Page 1

FREE! TAKE ONE! AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2016

your life on the Crystal Coast

the dog days oF summer

LOOK INSIDE FOR FUN & FREE

ASK THE AQUARIUM

Flounders: Crazy Eyes

THINGS TO DO ON THE CRYSTAL COAST MID–AUGUST THROUGH MID–SEPTEMBER page 8

WILDLIFE SHELTER

Catchin’ Flies With Flycatchers


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M I D - AU G U ST TO M I D - SE P T E M B E R 2 0 1 6

Inside This Issue T H E C RYS TA L C OAS T L I F E S T Y L E

F E AT U R E S 13 Catchin’ Flies!

The Great Crested Flycatcher breeds in the U.S., but when the temperatures drop, they’ll be on their way to sunny Florida (or Cuba)!

14 Ask the Aquarium: Flounder

13 CATCHIN’ FLIES! FREE! TAKE ONE! AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2016

your life on the Crystal Coast

the dog days oF summer

LOOK INSIDE FOR FUN & FREE

ASK THE AQUARIUM

Flounders: Crazy Eyes

THINGS TO DO ON THE CRYSTAL COAST MID–AUGUST THROUGH MID–SEPTEMBER page 8

WILDLIFE SHELTER

Catchin’ Flies With Flycatchers

ON THIS MONTH’S COVER The dog days are the hot, sultry part of the summer, supposed to occur during the period that the Dog Star, Sirius, rises at the same time as the sun. The dog days last from July 3 to August 11. We’re looking forward to the beginning of the new school year in late August!

Flounders have both eyes on one side of their heads. Is that normal? How and when does that happen in the fish’s normal development?

18 Preserving Your Harvest

Carry the delicious summer flavors of your garden forward into the cold winter months. Learn about three tried-and-true methods.

20 Voices of the South

ENC native Kristy Harvey, author of Dear Carolina, is set to speak at Clawson’s Restaurant in Beaufort on August 4 at noon.

LOCAL INTEREST Things To Do...............................8 Living History............................15

15 LIVING HISTORY at the Beaufort Historical Association with demos and workshops.

exhibits his work at the Mattie King Davis Gallery in Beaufort.

16 MICHAEL NARDOZZI

18 HARVEST your garden, and preserve it for months to come—includes recipe!

20 LOCAL AUTHOR Kristy Harvey to speak at Clawson’s Restaurant in Beaufort.

Michael Nardozzi.......................16 Hooked Up Fishing....................23 Diving Our Coast........................24 Tides.........................................25 BHA Thanks Its Members...........26

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2016 | C A R O L I N A S A LT | 5


PUBLISHER: Will

Ashby

CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Chevy

Kaylor

CONTRIBU TING WRITERS Khristi T. Nunnally, Sidney Hunter, Lindsay Parker, Lee Moore, Capt. Jeff Cronk, Linda Bergman-Althouse and Sherry White. E D I T O R IA L S & A D V E RT I S I N G Please contact the publisher at will@crystalcoastoutdoors.com or 252-723-7628 for ad rates and editorial ideas. Ad and editorial deadline for the Mid-September to Mid-October issue is August 16, 2016. Email letters to the editor, photos, community listings and articles to will@carolinasalt.com. Next issue will publish September 7, 2016.

From the Publisher Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt magazine, published to depict your life here on the Crystal Coast. All articles are written by locals. We cover a wide range of topics including local history, outdoor sports, wildlife, special events and more. Every month we look to you, our readers, to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote, an interesting local photograph or just some good times stories to share, send them our way. Participation is welcomed and appreciated. Reader contributions are the founding principle of the magazine. We want to be a local resource for you, our readers. If you like what you see, tell people about it—especially our advertisers. For questions, concerns and more information about Carolina Salt, send e-mail to will@carolinasalt.com or call 252-723-7628. For up-todate info, be sure to look us up on Facebook!

We Depend On Our Readers! Call 252-723-7628 if you’re interested in submitting an article or photo. Our local content is what keeps our magazine fresh and relevant.

PUBLISHED BY CRYSTAL COAST OUTDOORS PUBLICATIONS P.O. Box 572, Morehead City, NC 28557 | 252-723-7628


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THINGS TO DO

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M I D – AU G U S T T O M I D – S E P T E M B E R

AUGUST 2016

WEDNESDAYS IN AUGUST

Harrika’s Live Music Series

✪ Evening Gun

Come see what’s happening in the Biergarten! For more information visit drinkcoastal.com or call 252354-7911. At 911 Cedar Point Boulevard, Highway 24, Cedar Point.

[ 4–4:30 PM ] Meet in the fort to watch a 19thcentury cannon be loaded and fired in the military tradition of the “Evening Gun.” US Coast Guard Base Fort Macon will provide the cannon crew. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

Thursdays............Trivia & Beer Releases 6-10 p.m. Weekends.................. Live Music 7:30-10:30 p.m. 8/12...........................................Justin Castellano 8/13.................................................Hank Barbee 8/19.............................................. Barefoot Wade 8/20.............................Blues Chews & Brews Fest 8/26..................................................... Open Mic 8/27.............................................. Blu Sky Crying

AU G U S T 8 , 2 2

✪ BIRD HIKE at the Fort Macon Visitor Center. Take a leisurely like to identify birds native to the area. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road in Atlantic Beach. For information call 252-726-3775.

AUGUST 8, 22

✪ Bird Hike [ 9–10 AM ] Meet at the Fort Macon Visitor Center and take a leisurely hike to identify birds native to the area. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road in Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

AUGUST 9

Carteret County Beach Run Series Dust off your running shoes and join one of the most popular events of the season. Open to all ages and experience levels. 1 Mile, 5k or 10k. For more information call 252-808-3301.

WEDNESDAYS IN AUGUST

✪ Conservation Wednesdays: The Queen Anne’s Revenge

AUGUST 11

DEPRESSION BEAD WORKSHOP is a part of the Living History Series at Beaufort Historical Association. At the Beaufort Historic Site’s Welcome Center at 130 Turner Street in Beaufort.

Have you ever wondered what happens to the artifacts from Blackbeard’s ship Queen Anne’s Revenge once they are recovered from the bottom of the ocean? The Maritime Museum will host a conservator from the Queen Anne’s Revenge conservation lab in Greenville, from 10 a.m. to noon and 1 to 3 p.m. Conservators will be available from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. every Wednesday to answer questions. Free admission. At the Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. For more information call 252-728-7317 or visit ncmaritimemuseums.com.

AUGUST 11

Shackleford Banks: Horses, Hiking and History [ 9:30 AM–1:30 PM ] Experience Outer Banks heritage and wildlife with a guided hike on the island. Not suitable for children under 12. Cost is $30. Reservations required. At the Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. For more information call 252-728-7317 or visit ncmaritimemuseums.com.

AUGUST 11, 18, 25 | SEPTEMBER 1, 8

✪ Natural Side of Fort Macon [ 10–11 AM ] Meet in the Visitor Center lobby for a leisurely hike exploring the natural side of Fort Macon. Hike will cover both trail and beach. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

AUGUST 11

Depression Bead Workshop [ 10 AM ] As part of the Beaufort Historical Association’s Living History series, Gigi Koehler will conduct a depression bead workshop in the Beaufort Historic Site’s Welcome Center, 130 Turner Street. Ms. Koehler will demonstrate the way depression beads are made out of rolled paper and then strung together to create unique necklaces and bracelets. Although they originated during the Victorian Era, the beads got their name because women and girls during the Great Depression made jewelry out of paper instead of purchasing more costly items. Despite the inexpensive source, the paper beads added a vibrant pop of color to the wearer.

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M I D – AU G U S T T O M I D – S E P T E M B E R

THURSDAYS IN AUGUST

Kareta mimics Jimmy’s casual, storyteller style, while these world-class musicians, traveling with a full tropical stage setup, will take you on a musical cruise. At 1311 Arendell Street in Morehead City. For more info or tickets call 252-497-8919.

✪ EmeraldFest Series 2016 Free outdoor concerts will be held each Thursday evening throughout the summer! Bring your blanket or chair and come on out and enjoy some great music with us at the Western Ocean Regional Access on Emerald Isle. 8/11.......................... Big Drink (Pop/Rock/Variety) 8/18.............................Naked Knees (Party Band)

AUGUST 12

✪ Crab Talk Meet at the Fort Macon Bathhouse and learn about some of the crabs that can be found on the beach and in the waters of Fort Macon State Park. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

AUGUST 12, 13

Lunch with Pirates at the North Carolina Maritime Museum [ 11:30 AM–12:30 PM ] During this hour-long program, families will enjoy a delicious lunch with the notorious Blackbeard and his Cannon Crew. Families will learn about from Blackbeard himself as he discusses his life and favorite exploits. Following this presentation, Carl “Blackbeard” Cannon and the Cannon Crew will give families the chance to see up close the process of loading a cannon during a demonstration that will involve no live powder. The process demonstrated during the lunch will be similar to the process that will be used during the Beaufort Pirate Invasion’s weapons demonstrations, but without the crowds and with the ability to get safely up close to observe the process. Catered by Fat Fellas BBQ & Grille. Cost is $20 per person. Call to register in advance at 252728-7317, Ext. 31. This program will sell out!

AUGUST 12

Changes In Latitudes Changes In Latitudes is the country’s premier tribute show to the Mayor of Margaritaville, Jimmy Buffett. This nationally acclaimed band travels the country with beach balls and leis flying, dancing conga lines and “trop rock” fun for all ages. Over their 15 year history, the band has traveled from Maine to Barbados, Cape Cod to Chicago. Steve

THINGS TO DO

AUGUST 13

Indoor Craft Fair [ 9 AM–4 PM ] The longest running indoor craft fair in Carteret County takes place at the History Museum of Carteret County, 1008 Arendell Street, Morehead City. Private craftsmen and vendors from all over the region who specialize in ceramics, shell art, jewelry, children’s clothing, wood carving, glass and much more hand crafted items and more will be available for sale inside the museum’s fully air-conditioned auditorium. Desserts, created by the museum’s members, will also be available for sale. All proceeds benefit the Carteret County Historical Society’s operation. There is a reduced $1 admission charge. For anyone wishing to be in the show, table space is limited, so we would like to encourage all who may wish to sell their crafts to the general public to contact the museum’s director, Steve Anderson, at 252-247-7533.

AU G U ST 12

✪ CRAB TALK at the Fort Macon Bathhouse. Learn about the crabs that can be found on the beach and in the waters of Fort Macon. For more information call 252-726-3775.

FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS IN AUGUST

✪ Musket Firing Demonstration [ 10:30–11 AM | 2:30–3 PM ] Learn about a Civil War era musket’s history, loading procedures and firing. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

SATURDAYS IN AUGUST

✪ Morehead City Concerts [ 7–8:30 PM ] The Morehead City Parks and Recreation Department sponsors a free waterfront summer concert series from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day weekend. At Jaycee Park, 807 Shepard Street in Morehead City. For more information call 252-726-5083. 8/13..................................Freeway (Classic Rock) 8/20.................... Trophy Husbands (Rock, Variety) 8/27........ Calico Creek Bluegrass Band (Bluegrass) 9/3...............Carolina Beach Club (Beach, Top 40)

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AU G U ST 12

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THINGS TO DO

M I D – AU G U S T T O M I D – S E P T E M B E R

SUNDAYS THROUGH AUGUST 11

the shells that can be found along our coast. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

AUGUST 26

AUGUST 19 | SEPTEMBER 2

[ 5:30 PM ] A Singing Bowls Sound Concert can offer a positive, non-invasive way to create a deeply tranquil and peaceful state. It is easy and simple, all one has to do is listen, enjoy and receive. At the Emerald Isle Parks and Recreation Community Center located at 203 Leisure Lane in Emerald Isle. The cost is $10 in advance or $15 at the door. Register by calling 252-354-6350. Participants are encouraged to bring a blanket, yoga mat or cushion.

✪ SwanFest Concert Series [ 6:30 PM ] Free live music at the Pavilion at Olde Town Square in Swansboro! Bring your blanket or chair and come on out and enjoy some great music with us! 8/14........................ Fearless (Taylor Swift Tribute) 8/21.......................Trophy Husbands (Party Band) 8/28..............Notorious Clamslammers (Fun Stuff) 9/4 ..............................Chris Cavanaugh (Country) 9/11........................... Unknown Tongues (Zydeco)

AUGUST 16, 30

✪ Junior Ranger Day [ 2–4:30 PM ] Sign up your kids ages 6–12 to work with a Park Ranger to earn their Junior Ranger patch. Kids must be accompanied by an adult. Advance registration required. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

AUGUST 18–20

Evening at the Cape Lookout Lighthouse [ 7:15–10 PM ] This is an excellent time to witness a different side of your favorite beach. Watch the sunset and the moon and stars come out over unlit beaches. Hear stories of the light keepers and climb the lighthouse and island as the keepers did, in the dark of night with only the light of the moon to see by. The cost of the program is $28 (price includes ferry fee) and is non-refundable (weather dependent). The evening begins on Harkers Island promptly at 7:15 p.m. under the ferry dock canopy. Please allow enough time to pick up your ferry tickets from the ticket window ahead of time. Children joining the climb must be at least 44" tall and be able to climb the steps on their own. Children 12 years of age and younger must be accompanied by an adult (16 or older). Footwear is required as well. For more information, go to: http://go.nps.gov/eveningatcape.htm. For more information call 252-728-2250.

AUGUST 19

✪ Fort Macon Seashells [ 3:15–4:15 PM ] Join a ranger at Fort Macon’s swim beach looking for and talking about some of

✪ Alive at Five Outdoor Concert [ 5–8 PM ] Free concerts at Jaycee Park on the Morehead City Waterfront, 807 Shepard Street. For more information call 252-808-0440. 8/19.............................................Liquid Pleasure 9/2....................................................North Tower

AUGUST 19

Face-2-Face: Billy Joel/ Elton John Tribute Show [ 8 PM ] Sold out shows at The House Of Blues, The Fillmore and many other theaters around the country! This 3-hour show features all of the hits of both legendary artists. Formed and fronted by Levittown native Mike Santoro in late summer of 2009, The Stranger has already amassed an impressive list of high profile shows and events throughout the southeast. This is not just a band playing Billy Joel songs. What you get is a highenergy interactive show. Ronnie Smith channels Elton John at a level that is unmatched in the industry and has played countless shows with us, including a memorable performance at the legendary House Of Blues in Myrtle Beach, The Fillmore in Charlotte as well as every town and city festival throughout the southeast. Tickets $20-$30. At 1311 Arendell Street, Morehead City. For tickets and information call 252-497-8919.

AUGUST 25

Explore Rachel Carson Reserve Come explore the Rachel Carson Reserve. This protected area is set aside for research and is home to many diverse coastal habitats. Get up close and personal with some of the plants and animals. A guided hike will take you through the different habitats found on Town Marsh and Bird Shoal. Not suitable for children under 12. Cost is $20. Advance registration required. At 315 Front Street, Beaufort. For more information call the NC Maritime Museum at 252-728-7317.

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AUGUST 27–28

Introduction to Wooden Boat Building In this two-day hands-on course, students will explore the art of boat building from start to finish. They begin with the design and lofting of boats and move on to the setup, steam bending and different methods of creating the back bone of small boats. In addition, they will learn how to make planking systems and all the appropriate fastening systems. By the end of the course, students will have the knowledge and skill to choose a design and style of boat to build on their own and the confidence to take on the job. Course is $135. Minimum age is 16. Advance registration required. For more information call the Maritime Museum at 252-7287317.

AUGUST 27

Living History Series: Felting Workshop The popular Living History series will again be offered by the Beaufort Historic Site this summer. These hands-on workshops and demonstrations illustrate the traditional arts, crafts and necessary skills of early Beaufort residents. Programs are held in the Beaufort Historical Association’s Welcome Center, located at 130 Turner Street. For more information call 252-728-5225.

AUGUST 27

✪ EI Beach Music Festival [ 11 AM–5:30 PM ] The Town of Emerald Isle is excited to announce the return of the Emerald Isle Beach Music Festival! It’s been 17 years since the


✪ =FREE

M I D – AU G U S T T O M I D – S E P T E M B E R

last Beach Music Festival was held in Emerald Isle and the new 2016 event promises to match the great times of the festivals of the 1980s and 1990s! Lineup includes Sammy O’Banion, Spare Change, Hip Pocket, Too Much Sylvia, The Tams and Jim Quick and Coastline. At 101 Islander Drive, Emerald Isle. For more information call 252354-3424.

SEPTEMBER 5

SEPTEMBER 2

The Beaufort Pirate Invasion is free. For more information or for tickets to Signature Events visit beaufortpirateinvasion.com. You can also visit our Facebook page to keep up with the daily activities of our pirate community at facebook.com/pages/ Beaufort-Pirate-Invasion.

Murder Mystery Dinner End your summer with a bang at the Maritime Museum’s annual Murder Mystery Dinner. Staff and volunteers prepare an entertaining evening involving a murder plot, clues and of course a twist, all while you enjoy a catered meal! This event will sell out! Reservations required. Tickets are $30. Call 252728-7317.

SEPTEMBER 3–4

Vulture Awareness Celebration The North Carolina Aquarium joins in an International Vulture Awareness celebration to help spread the word about the virtues of vultures and the problems these birds face. Find out how you can help vultures while you experience closeup encounters with live vultures, make a craft vulture to take home and enjoy other interactive activities. For details call 252-247-4003 or visit ncaquariums.com/pine-knoll-shores.

TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS

Youth Archery Program At Old Beaufort Elementary, 801 Mulberry Street, Beaufort. Age groups: 7–10 from 5:30-6:15 p.m., 11–14 from 6:30–7:15 p.m. Session meets two times per week, Tuesday and Thursday, from September 15 to October 8. Price is $65 per child per session. Register online at ccpr.recdesk.com. For more information call 252-222-5858.

SEPTEMBER 3

THINGS TO DO

Flag Talk at the Fort [ 10–11 AM ] Learn about the flags used by at Fort Macon and by the Confederacy during the War Between the States. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach.

BEAUFORT PIRATE INVASION

AUGUST 12

The Buccaneer Revue: BBQ Dinner & Pirate Talent Revue [ 5:30–8:30 PM ] Captain Sinbad’s favorite meal with all the fixings. Join the captain and Beaufort’s most wanted pirates for a feast you are sure to enjoy. Then relax and let the pirates entertain you! Dinner begins at 5:30, revue begins at 7 p.m. At the Main Stage tent. Tickets are $22 (adult), $10 (kids) and include dinner, beverage, dessert and the show. Tickets available online at beaufortpirateinvasion.com.

AU G U ST 19

✪ FORT MACON SEASHELLS with a Park Ranger. Look for and talk about some of the shells that can be found along our coast. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach.

AUGUST 13

Yo, Ho, Ho and a Bottle O’ Run Pre-Grog 1M/5k Run or Walk [ 8 AM ] At the sound of the cannon fire, pirates will cheer you on as you run, walk or swagger down the scenic Beaufort waterfront! Prizes for the race winners as well as for the best pirate costumes. Strollers and pets are welcome. Pre-register online at beaufortpirateinvasion.com. On-site registration begins at 7 a.m. and race begins at 8 at the corner of Turner and Front Streets in Beaufort. Cost is $25 per participant or $85 for “crew” of 4.

✪ Cannon Day

AUGUST 13

Come down to Fort Macon and learn how different Civil War era cannons were loaded, aimed and fired. Cannon demonstrations will be at 10:30, 11:30, 1:30, 2:30 and 3:30. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach.

[ 10:30 AM ] Hosted by Beaufort Pet Provisions. Cannot deny our pets an opportunity to join in on the pirate fun and dress like a pirate. Held at

Peg Leg Pirate Pooch Costume Contest

AU G U ST 19

FACE-2-FACE Billy Joel / Elton John tribute show. Sold out at the House of Blues, now playing in Morehead City. Tickets are $20-$30. For information and tickets call 252-497-8919.

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THINGS TO DO

M I D – AU G U S T T O M I D – S E P T E M B E R

Beaufort Pet Provisions at 129 Turner Street, this event is one of the favorites amongst pet lovers. Beaufort Mayor Richard Stanley will be on hand to judge the contest. Win prizes and help raise money to help local pet rescue organizations. Register your pooch early for $10. For more information call 252-838-9286. Visit them at facebook.com/ BeaufortPetProvisions.

SUNDAYS THROUGH SEPTEMBER 18

AUGUST 12, 13

✪ Children’s Costume Contest We love our wee pirates, as one day they grow into big pirates. It is so much fun to dress up and get in touch with our inner pirate characters. The costume contest is judged by pirates themselves for first, second and third place winners. Contest Friday at 1 p.m., Saturday at 10:30 a.m.

AUGUST 13

✪ Parlay on the Waterfront [ 7–10 PM ] Celebrate the end of the Invasion and a return to peace and prosperity to Beaufort with an evening of live music, grog and good cheer! On the waterfront at The Dockhouse. Admission is free! Grog is available for purchase.

SWANSBORO PARKS AND REC For more information call 910-326-2600 or come by the Swansboro Recreation Center at 830 Main Street Extension in Swansboro. Register online at swansboro.recdesk.com.

AUGUST 14

Standup Paddleboard Outing [ 9–10:30 AM ] Great family outing for everyone ages 8 and older! Swansboro Parks and Recreation is partnering with Second Wind Eco Tours to offer paddle boarding. Enjoy the outdoors and learn basic stand-up paddle board (SUP) skills with Second Wind. The benefits of SUP works on balance, coordination and fitness level. Not to mention it is fun playing on the water. CPR-certified experienced instructors. Boards, paddles and life vest will be provided; must know how to swim. Class is for adults; cost is $45. Preregistration is required by August 13.

Waterfront Cruises [ 5–6 PM ] Join us aboard the Lady Swan on Sunday afternoons for a 1-hour relaxing and scenic cruise around historic downtown Swansboro, the Intracoastal Waterway and nearby Huggins Island. At the end of the cruise stay downtown and enjoy live music from bands performing at SwanFest at the Olde Town Square. Departs from Main Street dock in downtown Swansboro. Check-in is at 4:45 p.m. Cost is $10 per person. Children 2 and under are free. Reservations are required.

AUGUST 11

Shellfishing 101 Cruise [ 10:30 AM–12:30 PM ] Learn interesting facts and information about local shellfish on a 2-hour cruise aboard the Lady Swan. This trip will take you to the nearby Jones Island where you will learn about oysters, clams and blue crabs as well as how to harvest oysters and clams and how to catch crabs. Try your hand at crabbing when we dock at the island. Departs from Main Street dock in downtown Swansboro. Check-in is at 10:15 a.m. Cost is $15 per person. Children 2 and under are free. Reservations are required.

AUGUST 13

Carolina Redfish Series Tournament 3 The tournament weigh-ins will take place at the pavilion in Olde Towne Square located on the corner of Front and Church Streets. The event will feature cash payouts for the top anglers including a guaranteed first place payout of $5,000. In addition to main event winnings there is a $300 Hook & Bones early entry cash award, contingency cash and prizes from sponsors, trophies and plaques. Sign up at Swansboro Parks and Recreation or by calling 910-326-2600.

AUGUST 18

Bear Island Shelling Cruise [ 10:30 AM ] Shelling has been a long-time favorite activity for folks of all ages. Join Swansboro Parks and Recreation and the crew of the Lady Swan for a 2-hour tour to Bear Island. Your guide will introduce

✪ =FREE you to shell morphology and the types of shells that can be found along the beach. Bring along a bucket or bag as we explore the east end of Bear Island near Bogue Sound, strolling down the beach and searching for washed-up specimens that appeal to you. Departs from Main Street dock in downtown Swansboro. Check-in is at 10:15 a.m. Cost is $15 per person. Children 2 and under are free. Reservations are required.

SEPTEMBER 6

✪ Essential Oils 101: Ancient Secrets of Essential Oils [ 6–7 PM ] Join Swansboro Parks and Recreation for a viewing of the film “Ancient Secrets of Essential Oils.” According to the producers, “the purpose of the film is to educate the general public that essential oils are not ‘snake oils.’ Essential oils have had a significant place in history for centuries and are experiencing a resurgence.” The goal of the film is to present a factual representation of essential oils in order to empower its viewers to make an informed decision about their potential benefits”. Class is free, refreshments are served; please pre-register, though drop-ins are welcome!

WEDNESDAYS IN SEPTEMBER

Kids Hula [ 5:15–6:45 PM ] In this class children (keiki) will be learning playful basics for footwork and hand motions for hula. They may also learn about Hawaiian culture, stories and dance floor etiquette. Over the four weeks together, they will learn one choreography. Class is for ages 5 and up; cost is $25 for a four week series or $8 walk in; preregistration preferred.

WEDNESDAYS IN SEPTEMBER

HOT HULA Fitness® [ 6–7 PM ] Inspired by the dances of the Pacific Islands, HOT HULA Fitness incorporates easy-toperform dance movements set to the sounds of traditional Polynesian drum beats fused with funky reggae music, resulting in a modern, hip fitness workout. Don’t forget your lava lava (pareo, sarong, beach wrap). Series of four classes is $20 or $7 for a drop in; preregistration preferred. S

Stir a little love into everything you do. fair trade coffee • local baked goods • gluten-free choices

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L I N DA B E R G M A N – A LT H O U S E

O U T E R BA N K S W I L D L I F E S H E LT E R

ABOUT O.W.L.S. Take a tour of the facility at 100 Wildlife Way, Newport. To volunteer, call 252-240-1200. If your organization would like to learn more about wildlife, the O.W.L.S. non-releasable education animals jump at the chance!

CATCHIN’ FLIES!

S

eldom seen but always appreciated are Great Crested Flycatchers who perch high and wait diligently while bobbing their heads in all directions in search of summer insects that flit among foliage. Flycatchers may drop or crash into a bush to seize a bug but usually catch their prey on the wing. They are also capable of stopping abruptly in mid-flight to hover over an insect-covered leaf or tree limb, picking them off like … well, you know. As their name suggests, Great Crested Flycatchers are primarily insectivores. One would think that flies are their staple food source, but flies make up only a small percentage of its diet. GCFs prefer butterflies, moths, spiders, beetles, grasshoppers, crickets, katydids, bees, wasps and sometimes small lizards. When admitted to the Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter in Newport, usually as nestlings who have been displaced by bad weather or a nest attack, their diet will consist mainly of mealworms, a great protein substitute for what they might grab and go in the wild. They also enjoy small portions of fruits and berries which they consume whole; the pits or seeds are regurgitated later, occasionally quite a few at one time. They are usually very cooperative birds in the nursery who eagerly snatch mealworms from tweezers when offered and their vocalizations are quite soothing compared to the shrillness of baby cardinals or mockingbirds! Flycatchers sing a fairly low-pitched, threepart song of “wheerreep, whee” and end with a soft, low “churr.” They also have an alarm sound, like most birds do, that is a series of a fast and higher-pitched “huit, huit, huit.” Great Crested Flycatchers are reddish-brown-gray above, with a brownish-gray head, gray throat and breast and bright to subdued lemon-lime belly. The brown upper parts are highlighted by rufous-orange flashes in the primary and tail feathers. The black bill, which is fairly wide at the base and flanked by black whiskers, sports a bit of pale color

as an adult. They have a powerful build for a medium-sized songbird: broad shoulders and a large head with a crest that is somewhat underwhelming compared to that of a blue jay. GCFs do not display sexual dimorphism like cardinals, bluebirds and house finches do. The male and female GCF look the same in color and size, so it’s easier to tell the girls from the boys by observing their behaviors. Adult Great Crested Flycatchers are about the size of an American robin and usually measure between 6.7–8.3 inches in length, with a wingspan around 13 inches. They weigh in between 0.95 – 1.41 ounces. Flycatchers don’t seem to be too romantic when it comes to finding a mate. Courtship and the mating ritual may only involve a tenacious male swooping after a female in and among the trees until she finally gives up. So, they are not flashy and over the top with courtship displays but what they do counts because they are monogamous throughout breeding season and for years to come. Great Crested Flycatchers live in woodlots and open woodland, particularly among deciduous trees. Nesting occurs mid-April and the nest site is usually a hole in a tree, either a natural cavity or an old woodpecker hole found 20-50 feet above the ground. Great Crested Flycatchers are the only eastern flycatchers that nest in cavities, but they may also choose man-made sites such as birdhouses, nest boxes, drainpipes or hollow fenceposts. Both sexes help build their nest, although it has been observed that the female constructs the majority of the nest while the male stands watch. They carry in large amounts of material to bring the nest level up close to the entrance of the cavity. The nest foundation is made of grass, weeds, strips of bark, animal fur, rootlets, moss, feathers and other debris and is lined with finer materials. GCFs have the odd habit of weaving in or lining their nest with pieces of shed snakeskin and sometimes they add onion CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

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A S K T H E AQ UA R I U M

N C A Q UA R I U M S . C O M / P I N E - K N O L L - S H O R E S

Q. My daughter and I are new to fishing and recently caught a flounder. It had both eyes on the same side of its head. Is that normal?

Y

es. Flounder are a type of flatfish that spend most of their time buried in the sandy sea floor with only their eyes protruding. Having both eyes on the same side of their heads is helpful for their sly, ambush-hunting technique. The eyes swivel independently like small turrets, increasing their chances of catching a small, unwary fish, shrimp or crab passing by. Burying also helps keep them from becoming a meal for a neighbor or a hungry predator. A flounder begins life looking like any other fish—swimming upright and with an eye on each side of its head. At about five weeks old, one eye actually begins to migrate across its head until it’s next to the other eye. Also during this time, the young flounder begins to lean more and more to one side and soon develops its characteristic pancake-like shape and fluttery, undulating swimming style. Flounder have another remarkable characteristic: they can change color and patterns in a flash. Although creamy white on their flat underside, the flounder’s top side is covered with pigment-bearing cells. These cells can change both color and pattern, going from light to dark and from dots to irregular-sized blotches in a wide variety of colors and shapes. With this excellent camouflage ability, a buried flounder becomes almost invisible on the sea floor. But how does the flounder determine what color and pattern to use? Surprisingly, flounder have remarkable color vision. Researchers tested flounder against a variety of backgrounds, including a checkerboard pattern and were astonished at how effectively the fish succeeded in matching their environments. The fish instinctively scanned its surroundings and its brain adjusted the pigment cells to implement an astounding variety of colors and shapes. A blindfolded flounder doesn’t change color at all. For a look at this common but complex change artist in its natural habitat, check out http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=h72UXY2PHD0. Discover more fun and fascinating facts about North Carolina’s aquatic environments by visiting the state operated aquariums on Roanoke Island, at Fort Fisher, at Pine Knoll Shores or Jennette’s Pier in Nags Head. S 1 4 | C A R O L I N A S A LT | AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2016

A flounder prepares to settle into the sea floor. Once buried in the sandy bottom, the fish becomes nearly invisible. Photo by NC Aquariums, courtesy of Emmett Westbrook.

about the

AQ UA R I U M Information provided by the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores. The state operates three public aquariums; one in Pine Knoll Shores, another at Fort Fisher and a third on Roanoke Island, as well as Jennette’s Pier in Nags Head. The facilities are administered by the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources and are designed to inspire appreciation and conservation of North Carolina’s aquatic environments. —F O R M O R E I N F O —

For more information, call 1-800-832-FISH or visit ncaquariums.com.


B E AU F O RT H I S TO R I C S I T E

LIVING HISTORY AT BHA The Beaufort Historical Association offers its Living History series at their Welcome Center at 130 Turner Street in Beaufort. For more information on these and other programs call 252-728-5225 or visit beauforthistoricsite.com.

Depression Bead Demonstration and Workshop As part of the Beaufort Historical Association’s Living History series, Gigi Koehler will conduct a free depression bead demonstration on August 6 from 1 to 3 p.m. followed by a workshop on August 11 at 10 a.m. in the Beaufort Historic Site’s Welcome Center, 130 Turner Street, Beaufort. Ms. Koehler will incorporate the skills learned through the demonstration in a one-on-one interactive workshop where participants will enjoy the chance to create a piece of depression bead jewelry. The workshop

is limited to 8 people ages 10 and up. The materials fee is $25. Ms. Koehler will demonstrate the way depression beads are made out of rolled paper and then strung together to create unique necklaces and bracelets. Although they originated during the Victorian Era, the beads got their name because women and girls during the Great Depression made jewelry out of paper instead of purchasing more costly items. Despite the inexpensive source, the paper beads added a vibrant pop of color to

the wearer. The beauty of a depression bead relies on the type of paper used, as different colored and patterned paper create different variations in the design. After paper is chosen, the bead maker cuts it into a shape depending on what type of bead is desired. It is rolled around a sewing needle, creating a tightly wound bead with a hole in the middle. Finally, the end of the paper is glued to the bead and varnished, a process that takes 2 to 3 days. S

Quilting Demonstration: Beauty Meets Function For centuries quilts have been made for the purpose of keeping warm, but for Nancy Smith, it’s the inherent beauty of the quilt that has attracted her. Ms. Smith, of the Crystal Coast Quilters Guild, will conduct a demonstration on this popular craft at the Beaufort Historic Site on August 4 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Quilting, a method of sewing dating back to the 1100s, originated in China and was supposedly brought to Europe by Crusaders. Quilting does not appear to have been done in Europe much before the 12th century and is usually thought to have been brought

back from the Middle East by the returning Crusaders. However, a recent discovery from Germany indicates that quilted objects may have been recognized during the Dark Ages. Quilts were expensive, beautiful and warm, all desirable qualities for the upper class during the period of the late Renaissance. The art traveled across the ocean with early colonial American women who made “patchwork” quilts from scraps of old cloth due to the expense and unavailability of European fabrics. Over time and because fabric was becoming more readily available, American quilts began to take on beautiful

patterns and designs. Cherished for the warmth they provided and prized for their beauty and craftsmanship, quilts were handed down from generation to generation. By the early 19th century quilting was an established folk art in the United States, Britain, Canada, France, Sweden and Germany, often with the same patchwork patterns developing independently in two countries. American patchwork was perhaps the most elaborate in history, with several thousand documented block patterns in addition to superb trapunto, appliqué and “crazy patchwork.” S

Felting Workshop: Turning Raw Wool Into Fabulous Creations As part of the Beaufort Historical Association’s Living History series, Ashley Sullivan will conduct a felting workshop on Saturday, August 27th from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Beaufort Historic Site’s Welcome Center,

130 Turner Street. The art of making felt by rolling, beating and pressing animal hair or flocks of wool into a compact mass of even consistency is assuredly older than the art of spinning and

weaving. Come and learn how to make flowers from felt. Participants will need to bring needle, thread, scissors, & buttons (optional for centers). The workshop carries a materials fee of $10 and is limited to 10 participants. S

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Michael Nardozzi Featured Artist for August at the Beaufort Historical Association

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eaufort welcomes artist Michael Nardozzi in an exhibit of his work at the Mattie King Davis Art Gallery from August to September. His show will open on Saturday, August 6, from 5 to 7 p.m. on the grounds of the Beaufort Historic Site. Nardozzi is one of the most diverse artists you’ll ever meet. Self-taught and fueled by a powerful imagination, he explores all art mediums and styles. His work is inspired by his fascination with natural light and the dramatic mood it creates in our everyday world. His paintings cover many art forms: realism, land and seascapes, still life, fantasy art, impressionism, abstract and contemporary. He explores them all, even creating beautiful three-dimensional metal sculptures. Whether painting on canvas, sentra board, exotic wood, gold leaf or metal, he’s constantly pushing the envelope to further his skill set. Recently, Michael decided to team up with his wife, Bari, to bring her creativity into the mix. Now, on any given day or night, you’ll find them passionately collaborating on their latest piece of art. To give you a little background on the Nardozzis, they’re both from eastern North Carolina. Thirteen years ago, they moved to Maui, Hawaii, sight unseen. While in the islands, their art was embraced by the art community and then the mainland and has now been collected both nationally and internationally. Steven Tyler of Aerosmith is a Nardozzi collector. But as the old saying goes, “Every path leads home.” So while the Nardozzis continue to live in Hawaii, you can find them in Carteret County every spring and summer enjoying time with their family and friends. To sweeten the pot, they found, purchased and renovated an old house in Salter Path. While renovating, they decided that the downstairs would be perfect for an art gallery. This summer the Nardozzis officially open the doors of their art gallery, fittingly named “The Path.” You can check out their work at michaelfineart.com. The Mattie King Davis Art Gallery is the oldest gallery in Carteret County and exhibits the work of over 100 local and regional artists. Gallery proceeds benefit the ongoing educational and restoration projects at the Beaufort Historic Site. For more information on the Nardozzis’ upcoming show, call 252-728-5225, stop by the Mattie King Davis Art Gallery located at 130 Turner Street Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. or visit beauforthistoricsite.org. S


BURGERS, SLIDERS AND FRIES, OH MY! Join Jackie’s On The Roll On Facebook & Instagram! FOLLOW US TO FIND US! 252.354.8111


COLORED EGG HOMESTEAD

K H R I S T I T. N U N N A L LY

Harvest Preserving Your

Fresh & delicious

The summer growing season is in full swing and fresh delicious produce is abundant from our gardens, local produce stands and farmers markets right now. With a little planning and forethought we can carry these delicious summer flavors with us into the winter months. 1 8 | C A R O L I N A S A LT | AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2016


Preserving Your Harvest Preserving food has been an essential activity throughout history. Our ancestors spent much of their time working to feed themselves and their families, tilling, sowing, seeding, harvesting and preserving crops to avoid famine when winter came. Food preservation was not optional, it was a matter of survival. Then times changed. Grocery stores began offering commercially canned foods at reasonable prices and old traditions faded away. Recently, increased scrutiny on the commercial food industry and support for the local food movement have inspired a resurgence of interest in home food preservation. Preserving food now when it’s cheap and plentiful is also cost effective.

Exceptions FREEZING. Freezing is an excellent way of preserving surplus garden produce and it couldn’t be Not all vegetables easier to do. Be aware though, that many vegetables freeze well. Those require blanching prior to freezing. Blanching is important that do not freeze well because it kills the enzymes in vegetables that could cause include green onions, unsavory colors, flavors and textures in foods once they lettuce and other salad are frozen. Blanching is simple. Place the vegetables in greens, radishes and boiling water for just a few minutes (enough to stop the tomatoes (except if enzyme process, but not long enough to fully cook them) going to be used for and then plunge them into ice water to stop the heating cooking). Peppers do process. Simply wash, seed and slice the peppers. Dry, if not require blanching. necessary, and place them in a freezer bag or container with a label and date. One summer I went a little crazy with planting zucchini squash. We had zucchini coming out of our ears! I chose to shred and freeze some for later use and it was perfect for making zucchini bread that fall. Try my recipe! DEHYDRATING. Drying foods is one of the most ancient methods of food preservation. Drying produce is not as common today as freezing and canning but is very easy to do. If you have access to a dehydrator or even an oven with a very low setting, you can dry just about anything! Dehydrated fruits like apples, cherries, grapes, pears, plums and tomatoes are naturally sweet and make a great snack. Vegetables dehydrate well, but they usually need longer drying times. Fresh herbs can be dehydrated as well. Some important things to remember when dehydrating produce: • Select healthy produce at its peak ripeness. • Slice produce at the same thickness (usually ¼ inch or less). • Add lemon juice to fruits prior to drying to prevent color change, and blanch vegetables. • Season, if desired—cinnamon on apples, garlic salt on vegetables … the choice is yours. • Arrange food in a single layer on drying racks. • Check periodically. Fruit should be between chewy and leathery when done. Vegetables will be crisp when dried. • Store in an airtight container.

CANNING. Canning is a wonderful way to store fruits and vegetables from the garden while they are in season and make the harvest last through winter when local and seasonal foods become scarce. Both water bath and pressure canning heat the food, effectively killing any microorganisms that may grow, and also vacuum seal the jar preventing spoilage. I’m still a novice at canning but am taking steps to learn more about the process so that I can begin canning my garden produce at home. Most of the folks I’ve spoken to about canning highly recommend the Ball Blue Book for all you need to know about preserving foods with this method. It is very important to use current, up-to-date instructions and recipes when canning in order to ensure food safety. My absolute favorite homemade canned food is Hot Pepper Jelly. Heaven on earth with a little cream cheese on a cracker. So the next time you find yourself with tomatoes and zucchini overflowing from the garden, or if you stumble across a great sale on produce, take the time to put some by to enjoy later when the summer has gone. S

Zucchini Bread

This bread is a perfect way to use up extra frozen shredded zucchini from an over-bountiful harvest.

1 Tbsp. cinnamon 1 Tbsp. vanilla (or pure maple syrup) 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. baking soda ¼ tsp. baking powder 3 eggs (preferably local) 1 cup applesauce 1 cup honey (preferably local) 1 quart bag frozen shredded zucchini (or 2 cups raw) 3 cups whole-wheat flour

1. MIX together all ingredients prior to mixing in the flour. 2. POUR batter into two greased loaf pans.

3. BAKE at 350 degrees for one hour.

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L O C A L AU T H O R S

T

K R I ST Y HA RV EY

VOICES OF THE SOUTH —Lunch and Learn with Kristy Harvey—

he Beaufort Historical Association welcomes Kristy Harvey, an up and coming Southern author and native of Eastern North Carolina, for a Lunch and Learn event at Clawson’s Restaurant Thursday, August 4, at noon. Join the fun for a great meal and witty presentation from Kristy on both of her novels, Dear Carolina and Lies and Other Acts of Love. Reservations are required for this presentation. The cost is $22. Kristy Woodson Harvey’s captivating and insightful debut novel, Dear Carolina,

introduced a fresh voice to southern women’s fiction. Now with her second novel Kristy cements her status as a writer to watch. Bestselling author Elin Hilderbrand raves, Lies and Other Acts of Love establishes Kristy Woodson Harvey as a major new voice in Southern fiction. A beautiful testament to the steel and elegance of the South and its women, Lies and Other Acts of Love is a powerful examination of the lies we tell to protect our loved ones—and the life-altering consequences of a hidden truth revealed. Fans of Karen White and Wendy Wax will love this poignant, intergenerational family

story that is sure to resonate with anyone who has ever grappled with the gray areas of love. Kristy Woodson Harvey is the author of Dear Carolina and Lies and Other Acts of Love. A North Carolina native, she holds a degree in journalism from the University of North Carolina and a master’s in English from East Carolina University. She runs an interior design blog, Design Chic, and lives in North Carolina with her husband and son. For information on the Lunch and Learn or to reserve seat call 252-728-5225 or stop by the Visitor’s Center at 130 Turner Street in Beaufort. S

The Maine Lobsters Are Coming! SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 • NOON TO 3 PM St. Peter’s By-the-Sea EPISCOPAL CHURCH

LIVE $18 • COOKED $21

Purchase lobsters from parishioners, at the church office or by calling 910-326-4757.

Sold in advance only; order deadline is September 13. Net proceeds will help fund our outreach programs. For more information email annehume3@gmail.com 2 0 | C A R O L I N A S A LT | AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2016


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C A P TA I N J E F F C R O N K

HOOKED UP FISHING REPORT

AUGUST: SCHOOLING UP! A H O O K E D U P L O O K AT W H AT ’ S B I T I N G I N A U G U S T

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ell folks, August has arrived and school is in! But our youngsters aren’t the only ones “schooling up”… One of NC’s most popular recreationally targeted species really begins coming together in large pods or schools in the fall. Redfish, puppy drum, spot tail or channel bass, regardless of what you call them, will feed with a vengeance each fall.

Redfish season is about to get going on the Crystal Coast.

Targeting Reds As fall approaches, there are large numbers of shrimp and finger mullet working their way out of our coastal rivers and moving into the open sounds and closer to the inlets. Redfish will join together in pods of a few dozen to 500 or more along the surf, in our shallow sounds and bays and in the coastal rivers to take advantage of all this bait. Early mornings and late afternoons are great times to take advantage of these incredibly strong fighters. I guide my clients to redfish averaging between 5 and 10 pounds using a variety of artificial and natural baits. We’ll find fish on grass flats, sand flats, mud flats and around structure like oyster beds, docks and rock piles. Regardless of which situation you’re fishing, it’s important to use baits that closely mimic the bait in the area. The Crystal Coast is chock full of shrimp, finger mullet and menhaden and two companies have taken the time to perfect their baits to match the look and action our redfish crave. Berkley’s Gulp baits are absolutely irresistible to all of our inshore species—I keep several tubs on board during each guided trip. Regardless of which Gulp you prefer, you’ll need a specialized jighead to hold the bait on correctly. Sebile’s flats jigheads and Berkley’s Gulp jigheads have multiple keepers that are designed to keep all soft baits firmly in place. You can search their tackle at sebile.com or berkley-fishing.com While you’re there, take a look at their Bonga minnow for your next topwater strike. I prefer the Black Gold Shiner pattern for redfish. They use superior hooks and split rings that will hold up to the kind of hardcore fight any redfish can offer.

Regulations and Handling

FISH’N 4 LIFE Captain Jeff Cronk leads fishing and nature charters on the Crystal Coast. To get out on the water with him, call 910‑325‑8194. You can also visit him online at nccharterfishing.com.

It’s important to remember NC’s regulations regarding redfish. Anglers are allowed one 18-27" fish per person per day. Because of these regulations, a lot of NC redfish are released to be caught another day. Keeping that in mind, anglers should practice good fishing and handling habits. Most artificial baits will hook a redfish in the mouth and can easily be removed without any injury to the fish. But in cases where a fish swallows a small artificial bait, it’s best to cut off the bait and allow the hook to rust out. When anglers are using natural bait, it’s important to use circle hooks. These hooks are designed to slide out of the throat if swallowed and hook the fish in the jaw. They are very effective and rarely cause a deep hook injury or fatality to a redfish. So, as you head out this fall, please enjoy targeting this species and remember that all of us are responsible for ensuring this natural resource is available for our children in the years to come. If you’d like to get in on some of this action with your friends or family, give me a shout at 910-325-8194 or 336-558-5697 and I’ll set you up on an afternoon guided trip. Tight lines, see ya on the water! S AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2016 | C A R O L I N A S A LT | 2 3


DISCOVERY DIVING

LEE MOORE

DIVING OUR COAST

NIGHT DIVING IN AUGUST

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JOIN DISCOVERY Contact Discovery Diving at 252‑728‑2265 or visit them on Facebook to see what classes and events are coming up. You can also visit discoverydiving.com.

JOIN ECARA ECARA works to continue sinking ships to create artificial reefs here in North Carolina, but their resources are limited. To get involved with ECARA, visit carolinareef.org to check out their current project list.

hen you think about diving, the first image that pops up is a sunlight filtering through blue water and schools of fish swimming around a wreck. But diving isn’t limited to the daylight hours. Night diving is a great way to get more out of your diving experiences. Divers can go to a dive site during the day and see lots of marine life, but if they come back to the same place after the sun has gone down, they will see the creatures that were hidden during the day and are active at night. It will feel like a totally different site. But, since it is actually the same, the diver would already be on familiar ground. In some ways, divers see more at night! During the day when the sun is lighting the water, a diver has a great deal of visibility, from 30 to 100 feet. There is a lot of marine life swimming by, so the divers tend to look all around to try and see everything. At night, instead of looking around, they are looking at the point where their light is shining. Since the diver is looking at a particular area, they notice the small creatures they would have passed by during the day. Of course, since but because the diver only sees where the light is shining, they can also miss some of the larger marine life. Sea turtles spend most of their time sleeping and resting on the sea floor. When they can, they like to back into places to get out of sight and to be protected. On a night dive, a group of divers were exploring the engine room of the wreck of the Theodore Parker. As the group turned to leave, one of the divers shined their light beside them and just three feet away was a sleeping sea turtle. That type of experience is exhilarating, but can also make you wonder what else is out there that you didn’t see…but saw you. Night diving is possible because of underwater lights. Unlike the flashlights you purchase at the local hardware store, dive lights have O-rings that are used to keep water out, even at depth. Lights are divided into two main categories, primary and backup. Primary lights are usually larger in size and use up to 8 C or D batteries. Most primary lights have a pistol grip style handle that makes it easier to hold and to direct the light. Another style of primary light is the canister light. The light is composed of three parts: the bulb housing, the cable and the canister. There is usually a strap that goes across the palm so the housing rests on the top of the hand, which leaves the hand free to hold other items. The canister is the power source, which is sealed and contains rechargeable batteries. Because of its large size, the canister is mounted to the diver’s tank so it will be out of the way. The cable connects the canister and the bulb housing. Backup lights are smaller lights that divers go in a buoyancy compensator (BC) pocket and are not to be used for the entire dive. If the primary light goes out during the dive, the backup light can be used to get the diver back to the surface. Most divers carry backup lights with them all of the time, even during the day. At depth, the prominent color is blue because the reds oranges and yellows diminish with depth. Since true colors are not visible at depth, the light from the dive light can make a brown fish become red or a gray sponge become a brilliant pink. These lights can also be used to look under overhangs or into holes. Most divers do their first night dive in their Advanced Open Water class or in a Night Diver specialty class. Both introduce divers to the equipment and techniques used in night diving. Most divers on the Crystal Coast usually do their first night dive at Radio Island. It is an easy shore dive; the divers walk right off of the beach into the water. Even at high tide, the water is only chest-high by the rocks. During the summer, visibility averages 6-8 feet during the day, but at night, the beam of your light determines the visibility. The red, yellow and orange sponges and soft corals appear more brilliant at night because the dive light brings out their true color, unlike the sunlight. If you have dove the same site many times and are looking for a new dive site, try diving the same site at night. Take the Advanced Open Water Class or the Night Diver Specialty Class at Discovery Diving. For more information about these classes, go to discoverydiving.com. S

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T I D E C HA RT CAPE HATTERAS TIDES AUGUST 7 TO SEPTEMBER 7

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Flycatchers, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13 skins or pieces of litter such as clear plastic wrappers. The male defends the couple’s nesting territory with loud calls, but if that doesn’t work he may have to fight other males. Great Crested Flycatchers lay a single clutch of 4 to 6 creamy white to pale buff eggs, marked with splotches of brown, olive and lavender, per breeding season. The eggs are incubated for about two weeks by the female only. Both parents will bring food for the hatchlings for the next 12 to 18 days. Around 18 to 20 days after hatching is about the time the youngsters experience their first flight. Nestlings rarely return to breed near where they were born, but once yearlings have chosen a breeding area, they often return to that same area year after year. The Great Crested Flycatcher is a bird of the treetops. It spends very little time on the ground and does not hop or walk. It prefers to fly from place to place close to the ground rather than walk. So, if you are trying to locate one based upon their distinctive, rolling call, you should probably look up! Great Crested Flycatchers live along the edges between habitats, so they don’t need big stretches of unbroken forest canopy to thrive. This is a rare occasion when logging and development practices that increase forest fragmentation actually work to a bird’s advantage, rather than in sharp contrast to other birds that dwell deep within the forest. Although GCFs breed in most regions of the United States, they are migratory birds. When the temperatures drop in autumn, they head south to Florida and Cuba, as well as Mexico and South America. The oldest recorded Great Crested Flycatcher was at least

14 years, 11 months old when it was found in Vermont way back in 1967. It had been banded in New Jersey in 1953. These little birds can be around for quite a long time barring troublesome hawks who give them the stink eye and loss of habitat or insect food sources. Insects procreate in crazy numbers, especially pesky flies! It’s a good feeling to know that these “great” little flycatchers are out their making our world a better place! S

Beaufort Wine and Food to Thank Volunteers, Members

B

eaufort Wine and Food will thank its members, sponsors and volunteers and announce the organizations that were selected to receive funding from its annual grant cycle at its semi-annual Membership Appreciation event, Tuesday, August 23 at Beaufort Grocery Co., 117 Queen Street from 5 to 7p.m. Reservations are requested. The celebration will feature heavy hors d’oeuvres, wine and beer. During the event, BWF will recognize representatives from the charities and organizations who were selected to receive funding from the 2016 Grant Program. “Our Community Enrichment Grant Program is just one of the ways we give back to the community throughout the year,” explains Lindsay Parker, BWF executive director. The Grant Program started in 2015 as a way for BWF to invite area non-profits and charities to apply for funding of projects that enrich the communities along the Crystal Coast and serve Carteret County. From the 2016 April festival alone, BWF was able to donate over $50,000 to 10 organizations. “The energy and dedication of our volunteers and members and the generosity

and support from our sponsors all come together and allow us to put on amazing events throughout the year,” says Ms. Parker. Beaufort Wine and Food began as a weekend event in 2004 and has evolved into an organization that holds fundraising events year round. Since its inception, the organization has raised more than $575,000. “The appreciation event gives our members, volunteers and sponsors a firsthand look at what they helped accomplish,” says Parker. Memberships were initiated in 2013 to encourage continuing participation and to acknowledge those who regularly attend and support the fundraising events. Benefits of membership include discounted rates on tickets and merchandise and exclusive or early access to special events. Beaufort Wine and Food currently has over 400 members. The membership appreciation event is free to current members and registered volunteers. You can become a member online, by calling the office, or register in person at the event. Annual Memberships are $50 per person. Also on the agenda for the evening is the announcement of event details for Beaufort’s Brewin’, BWF’s inaugural craft beer festival. The exciting two-day festival will feature a variety of events from beer seminars,

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luncheons and dinners in area restaurants, pubs and breweries as well as a Beer Walkabout and crowd favorite, the Beer, Bubbles and BBQ tasting and competition. The festival will focus on North Carolina craft breweries and brew pubs, with a sampling from across the state. Dozens of breweries, including Aviator Brewing, Bold Rock Cider, Carolina Brewery, Carolina Brewing Co., Catawba Brewing, Duck Rabbit, Fortnight Brewing, Fullsteam, Gibb’s Hundred, Highland Brewing, Mother Earth, Natty Greene’s, Triple C, Unknown Brewing, White Street Brewery, Wicked Weed and Beaufort’s own Mill Whistle Brewing. BWF will also be holding its first ever Road Race, Running on Empty, September 24. Registration is available online and racers of all levels are invited to partake. The 5K and 10K races will be timed using RFID technology from IPICO Sports. Racers’ times will be displayed on site via TV. To RSVP for the August 23 membership appreciation event, or for more information about Beaufort Wine & Food events, tickets and sponsorships or to become a member, log onto beaufortwineandfood.com, email beaufortwineandfood@gmail.com or call the office at 252-515-0708. S


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