Page 1

FREE! AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

your life on the Crystal Coast

Welcome

back to school 2018

LOOK INSIDE ON PAGE 8 FOR FUN & FREE

THINGS TO DO MID–AUGUST THROUGH MID–SEPTEMBER


—Home of the Crystal Coast Steam Pot—

Enjoy a coastal casual atmosphere comfortable for the whole family. We offer a variety of fresh seafood including all your favorites from sea and shore, from shrimp and clams to Angus beef, plus an extensive gluten-free menu and plenty of desserts.

www.SnapperzSteamBar.com JOIN US IN

NOW WITH 2 LOCATIONS!

3710 ARENDELL STREET

LUNCH, DINNER AND KIDS MENU ALL DAY!

The Boat Bar

MOREHEAD CITY • 252.240.1313

JOIN US IN

The Oyster Bar

8106 EMERALD DRIVE

EMERALD ISLE • 252.354.5722


Discover a different world

GO PRO! LOVE YOUR JOB! TRAVEL! OUR CAREER SCUBA DIVING PROGRAMS ARE ELIGIBLE FOR USE OF YOUR GI BILL® BENEFITS. Our school is nationally accredited by ACCET, which also allows NC National Guard to use Tuition Assistance for these programs.

414 ORANGE STREET » BEAUFORT » 252.SCUBA.OK » discoverydiving.com


A casual island eatery with a touch of class.

AUGUST 10

4EVERALL AUGUST 17

JEFF SCOTT

AUGUST 24

NAKED KNEES

AUGUST 31

CHRIS BELLAMY

SEAFOOD ♥ STEAKS ♥ SANDWICHES 311 Mangrove Drive Across from CVS in Emerald Isle 252.354.7775 • flipperz.net • facebook.com/flipperzemeraldisle


MID-AUG U ST TO M I D-SE PT E M B E R 2 0 1 8

Inside This Issue your life on the Crystal Coast

13 The Regal Purple Martin The Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter recently

welcomed a Purple Martin with no visible injuries or illnesses. She didn’t seem to want to eat, and was refusing mealworms—but it all worked out, thanks to creative thinking by rehabilitators!

15 What Do Shrimp Eat? Shrimp show up on our plates in restaurants here

13

WILDLIFE SHELTER: The Regal Purple Martin

FREE!

AUGUST

/ SEPTEMBER

2018

t stal Coas on the Cry your life

Welcome

l

back to sc20h18oo

ST MID–AUGU

E

FUN & FRE

TO DO

E 8 FOR

IDE ON PAG

THINGS

LOOK INS

THROUGH

EMBER

MID–SEPT

August / September ON THIS MONTH’S COVER

The summer is drawing to a very rainy close, and a new school year is about to begin. We’re ready for cooler temperatures and looking forward to the holiday season!

on the Crystal Coast, but what are they dining on in our coastal waters? The experts at the NC Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores have answers for you, and some interesting facts as well.

16 Disaster Preparedness: Do It Now The best time to prepare for a disaster is before it hits. Developing an emergency plan can help you protect, prepare and respond more calmly in the event of a disaster. Helpful lists include lots of things you might not think of.

18 It’s For Your Own Good Pastor Paul Ortiz of the Island Church in Emerald Isle shares his insight on “pull the lever” religion— one that delivers answers to prayer on demand— and why that doesn’t provide what we really need.

22 LOL!: Back To School If you’re in need of a good laugh, flip to the end for Kim Murdoch’s hilarious take on getting the kids back to school. For her, “It’s The Most Wonderful Time of the Year.”

15 WHAT DO SHRIMP EAT? Have you ever wondered what these tiny things eat?

16 HURRICANE PLAN The time to get a plan together is before you’re under stress!

LOCAL INTEREST

Things To Do................................................ 8 Hooked Up Fishing...................................... 19 Diving Our Coast.. ....................................... 20 Tides. . ........................................................ 21

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2018 CAROLINA SALT 5


NOW OPEN DELI • DRINKS PREPARED FOODS BREAKFAST • LUNCH OPEN 7 DAYS

PUBLISHER

WILL ASHBY C R E AT I V E D I R E C TO R

C H E V Y K AY LO R B E C O M E A C O N T R I BU TO R

Submit your letters to the editor, photos, community listings and articles to will@carolinasalt.com. The editorial deadline for the next issue is August 16. The next issue publishes September 7.

B E C O M E A N A DV E RT I S E R

Carolina Salt is a great way to reach out to your local customers, as well as our seasonal visitors.

252-723-7628

Call us to find out how we can help you grow your local business. FROM THE PUBLISHER

Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt magazine, all about our life here on the Crystal Coast. Our articles are written by locals. Every month we look to our readers to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote or an interesting local photograph, send them our way. Participation is welcomed and appreciated. Reader contributions are the founding principle of the magazine. If you like what you see, tell people about it— especially our advertisers. For questions, concerns or more information, send e-mail to will@carolinasalt.com or call 252-723-7628. For up-to-date info, be sure to look us up on Facebook!

133-A TURNER STREET BEAUFORT 252.838.9381

WE DEPEND ON OUR READERS! Call 252-723-7628 if you’re interested in submitting an article or photo. Our local content is what keeps our magazine fresh and relevant. PUBLISHED BY CRYSTAL COAST OUTDOORS PUBLICATIONS P.O. Box 572, Morehead City, NC 28557 | 252-723-7628


OUTFITTING SALTWATER ANGLERS & BOATERS FOR OVER 15 YEARS! Our knowledgeable staff can assist you with all your fishing and boating needs. AUTHORIZED DEALER

7802 EMERALD DRIVE • EMERALD ISLE TheReelOutdoors.com • 252-354-6692 RODS & REELS | BAIT & TACKLE | REEL REPAIR | MARINE SUPPLIES SUNGLASSES | APPAREL | SANDALS, SHOES & FLOPS

Join us for breakfast daily starting at 7am 7802 EMERALD DRIVE

EMERALD ISLE • 252.354.6592 VILLAGEMARKETOFEI.COM


THINGS TO DO

WEDNESDAYS–SUNDAYS

Climb the Cape Lookout Lighthouse

[ 10:15AM–4PM ] The Cape Lookout Lighthouse is

WEDNESDAYS–SUNDAYS

LIGHTHOUSE CLIMB

Climb the Cape Lookout Lighthouse starting at 10:15 a.m. Self-guided tours start every 15 minutes. For information visit islandexpressferryservices.com.

open for climbing for self-guided tours of up to 10 people. Children must be at least 44” tall. Regular admission $8, children and seniors $4. Ticket prices do not include cost of ferry transportation. Warning: Climbing the 207 steps to the gallery is roughly equal to climbing a 12-story building. The stairs are narrow and groups going up will share the stairs with groups returning to the bottom. The lighthouse may close at any time if conditions are determined to be unsafe. For more information visit islandexpressferryservices.com or call 252728-7433. THURSDAYS

Sunset Lady Swan Cruises

Swansboro Parks and Recreation is partnering with Lady Swan Boat Tours to offer Thursday Sunset Cruises departing from the Main Street dock. Join us aboard the Lady Swan on Thursday evenings for a one-hour relaxing and scenic cruise around historic downtown Swansboro, the Intracoastal Waterway and nearby Huggins Island, a part of Hammocks Beach State Park. Enjoy the sights and sounds of being on the water and if you’re lucky you may get a glimpse of some local wildlife. The cruise ends with a beautiful sunset. Call 910-326-2600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center, 830 Main Street Extension. Cost is $10 per person; children under 2 are free.

✪THURSDAYS AUGUST 11

‘DO IT FOR DREW’ COLOR RUN

On Emerald Isle. Help the Do It For Drew Foundation save lives and make a positive difference. For more information visit doitfordrew.org.

EmeraldFest Concert Series

[ 6:30PM ] Emerald Isle’s popular EmeraldFest

outdoor concert series is back again this summer, with concerts every Thursday evening on the oceanfront at the Western Ocean Regional Access, located off Islander Drive. Please bring your friends, lawn chairs or a blanket and enjoy some great music from several different genres! August 9................................................. Pure T Mommicked August 16...........................................................Naked Knees SATURDAYS

Morehead City Curb Market [ 8AM–1PM ] We are a quaint, old market

welcoming vendors of handmade and hand grown products since 1931. We are open every Saturday morning at 13th and Evans Streets in Morehead City. For more information call 978-621-5436.

✪SATURDAYS ✪ AUGUST 8, 15

MOVIE NIGHT

On the Circle along the Boardwalk in Atlantic Beach. Bring chairs or blankets. Rain date is Thursday night. At 115 Atlantic Boulevard. Free and open to the public. 8

✪ = FREE

MID–AUGUST TO MID–SEPTEMBER

✪SATURDAYS

Olde Beaufort Farmers’ Market [ 8:30AM–1PM ] Head to the Olde Beaufort

Farmers’ Market on lazy summer Saturday mornings on the courthouse square in Beaufort. You’ll find farmers with beautiful, fresh local veggies, meats and seafood along with artists and craftspeople offering their work in the shade under the huge live oaks. Catch up with your neighbors, make new friends, have a cup of iced tea, lemonade or coffee and some breakfast from the market bakers or lunch with the food truck. Listen to entertainment from local musicians and enjoy this hometown market that has something for everyone! Find more about weekly events at oldebeaufortfarmersmarket.org or on Facebook. At 300 Court House Square, Beaufort. For more information call 252-564-8822. SUNDAYS

SwansFest Summer Concerts [ 6:30PM ] The popular SwansFest outdoor concert

series is back again, with concerts every Sunday evening at The Pavilion at Olde Towne Square in historical downtown Swansboro. Please bring your friends, lawn chairs or a blanket and enjoy some great music from several different genres!

August 12............................................................. Now & Then August 19.................................... Notorious Clamslammers August 26...........................................Monika Jaymes Band September 2........................................................Pizazz Band SUNDAYS

Lady Swan Cruise Series Swansboro Parks and Recreation is partnering with Lady Swan Boat Tours to offer a summer cruise series! Join us aboard the Lady Swan on Sunday afternoons for a one-hour relaxing and scenic cruise around historic downtown Swansboro, the Intracoastal Waterway and nearby Huggins Island, a part of Hammocks Beach State Park. Enjoy the sights and sounds of being on the water and if you’re lucky you may get a glimpse of some local wildlife. At the end of the cruise stay downtown and enjoy live music from bands performing as part of SwanFest at the Olde Town Square. For questions, please call 910-326-2600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center, 830 Main Street Extension. Cost is $10 per person; children under 2 are free.

Free Summer Concerts On the Morehead City Waterfront

✪AUGUST 8, 15

Morehead City waterfront at Jaycee Park, 807 Shepard Street.

nights at the Circle along the Boardwalk in Atlantic Beach. Bring chairs or blankets. Rain date is Thursday night. At 115 Atlantic Boulevard, Atlantic Beach.

[ 7–8:30PM ] Enjoy live entertainment on the

August 11....................................................................... Scearce August 18............................. Calico Creek Bluegrass Band August 25.....................................................................NiteOwl September 1........................................ Carolina Beach Club

CAROLINA SALT August / September 2018 » CarolinaSalt.com

Movie Night at Atlantic Beach [ 8:30PM ] Come out for free Wednesday movie

August 8...................................................... Despicable Me 3 August 15.......................................A Wrinkle In Time (2018)


✪ = FREE

MID–AUGUST TO MID–SEPTEMBER

AUGUST 9

Shackleford Banks Hike: Did Blackbeard See Horses?

Experience Outer Banks heritage and wildlife with a guided hike on Shackleford Banks, part of the Cape Lookout National Seashore. Participants will see an undeveloped barrier island like Blackbeard may have seen. This field trip requires hiking through sandy terrain for long distances. Under 18 must be accompanied by an adult, not suitable for children under 12. Advance registration required. Call the Program Registrar at 252504-7758. Cost is $30. North Carolina Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort, NC 28516. For information call 252-504-7740 or visit ncmaritimemuseumbeaufort.com.

✪AUGUST 10 | SEPTEMBER 7

Friday Free Flick—Emerald Isle

Movies are family oriented. Free and open to the public, children must be accompanied by an adult. Popcorn and drink for $1. Please bring chairs and or blankets, no outside beverages or snacks. Call 252-354-6350 for movie title. At Emerald Isle Community Center, 203 Leisure Lane, Emerald Isle.

✪AUGUST 10–11

Beaufort Pirate Invasion: Join the 300-Year Legend

It has been 300 years since the notorious pirate Blackbeard lost his ship, the Queen Anne’s Revenge, in Beaufort waters. Since that time, many legends have emerged, some based on facts, some born of imagination. Either way, Blackbeard has become an inseparable part of our story! August 10–11 of this year, the Beaufort Pirate Invasion will acknowledge this part of our history. Every August, the Beaufort Pirate Invasion attracts thousands of people to our community to be entertained by pirate-themed activities and historical re-enactments while enjoying spending time in the nation’s Coolest Small Town. The Beaufort Pirate Invasion, Inc., is a community-based organization comprised of dedicated volunteers, historical re-enactors and history enthusiasts. Our mission is to celebrate the rich history of our town by bringing to life our interpretation of the Spanish attack of 1747

and the history of piracy along our coast. This year, event will donate a portion of proceeds to the Bonehenge Whale Center, a project of the Carolina City Maritime Foundation. Learn more at www.bonehenge.org.

✪AUGUST 10

Free Outdoor Movie Night at The Barnyard in Newport [ 8PM ] Free movie night—Ferdinand. Movie

starts as soon as it’s dark! Bring your own snacks and drinks, chairs and blankets! Please no pets or alcohol! This is not a chance to see the animals, but to enjoy an outdoor family movie! Located at 844 Roberts Road, Newport. For information call 252-223-2950. AUGUST 10

Horsin’ Around Camps at Trade-Win IV Farm

[ 9AM–NOON ] Trade-Win IV Farm are hosting

Horsin’ Around camps! Five half-day camps are planned for ages 5 to 15 years. Campers will be divided into age-appropriate groups and will enjoy horse riding and learning about complete horse care, crafts and more. Snacks and drinks will be provided. Camp is $35 (sibling discount of $5). Sign up by emailing tradewinfarm@gmail.com. AUGUST 11

Do It for Drew 5K Color Run

[ 7:30AM ] Join in the 4th annual Do It For Drew

5K Color Run on Emerald Isle. The route will take you on a scenic tour of the sound side of the island. Along the way you will be dusted with the bright colors that remind us of how bright and happy Drew Hughes always was, and is, in our hearts! Your participation in and support of this event will help The Do It For Drew Foundation save lives and make a positive difference in so many more. To learn more about The Do It For Drew Foundation and for links to all events visit doitfordrew.org. AUGUST 11

Hook + Bones Redfish Open

Swansboro Parks and Recreation and Hook and Bones clothing and water lifestyle company is proud to present the 2018 Hook and Bones Redfish Open. The tournament, weigh-ins and

THINGS TO DO

awards will take place at the Harry C. Pugliese pavilion in Olde Towne Square located on the corner of Front St. and Church St. The event will feature cash payouts for the top anglers, based on boats fishing, including a guaranteed first place payout of $5,000. In addition to main event winnings there is are contingency cash and prizes from sponsors, trophies and plaques. Anglers can sign up for the tournament by visiting Swansboro Parks and Recreation or calling 910-326-2600. Online registration is also available at Swansboro. recdesk.com. Coastal Conservation Association will be hosting a free youth fishing tournament in conjunction with the Hook and Bones Redfish Open. Kids fishing from land, boat or kayak will compete in multiple age groups for prizes including longest redfish, trout, flounder and many more! Awards will take place in Swansboro, but kids can fish at any inshore location. For more information and registration visit the tournament website at ccancfishingforthefuture.com or Facebook at CCA NC & Hook and Bones Fishing for the Future. The public is encouraged to attend live weigh-ins from 3 to 4 p.m. followed by the Fishing for the Future awards ceremony from 4 to 5 p.m. Awards for the Redfish Open will be at 5 p.m. There will be fun for the entire family with music, giveaways, vendors, games and a chance to meet teams and anglers. Children’s activities will be available. AUGUST 11

Wilmington Day Trip Spend the day in historic Wilmington! Start off with a morning tour of the New Hanover Arboretum, home to ten specialty gardens. Travel on to the Cameron Art Museum where we will enjoy a lunch in the Cam Café, which specializes in creative and satisfying brunch entrees (included in registration cost) followed by a visit to the galleries. Finally, spend time shopping along the Wilmington waterfront in shops and galleries. Call 910-326-2600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center for more information or to register. No unaccompanied individuals under the age of 16.

Nautical Collection E X C L U S I V E LY D E S I G N E D B Y

VERANDA SQUARE | EMERALD ISLE | CHURCHWELLS.COM 1-800-846-1961 | 252-354-7166

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2018 CAROLINA SALT 9


THINGS TO DO

✪ = FREE

MID–AUGUST TO MID–SEPTEMBER

AUGUST 11

Individual races are $7 per person per race. For more details and to register and pay online, visit ccpr.recdesk.com or call 252-808-3301.

“Yo, Ho, Ho and a Bottle of Run” is a fundraiser hosted by and to benefit the Beaufort Pirate Invasion. This event attracts participants of all ages to run, walk, swagger or jog along the downtown waterfront for this fun and scenic event. Registration opens at 7 a.m. Warm-up is at 7:30 a.m. At 8 a.m., cannon fire will resonate through Beaufort, marking the beginning of the race. Pirates will be located at various course positions along the route to encourage and cheer participants on. Prizes and awards will be presented immediately following the race for race winners as well as for the best pirate costumes for individuals and crews. Early registrants will receive a race T-shirt. Strollers and four-legged friends are welcome. Registration fee is $30 per participant or $100 for a crew of 4. On-site registration will be accepted at 7 a.m. on day of race. At corner of Tuner and Front Streets, Beaufort. For information call 252-902-9712.

AUGUST 17

‘Yo Ho Ho and a Bottle of Run’ Fundraiser for Pirate Invasion

AUGUST 11

SPEEDWAY RACING

From 7 to 10 p.m. Bring the family and come out for action-packed racing at the most pristine racing arena ever. Kids 10 and under admitted free. Call 252-436-7223.

AUGUST 11

August Beach Sweep + Surfrider Foundation Meeting [ 9AM ] Join us for our monthly membership

meeting and beach sweep at Stir It Up Coffee Shop in Emerald Isle. See you there! For information call 252-354-2643.

BOB ROSS PAINT ALONG

Enjoy a night of happy trees, happy clouds and zero mistakes—just happy accidents. At the Swansboro Recreation Center. Call 910326-2600 or visit swansboro.recdesk.com.

Red Cross Blood Drive [ 11AM–5PM ] The Carteret County chapter of the

American Red Cross is holding a blood drive at Emerald Isle Parks and Recreation Community Center at 203 Leisure Lane. Please give! AUGUST 17

Bob Ross Paint Along

AUGUST 11

AUGUST 17

[ 7–10PM ] Bring the family and come on out for

Join the “Talk About Light” conversation to learn how people are incorporating this health enhancing self-care tool into their lives. Whether you’re looking for relief from a chronic pain, an injury or a new approach to wellness. InLight’s gentle, pulsing LED light wavelengths increase circulation to relieve pain and rejuvenate the entire body… pain relief without pills. You will have the opportunity to experience a complimentary Polychromatic Light Therapy Session. You will be able to receive a free light therapy session and join in for a brief presentation on what light therapy can do for you and your loved ones. For more information on light therapy check out rockingthelights.com. You can sign up ahead by making a call to 910-326-2600 or coming by the Swansboro Recreation Center. You can register online at swansboro.recdesk.com.

AUGUST 16

Beach Run Series

MASQUERADE SUMMER PARTY

✪AUGUST 17

Time to head to the beach for the 6th annual Blackbeard Sevens Beach Rugby Championship on Atlantic Beach. Entry fee is $150 per team. Men’s and women’s bracket! For more information call 919-656-1626.

action packed racing at the most pristine racing arena ever! Kids 10 and under are admitted free. Enjoy pizza, hamburgers, beverages and much more! At 501 Whitehouse Fork Road, Swansboro. For more information call 252-436-7223.

and Reverse Drawing at the Civic Center. Win a top prize of $10,000 and enjoy a buffet dinner, open bar and more, including free cab ride. For information call 252-726-6350.

Alive at Five is a free summer concert series the first and third Fridays of each month during the summer in Downtown Morehead City. Concerts take place at Jaycee Park, 807 Shepard Street, between the Bask Hotel and the waterfront. Free public restrooms are available on site with handicap ramp access. Bring your blankets and chairs! Beverage concessions are available. Limited boat parking is available during the concerts at the Jaycee Docks. No coolers or outside beverages permitted.

Blackbeard Sevens Beach US Open Rugby Championship

Carteret County Speedway Racing

AUGUST 18

[ 5–8PM ] Hosted by Downtown Morehead City,

Join us for a night full of happy trees, happy clouds and zero mistakes—just happy accidents. We will be rolling with the best at our Bob Ross Paint Along! Everything you need will be supplied, just bring yourself and some painting clothes. In the words of the man himself, “Let’s get a little crazy here!” You can pre-register by calling 910-3262600, come by the Swansboro Recreation Center or register online at swansboro.recdesk.com. This is a small class! We are looking to max out at 9 people due to classroom size.

AUGUST 11

AUGUST 17

Alive at Five Outdoor Concerts

Mark your calendars for the Carteret County Parks and Recreation Beach Run Series. Join in the fun with a run on the sand. Offering 1 Mile, 5K or 10K. Fun for the entire family. No running experience needed. All ages and skill levels welcome! All runs take place on the beach at the Atlantic Beach Circle. Registration and check-in from 5:15–6:15 p.m. All races start promptly at 6:30 p.m. Cost for the entire 7-run series is $50 per person, and includes a beach run T-shirt.

10 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2018 » CarolinaSalt.com

Friday Night Lights Therapy Seminar


✪ = FREE

MID–AUGUST TO MID–SEPTEMBER

AUGUST 18

AUGUST 18

Kinston Day Trip

Let us take you on a fun day to Kinston! Start off with a visit to the CSS Neuse, a replica of a Confederate ironclad. Next, join the experts at Spice Bouquet for an exciting cooking class with full meal included. Mother Earth Brewery Tour is up next with a walk through the brewing facility, bottling and canning rooms and the barrel aging room. One last stop is scheduled for either the Neuse Sports Shop or the Lenox China outlet. Call 910-326-2600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center for more information or to register. AUGUST 18

American Heart Association: HeartSaver CPR Class

[ 9AM–1PM ] At Emerald Isle EMS Department,

7604 Emerald Drive, Emerald Isle. Cost for class $20. Class size is limited, so pre-registration is mandatory by calling 252-354-2249.

✪AUGUST 18

New Orleans Masquerade Summer Party and Reverse Drawing at the Civic Center

The 2018 theme is: “New Orleans Masquerade— Laissez les bon Temps Rouler!” Here’s how it works. Purchase a ticket for $100 and you are entered into the drawing. Only 325 tickets will be sold. Once they’re gone, they’re gone. Don’t delay. Each ticket number has a corresponding ball in the squirrel cage. The balls are spun and pulled, spun and pulled, etc. The last ball to be selected is the winner of the grand prize of $10,000. You don’t have to be present to win, but you can’t win if you don’t have a ticket. You can buy as many tickets as you want; no limit. Each ticket admits two adults to the best party of the summer, featuring a buffet dinner, open bar, silent auction, entertainment, fun and games... and a free cab ride home afterward—anywhere in Carteret County. There are no refunds on ticket sales. At 3505 Arendell Street, Morehead City. For more information or tickets, call 252-726-6350.

USCG Appreciation Day: Centenarian Ira Lewis

✪AUGUST 18

And it’s not every community that has a man like Ira Lewis. On Saturday, August 18, Harkers Island will honor its oldest citizen, Chief Ira Lewis, who turns 100 on August 2, with a celebration of his 100th birthday as part of a US Coast Guard Appreciation Day, parade and recognition ceremony. Chief Ira Lewis, still active and often seen at special events in his US Coast Guard uniform, served his entire Coast Guard career on Long Island, including his role as Officerin-Charge at the Montauk Point Lighthouse on February 17, 1957, until he retired in August 1959. He returned home to Harkers Island after his more than 20 year service time and has remained an active and much-loved member of the community. On Saturday, August 18, 2018, the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum & Heritage Center, will partner with local community members and local officials to honor Chief Ira Lewis with a parade at 11 a.m., ending at the Core Sound Museum with lunch and a 2 p.m. ceremony. At 1785 Island Road, Harkers Island.

[ 6:30PM ] Join us in the Newport Community

[ 11AM ] It’s not every day that a man turns 100.

Justice League Movie in the Park in Newport

Park as part of Newport Public Library’s summer reading program. This is a free event! There will be activities for the kids beginning at 6:30 p.m. and will also include information for the summer reading program. The movie will begin at 7:30 p.m. Bring a blanket or a lawn chair and enjoy the kick off to all the town’s summer events! At 200 Howard Boulevard, Newport. AUGUST 18

Carteret Community Theatre: ‘Country Cool’

Country Cool is a straight-shootin’, no-holdsbarred comedy show that laughs at what we’re all dealin’ with: the “this can’t really be happening” moments in life that make us feel like we’re losing our minds, one traffic jam at a time. Trish Suhr, Karen Mills and Leanne Morgan, all headlining comedians, have Southern roots but are welltraveled, diverse, razor sharp and savvy. Their no-nonsense approach “tells it like it is” but, of

THINGS TO DO

course, with charm and style. It’s not redneck; it’s not white trash—these girls are country cool! It’s comedy for the masses, because, let’s face it, everybody’s got a little country in ’em. These three women have been friends for more than a decade and have stood in it, walked through it and come out the other side laughing. Whether it’s overcoming cancer, the loss of a beloved pet or talking each other down from the hormonal ledge, they continue to find the humor in everything life dishes out. At 1311 Arendell Street, Morehead City. For information and tickets call 252-497-8919 or visit carteretcommunitytheatre.com.

✪AUGUST 20

Fellowship Night: Park Cleanup Join us for fellowship and fun. This program is geared towards adults with special needs and will be held once a month as an after dinner/evening group. This month we will be talking about conservation and grabbing some gloves to help pick up in the park! You can come and volunteer or just enjoy. Please make sure to pre-register by calling 910-326-2600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center. You can register online at swansboro.recdesk.com. AUGUST 21

Explore Rachel Carson Reserve Discover the various plants and animals of the Rachel Carson Reserve. A guided hike will take you through the different habitats found on Town Marsh and Bird Shoal. Under 18 must be accompanied by an adult, not suitable for children under 12. Advance reservations required. At 315 Front Street, Beaufort. For information or registration, call 252-504-7740. AUGUST 24

Summer Taste of Core Sound Summer taste of Core Sound … a brand-new experience. Special guest Chef Ricky Moore of the Salt Box, Durham, will be the featured chef with a mix of old and new recipes! Tickets on sale now. This event will sell out so don’t wait! At 1785 Island Road, Harkers Island. For information and tickets call 252-728-1500 or visit coresound.com.

Designated Driver Taxi

D.D.

Taxi Services

Outstanding service, friend

ly drivers.

Need a ride? Call us! 252-393-6015

Emerald Isle | Cape Carteret | Swansboro | Cedar Point | All NC Airports

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2018 CAROLINA SALT 11


THINGS TO DO AUGUST 25–26

SEPTEMBER 1

Intro to Wooden Boat Building A two-day hands-on course, students will explore the art of boat building from start to finish. They begin with the design and lofting of boats and move on to the setup, steam bending and different methods of creating the back bone of small boats. In addition, they will learn how to make planking systems, both carvel and lap strake and all the appropriate fastening systems. By the end of the course, students will have the knowledge and skill to choose a design and style of boat to build on their own and the confidence to take on the job. Cost is $135 (Friends of the Museum $121.50). Minimum age is 16. Course size limited. Advance registration required. Call the Program Registrar at 252-504-7758. The Watercraft Center offers more intensive longer classes on an on-demand basis: build your own stand-up paddleboard or surfboard; stitch-and-glue kayaks and skiffs; skinon-frame boat building; building and shaping masts, spars and oars or paddles; and half-model making. Visit thewatercraftcenter.com or Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center, North Carolina Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. Register by calling 252-504-7740.

Bogue Sound Full Moon Paddle

ERALD

IS

I

R

F

FA

EE

LE

O

Nothing can be more beautiful than a full moon rising above Bogue Sound. There is just something magical about moonbeams and water. Participants arrive early enough in the evening to practice paddling, enjoy a beautiful sunset and adjust their eyes to the night sky. As the moonlight gets brighter, we will paddle around to enjoy the night sounds. Eventually, we will “raft-up” and lay back to take in our surroundings. Arrive at 6:30 p.m. and depart at 7. The paddle will last about 1½ hours and kayaks are provided. Couples can have individual kayaks or a tandem kayak. (Please note when checking out if you prefer tandem.) We look forward to seeing you! At 9404 Coast Guard Road, Emerald Isle. For information, call 252-422-0559.

N

TR

Carteret Community Theatre: ‘Zoso’ Led Zep Cover Band

The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience formed in 1995 to perform the most accurate and captivating Led Zeppelin live show since the real thing. For Zoso, it’s much more than just being a tribute. It’s about touching a golden era in music. Zoso embodies Page, Plant, Bonham and Jones in their spirit: tightly-wound talent and authenticity. Each band member has been carefully selected to portray both the appearance and playing styles of their Led Zeppelin counterparts. In 18 successful years of touring, they have perfected their art. At 1311 Arendell Street, Morehead City. For information and tickets call 252-726-1501 or visit carteretcommunitytheatre.com. SEPTEMBER 2

Southern Modified Racing Series at Carteret County Speedway

Bring the family and come on out for action packed racing at the most pristine racing arena ever! Kids 10 and under admitted free. Enjoy pizza, hamburgers, beverages and much more! At 501 Whitehouse Fork Road, Swansboro. For information call 252-436-7223.

SEPTEMBER 5

Explore Rachel Carson Reserve Discover the various plants and animals of the Rachel Carson Reserve. A guided hike will take you through the different habitats found on Town Marsh and Bird Shoal. Under 18 must be accompanied by an adult, not suitable for children under 12. Advance reservations required. For more information call 252-726-3775.

✪SEPTEMBER 8

Newport Community Festival [ 10AM–2PM ] Featuring performances by the

band 4Ever All and Magician Bryan Sanders. Face Painting by Independent Airbrush. Touch A Truck, Mini Food Truck Rodeo, Hands on Demonstrations, Performing Arts, Crafts and Living History Demonstrations, Bounce Houses, Police Department and Fire Department Displays. Don’t miss out on the all the fun! Free admission! At 200 Howard Boulevard, Newport. For more information call 252-223-4749. €

SEPTEMBER 4

AUGUST 26, 27

EM

✪ = FREE

MID–AUGUST TO MID–SEPTEMBER

ADE

CO

F

Boro Buddies Pre-K Program

Registration Now open for Pre-K starting September 4. This program is designed to provide a safe and fun place for children to interact with their peers while parents have a few hours of freedom to run errands, have coffee or just enjoy a stroll through the park. Program activities will include age appropriate arts and crafts, nature activities and fundamental skill building. Boro Buddies will be held Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 a.m. to noon. Buddies must be 3 years of age by August 30 and must be fully potty-trained at date of registration. Program will begin on September 4 and run through June 6. Please call 910-3262600 for more details, online registration is not available for this program. Please note that there is a $50 non-refundable deposit due by August 15 that will be applied to your first month’s tuition.

Stir a little love into everything you do. coffee • local baked goods • gluten-free choices

Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt! Our articles are written by locals. Every month we look to our readers to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote or an interesting local photograph, send them our way!

WILL@CAROLINASALT.COM

252-723-7628

june Special

coconut 16-oz.latte

open every day from 7am–6pm •252.354. 2643• Emerald Plantation •8700 Emerald Drive

12 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2018 » CarolinaSalt.com

$

3.50

FREE


LINDA BERGMAN–ALTHOUSE

OUTER BANKS WILDLIFE SHELTER

The Regal Purple Martin Martins do very well near caring humans, but it’s a “look but don’t touch” relationship.

S

he was built like a race car: smooth, sleek and shiny black with an aerodynamic head. From the beginning, the adult Purple Martin did not enjoy her stay at the Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter in Newport and probably couldn’t figure out why she was there, but a day earlier she had a moment of stillness on the ground long enough for a human to pick her up, place her in a box and transport her to our shelter. For an individual to be able to do that with a wild bird is evidence that something isn’t right. A thorough examination revealed no injuries or illness, so theories were shared that she may have been knocked out or stunned by running into something or maybe because of the heat, dehydration occurred. We didn’t know how long she’d been on the ground without food or water, so keeping her with us for a couple days while providing hydration and a steady diet of mealworms and crickets would ensure she wasn’t malnourished when returned to the wild, but she wasn’t having any of it! She refused to eat, even though nestlings were chirping all around her in the nursery. She hid behind a basket of youngsters when feeding time began and would not accept mealworms offered her by tweezers or allow a wildlife rehabilitator to open her mouth to drop a few worms in. That was not going to happen—how undignified! With no food or water, she would only get weaker, so this could not continue. She was removed from the enclosure with the young birds—even though there were a few juvenile Purple Martins present we thought she could relate to—and placed in a transport bin by herself. A pile of mealworms and crickets were dropped into the bin and the bin was covered so she could not see us and we could not see her. In a half hour, she was checked on and although Purple Martins eat on the wing, most of the mealworms and all the crickets were gone. Good girl! How about some more? She ate to her tummy’s content and that evening she was assimilated with a well-known flock of Purple Martins living in a wetlands area that provides three, man-made Purple Martin condos. When the lid of her transport carrier lifted, she rapidly flew to join her kind, who were vacuuming the sky of insects for their evening meal and we could tell she was one much relieved bird. The Queen was happy and where she needed to be. The Purple Martin is North America’s largest, broad-chested swallow. They have stout, slightly hooked bills, short forked tails and long, streamlined and tapered wings. Their wingspan is between 15-16 inches and they fly gracefully and swiftly with a mix of flapping and gliding. Adult males are black and lustrously shiny. When the light catches that shine, they look dark blue-purple. Females and immature Purple Martins are black on the top side but have splotches of gray around the throat and sport light gray feathering on their chest and belly. Purple Martins like to talk to each other in chortles, rattles, gurgling and croaks. They are aerial insectivores, which means they catch insects such as dragonflies, houseflies, wasps, moths and butterflies in midair. The birds are alert and nimble hunters and do eat a variety of winged insects—but not mosquitos (we must leave that task to the Chimney Swifts and Flycatchers who hunt at a lower level). However, recent research has found Purple Martins occasionally feeding on invasive fire ants.

Purple Martins are colonial, feeding and roost in flocks, often with other species of swallows mixed in. They feed in open areas, especially near water and in our area of the East Coast, nest exclusively in boxes and martin houses provided by humans who appreciate their value. That human initiative goes back to the Native Americans, who once hung empty gourds to attract Purple Martins. Martins do very well near caring humans, but it’s a “look but don’t touch” relationship. Purple Martin condos should be monitored because very aggressive and non-native species such as Starlings and House Sparrows are known to invade a Martin condo in a takeover and possibly kill their nestlings. Advocates for Purple Martins are extremely concerned that the Purple Martin will simply disappear from eastern North America if human condo security is not provided. The nest inside the cavity, condo or gourd is made of twigs, mud and small stones, then lined with grasses and leaves. Three to six white eggs are laid and the female is the main incubator for 15-18 days. A pair of Martins will generally raise only one brood per year. Purple Martins are highly social birds and migrate in large, noisy flocks to winter in South America at the Amazon Basin or the Barba Azul Reserve. They show up in eastern North Carolina to breed in the spring. Purple Martins have shown a steep population decline over the past two decades and as a result have been placed on the watch list of Special Concern. Factors that contribute to the loss of PMs include pesticide use, colliding with buildings and bridges, unseasonably cold or wet weather (wipes out insects which causes food source loss), aerial predators such as hawks and owls, ground predators such as raccoons and snakes and, those invaders mentioned earlier, Starlings and Sparrows. With every subsequent Purple Martin admitted to our shelter for care from here on out, we will think of our regal PM girl who knew herself all too well and wanted absolutely nothing to do with us! We hope our sassy girl is still flying high and appreciating the precious freedom she held dear. €

ABOUT OWLS TAKE A TOUR of the facility at 100 Wildlife Way in Newport. To volunteer, call 252-240-1200. If your organization would like to learn more about wildlife, the OWLS non-releasable education animals jump at the chance!

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2018 CAROLINA SALT 13


—GRILL

of

S WANSBORO—

A LITTLE SALTWATER CURES EVERYTHING. AUGUST 10

BRYAN MAYER BAND AUGUST 11

SWANSBORO HOOK & BONES REDFISH OPEN AUGUST 24

TOM GOSSIN

(FORMERLY OF GLORIANA)

SEPTEMBER 1

THE MIKELE BUCK BAND SEPTEMBER 14

TOM GOSSIN 99 W CHURCH STREET • SWANSBORO

910.326.7300 • SALTWATERGRILLSWANSBORO.COM

R E S TA U R A N T

8/8 �����������������������������Bryan Mayer 8/11 �������������������Kevin Siebold 5-8 Hank Barbee 9-12 8/15 �������������������������������Steel Shot 8/18 ������������������ Kevin Siebold 5-8 Davy Williamson 9-12 8/22 ����������������������������� Wild Honey 8/25 ��������������������Justin Castellano 8/29 ���������������������������� David Dixon 9/1 ���������������������������Dave Sax 5-8 True Blue 9-12 9/5 ��������������������������� Hank Barbee 9/8 ��������������������Kevin Siebold 5-8 Davy Williamson 9-12

B A R

WATERFRONT VIEW FROM EVERY TABLE

your life on the Crystal Coast

AUGUST 10

Pure T Mommicked AUGUST 17

Eddie Prophet AUGUST 24

Justin Castellano AUGUST 31

Wild Honey SEPTEMBER 7

Booking Soon!

2 VENUES UNDER 1 ROOF 103 Moore Street Swansboro

WE DEPEND ON OUR READERS! CALL 252-723-7628 IF YOU’RE INTERESTED IN SUBMITTING AN ARTICLE OR PHOTO.


NCAQUARIUMS.COM/PINE-KNOLL-SHORES

ASK THE AQUARIUM

What do shrimp eat?

S On average, shrimp live about two years. Because of such a short life span, they are considered an annual seafood crop in North Carolina. INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE NORTH CAROLINA AQUARIUM AT PINE KNOLL SHORES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, LOG ONTO NCAQUARIUMS.COM, OR CALL 1-800-832-FISH.

MAKE MEMORIES THAT WILL

Last A Lifetime!

hrimp are omnivores and scavengers, meaning they eat most anything. Like lobsters, crayfish and crabs, shrimp are crustaceans with segmented bodies, jointed legs, eyes on stalks and hard exteriors. All crustaceans must molt to grow, and some, like shrimp, even eat their discarded calcium- rich shell. There are many species of shrimp. Some live thousands of feet under the ocean on thermal vents. Others, like the ones we’re more familiar with, live in waters from low tide to about 300 feet deep. Along the East Coast, pink, brown and white shrimp are harvested and sold commercially. These familiar varieties belong to the Penaeidae family. A shrimp’s body has a relatively short upper segment containing vital organs. The remaining two-thirds consist of an abdomen and fan-like tail. Swimmerets on the abdomen enable the shrimp to walk and swim forward, and a flip of the tail sends it shooting backward. Females grow larger than males. Shrimp spawn in the ocean where the new hatchlings bob about as free-floating oceanic zooplankton. When the weather warms, they move into shallow marshes and estuaries where food is more plentiful. The young grow quickly, doubling in size every few weeks. When almost full grown, they leave the estuaries and return to the ocean. On average, shrimp live about two years. Populations of this favorite seafood vary each year, depending on weather. Commercial shrimping is a valuable and highly regulated industry. In 2012, 6.1 million pounds were harvested in North Carolina, valued at 13.2 million. Shrimp require healthy estuarine waters of bays, sounds and marshes to survive. Protection of these nursery areas is of critical importance to the industry. Discover more fascinating facts about North Carolina’s aquatic environments and inhabitants by visiting the aquariums on Roanoke Island, at Fort Fisher and at Pine Knoll Shores, or Jennette’s Pier in Nags Head. €

AFFORDABLE HIGH-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE (HDPE) FURNITURE MADE FROM 100% RECYCLED MATERIAL! The material used is environmentally responsible and is sturdy, retains its color, is maintenance free and will survive all weather.

20-YEAR WARRANTY

Many Colors • Picnic Tables • Benches • Checker Tables • Barstools • Gliders • More!

20-YEAR WARRANTY

1075 CEDAR POINT BOULEVARD • CEDAR POINT • 252.393.7200


LOCAL INTEREST

STORM PREPAREDNESS

TAKE INVENTORY

THE BEST TIME TO RESPOND TO A DISASTER IS

Before It Hits

• Battery-powered or hand-crank radio

• Develop an inventory list for your home to document your valuables, complete with pictures or video if possible. This list is key when filing an insurance claim in the event of loss or damage. • Place important documents (Social Security cards, birth certificates, passports, titles or deeds, wills, insurance documents) into a waterproof container that you can grab quickly in case of an evacuation. If you are computer savvy, make digital copies and place them on a portable drive that can be stored in an offsite location, with a reputable online data storage company or an online backup service. This will ensure that your vital documents available in the event of damage.

THE EMERGENCY PLAN • Review area evacuation routes and determine a primary and alternate route to be used in the event of an evacuation. • Identify meeting places to be used in the event that you are unable to return home. • Make plans for pets. • Put together a list of emergency phone numbers: police, fire and rescue, utility companies, insurance providers, family, friends and co-workers. Program them into your cell phone and make a print copy. • Keep in touch. The American Red Cross has a “Safe and Well” website to help families keep in touch after a disaster.

THE EMERGENCY KIT

HURRICANE SEASON IS HERE Now is the time to develop a disaster plan. Developing an emergency plan can help you protect, prepare and respond more calmly in the event of a disaster.

At a minimum, have the basic supplies listed. Keep supplies in an easy-to-carry kit that you can use at home or take with you in case you must evacuate. Kits should be inspected annually to ensure items are not missing or out of date. • Water (one gallon per person, per day) • Food (nonperishable) • Flashlight

• Extra batteries • First aid kit • Medications (7 day supply) and medical items; ice for medications that need to be kept cool • Multipurpose tool • Sanitation and personal hygiene items • Change of clothes • Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information—see “Take Inventory”) • Cell phone with chargers • Family and emergency contact information • Extra cash • Emergency blanket • Map of the area • Baby supplies • Pet supplies (collar, leash, food, carrier, etc.) • Ziplock bags to protect items, medications and documents from moisture damage • If staying home, be sure to have supplies such as tarps, plywood, ropes, fasteners, sandbags, generator with extra fuel and cleaning supplies • Be sure that your vehicle has a full tank of gas and an empty gas container.

TEST YOUR PLAN Planning and doing are two different things. Review and test your plan to be sure that you and your family are ready to respond. Involve all family members, including children. When you develop a team approach everyone understands the plan and helps each person feel more secure. €

P H O T O G R A P H Y

A R T F U L , O R G A N I C + H E I R LO O M PHOTOGRAPHY hello@melissablythe.com

2 5 2 . 6 3 5 .7 5 9 7

melissablythe.com

16 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2018 » CarolinaSalt.com


Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner All ABC Permits

BREAKFAST NOW SERVED UNTIL 2PM ON SATURDAY & SUNDAY!

8302 Emerald Drive • Emerald Isle • 252.424.8284

ENTERTAINMENT AT TRADING POST

August &September

—FROM 6:30 TO 9:30 PM — August 8 ................ Naked Knees August 11 .............Chris Bellamy August 15 ............... Dick Knight August 18 ... Big Drink Music Co. August 22 .............Chris Bellamy August 25 .......... Monika Jaymes August 29 ..................... 4EverAll September 1 ........... Naked Knees September 3 ......Chris Bellamy & Ken Fradley September 6 .......... Mykel Barbee September 8 .................. Flip Side

Find us on Facebook or TheTradingPostEI.com for specials and upcoming events.

TheTradingPostEI.com

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2018 CAROLINA SALT 17


A MOMENT OF REFLECTION

PAUL ORTIZ

IT’S FOR YOUR OWN GOOD AN ISLAND CHURCH PERSPECTIVE

T

here are so many people looking for a “pull the lever” god. They want a god that is going to answer prayers to their liking. They want a god that is going to deliver them from every mistake and sin they have committed in life. They want a god that is on time to their situations and circumstances. They want a god that is going to give them what they want when they want it. I remember as a child being told what to do and what not to do. I am certain many of you can relate. My parents also did not always give me what I wanted, but they always provided what I needed. If there were times when I would misbehave— it didn’t happen often (sarcasm)—I would have to reap the consequences of my actions. Depending on the degree of mischief, it would be the belt or “go to your room.” I don’t remember having it my way as a child growing up. My parents wanted me to grow up to be a responsible, well mannered, contributing adult. So, as a child they did their part to help me along the way and did not give in to my wants and desires. Why would we begin to think that the God of the universe, the Holy of Holys, is going bow to our will? I hear so many people who “name it and claim it!” How does that work? I can just make a claim on something by calling it out by name and declare it before God and God will make it happen for me? If that were true, this world would be filled with a lot of materially rich people. The truth is, God does not work for you! He does not bow to your will and wants! This is what scriptures tells us about God: “In Him we were also chosen, having been predestined according to the plan of Him who works out everything in conformity with the purpose of His will.” (EPHESIANS 1:11) God is working out everything in conformity to the purpose of His will… not yours and not mine. God’s plans cannot be thwarted. God is working all things out according to His purposes. The good news is His purposes are “good, pleasing and perfect.” (ROMANS 12:2) For some this is bad news, but God’s will is not that He would get on your plan, but that you would get on His plan. Let’s face it, His plans are better than ours. He can see things we can’t. He can prepare us for what is ahead. And before you come back with, “Well if He knows everything, why doesn’t He stop the bad things?” The answer is choice. You have free choice because God did not create robots. And the sad fact is, we live in a world of choice and people are choosing wrong. As a result, people are having to deal with the consequences of their bad choices. So, what we need to understand is God’s way is the perfect way. He created this world, everything in it, you and me. He has given us a prescription for life and that is His Word, the Bible. When we use this prescription, we are using the directions He has provided for His creation and when we don’t, we have chosen to go on our own. That is not God’s fault! God forgives our sins, but we must still deal with the consequences. This is what the Bible says about following God’s prescription for life: “This Book of the Law shall not depart from your mouth, but you shall meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do according to all that is written in it. For then you will make your way prosperous and then you will have good success.” (JOSHUA 1:8) And God’s will for your life is not that He would give you everything you want the way you want it, but that you would get on His plan for your life. “My son, do not despise the Lord’s discipline or be weary of his reproof, for the Lord reproves him whom he loves as a father the son in whom he delights.” (PROVERBS 3:11-12) Just like parents are trying to raise their children up to be good adults through discipline and love, God is raising you up to be who He desires you to be for all eternity. Choose Christ and choose His way. You may not like it or understand it, but in the long run it is for your good. €

18 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2018 » CarolinaSalt.com

THE ISLAND CHURCH PASTOR PAUL ORTIZ

Paul Ortiz is a follower of Jesus Christ, not religion. A husband and father, he is pastor of The Island Church in Emerald Isle. Reach him at paul@TheIslandChurchEI.org


CAPTAIN JEFF CRONK

HOOKED UP FISHING REPORT

GETTING HOT!

A H O O K E D U P L O O K AT W H AT ’ S B I T I N G I N AU G U S T

W

ell folks, August has arrived which is known for some extremely hot weather, but anglers here along the Crystal Coast know that the fishing gets hot too! Several of NC’s most popular recreationally targeted species, both inshore and nearshore, really begin coming together in large concentrations or schools in August as a plethora of bait moves from our rivers toward the ocean.

McKenna’s redfish!

TARGETING INSHORE SPECIES

Some of the most popular inshore species that anglers can look for this month are redfish, flounder, black drum and speckled trout. Anglers can expect to find these species schooling up throughout much of our backwaters this month. When working the shallow marsh bays behind our beaches or the oyster beds in the lower river for reds and flounder, I prefer to cast a ⅛-oz. jighead or a ¼-oz. spinner bait tipped with a 3-4" Berkley Gulp Alive bait. If you suspect there might be some black drum in these same areas, a popping cork rigged with a live shrimp on a small circle hook is an excellent bait and it will catch the other species as well. If the tide is high try working a top water bait along the flooded grass for some incredible blow ups from redfish. Another location often overlooked is boat docks along the ICW and the rivers. They often attract redfish, flounder and black drum. To a fish, these structures are a bait haven and provide good current breaks. Try fishing the down current side of docks, casting either an artificial bait or a Carolina-rigged live bait under the dock and working out slowly. If hooking up with a speckled trout is piquing your interest this August, move out of the shallow bays and target the edges of the secondary channels that meander their way throughout the marsh systems. Some of the best trout baits include: Berkley Gulp Shrimp, Bett’s Halo Shrimp, the VooDoo Shrimp and a variety of mirrolures. Anglers should look for current breaks pushing off the shores along deep channel walls. Anchor offshore of these locations and toss across the current breaks, working the baits back very slowly with an occasional twitch of the bait.

TARGETING NEARSHORE SPECIES

FISH’N 4 LIFE CAPTAIN JEFF CRONK

leads fishing and nature charters on the Crystal Coast. To get out on the water with him, call 910-325-8194. You can also visit him online at nccharterfishing.com. youtube.com/user/carolinafishingtv

Anglers who want to venture outside one of the Crystal Coast’s many inlets this month will have a multitude of options available as every species that roams our nearshore waters can be caught this during the early fall months. Our tidelines, artificial reefs and nearshore hard/live bottoms will be alive with Spanish and king mackerel, amberjack, cobia, barracuda, bull red drum, flounder and plenty of other bottom fish. Without a doubt, slow trolling live menhaden or jig bait will produce the best action on the surface for Spanish, kings, amberjack and barracuda. If targeting big Spanish use 4 to 5" menhaden rigged with No. 4 to 6 gold trebles rigged with 20-30-lb. wire and target tidelines and artificial reefs or hard bottoms within 2 miles of the beach. When focusing specifically on kings, use larger live baits with No. 4 to 6 trebles rigged with 40-plus-lb. wire. Amberjack fishing is in a class of its own. If you want to double down with one of these “reef donkeys” you want to step it up to a heavier rod/reel. I prefer Penn’s Rampage jigging rod paired with a Penn 7500 Spinnfisher and loaded down with 60 to 80-lb. Spiderwire Ultracast Invisibraid. These fish are rarely shy but, a 6 to 8" live menhaden pulled on a 5/0 to 6/0 hook using 60 to 80-lb. fluorocarbon will draw their attention and keep them hooked up during one of the strongest nearshore battles you’ll ever experience. If flounder and seabass are what you’re wanting to put onto the dinner plate, nothing will be more productive than Bett’s 2-oz. Flounder Fanatic Bucktail rigged with a 4" Berkley Gulp Alive Shrimp. This bait combo is absolutely amazing! My clients and I jig these baits each summer along our nearshore live bottoms landing deck loads of flounder and seabass each trip and never have to waste time to catch bait before our trip. Regardless of what species you’re targeting this month, chances are you’ll stretch a string and have plenty of action. Have a great time along the Crystal Coast this August and enjoy our beautiful marine resource and the hot bite! €

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2018 CAROLINA SALT 19


DISCOVERY DIVING

LEE MOORE

DIVING OUR COAST W H AT ’ S U N D E RWAT E R I N AU G U S T

W

arm, blue water was present on the inshore and offshore wrecks in July. Bottom temperatures ranged from 73 to 78 degrees; surface temperatures ranged from 82 to 86 degrees. In August, the water temperatures should be in upper 70s on the bottom, while the surface temperatures should remain in the low 80s. Hurricane Chris stayed off of the coast, causing the boats to stay inshore. Luckily, the inshore visibility was in the 40 to 60 foot range. The wrecks and ledges will continue to see a wide variety of marine life, ranging from game fish to tropical fish commonly seen in the Caribbean.

THE PROTEUS The Proteus is located on the east side toward Hatteras. It takes about two and a half hours to get there from Beaufort Inlet. The area is known to have currents that are generally on the surface but can go all of the way to the bottom. The visibility ranges from sixty feet to over a hundred feet. When there is no current and the water is blue, the Proteus is an impressive wreck. Sand tiger sharks, amberjacks, lionfish, sea bass, grouper and tropical fish are some of the marine life that can be seen around the wreck. The Proteus was named after one of the mystical society organizations that take part in Mardi Gras in New Orleans. In mythology, Proteus was the son of Neptune and Phoenice or Oceanus and Tethys, depending on the version you are using, either Greek or Roman. The Proteus was built in Newport News, Virginia, and launched on December 16, 1899. She was considered one of the safest ships of the time. She had 46 staterooms for 78 first class passengers, 30 staterooms for 50 second class passengers and 50 berths for third class passengers. The apartments were elegant and were equipped with electric fans and lights and very comfortable chairs. There were enough chairs and lounges for every passenger to be seated at one time. The main dining room could hold 56 passengers at one sitting. On August 14, 1918, the Proteus left New Orleans bound for New York with 75 passengers and crew. On August 19, 1918, the Proteus was in a heavy fog 34 miles southwest of Diamond Shoals. Also in the heavy fog was the Cushing, an oil tanker. Both ships were running at reduced speed when the Cushing appeared out of the fog and hit the Proteus amidships. The Proteus had a large hole beneath her waterline and Captain Boyd gave the order to abandon ship. Only one person died in the collision, a fireman aboard the Proteus who panicked and jumped into the water at the time of the collision and drowned. The Cushing was undamaged and picked up all of the survivors. Six hours later, the Proteus sank to the bottom. The Proteus is a 406-foot-long passenger-freighter that is in 120 feet of water, with the highest part rising to about 90 feet. Until a hurricane rolled it in 2012, the wreck had been upright, but it now lists to port. The steering quadrant, located on the stern, used to be the highest piece of the wreck, but since it has rolled, it now touches the sand. A large brass propeller that is attached to a long shaft is on the stern deck. The rudder is still in place and a 4-blade, 18-foot propeller is sticking up out of the sand. Each of the blades is about ten feet in length. Moving from the stern towards the bow, the next noticeable feature is the engine. The triple expansion steam engine has fallen and is now leaning toward the port side of the wreck. Looking inside the engine, the gears, rods and other parts of the engine can still be seen. Even though it is no longer upright, the propeller shaft is still connected to the engine. The propeller shaft is still partially covered by the propeller shaft alley and can be spotted running toward the stern in places the shaft alley has rusted away. Forward of the engine are the boilers. There are three large boilers and one smaller auxiliary boiler. The large boilers are twentyfive feet in diameter and are thirty feet long. The smaller boiler has broken free of it mounts and is now laying at an angle on the port side of the wreck. This area of the wreck rises 30 feet above the sand and is the highest part of the wreck. Forward of the boilers are the cargo hatches and the windlass. The windlass is located in the center of the wreck. Forward of the windlass is the bow of the wreck or what is remaining of it. It is angled upward toward, rising about twenty-five feet off of the bottom. The ship’s bell was recovered in May of 2013. Most of the rectangular porthole windows were recovered in the 1970s and 1980s. The Crystal Cost has some of the best wreck diving and large animal encounters in the world, but the weather can be unpredictable. When you cannot get offshore, there are inshore wrecks that still provide a lot of marine life. For more information about charters, contact Discovery Diving at dive@discoverydiving.com, 252-728-2265 or like us on Facebook to see what charters, classes and events are coming up in the near future. € 20 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2018 » CarolinaSalt.com

JOIN DISCOVERY CONTACT

Discovery Diving at 252-728-2265 or visit them on Facebook to see what classes and events are coming up. You can also visit them online at discoverydiving.com.

JOIN ECARA ECARA

works to continue sinking ships to create artificial reefs here in North Carolina, but their resources are limited. To get involved, visit carolinareef.org.


AUGUST 7 TO SEPTEMBER 7

CAPE HATTERAS TIDE CHART

200

NORTH CAROLINA

WET & DRY SLIPS

WILDLIFE SERVICE AGENT

BOAT SERVICE OFFICIAL CITATION WEIGH STATION

The most complete bait & tackle marina on the East Coast. Extensive boat storage and a friendly staff make Dudley’s a one-stop shop for all your boating needs.

ETHANOLFREE GAS AT THE DOCKS

HIGHWAY 24 EAST • SWANSBORO • 252-393-2204 • DUDLEYSMARINANC.COM


LOL!

KIM MURDOCH

It’s The Most Wonderful Time Of The Year

N

o, silly, not Christmastime. I’m referring—as any good parent who has owned a school-aged child over the last ten years would know—to that FABULOUS commercial that starts airing around the beginning of August. You know the one: the dad is riding a shopping cart down the school supply aisle, kicking up his heels, grinning like a fool, tossing pencils and packs of paper into the cart with more glee than a gaggle of tweens at a Justin Bieber concert. Trailing behind him are his two young kiddos walking as if they are marching the Green Mile to their own certain deaths. It’s beyond awesome. As the school year is upon us again—at lightning speed I might add (Summer? I barely knew ya.)—it gets me to thinking about the beginning of the new school year, the excitement of new opportunities, new challenges, the hope of new possibilities. Not for the kids, though. For me. See, I’m not one of those uber-organized moms. I find putting things away … tedious. Not nearly as tedious as climbing through closets to find shoes or upsetting the delicate balance of Mt. Laundrymanjaro on top of the dryer to find a matching pair of socks (which is almost always at the bottom of the pile AND toward the back), but tedious enough to find any reasonable distraction under the sun to keep from doing it. Therefore, I’m a pile-er, a stack-er, a shoveer, a joker, a smoker, a midnight toker. Oh, wait. Not those last two. Anyway, as a result of my OCD (Organizationally Challenged Disorder), school mornings around my house are, to say the least, chaotic. They generally start late, with me screaming for the kids to come downstairs because I got distracted by the morning news. (Okay, it was Facebook. Whatever.) Then begins the mad rush to put together a quick breakfast. By “breakfast” I mean Pop-Tart and by “put together” I mean Frisbee them across the table to each kid’s napkin like a Vegas blackjack dealer. While they are eating, I dash to the laundry room to fish out something that matches—preferably clean, but desperate times call for desperate measures—and work diligently to get the wrinkles out (set my dryer to “fluff”). While the dryer is ironing their clothes, I run back to the kitchen to empty out their lunchboxes from the day before (I know, I know) and scan the refrigerator and cabinets for some reasonable combination of vittles to pack for the girls. It’s easy for The Boy. Nutella sandwich. Every. Single. Day. (It’s funny, he always asks for dessert in his lunchbox. I’m like, “Dude, you took a CHOCOLATE sandwich to school. How am I supposed to “dessert” that?”) Breakfast and an armful of hot clothes later, the kids and I are in a panic to get dressed, hair brushed, teeth brushed, lunches gathered, backpacks snagged up … With mere moments to spare, we run out of the door toward the car and … SHOES! No one has shoes. Well. There went our “moments to spare.” 22 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2018 » CarolinaSalt.com

Believe it or not, most mornings we actually make it to school on time. Mad, flustered, squealing into the parking lot on two wheels … but on time. This year, though, THIS year is going to be the year I finally get it right! We are going to get up on TIME (Facebook, you will have to wait until 8:30 from now on). The night before, clothes will be laid out. CLEAN, IRONED CLOTHES, with SOCKS … and SHOES. Breakfast will consist of hot scrambled eggs, toast and fresh juice and will be served on PLATES (no more Fart for us, no sirree bob). Lunch optional items will be organized in specific areas of the refrigerator and pantry (right beside the Nutella) and empty lunch boxes will be on the counter waiting to be filled with healthy, delicious meals for those precious little tummies. Hairbrushes will be placed on the bathroom counter along with the detangler and a bow for Baby Girl. Toothbrushes and the kid toothpaste will be beside the sink. My sweet, fresh-faced, children—dressed and ready for school—will gently kiss their Daddy good-bye on his cheek and then gather their lunchboxes and backpacks. On the leisurely ride to school, we’ll talk about our plans for the day, share little bits of wit and wisdom and, as they exit the car to go off to school, they’ll each give me a little smooch and tell me that I am the BEST mother in the world. Oh, did I mention I’d be wearing pearls? Yeah. Right. Like THAT’S gonna happen. Fart, anyone? I personally find that the Frosted Strawberry Pop-Tarts play the best. They taste so yummy AND the frosting gives them a bit of an aerodynamic edge over the unfrosted kind. And I’m TOTALLY going to be on Facebook first thing in the morning. Bingo Blitz is ROCKING at 7 a.m. There’s hardly ANY competition! Come the end of August, I guess I’ll be seeing you at the END of the school drop-off line. I’ll be the one in the tan minivan yelling at her kids and still wearing pajamas … pearls optional. €


BackToSchool

NEW STYLES & ACCESSORIES AT MADRAS & KHAKI’S

FREE

MONOGRAM

of initials or name only with the purchase of a backpack!

T H E M A D R A S & K H A K I ’ S B O U T I Q U E of E M E R A L D I S L E

in the k+v plaza next to flipperz ✿ 311 mangrove drive ✿ emerald isle ✿ 252.354.7775

Z E N Z I I | EMMA’S CLOSET | mudpie | SCOUT | coco + carmen | MARY SQUARE


FISH

Sustainable local seafood utilizing modern cooking techniques. From local boats to our table– prepared with a Southern flair.

PRIME

Prime certified AngusÂŽ beef. Aged up to 36 days in-house for maximum flavor, and simply prepared, showcasing the best of American ranchers.

RAW

Special techniques in preparing seafood and beef ensure food safety and maximum flavor and texture.

A ROOFTOP EXPERIENCE

Best Sunset on the Island

//

Bar Menu

//

Drink Specials

8920 crew drive // emerald isle // 252.424.8400

caribsearestaurant.com

Profile for Will Ashby

Carolina Salt August 2018  

Your Life on the Crystal Coast

Carolina Salt August 2018  

Your Life on the Crystal Coast

Advertisement