Page 1

FREE! TAKE ONE! APRIL/MAY 2016

your life on the Crystal Coast

WILDLIFE SHELTER

Sweet Release! SMYRNA’S OWN

Underground Farm SOUTHERN GARDENER

STORIES IN THE SKY

Find Your Fruit Tree

Stellar Drama

LOOK INSIDE FOR FUN & FREE

BEAUFORT’S ANNUAL

Wooden Boat Show

THINGS TO DO ON THE CRYSTAL COAST MID–APRIL THROUGH MID–MAY page 8

COME SHOP AT BEAUFORT’S

Publick Day


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APRIL 29

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M I D - A P R I L TO M I D - M AY 2 0 1 6

Inside This Issue T H E C RYS TA L C OAS T L I F E S T Y L E

F E AT U R E S 15 Sweet Release!

The best day in an animal rehabilitator’s life is the day when an injured animal has recovered enough to be released back to the wild.

17 The Underground Farm

Operating out of Smyrna, North Carolina, under the guidance of the Carteret Local Food Network, Underground Farm has a lot to share.

17

FREE! TAKE ONE!

your life on the Crystal Coast

WILDLIFE SHELTER

Sweet Release!

ON THIS MONTH’S COVER Turn ahead to page 17 to find out about The Underground Farm, a teaching and learning

SMYRNA’S OWN

Underground Farm

farm located in Smyrna operating under the

SOUTHERN GARDENER

STORIES IN THE SKY

Find Your Fruit Tree

Stellar Drama

LOOK INSIDE FOR FUN & FREE

BEAUFORT’S ANNUAL

Learn a little bit about this incredibly diverse group of creatures that live everywhere, including Carteret County.

THE UNDERGROUND FARM

APRIL/MAY 2016

Wooden Boat Show

20 Ask the Aquarium: Nudibranchs

THINGS TO DO ON THE CRYSTAL COAST MID–APRIL THROUGH MID–MAY page 8

COME SHOP AT BEAUFORT’S

Publick Day

guidance of the Carteret Local Food Network. Spring has sprung! We’re looking forward to days warm enough to beach it!

21 Southern Gardener: Fruit Trees

Bring some shade, beauty, fragrance and nutrition to your yard with fruit trees. Great suggestions for trees to suit your needs.

23 Stellar Drama: Orion

The constellations of stars in the sky come with interesting back stories. Orion the Hunter, with his familiar belt of stars, has a great one.

LOCAL INTEREST NOSB Comes to Carteret County.......18 Wooden Boat Show Schedule............18 15 SWEET RELEASE! The best day for a rehabilitator is the day an animal is released.

21 FRUIT TREES Bring some shade, beauty, fragrance and nutrition to your yard!

Weekend of Art in Beaufort...............26 Publick Day in Beaufort....................26

The Regulars 8 Things to Do 15 OWLS: Sweet Release! 20 Ask the Aquarium: Nudibranchs 24 Diving the Coast 25 Tides A P R I L / M AY 2 0 1 6 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | 5


PUBLISHER: Will

Ashby

CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Chevy

Kaylor

E D I T O R IA L S & A D V E RT I S I N G Please contact the publisher at will@crystalcoastoutdoors.com or 252-723-7628 for ad rates and editorial ideas. Ad and editorial deadline for the Mid-May to Mid-June issue is April 16, 2016. Email letters to the editor, photos, community listings and articles to will@crystalcoastoutdoors.com. Next issue will publish May 7, 2016.

From the Publisher Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt magazine, published to depict your life here on the Crystal Coast. All articles are written by locals. We cover a wide range of topics including local history, outdoor sports, wildlife, special events and more. Every month we look to you, our readers, to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote, an interesting local photograph or just some good times stories to share, send them our way. Participation is welcomed and appreciated. Reader contributions are the founding principle of the magazine. We want to be a local resource for you, our readers. If you like what you see, tell people about it—especially our advertisers. For questions, concerns and more information about Carolina Salt, send e-mail to will@carolinasalt.com or call 252-723-7628. For up-todate info, be sure to look us up on Facebook!

We Depend On Our Readers! Call 252-723-7628 if you’re interested in submitting an article or photo. Our local content is what keeps our magazine fresh and relevant.

PUBLISHED BY CRYSTAL COAST OUTDOORS PUBLICATIONS P.O. Box 572, Morehead City, NC 28557 | 252-723-7628


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THINGS TO DO

✪ =FREE

M I D – A P R I L T O M I D – M AY

APRIL, MAY

APRIL 9

Lifeguard Training, Swimming & Summer Camps at The GYM

✪ North Carolina Whales & Whaling Symposium

The GYM is now an American Red Cross Training Center offering the following courses: 4/11 Parent & Child Aquatics...........................$50 4/11 Preschool Aquatics..................................$50 4/11 Learn-To-Swim Program...........................$50 5/14 Baby Sitting (9 a.m.–5 p.m.)....................$50 4/16–17, 23–24 Lifeguard (9 a.m.–5 p.m.)....$250 TBD Adult CPR/AED........................................$50

A P RIL 9

✪ WHALES & WHALING Symposium from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the North Carolina Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. No advance registration required. Free.

Summer swim clinics for advanced swimmers and a summer swim team are coming in May. Weekly summer camps for ages 5–10 start June 13 for $130 per week. Now taking applications for afterschool care for $50 per week. All registrations are online at ccaw.net. For more information call The GYM at 252-393-1000.

APRIL 9

Emerald Isle Marathon, Half-Marathon & 5K Races [ 6:15 AM ] The 3rd annual Emerald Isle Marathon, Half-Marathon and 5K Races will be held at the Western Ocean Regional Access. The full Marathon begins at 6:15 a.m., followed by the Half-Marathon at 8:15 and the 5K race at 8:30. The 2015 races attracted nearly 1,600 runners and raised $50,000 for charity—we hope to surpass those totals in 2016. The 2016 races will benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and the Emerald Isle bike path. Start your training now and sign up at emeraldislerun.com.

APRIL 9

Build a Boat-in-a-Day Course

A P RIL 1 6

✪ PUBLICK DAY from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Historic Site, 100 Block Turner Street, Beaufort. Vendors sell antiques, collectibles, arts, crafts, jewelry, books, food and much more. Free admission.

Each participating team assembles a prepared kit for a small flat-bottomed plywood boat suitable for paddling. The boat is 12' x 32" and weighs about 40 pounds. By the end of the 6-hour class each boat will be completed to a watertight condition. Detail finishing and painting is the responsibility of team members and may not be undertaken in the Watercraft Center. Teams are limited to a maximum of 4 persons, at least one of whom must be an adult. Minimum age is 8. Cost is $600. Advance registration is required for all courses by calling The NC Maritime Museum at 252-728-7317.

This day-long event will include several presentations focusing on whales and historic hunting practices. Participants will learn about species of whales that can be found in our coastal waters, how some of these whales were hunted and research with stranded animals: 10 a.m..............................Whales of North Carolina 11 a.m............................. Native American Whaling and Porpoise Hunting 1 p.m......................... The History of Whaling in NC 2 p.m..................................... Legendary Cetaceans 3 p.m........ NC Marine Mammal Stranding Response No advance registration required. At the North Carolina Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort.

APRIL 13

✪ Merry Time for Tots: Whale of a Time! Children and their caregivers will have a whale of a time! Join us for a whale sing-a-long, read a book all about whales, create your own whale craft and even touch a whale’s heart! Ages 2-5. Free. Space is limited, pre-registration is required. At the NC Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort.

APRIL 14

Shackleford Banks: A Beach for Whalers Experience Outer Banks heritage and wildlife during a guided hike on this Cape Lookout National Seashore island. NC Maritime Museum Curator Benjamin Wunderly will guide participants on a hike in this designated wilderness area managed by the National Park Service as part of the Cape Lookout National Seashore. The hike will focus on whaling activities that once took place on the island. Not suitable for children under 12. Cost is $30. Advance registration required. To register call 252-728-7317.

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M I D – A P R I L T O M I D – M AY

APRIL 14

✪ Beaufort Woman’s Club Presents ‘Auction for the Arts’ [ 6–8 PM ] A fundraiser to benefit Beaufort and Down East School art programs will be held at the Maritime Museum in Beaufort. Admission is free and refreshments will be provided. Paintings, photography, jewelry, handcrafted items and all things creative will be up for auction.

systems, both carvel and lap strake and all the appropriate fastening systems. By the end of the course, students will have the knowledge and skill to choose a design and style of boat to build on their own and the confidence to take on the job. Cost is $135. Minimum age is 16. Advance registration is required for all courses by calling The NC Maritime Museum at 252-728-7317.

APRIL 16

APRIL 14

✪ Publick Day

Jones Island Cleanup

[ 9 AM–4 PM ] An old-fashioned flea market on the Beaufort Historic Site, 100 Block Turner Street, with vendors selling antiques and collectibles, art, crafts, handmade jewelry, books, food and much more. Free admission.

[ 10 AM–2 PM ] Together with Hammocks Beach State Park, we invite volunteers to clean up Jones Island, a small island in the White Oak River. In addition to picking up trash, volunteers will also record data for Carteret Big Sweep on the types and quantities of debris collected. This will help to identify the sources of debris and focus educational efforts. Volunteers will meet at the Hammocks Beach State Park maintenance area (first left upon entering the park) by 9:45 a.m. Park boats will transport volunteers to the island. Please wear weatherappropriate clothing that may get wet and dirty and bring work gloves, a towel and any medications you may need. Closed-toe shoes are required. Trash collection supplies, peanut butter sandwich fixings, water, sunscreen and bug spray will be provided. Registration is required at nccoast.org/events. There is a maximum of 20 participants. For more information call 252-393-8185.

APRIL 15

American Red Cross Blood Drive [ 2–7 PM ] The Carteret County Chapter of the American Red Cross is holding a blood drive at Emerald Isle Parks and Recreation Community Center, 7500 Emerald Drive. Please give!

APRIL 16

Introduction to Wooden Boat Building Course In this two-day hands-on course, students will explore the art of boat building from start to finish. They begin with the design and lofting of boats and move on to the setup, steam bending and different methods of creating the back bone of small boats. In addition, they will learn how to make planking

ICE COLD BEVERAGES AND GREAT FOOD

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THINGS TO DO

APRIL 16

APR IL 16

✪ Crystal Coast Earth Day [ 10 AM–2 PM ] The Coastal Federation is teaming up with other local environmental partners to celebrate Earth Day. Join us at Fort Macon State Park for a day of fun and learning. Showcased at the celebration will be educational displays with free hands-on activities for children, an aquarium touch tank and much more! Volunteers will be needed to help with the Coastal Federation booth. Please contact Rachel Bisesi atrachelb@nccoast.org if you are interested.

✪ EARTH DAY at Fort Macon State Park offers a day of fun and learning in cooperation with the NC Coastal Federation. Educational displays, aquarium touch tank and more!

APRIL 23

✪ Olde Beaufort Farmers’ Market Opening Moving into the fourth season, the market will be open every Saturday through November 19 from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and will offer fresh fruit and vegetables, baked goods and bread, meats, eggs and seafood as well as arts and crafts. The location is the same as last season: under the majestic live oaks trees on the grounds of the Carteret County Courthouse in Beaufort.

APRIL 23

The 27th Annual Lookout Rotary Spring Road Race! For the 1-Mile Run, 5-K and 10-K races, prizes are awarded to the top 3 male and female winners in each race. Medals awarded to first and second

APR IL 24

BIRDING CRUISE on the White Oak River in Swansboro. Cruise on a covered ferryboat looking for resident and migratory birds. Add to your life list! For information call 252-393-8185.

SATURDAY Classic Car Cruise-In! Bring out your classic & custom cars!

A P R I L / M AY 2 0 1 6 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | 9

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THINGS TO DO

✪ =FREE

M I D – A P R I L T O M I D – M AY

place male and female winners in all age divisions in each race. High performance T-shirt to the first 350 registered. Post-race massage therapy provided by Carteret Community College. 7 a.m.......................................... Race Registration 7:30 a.m............... “Run For Healthy Living” 1-mile for fifth graders by qualification 8 a.m..........................1-Mile Run and Fitness Walk 8:20 a.m..................................10K/5K Wheelchair 8:30 a.m.................. 10K/5K Run and Fitness Walk Tot Push/Pull welcome in all races! Packet pickup available April 22 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at Connecting Point Computer Center, 4370 Arendell Street, Morehead City or on Race Day at 7 a.m. at the Sports Center.

APRIL 24

Birding Cruise [ 10 AM ] Join local birding expert Joanne Powell for a birding cruise on the White Oak River in Swansboro. The group will slowly cruise on a covered ferryboat through the estuaries in and around the White Oak River and Bogue Sound looking for resident and migratory birds. These cruises give birders unique “on-the-water” access to see and photograph a variety of birds and coastal wildlife. Participants will meet at the Hammocks Beach State Park Visitor Center in Swansboro and are asked to bring their own binoculars as well as water and a snack and to dress appropriately for the weather. The program fee is $20 for Coastal Federation members and $25 for nonmembers. All ages are welcome, through the program is geared toward adults and older children. Registration is required at nccoast.org/events and is nonrefundable. For more information call 252-393-8185.

APRIL 26

✪ Volunteer for an Oyster Shell Bagging Workday [ 10 AM–NOON ] The Coastal Federation invites community members and volunteers to help bag oyster shells at our headquarters in Ocean. Volunteers will be filling mesh bags with oyster shells that will be used to build oyster reefs in the spring and summer. Volunteers are needed to cut, tie, lift and stack the shell bags. These events are suitable

for adults organized groups and supervised children aged 12+. There will be activities to accommodate a wide range of physical abilities and refreshments are provided. Volunteers should dress in layers for the weather and in clothes that will keep you comfortable but that can also get dirty. Volunteers should also wear closed-toe shoes or boots that cover your entire foot. Registration is required at nccoast.org/events. For more information call Rachel Bisesi at 252-3938185.

APRIL 27–MAY 1

Beaufort Wine & Food Festival Since 2004, Beaufort Wine & Food has been bringing top-notch chefs and award-winning wines to their five-day festival. Now in its 12th year, organizers have decided to revamp the festival. New this year is the opportunity to enjoy two amazing nights of wine dinners. In past years, the dinners were held on Thursdays only. This year, dinners will be on April 27 and April 28. During the festival, many crowd favorites like the Historic District Wine Walkabout and Grand Reserve Tasting and Auction will return, but with some notable changes, including an additional stop on the Wine Walkabout. Tickets are now available! Visit beaufortwineandfood.com to learn about more events, including guest chefs and featured wines. For more information, tickets and sponsorships or to become a member, visit the website, email info@beaufortwineandfood.com or call the office at 252-515-0708.

APRIL 30

✪ Maritime Model Society Meeting The Carolina Maritime Model Society exists to promote the active participation in building ship models, a craft as old as shipbuilding itself. The group is the only such organization in the entire state and has become a major vehicle for widening public interest in North Carolina’s maritime history and culture. Free admission. Membership is open to all members of the Friends of the Maritime Museum. For information call 252-728-7317.

MAY 6–8

‘Mile of Hope’ for Childhood Cancer Patients The Mile of Hope weekend provides an escape from the medical procedures and hospital visits facing young cancer patients. Started in 1991, the event brings a little sunshine, joy and optimism into the lives of these special children and their families. The Mile of Hope celebrates children treated by the Pediatric Oncology Departments of ECU in Greenville, UNC in Chapel Hill and Duke University in Durham. Families from all over NC with children suffering from cancer and life-threatening blood diseases are served by the quality care of these three facilities. Their goal is to help families cope with this illness by offering the treatment, support and care that they need. Dedicated physicians, nurses, social workers and child life specialists provide this care including psychological, nutritional, financial and social assistance. Guests are treated to a funfilled visit to the Crystal Coast with activities and entertainment provided by our dedicated volunteers. From sand castle building to local events and tours, the Mile of Hope is an unforgettable weekend for everyone involved. Visit mileofhope.org to learn how you can contribute and make a difference for these young cancer patients.

MAY 5–8

✪ Boating Skills Virtual Trainer The United States Power Squadrons has partnered with the NC Maritime Museum to bring a Boating Skills Virtual Trainer for demonstration and use by the public. This event is part of the 42nd Annual Wooden Boat Show at the North Carolina Maritime Museum. Free admission. For more information call the NC Maritime Museum at 252-728-7317.

MAY 6

42nd Annual Wooden Boat Show Kick-off Reception At the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center. Music and food. Ticketed event. Tickets available at the NC Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort.

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M I D – A P R I L T O M I D – M AY

MAY 7

MAY 7

✪ Wooden Boat Show

✪ Cricket II from the Movie ‘Jaws’

The 42nd Annual North Carolina Maritime Museum Wooden Boat Show features a variety of small wooden boats, historic vessels, nautical crafts, educational activities, boat models, traditional skills demonstrations and displays. Selected as a Top 20 Event for May by the Southeast Tourism Society, the Annual Wooden Boat Show takes place on the Beaufort waterfront at the NC Maritime Museum and the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center located across the street from the museum. Admission is free. Proceeds help support the operations of the Friends of the North Carolina Maritime Museum and the North Carolina Maritime Museum.

Visitors to the Beaufort waterfront will have the opportunity to see the fishing boat that became the inspiration for the book and movie Jaws. The Cricket II will be at the town docks in Beaufort as part of the NC Maritime Museum’s Annual Wooden Boat Show. Free admission.

MAY 7

2nd Annual ‘Bike The Banks!’ The Emerald Isle Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee will host its second annual Bike the Banks Crystal Coast Lighthouse Century as part of the committee’s effort to promote the area as a one of the top bicycle-riding destinations along our coast. The event will feature three rides of varying length, all beginning at the Emerald Isle Community Center. Cyclists can choose from the 10-Mile Fun Run along the bicycle and pedestrian path in Emerald Isle; the Fort Macon 50-Miler, a round-trip ride to Fort Macon along Highway 58; or the Crystal Coast Century, a 100-mile round trip to Cape Lookout. The entry fee for the Fun Run is $25. Entry fees for the Fort Macon and Century rides are $40 each. Riders can register by visiting www.active.com/emerald-isle-nc/ cycling/races/bike-the-banks-crystal-coast-lighthousecentury-2016. All pre-registered riders will receive a free T-shirt at check in. Registration will be available on the day of the event, though pre-registration is encouraged.

THINGS TO DO

MAY 7

✪ Ships in a Bottle Demonstration [ 10 AM–4 PM ] Learn how ships in a bottle are made with Jim Goodwin as he demonstrates inserting 37 different ships into a bottle. This event is part of the Wooden Boat Show at the North Carolina Maritime Museum. Free admission.

MAY 7

✪ Wooden Boat Kids [ 10 AM–4 PM ] A variety of nautical activities will take place for the kids. Free admission. This event is part of the Wooden Boat Show at the NC Maritime Museum.

SWANSBORO PARKS & REC

MAY 7

✪ CRICKET II from the movie “Jaws” will be on the Beaufort waterfront at the town docks as part of the NC Maritime Museum’s Annual Wooden Boat Show. Free admission.

Events are held at the Swansboro Recreation Center at 830 Main Street Extension. For more information or to register, call 910-326-2600 or visit swansboro.recdesk.com.

TUESDAYS IN APRIL

Kids Hula [ 4:30–5:30 PM ] In this class children (keiki) will be learning playful basics for footwork and hand motions for hula. They may also learn about Hawaiian culture, stories and dance floor etiquette. Over the four weeks together, they will learn one choreography. Class is for ages 5 and up; cost is $25 for a four week series or $8 walk in.

APRIL 8, MAY 6

MAY 7

✪ The Art of Nautical Knot Tying

Kids’ Night In, Parents’ Night Out

Don Van Hoy is keeping alive a tradition of working with ropes and knots for practical purposes. Known as Marlinspike seamanship, he will demonstrate this practice that goes back as long as there have been ships going to sea. This event is part of the 42nd Annual Wooden Boat Show at the North Carolina Maritime Museum. Free admission.

[ 6–8 PM ] Calling all K–6th graders! Join Swansboro Parks and Recreation for an evening of fun and creative crafts, games and activities in the this program series. Dinner and refreshments will be served. Drop the kids off for a safe and fun time while you head out for a fun evening of your own! Space is limited to 12 participants so be sure to pre-

APR IL 22

DINNER AND A MOVIE (or just the movie for free) at the Town Hall Community Room in Swansboro. See next page for details. For information call 910-326-2600.

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THINGS TO DO

register by March 30; $10 for the first child and $5 for each additional child.

APRIL 9

✪ Touch A Truck [ 10 AM–2 PM ] The Swansboro Parks and Recreation Department will host its 3rd Annual Touch A Truck event. Touch A Truck provides a unique opportunity for those young and young at heart to explore, climb, touch, learn what the trucks do, how they work and how they benefit our community. This is your chance to climb in, take a seat behind the steering wheel and imagine being the driver of a fire engine, ambulance, bobcat and many, many more! Along with the vehicle displays you will find arts and crafts vendors, food and beverage vendors, entertainment, children’s inflatables and our annual Fun Run. Bring out the entire family for a day of fun and hands on vehicle exploration. Bring your vehicle to the event! Do you or your company have a unique vehicle that you would like to share with the community at the Touch A Truck event? If so, contact the Swansboro Parks and Recreation Department for more information.

APRIL 11–MAY 2

Mermaid Ballerina Camp [ 2:30–3 PM ] Swansboro Parks and Recreation is partnering with Swansboro Dance Studio to offer a Mermaid Ballerina camp. The cost is $45 for four weeks. You will receive a tutu and dance bag as a gift. Your little ballerina will learn beginning ballet moves, how to follow directions and how to dance to music. They will leap, plié and many other beginning dance moves. The classes will last 30 minutes and we hope to see your little one there!

APRIL 12

✪ Pins and Needles: Open Sew [ 5–8 PM ] Do you have lots of unfinished projects? If so, Pins and Needles is for you. On the second Tuesday of each month individuals will have the chance to have uninterrupted time for completing unfinished projects. The classroom is open to anyone who sews, quilts, knits, crochets or does needlework. Have fun, sew and show off your skills!

✪ =FREE

M I D – A P R I L T O M I D – M AY

APRIL 14

APRIL 22

✪ Carteret Chiropractic: Health and Wellness

Dinner and a Movie

[ 5:30–6:30 PM ] A free seminar on chiropractic health and wellness. The class will cover the basics of chiropractic principles and the benefits of chiropractic care for pain and overall wellness.

APRIL 16

✪ Pitch, Hit and Run [ 1 PM ] Pitch, Hit and Run is the official skills competition of Major League Baseball®. This program is designed to provide youngsters with an opportunity to compete, free of charge, in an arena that recognizes individual excellence in skills. Swansboro Parks and Recreation and Swansboro Baseball Softball Association will be hosting this event at Sanders Park at 287 Swansboro Loop Road.

APRIL 19

✪ NC Division of Services for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing [ 10:30 AM–12:30 PM ] The NC Division of Services for the Deaf and the Hard of Hearing staff are available to work with individuals needing assistance in applying for equipment including hearing aids, weather alert radios and specialized phones through the NC DSDHH Equipment Distribution Service. Please call 1-800-205-9915 to make an appointment. Reservations are required.

APRIL 22

✪ Friday Movie Mania: Concussion [ 7:30 PM ] Come relax and unwind with Swansboro Parks and Recreation and enjoy a blockbuster movie. Movie is free and will be shown at Town Hall Community Room. 4/22.................................................... Concussion 5/6............................................ Norm of the North

[ 6 PM ] Join Swansboro Parks and Recreation and Icehouse Waterfront Restaurant for dinner and a movie at Town Hall Community Room. Start the evening off with a delicious meal prepared by local downtown Icehouse Waterfront Restaurant. After dinner, stay for a Movie Mania showing of “Concussion” at 7:30. Cost is $35 per couple or $20 per person, which includes your meal, movie, popcorn and a drink. Pre-registration and payment required by April 18.

ONGOING

Personal Training Swansboro Parks and Recreation is partnering with Aubrey Morrison to offer personal training. For detailed information, pricing and specials contact Aubrey Morrison at 423-653-1277 or email aubreygmorris@gmail.com.

MAY 2

✪ Essential Oils 101: Essential Oils for Skin Health [ 6 PM ] Got a headache? There’s an essential oil for that. Have a hard time sleeping? There’s an essential oil for that. Have a skin problem? There’s a ton of essential oils for that! This month’s seminar topic will teach you how essential oils can help you remedy a number of skin conditions from acne to aging, dryness to oiliness. Seminars on the first Tuesday of each month. Drop-ins welcome! Class is free. Snacks provided, pre-registration encouraged.

WEDNESDAYS IN MAY

Polynesian Dance [ 6 PM ] In this four-week series, participants will learn basic hula and Tahitian moves and hand movements of the elegant modern version of hula. This class is for ages 12 and up and a wonderful way to connect with the body through gentle and graceful movements of the hips and arms. During the time together participants will learn not only the basic steps but also an easy choreography for a popular Hawaiian song and for one heard at most luaus. Pre-registration preferred by May 3; class is $30 for series; $10 walk-in. S

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L I N DA B E R G M A N – A LT H O U S E

O U T E R BA N K S W I L D L I F E S H E LT E R

ABOUT O.W.L.S. Take a tour of the facility at 100 Wildlife Way, Newport. To volunteer, call 252-240-1200. If your organization would like to learn more about wildlife, the O.W.L.S. non-releasable education animals jump at the chance!

SWEET RELEASE! Wildlife rehabilitation is a joint effort between the public and the rehabilitators, release day is a joy for both.

W

hen a Carteret County gentleman on his way to work straddled what he thought was roadkill with his tires, he was shocked to see a lifted wing in his rearview mirror, motioning, “Hey, I’m still alive here!” Dale stopped immediately and returned to find an adult Barred Owl alive in the middle of the road! He placed the injured owl in his car and took him home. His wife was surprised to see her husband walk in with a large owl under his arm, but quickly found one of their pugs’ kennel cabs to place the owl in. It did not look good for the Barred Owl—he appeared weak and could not stand. Who knew what internal injuries he may have suffered as a result of a collision with an automobile? She placed him in the pet carrier, believing he probably would not make it. Imagine her surprise when she checked on him a while later and found that although he was leaning against the carrier, he was on his feet! At that point, the “great” Samaritan, Lori, figured the owl had a chance and transported him to the Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter in Newport. An examination found no broken bones, lacerations or puncture wounds, but a concussion was evident due to his inability to stay steady on his feet. He received medicinal therapy to diminish brain swelling and to prevent any permanent neurological damage. When providing treatment, timing is critical when dealing with any injury, but especially a head injury. Day after day he continued to improve and, despite taking his sweet time, he eventually became his wild Barred Owl self again. He ate well, packed on some weight and passed hunting school with flying colors. Then the day arrived that all wildlife rehabilitators look forward to: Release Day! Honestly, there is no better day at the shelter! Coordination with the family who found and brought him to the shelter for the care he urgently needed made it possible to release the Barred Owl back to his home area, which is filled with tall trees and wide fields. The family was thrilled to participate in his “Sweet Release,” and it became a joyous family and wildlife rehabilitator affair. Everyone stood back, away from his enclosure, giving him a wide birth to leave in any direction he wanted to go. After the door opened, he sat for a bit and peeked out before taking wing to the open sky. It didn’t take long for him to pass completely out of sight. Releases are usually quick; you dare not blink or you’ll miss it. Very seldom does a

wild animal look back, for they are doing what they were made to do—avoid us! It’s an emotional few seconds for those taking part for so many reasons and yes, there are tears. It’s always heart-warming for compassionate rescuers, who had put their day on hold to help an animal in distress, to see that because they cared enough to ensure the animal was taken to those who could help, a magnificent wild animal received a second chance at life. Wildlife Rehabilitators get a little weepy too because we know how tedious the animal’s care has been and how hard an animal has to fight to recover in captivity. They have to stay “wild-strong” and want to recover as much as we want them to, although despite our most heroic efforts, a second chance doesn’t always come. Releases are Graduation Day whether rehabilitation has taken only a few weeks or many months. The compassion, efforts and strengths of everyone involved, to include the animal itself, has come full circle. Release is definitely a time to celebrate, whether it’s a very quiet moment between only the animal and rehabber or with others looking on. Our shelter says “thank you” to all rescuers who stop in the middle of their plans during the day or night to take the necessary time required to intervene when an animal is obviously suffering. Wildlife rehabilitation is truly a joint effort that relies on the public’s eyes, ears and compassion because it would be impossible for the shelter staff to do what they do, if it wasn’t for kind, caring and generous rescuers like Lori & Dale of Peletier. If you aren’t familiar with Barred Owls, they are large, stocky nocturnal raptors with forward facing, soulful brown eyes and a hawk-like beak. They have no ear tufts like Great Horned Owls, which makes them look very round in appearance. The pattern of the Barred Owl’s brown and white striped plumage allows them to fly soundlessly with their four foot wingspan. When you’re out for a night walk and hear a call in the distance that almost sounds like someone is saying “Who cooks for you, who cooks for you all,” you have just identified a Barred Owl! S

A P R I L / M AY 2 0 1 6 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | 1 5


T H E U N D E R G R O U N D FA R M

S U S TA I N A B L E L I V I N G

ABOUT UNDERGROUND FARM The Underground Farm plans to teach all of us a little more about farming. They will be offering up locally grown, farm-fresh produce at the Olde Beaufort Farmers’ Market.

customers appreciate our efforts and are happy to eat a different vegetable. Looks like a tomato but a better tomato!

Tell us about the teaching aspect of the farm and the Carteret Local Food Network (CLFN).

THE UNDERGROUND FARM The Underground Farm plans to teach all of us a little more about farming. Just one visit is all it takes to understand how.

T

he Underground Farm in Smyrna—under the guidance of the Carteret Local Food Network (CLFN)—is an example of the market’s home-grown and handmade philosophy. Recently we talked with Catherine Elkins, the originator of the farm. We’ve included information about Josh Potter, the person responsible for its day-to-day operations.

What was the initial plan, how did the business get started? Underground Farm and Learning Center in Smyrna was originally begun in 2011 as an experiment to grow sustainably raised vegetables in Carteret County. The ownership was transferred to the non-profit CLFN in 2014. The demographics of our coastal community has changed a lot and there are enough shoppers to appreciate and demand fresh produce. The branding of “local” has reached Beaufort and generated many happy CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) customers too. As a non-profit, CLFN has hired long-term employee Josh Potter to be the manager of the farm, overseeing the annual schedule of prepping, planting, tending, harvesting and marketing the over forty different vegetables and small berries. He manages any other employees, interns and volunteers in their weekly chores, as well as tending to his customers’ needs on Saturday mornings at market.

Tell us about day-to-day operations. The farm has been a work in progress since day one. The annual schedule of crops ranges from 34 to 48 types of vegetables. Since we sell through both a spring and a fall CSA, we base most of our calculation on those requirements and then double it for Olde Beaufort Farmers’ Market sales. There are some ‘slow’ times of the year such as January and August, but starting with peas and potatoes in February gives us plenty to do when the weather is not accommodating.

This approach to farming operations is different from most… We’ve always wanted to prove to ourselves and our community that sustainable farming is possible in Carteret County. Our definition of sustainable includes the farmer, the community and Mother Earth—all need to be sustained and nurtured. We don’t produce the quantity of vegetables that other farms can, but we’re growing in a way that requires a more hands-on approach. We squish a lot of bugs, pull a lot of weeds and use fertilizers that may not yield as much as synthetics do, but our

CLFN hosts workshops on topics such as beekeeping, composting and vermiculture as well as how-to projects such as building a hoophouse. We also conduct on-farm tours. We offer intern positions, CSA exchanges and on-the-farm training to folks who want to become our competitors. It’s all good! When Underground Farm was transferred to CLFN, the mission was enhanced to provide opportunities for learning sustainable growing practices on the edge of the continent. We have unique weather here and can really take advantage of a much longer growing season with season extending-techniques. CLFN would like to promote this sustainability, not just a making a living but as a positive life-style choice. “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants,” is Michael Pollan’s quote and we aim to satisfy the growing demand of real food for our neighbors and citizens who then support the farmer and fisherman who respects Mother Earth.

What comments are you hearing from Olde Beaufort Farmers’ Market shoppers? The feedback from repeat customers is phenomenal! They really like the different varieties we’re trying and the fact that we grow with the “O” word in mind. No, we’re not certified organic, but we behave that way and we believe that our customers appreciate our extra efforts.

Tell us a little about yourself. I grew up outside of Philadelphia and moved to Chapel Hill in late ‘80s for husband Chris to teach at UNC (go Tar Heels!). The next move was to Gloucester in 2010. My previous work was mostly accounting and construction. I have three kids spread to corners of the country, two grandchildren, one husband and one dog. Josh grew up in Marshallberg, knows everyone and enjoys anything CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

A P R I L / M AY 2 0 1 6 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | 1 7


NC’S ENTRY TO NOSB Students from Walter Williams High School.

National Ocean Sciences Bowl Comes to Carteret County

C

an you name the top commercial fish taken but not consumed directly by humans? Could you say for whom the Tethys Sea is named? Do you know the word for a sharp change in density in water? Do you know what the name is for the “King of Knots?” No? Well, more than 120 high school students from all over the United States do know the answers to those questions and will be competing for college scholarships and other prizes this April in Carteret County! Carteret County will, for the first time, be hosting the National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB) from April 21-24. The NOSB is an academic program and competition for high school students that focuses on the marine sciences. Participants for this fourday event are the winners of 24 regional bowls from all over the country and will be flown to Carteret County for the competition. North Carolina’s entry in the national competition is from Walter Williams High School in Burlington, led by coach Erica Bower. The Walter Williams team won our state competition, the Blue Heron Bowl, that was held on the campus of Carteret Community College in February. Many of the judges for the competition, including moderators, timekeepers, and scorekeepers, are volunteers from the many marine science institutions in the area as well as interested citizens. In addition to the field trip sponsorship, many other local businesses are supporting this event through monetary, in-kind, and volunteer support. The Seafood Festival is sponsoring the competition lunch on Saturday and the Tourism Development Authority is providing gift bags and other items. This event was brought to Carteret County by Janelle Fleming of Seahorse Coastal Consulting (seahorsecoastal.com). She has been the regional coordinator for the Blue Heron Bowl for the last four years and is excited about hosting the National Bowl. UNC’s Institute of Marine Science was the host institution for the Blue Heron Bowl and will be again for the upcoming National Bowl. We are looking forward to showcasing the marine industry here in Carteret County and all that this area has to offer! There are always volunteer and sponsorship opportunities available and if you would like to participate, please email janelle.fleming@seahorsecoastal. com. Additional information about both the Blue Heron Bowl and the National Ocean Sciences Bowl is available at sites.google.com/ site/blueheronbowl and nosb.org. S 1 8 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | A P R I L / M AY 2 0 1 6

42nd Annual Wooden Boat Show 2016 Schedule of Events The 42nd Annual North Carolina Maritime Museum Wooden Boat Show features a variety of small wooden boats, historic vessels, nautical crafts, educational activities, boat models, traditional skills demonstrations and displays. Selected as a Top 20 Event for May by the Southeast Tourism Society, the Annual Wooden Boat Show takes place on the Beaufort waterfront at the NC Maritime Museum and the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center located across the street from the museum. Admission is free. For up to date information check out ncmaritimemuseums.com and beaufortchallenge.com.

Thursday, May 5 9 a.m. – 5 p.m ������� Blackbeard’s Queen Anne’s Revenge, 1718, at the North Carolina Maritime Museum 1–4 p.m. ���������������� Go Sailing in a Traditional Wooden Boat. Free with a $5-per-person donation suggested. At the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center

Friday, May 6 9 a.m. – 5 p.m ������� Blackbeard’s Queen Anne’s Revenge, 1718, at the North Carolina Maritime Museum 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. ������ Boating Skills Virtual Trainer by Fort Macon Sail & Power Squadrons at the North Carolina Maritime Museum Library 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. ������ Go Sailing in a Traditional Wooden Boat. Free with a $5-per-person donation suggested. At the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center 5:30–7:30 p.m. ������ 42nd Annual Wooden Boat Show Opening Party at the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center

Saturday, May 7 8–9 a.m. ���������������� New Boat Launchings at the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center 8:30–10 a.m. ��������� Registration of Boats at the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. ������ Blackbeard’s Queen Anne’s Revenge, 1718, at the North Carolina Maritime Museum 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. ���� Exhibit of Wooden Boats at the North Carolina Maritime Museum (Front Street and parking lot) ������������������������������� Wooden Boat Kids at the North Carolina Maritime Museum Front Patio & Breezeway & Museum Back Parking Lot ������������������������������� Sailing Radio-Controlled Model Boats at the North Carolina Maritime Museum front patio ������������������������������� Carolina Maritime Model Society Ship Model Exhibition at the North Carolina Maritime Museum auditorium ������������������������������� Ship-in-Bottles Modeling Demonstrations by Jim Goodwin at the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center


������������������������������� Knot Tying Demonstrations by Don Van Hoy at the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center ������������������������������� Display of Wooden Model North Carolina Boats by Robert Tuttle at the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center ������������������������������� Nautical Book Sale at the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center ������������������������������� In-Water Boat Show, from Sinbad’s pirate ship the Meka II to a traditional Core Sounder fishing boat. Others may offer tours aboard. ������������������������������� Cricket II, the boat that inspired the movie Jaws, at the Beaufort waterfront docks 10 a.m. – 5 p.m ����� Boating Skills Virtual Trainer by Fort Macon Sail & Power Squadrons at the North Carolina Maritime Museum Library 11 a.m �������������������� Spritsail Race on Taylor’s Creek 1–3 p.m. ���������������� Go Sailing in a Traditional Wooden Boat. Free with a $5-per-person donation suggested. At the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center 2 p.m ���������������������� Beaufort Oars Gig Race on Taylor’s Creek 3 p.m. ��������������������� Traditional Sailboat Races on Taylor’s Creek 5:30–7 p.m. ����������� Wooden Boat Show Awards Reception at the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center

Sunday, May 8 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. ������ Blackbeard’s Queen Anne’s Revenge, 1718, at the North Carolina Maritime Museum 1–5 p.m. ���������������� Boating Skills Virtual Trainer by Fort Macon Sail & Power Squadrons at the North Carolina Maritime Museum Library

About the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort The North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort reflects coastal life and interprets lighthouses and lifesaving stations, the seafood industry, motorboats, and more. Studies in marine life, science, and ecology are available for all ages. The Beaufort museum is the repository for artifacts from Blackbeard’s wrecked flagship, Queen Anne’s Revenge, among them cannons, grenades, belt buckles and beads. The Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center teaches boatbuilding for all ages. The North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort is open Monday thru Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. The museum is open to the public with free admission. Donations are always appreciated.

About the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources The N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (NCDNCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state’s natural and cultural resources to build the social, cultural, educational and economic future of North Carolina. Led by Secretary Susan Kluttz, NCDNCR’s mission is to improve the quality of life in our state by creating opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history, libraries and nature in North Carolina by stimulating learning, inspiring creativity, preserving the state’s history, conserving the state’s natural heritage, encouraging recreation and cultural tourism, and promoting economic development. NCDNCR includes 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, two science museums, three aquariums and Jennette’s Pier, 39 state parks and recreation areas, the N.C. Zoo, the nation’s first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the State Archives, the N.C. Arts Council, State Preservation Office and the Office of State Archaeology, along with the Division of Land and Water Stewardship. For more information, please call 919-807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov. S A P R I L / M AY 2 0 1 6 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | 1 9


A S K T H E AQ UA R I U M

N C A Q UA R I U M S . C O M / P I N E - K N O L L - S H O R E S

FAQ

Q. My grandson was snorkeling in Florida and saw what his instructor called a nudibranch. It was purple and yellow and very small. What are nudibranchs and do we have them in North Carolina?

N

udibranchs (noo-dee-bronks) are shell-less mollusks in the sea slug family. Their splendid colors and shapes belie their unappealing family namesake. More than 3,000 species are known throughout the world’s oceans and new species continue to be discovered. Nudibranch means “naked gill,” referring to the animal’s external, feathery, sometimes plume-like gills. These aquatic creatures are slow movers that meander amid corals, sponges and shallow-water reefs. Some, like graceful sea hares, have wing-like flaps for swimming. Nudibranchs come in all shapes and sizes—flat, thick, long or short— and most exhibit two highly sensitive tentacles on their head. Nudibranchs range in size from less than an inch to more than 12 inches in length. They are hermaphroditic and can mate with any other mature member of their species. Some live less than a month and others up to a year. Most nudibranchs are carnivorous, feasting on sponges, anemones, bryozoans, corals—and even each other. Others have diets ranging from bacteria to plants. Many carnivorous varieties feed on stinging animals like hydroids, jellyfish and anemones and store the stinging cells in their body to serve as a defense against predators. Others produce a distasteful, noxious secretion that makes them unpalatable to would-be attackers. Not all nudibranchs come in vibrant colors, but even they are equally remarkable for their amazing ability to disguise themselves to match the plants and animals on which they live. In 2003, a new species of nudibranch was captured in a photo by diver and underwater photographer Sandy Smith. Smith spied the small snail grazing in a mass of sargassum weed off Cape Lookout. The nudibranch’s coloration was a brilliant yellow, hot orange and butterscotch to match the sargassum on which it lived. Smith earned the privilege of giving the new species a common name, aptly dubbing it “Butterfinger” (Polycera chilluna). Discover more fascinating facts about North Carolina’s aquatic environments and inhabitants by visiting the aquariums on Roanoke Island, at Fort Fisher and at Pine Knoll Shores, or Jennette’s Pier in Nags Head.S 2 0 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | A P R I L / M AY 2 0 1 6

Marine slugs and snails are gastropods, a word that literally means “stomach foot.” PHOTO COURTESY OF JOE POE FOR NC AQUARIUMS

about the

AQ UA R I U M Information provided by the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores. The state operates three public aquariums; one in Pine Knoll Shores, another at Fort Fisher and a third on Roanoke Island, as well as Jennette’s Pier in Nags Head. The facilities are administered by the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources and are designed to inspire appreciation and conservation of North Carolina’s aquatic environments. —F O R M O R E I N F O —

For more information, call 1-800-832-FISH or visit ncaquariums.com.


CAROLINA HOME AND GARDEN

SOUTHERN GARDENER

ALL ABOUT FRUIT TREES

Everybody’s talking about fruit!

F

FIG TREE

ruit trees are a great way to add beauty, fragrance and nutrition to your garden. There are many choices available in our area to plant and improve your outdoor space. Whether you have a lot of space for the larger trees or only a small area for a dwarf tree, there is something to accommodate everyone’s needs this time of year. So what’s the big deal about fruit trees anyway?

Why plant a fruit tree?

Along with the potential of great fruit developing, fruit trees offer beautiful floral blooms to keep your landscape breathtaking. They add depth and natural beauty to any yard with easy-to-moderate upkeep.

What tree is right for me?

PEAR TREE

If you’re unsure of what type of tree you wish to have in your yard, think about how much time you spend in your garden. The more low-maintenance fruit trees like fig, pecan and persimmon call for less concentration on fertility, insect and disease control. If decided that you’re up for a challenge, but would still like something manageable, plum and pear trees are a great option. You can even try your hand at both and have a great variety available in your own back yard.

Where do I place and how do I grow my tree? Just like any plant, it’s all about location. If you plant your tree in too little or too much sunlight, growth opportunity will vary. The best locations for fruit trees are away from any fences or hedges and in sufficient sunlight. Fruit trees tend to dislike cold and shaded areas. Growth will also depend on the type of soil used. A fairly fertile and well-drained soil will add to the growth of your tree greatly. The roots can easily drown on a fruit tree if in soil that doesn’t properly drain. Consider the acidity of the soil as well. The soil pH should be approximately 6.5. North Carolina soils tend to be very acidic, which is not ideal for keeping nutrients in the soil. Finding the right products to keep the proper pH will substantially improve the healthiness of your tree. With proper pH balance, your tree will thrive!

PECAN TREE

What are the benefits of having my own tree? Growing and shopping locally are always important. It’s obviously nice to be able to get the freshest product right out of your back yard; however, there are many other benefits to growing fruit trees. Every tree planted reduces the amount of carbon dioxide emissions produced in the air by absorbing CO2 and expelling oxygen into the atmosphere. Who doesn’t want to help our beautiful planet? With so much focus on organic products, there is nothing more organic than pulling a piece of fruit directly off the tree of your yard—no shipping costs necessary. In the right area, a fruit tree can also help shade areas of your yard or home, reducing energy costs. If you plant other shrubs or plants needing less sunlight around your fruit tree, you will also reduce the cost of water during your hotter months, as the soil will retain water and less supplemental watering will be needed.

PERSIMMON TREE

What are some things to be aware of? In order to grow fruit, the trees have to be pollinated properly. This means that choosing a tree that self-pollinates or choosing two trees to cross-pollinate is necessary. Without this, your tree will be beautiful, but you’ll never reap the benefits of fruit. Make sure you properly test your soil for any pests or fungicides. There are several inexpensive tests that can be done to ensure your tree is healthy and will remain healthy throughout the growing process. Planting new things in your garden can always be a little overwhelming. Unless you’re a professional, we all have worries. However, fruit trees are so greatly beneficial for personal and environmental use, why not give it a try? You’ll be so thankful when you take that first bite that you’ll never look back! S

PLUM TREE

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outside or on the water, Jack-of-all-trades and becoming a master at them too!

Underground Farm, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17

What are your plans for the future? We’re looking for more opportunities to grow for restaurants and caterers. We’re starting some micro-green and edible flower production and expanding our selection of unique vegetables. Also, we try to deliver tasty veggies that are not as easy to get fresh, such as peas, beets, garlic, kale, chard, herbs, broccoli rabe, Asian greens and kohlrabi. In addition we grow variations on standards like bitter melon, red okra, yard-long beans, horseradish, Daikon radish and hakurei turnips. We are not competing with the farmers in Carteret County who often count on reliable varieties of proven winners (strawberries, watermelon, onions, cucumbers, okra, beans, sweet potatoes, collards). They deserve every sale they can get because they work so hard. S

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N ATA L I E TAY L O R

Stellar Drama: Orion the Hunter

D

uring the month of April, as soon as the sun sets along the Crystal Coast, the great hunter Orion sprawls across the western sky, with the dog Canis Major bounding after him. Their departure from the stage of starlight that plays through each night signifies the coming of warm weather

and long days. Orion, easily recognizable by his belt of three bright stars, is often depicted wielding a sword and a club or sometimes a bow. According to the ancient lore, Orion was from a species of giants and he was known for his strength and skills as a hunter. What drives this great giant to circle the Earth so prominently? Who is he chasing or who may be chasing him? To astronomers, Orion is famous for more than his hunting style. Look for the three stars that make up Orion’s belt and look toward the horizon for the stars that make up the sword hanging from his belt. This group of stars contains the Orion nebula. The brightest spot in the sword of Orion, this nebula is hot with the formation of baby stars—astronomers think there may be more than a thousand of them—and the gas and dust spread by the stellar winds create a dramatic glow for telescopic photographs. Looking back up toward Orion’s belt is another nebula, the famous Horsehead nebula. Visible with a telescope, this nebula has a gas cloud that is dark and in the shape of a horse’s head. Even without a telescope, we can see the bright star Betelgeuse at Orion’s shoulder. If you think this star looks a little reddish, you are right. Betelgeuse is a Red Supergiant, which means it is a very old and very large star; in its old age, it has expanded to a diameter 1,000 times larger than that of the sun. But the ancient Greek gods didn’t have telescopes to view the birth and death of stars. Instead they had Orion, a great hunter who was desperately

SKYLORE

in love with the Seven Sisters. He pursued these sisters relentlessly, especially the youngest: Merope. But Orion was a foolish giant and one evening after excess imbibery, he attacked Merope. Her father, enraged by the attack and insult to his daughter’s virtue, had Orion blinded and cast along the shore. Orion, upon advice from an Oracle, followed the sound of the Cyclopes hammer, as far east as he could go, where the sun god took pity on him and restored his sight. Orion became a huntsman for the great goddess Artemis and he spent many days hunting alongside her and her hunting dogs. Now Artemis, goddess of the hunt, was one of Zeus’s many children and she had a twin brother, Apollo. Artemis was deeply infatuated with Orion, a condition that her brother did not approve of. One day, after observing Orion swimming in the ocean, Apollo said to his sister, “I’ll bet you can’t hit that rock with your arrow.” “Of course I can hit that rock, don’t be foolish!” Artemis retorted. “That tiny little thing in that big old ocean?” Apollo taunted. “You couldn’t hit that.” “Watch me!” cried Artemis, and with her characteristic strength and precision, Artemis drew back her bow and let loose a perfectly aimed shot. Unbeknownst to her, the rock at which she aimed was not a rock at all, but was the head of the giant Orion, swimming along in the ocean. Her aim was so superior that Artemis’s arrow pierced Orion’s skull, killing him. She was distraught by the loss of her love and in her grief, Artemis placed Orion among the stars. The Seven Sisters, meanwhile, earned their place in the sky as a reprieve from Orion’s constant advances and they are the names of the seven visible Pleiades. To the astronomer, the Pleiades are an open cluster, which means there are not just seven, but over a hundred stars clustered together in close proximity to each other. To the casual observer, the Pleiades are a hazy patch that is easily picked up by the eye. Those with keen eyesight can pick out the seven (or sometimes six) visible stars. In April the Pleiades are close to the western horizon after sunset. Orion, still in love with Merope and her sisters, pursues them into eternity, but is never able to catch them. Apollo, still trying to protect his sister Artemis, continued to disapprove of her infatuation with Orion. As she placed him in the stars in her grief over his death, Apollo sent a scorpion to chase after him. This is why Orion is a winter constellation and the Zodiacal constellation Scorpio is always on the other side of the stellar stage, rising in the summer and chasing Orion around the globe. Eastern North Carolina is a few degrees south in latitude from southern Greece and many of the stories that played out in the archaic night skies over the Mediterranean also play out over the Atlantic Ocean from the beach on Emerald Isle. In the winter evenings the great hunter passes, with the dog Canis Major bounding after. As the seasons change and the position of the Earth gives us a different view of the universe, there are many more adventures to tell! S A P R I L / M AY 2 0 1 6 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | 2 3


DISCOVERY DIVING

LEE MOORE

DIVING OUR COAST

IN APRIL

A

s the cool days in March faded way to warm days that got into the 80s (and even hit 90 on one day), everyone got a case of spring fever, but water temperatures were slow to warm up as quickly. Offshore temps in March ranged from the low 50s to the low 60s, while the inshore ranged from the 40s to low 50s, which are normal temperatures for March. But with these warm days, inshore temperatures should continue to rise.

The Annual Gear Service

Before divers decide to take their first underwater breath of the season, they need to have the annual service on their gear performed. When the dive season starts, you don’t want to be standing on the dock watching the boat head offshore while your gear is getting its annual service because you waited until the last minute. When choosing someone to work on your gear, check their references. Ask how long they have been repairing gear, what type of training they have received, if they were an apprentice to another repair technician before they started out on their own. There have been cases of new repair technicians putting regulator second stages back together with the internal components in backwards so that it did not function properly and other cases where the repair technician used the wrong parts kit to do a rebuild. This caused the second stage to leak air at depth because some O-rings were missing. Sometimes the manufacturer does upgrades to their products. They may look the same on the outside, but the changes could have taken place on the inside. Repair technicians need to be up to date on all new equipment and equipment changes. If you have any questions about your repair technician’s credentials, verify them. If you still have concerns or your shop doesn’t have a repair technician, AirTech in Raleigh does equipment repair and service. That is their primary function, not a sideline. They receive equipment from around the world for service. All you have to do is mail it to them and usually within two weeks of receipt, the service has been completed.

Life Support Equipment

JOIN DISCOVERY Contact Discovery Diving at 252‑728‑2265 or visit them on Facebook to see what classes and events are coming up. You can also visit discoverydiving.com.

JOIN ECARA ECARA works to continue sinking ships to create artificial reefs here in North Carolina, but their resources are limited. To get involved with ECARA, visit carolinareef.org to check out their current project list.

A regulator is the major piece of life support equipment that the diver uses to breathe underwater. It is made up of two main pieces, the first stage and the second stage. The first stage is the part that is connected to the tank and the second stage is the piece that the diver put in their mouth and breathes through. Most divers have two second stages. One is their primary, the one they breathe off of, and the other is their alternate air source, more commonly known as an octopus. The octopus is used to share air with another diver in the event they are low on air. All three stages have internal parts that are replaced during the annual service. Even though the outside looks the same, it is like getting a brand new regulator each year. When the moving parts are replaced, they are coated with lubricants to make them move more smoothly. Aqua-Lung provides free parts for life for their customers, as long as the regulators are serviced every year. Sherwood provides free parts for their customers for the first two years. The buoyancy compensator is the piece of equipment that the diver wears to hold their tank on their back and uses to attain neutral buoyancy while underwater. When it is inspected, the dump valves are inspected to make sure they open and close properly to hold and release air. Buoyancy compensators either have an inflator hose or an “i3” device to adjust the amount of air that is added and released. A low pressure hose connects the inflation device to the first stage and allows air to be directly added from the diver’s tank to the buoyancy compensator. The repair technician inspects the inflation device to ensure it is functioning properly. Proper servicing of your gear is essential. Most gear needs to be serviced annually, but some manufacturers say two years. Check your owner’s manual. If you dive a lot, you might want to get serviced once a year anyway. Not only will it enhance your dive experience, but your life depends on it. S

2 4 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | A P R I L / M AY 2 0 1 6


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Enjoy a Weekend of Art In Beaufort at Mattie King Davis Art Gallery

T

he Mattie King Davis Art Gallery and the neighboring Craving Art Gallery will both be featuring fabulous artists to kick off the spring season in Beaufort. The Mattie King Davis Art Gallery will kick off the weekend by welcoming artist Beth Roy from Vass, North Carolina, for an opening Friday, April 1, featuring new works. Angela Nesbit will have an opening the next night at the Craving Art Gallery Ms. Roy’s paintings reflect a childhood spent in rural Michigan growing up with a love for horses that has lasted a lifetime, a connection that translates into beautiful paintings. Her compositions are inspired by body language and her ability to capture the personality and expressions of the animals and people that are the subject of her work. Her professional art schooling took place at Austin Peay State University and Christopher Newport College. Her first 15 years as an artist, she always painted with watercolors and in 2002 she made a change to oil painting. Ms. Roy was awarded an Honorable Mention for oils in the Moore County Fine Arts Festival in 2006 and two years later won first place in oils at the festival. In 2009 she was awarded Best in Show at the juried Artist League of the Sandhills Pot of Gold Show. You can see her work featured in Swansboro, Beaufort, Pinehurst and Southern Pines, NC. When she isn’t painting, Ms. Roy is busy living life on the family farm with her husband, Tom, three horses, three cats and a dog. No stranger to Beaufort, Ms. Roy has had paintings in the gallery for many years and will make a great fit as the April-May featured artist. Her work will be on display beginning Friday, April 1 with a reception in her honor from 5 to 7 p.m. at the gallery on the grounds of the Beaufort Historic Site, 130 Turner Street in Beaufort. The Mattie King Davis Art Gallery is the oldest gallery in Carteret County showcasing the work of over 100 local and regional artists. Gallery proceeds benefit the ongoing educational and restoration projects at the Beaufort Historic Site. The gallery is open year-round Monday through Saturday at 130 Turner Street. For more information on The Mattie King Davis Art Gallery or the works of Beth Roy, please call 252-728-5225 or visit BHA’s website at beauforthistoricsite. org. You can also visit Beth Roy’s website at bethroy.com The next evening Craving Art Studio will host Charlotte artist, Angela Nesbit for an art opening on Saturday, April 2, from 6 to 8 p.m. Ms. Nesbit has a gift for capturing light, movement and texture and is recognized for her portraits of children in motion. Using a brush and palette knife, Ms. Nesbit builds energetic layers of paint to allow her subjects to blend between abstraction and reality. She received a B.A. from UNC at Chapel Hill and studied classical drawing and painting at Queens University and Spirit Square Center for Arts in Charlotte. Ms. Nesbit loves to paint what she knows, including children, flowers and the coast. She says of her work, “I love to create chaos on the canvas and then bring the painting into focus, constantly trying to see how much more I can leave out, bridging the gap between impressionism and abstraction”, Angela says. View more of Angela’s work on her website, angelanesbit.com and visit the Craving Art site to see more information on their events, cravingartatudio.com. S 2 6 | C A R O L I N A S A L T | A P R I L / M AY 2 0 1 6

Publick Day at the Beaufort Historic Site

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n Saturday, April 16, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., The Beaufort Historic Site will kick off the spring season with the annual Publick Day event on the grounds at 130 Turner Street. The Site will transform into an open-air marketplace, welcoming visitors to explore the vast array of goods and items for sale from various vendors. “Publick Times” dates back to the colonial period and is fashioned after Williamsburg of the 1700s when the General Court was in session. Publick Day gave visitors an opportunity to come to town to see and be seen, conduct court business, shop, gossip, dine and dance. Guests who attend Publick Day can expect to find a variety of vendors selling antiques, vintage finds, collectibles, arts and crafts, wood crafts, furniture, hand-made jewelry, baskets, pottery and more. “It’s a truly unique event,” said PR Director Sidney Hunter. “Publick Day provides the chance to shop local, and find the perfect treasure that you couldn’t necessarily find on the shelf of any store.” Vendor space is available for Publick Day. Applications are being accepted to rent a 10' x 10' space for $35 if you are a BHA member and $50 for non-members. Space is first-come, first served, and the event is held rain or shine. Spaces are non-refundable. Vendors must supply their own tables and tent if needed. All proceeds from Publick Day go towards the ongoing restoration efforts and educational programs of the Beaufort Historical Association. For more information on Publick Day, or to reserve your space as a vendor, call 252-728-5225, 1-800-575-7483 or download an application online at beauforthistoricsite.org. S


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