advertisement