Page 1

News and Events | Raising Awareness | Our Fundraisers

Update 74 | September to December 2017

In this

The critical issue of family screening

| 18

CRY Conference 2017

| 24

CRY Heart of Durham Walk

| 28

CRY Great Cake Bake

| 31

CRY Parliamentary Reception

| 38

Tel: 01737 363222 Fax: 01737 363444 Email: cry@c-r-y.org.uk

Visit our websites: www.c-r-y.org.uk www.sads.org.uk

CardiacRiskintheYoung CardiacRiskintheYoung @CRY_UK

To r of ece th ive ww e C th w. RY e on su c-r- Upd line bs y.o at v cr rg e, ers ib .u vis io e k/ it n :

Newsletter


CRY Update 74 September to December 2017 Editor Dr Steven Cox

Deputy Editor Tom West

Inside Update 74

Chief Executive

Newsletter Editor As Deputy Editor of the CRY Update it is my responsibility to put together this newsletter, and ambition that you find all the CRY news, events and fundraising in these pages to be of interest.

I always endeavour to ensure the information printed in this newsletter is accurate, but please do not hesitate to get in touch with me if you notice something amiss. CRY receives an incredible amount of support and I know occasionally an error will slip through, however any fundraising corrections will be clearly demarcated at the beginning of the subsequent issue’s fundraising section. I would appreciate hearing from you at tom@c-r-y.org.uk or on 01737 363222 if you have any feedback or comments regarding previous issues. Thank you for your help.

Contributors Alison Cox MBE

Founder

Meet Our Representative News from the Chief Executive CRY Online CRY Screening Report Alison’s Column CRY Centre for Cardiac Pathology (CRY CCP) Report Research News CRY Conference 2017 Great North Run 2017 CRY Heart of Durham Walk 2017 CRY Great Cake Bake 2017 CRY Parliamentary Reception 2017 Our Fundraisers Raising Awareness in the Media Report Fundraising Events 2018

Professor Mary Sheppard Consultant Cardiac Pathologist Rebecca Zouvani

Fundraising Manager

Head Office: Unit 1140B The Axis Centre Cleeve Road Leatherhead KT22 7RD No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means; electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior permission of the Editor. The Editor welcomes letters but reserve the right to edit when necessary and to withhold publication. Any opinion or statement by the author of any article or letter published does not necessarily represent the opinion of Cardiac Risk in the Young (CRY). Articles pertaining to health-related topics are for information only. Readers should obtain advice from their own practitioner before attempting to diagnose or administer any medication. Mention of any products or procedure should not be considered an endorsement for said product or procedure.

1 13 12

2

3

4 5 8

11

10

6 7

9

3 4 10 15 18 20 21 24 26 28 31 38 40 112 114

For more details regarding the events shown on the cover, please turn to the corresponding page references below. Images are listed clockwise from top left: 1. CRY runners at the Great North Run 2017. Page 26. 2. The Camp Hill Fair event in memory of Amy Osborne and Camilla Irvine. Page 90. 3. CRY Patron Simon Halliday at the An Evening With

the President event. Page 110.

Submission guidelines: We include activities in the “Our Fundraisers” section that raise £100 or more. Entries appear in the “Our Fundraisers” section according to when CRY sends official receipt of monies raised. If you can supply a writeup or photos for any fundraising activities you have taken part in, please email tom@c-r-y.org.uk. Images of CRY Patrons and Members of Parliament throughout have been highlighted in red.

4.

Supporters taking part in the Yorkshire Three Peaks Challenge in memory of Aaron Dixon. Page 59.

5.

Michelle Carloss’s skydive in memory of her husband, Simon. Page 52.

6.

Supporters taking part in the Cotswold Way Challenge 2017 in memory of Jack Boulton. Page 47.

7.

A supporter at the CRY Heart of Durham Walk 2017. Page 28.

8.

Kevan Jones MP, CRY Founder Alison Cox, Montana Brown and CRY Chief Executive Dr Steven Cox at the CRY Parliamentary Reception 2017. Page 38.

9.

CRY Research Fellow Dr Gherardo Finocchiaro presenting at the CRY Conference. Page 24.

10. The North Dorset 7s Rugby Tournament in memory of Maxwell Biles. Page 46. 11. Professor Sanjay Sharma speaking at the CRY Parliamentary Reception 2017. Page 38. 12. A selection of photos from the supporters of the CRY Great Cake Bake 2017. Page 31. 13. Mims Davies MP after completing the London Marathon 2017 in memory of Claire Reed. Page 94. Copyright © 2018 Cardiac Risk in the Young. Registered Charity No. 1050845 A Company Limited by Guarantee. Registered in England No. 3052985 Registered Office: Unit 1140B The Axis Centre, Cleeve Road, Leatherhead, KT22 7RD

2

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Meet Our Representative

Mallory Brand Representative in London I’m Mallory, a director at an events agency and I live with my fiancé, Luca, in South London.

I also recruited a team of friends for the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk in 2014 which was an amazing day.

I enjoy making homemade pasta and drinking red wine (as that’s good for your heart, right?) while listening to some ‘80s music or counting down to Christmas.

Me and Luca are due to get married in August and we have added a link on our gift list for guests to donate to CRY.

I was diagnosed with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome in July 2012, when I collapsed on a plane to the U.S.A. for a work trip. The first fact I discovered about the condition was that Meat Loaf was a fellow sufferer, so I thought that if the ‘bat out of hell’ could beat it, so could I! I picked up a leaflet about CRY at my first cardiologist appointment and got in touch with them soon after. Following my electrical ablation procedure in November 2012 at St George’s Hospital in Tooting and subsequent all clear in February 2013, I have contributed to the CRY newsletter and the myheart booklet launched at Parliament in November 2013.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

CRY were a huge support to me during my diagnosis and treatment of the condition, and I look forward to working with the team and supporting this very worthy cause over the next year.

3


News from the Chief Executive Dr Steven Cox

CRY Chief Executive

@Drstevenjcox drstevenjcox Thank you for everything that you continue to do to support CRY and raise awareness within your local communities. Included in this section are a number of media stories from September to December, as well as information about some of CRY’s events in this period.

September

Donna Faulkner interview on BBC Three Counties September 14 Donna Faulkner lost her son, Harry, at just 18 years of age to a sudden cardiac death when he was playing a match for his squash club. In an interview with BBC Three Counties, Donna recounted the tragic story of Harry’s death. Since Donna first contacted CRY, she has been organising fundraising in memory of Harry and screening, to ensure that other families don’t endure the same kind of tragedies. When asked about the pain of bringing up Harry’s death and the work she’s doing to support CRY now, Donna said the following: “It’s painful. It’s so, so painful. But you have to get the message out there to young people that you have to get your heart screened and this could happen. There could be children out there with underlying problems that, without the screening, wouldn’t be seen. I’ve screened – so far as part of Harry’s charity within CRY – over 600 children in Berkhamsted School and this November we will screen another 200. From the fundraising that we’ve done, that friends and family have done to support us… without that fundraising, those children might not get screened.” Donna reiterated CRY’s message before the end of the interview: “If I can say to any mum or dad out there, if you have a child over 14, please, please get your children screened, athlete or non-athlete.”

62 represent CRY in the Great North Run September 10

Interview on BBC Three Counties September 14

Thank you to the 62 runners who took part in the 2017 Simplyhealth Great North Run. As the most popular half marathon event in the world, it’s one of the biggest events for us once autumn and winter roll around each year.

I was able to address a couple of important topics in this interview, ranging from the awareness that was brought about by the collapse of Fabrice Muamba to the National Screening Committee’s backward views on screening.

To have so many people running for CRY is fantastic, thanks to every pound raised and each CRY jersey that raises awareness in front of the vast crowds. Runners who boldly represent CRY with our heart costume are always much appreciated too. For the article and photos from the day, turn to page 26.

4

Fabrice Muamba was a tipping point, because usually these tragedies will occur at sleep or during rest and people don’t see them. They almost don’t believe this can happen. Whereas, for the first time, everyone was watching. Millions of people were watching and seeing what happens when a cardiac arrest like this occurs. Since then our screening programme has been inundated with young people wanting to be tested, which is fantastic that people want to have their hearts

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


News from the Chief Executive checked. In this interview I managed to stress how much we have progressed in the last 20 years and we now know that one in 300 people we screen will have a potentially life-threatening condition and one in 100 people we test will have a condition that, although not immediately life threatening, could cause problems in their fourth decade if they’re not aware of it. One of the reasons the National Screening Committee need a more progressive approach is that there are international recommendations and European guidelines which state any person involved in organised sport should have an ECG prior to participation. This is because if you play sport, you increase the risk of having a cardiac arrest if you have an underlying problem. There are very many reasons why you need to know about this. One is there are certain drugs which should be avoided, prescribed medications which should be avoided if you have certain conditions. Some of the conditions – including the most common condition we identify in our screening programme – can be cured, so all risks from that condition can be removed. Sometimes, it’s about avoiding a career in professional sport and that’s indeed why, for many athletes, it’s mandatory for them to be screened because of the risks associated with sport. But, absolutely, the evidence for us is very strong that there should be at least the choice to have cardiac screening for young people.

deaths there are symptoms including chest pain or passing out during exercise. When we raise awareness we try to stress this and the importance of family history as much as possible – often on the website, through the local stories, and social media – as it’s a really important message to get out there. Support: support is essential. After a tragedy we help families to understand the cause of death and enable them to have comprehensive testing at St George’s Hospital in Tooting where we have our specialist National Centre, which is so vital after a young sudden cardiac death in the family. We also facilitate different ways for them to connect with other families who have been through a similar experience, creating support networks. This is so important after a young person has died suddenly. Screening: One of the key issues when we raise awareness about these conditions is to tell people about the opportunity to have cardiac screening and the unique service that CRY offers in the UK. There’s so much we can do to prevent a tragedy once someone knows if they have a condition. It might be avoidance of medications or drugs. It might be avoidance of a certain lifestyle, or it might be taking some preventative medicines. Over 23,500 people last year contacted us to have cardiac screening. They just go to our website, testmyheart.org. uk, and within a few clicks they can book an appointment to have a free cardiac screening, a service that is open to anyone between the ages of 14 and 35. Research: And then there’s research which is the future, and through research we’re going to prevent many young sudden deaths.

Interview with That’s Surrey TV September 20 That’s Surrey TV came to visit CRY’s office in Leatherhead. I was interviewed about CRY’s key principles, giving me a chance to raise awareness and highlight exactly what we do to tackle young sudden cardiac death. Awareness: people need to find out about these conditions. They need to know what to look out for and how they can be tested. Most sudden deaths will occur with no symptoms. However, in 20% of young sudden

www.c-r-y.org.uk

Interview with BBC Radio Sheffield September 27 Before I was interviewed about the importance of screening, Sophie Hirst told her story of being just 6 years old when she lost her mum to a sudden cardiac death. Sophie was later screened herself at St George’s Hospital in London, and a heart defect was picked up. The radio host, Toby Foster, supported the need for screening young people and planned to take his own children to be screened, but also mentioned the issue of false positives, which can put some people off. This gave me a chance to provide some clarity about false positives and point out just how effective CRY’s screening

5


News from the Chief Executive programme is in this regard. There’s a whole notion of false positives. These are people who are referred for further tests, which then turn out to be normal. But what we’re talking about here is an abnormal ECG. On the same day we do a follow up test, an ultrasound test, which looks at the structure of the heart. So, there are about 4% of people who are screened who are referred for further tests and you want to see what happens to that heart abnormality under pressure. For instance, during exercise, to check whether it gets worse and therefore is a high risk condition or whether the abnormality really is something you can be reassured is nothing to worry about. So, I think the whole notion of false positives is important to understand.

story and what he’s doing in aid of CRY to fight young sudden cardiac death. When asked about how pleased he is to see so much being done in Claire’s memory, Graham discussed his efforts to increase the distribution of defibrillators as much as possible and raise funds for CRY screenings. “What we’re aiming and what we’re lobbying for – both in parliament and we are also stakeholders on the National Screening Committee – is proactive screening for young people,” Graham said in response to a question on national heart screening in schools. “At the moment, it is reactive. They will only screen bloodline relatives if a loved one dies. We want to see that change. We know screening saves lives.”

One area of our research is to focus on reducing the number of false positives, but within cardiac screening it’s far less than in many other screening programmes we’re looking at, as long as there is a specialist there looking at the ECG which is so important.

Following Graham’s interview, I joined the show to further emphasize the importance of screening and how the remarkable fundraising efforts of CRY’s supporters enable us to provide them for free, which is so vital as screenings typically having a far higher cost when done privately.

October

Sue Dewhirst on BBC Radio Shropshire October 9

230 supporters participate in the Heart of Durham Walk October 7 I would like to thank all of the supporters who gathered together for the 2017 CRY Heart of Durham Walk, which wound through iconic sites such as Durham Cathedral, Durham Castle and the River Wear. This event is an opportunity for friends and families to walk in memory or support of someone and raise a fantastic amount of awareness in the process. This year was no different.

Interview with BBC Radio Solent October 9 Graham Hunter, who lost his daughter, Claire, was interviewed by BBC Radio Solent to talk about Claire’s

6

During an interview with Jim Hawkins on BBC Radio Shropshire, Sue Dewhirst highlighted exactly why it’s so vital for all young people to be screened. Her son, Matthew, tragically died when he was just 17. “He used to pass out when he was doing sport,” Sue said. “Quite simple as that. When he was in a rugby scrum he’d get up and then all of a sudden he’d be on the floor. You know, he’d be doing a tackle, he’d be running up the field and suddenly he’d just fall over and he’d be out cold. And the first time it happened he was 8 and a half years old, he was playing football and he stopped breathing. I was just made to feel like I was a neurotic mother by the NHS.” When asked what happened as she tried to get people to pay attention to her rightful concerns about Matthew’s health, Sue said the following: “Nothing. It got put down. We saw specialists, it got put down to stress, to migraines. And then after we saw a cardiologist in Shropshire after his last episode they said it was dehydration. It was simply dehydration. And everybody kept saying, ‘you’ve only got to look at him to know there’s nothing wrong with his heart,’ because he was 6’2”, he looked like the proverbial ‘he was fit and healthy’, but he had an issue. “Even the night before he died he came home

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


News from the Chief Executive complaining of chest pains, and I turned and said, ‘you’ve got to drink more’. So, the poor devil, before he was going out to play rugby games, we were trying desperately to get 2 to 3 litres of water down him and, of course, that made him feel terrible, with all that sloshing around inside him. It was nothing to do with that. If anything, we were probably doing more harm.” Sue and her husband, Chris, fundraise for CRY screenings to keep Matthew’s memory alive and prevent more sudden deaths. Just like expertise is needed for those interpreting ECG results to avoid any anomalies being missed, expertise/screening is needed in the first place to avoid problems being so casually swept aside and wrongly chalked up to simple diagnoses. Otherwise, heart defects can go completely unnoticed far too easily. As Sue powerfully said herself, “If you want to come to our screenings, that’s great. If you don’t, you’re playing Russian roulette.”

November The launch of #CRY4Friends and ‘A Friend’s Grief’ November 13 The biggest new initiative from CRY for the September to December period was the launch of our new campaign #CRY4Friends. The aim of the campaign – which was supported by the hashtag on Twitter and the release of our new booklet, ‘A Friend’s Grief following a young sudden cardiac death’ – is to encourage people that it’s ok to share their grief after losing a friend, just as it is for parents, siblings and other relatives. Many of our booklet’s authors emphasised how much talking helps and were surprised to see that the parents of the friends they have lost wanted to stay in contact. After all, there’s truth to the statement that friends are the family you choose, and losing a friend that you could spend more time with than your family – such as someone at school, a close colleague, a housemate, or simply an inseparable friend – can have a devastating impact on a person’s life.

The 2017 CRY Conference October 12

Thankfully, plenty of people got involved with our campaign and we also received the support of Montana Brown (who spoke at this year’s Parliamentary Reception) and CRY Patrons such as Pixie Lott, for which we are extremely grateful.

The annual CRY Conference was another resounding success in 2017. There was a wide range of expert speakers, featuring several current and former CRY Research Fellows – including Dr Harshil Dhutia who spoke on screening young individuals and grass roots athletes, Dr Aneil Malhotra who discussed cardiac issues in adolescent football, and Dr Gherardo Finocchiaro who spoke about why women are less at risk of sudden cardiac death than men – that ensured we were well represented. CRY Consultant Cardiologist Professor Sanjay Sharma also offered his expertise by serving as the chair to presentations in the morning and speaking himself, discussing how recommendations for ECG interpretation have changed and how pivotal the influence of CRY’s research has been. To conclude the day’s presentations, myheart cardiologist Dr Michael Papadakis discussed exercise recommendations for those with cardiomyopathy, raising some of the questions which our latest research will be focusing on. Read more about the day on page 24.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

CRY had another fantastic boost of exposure thanks to an article published by the Daily Mail on the launch of the campaign, including the story of Jessica Spokes, whose best friend, Jemima Wilson, died due to SADS in 2016. To see some of the thoughts and photos shared by those who reacted to #CRY4Friends, go to the website cry4friends.org.uk.

7


News from the Chief Executive interviewed about their recent contribution to the booklet ‘A Friend’s Grief’. As they said in their interview, it’s helped them deal with their grief somewhat, and they hope it will reassure others. “I suppose that’s why the booklet was launched really, the CRY ‘A Friend’s Grief’ booklet, so people that are going through a similar situation can relate to the booklet,” Nathan said.

CRY’s annual Parliamentary Reception November 22

“There’s also a hashtag, #CRY4Friends,” Steve added. “Basically, the booklet is a lot of stories about other people that have gone through a similar situation and it just helps you to see that you’re not alone, that these things are happening more and more to a lot of young people.”

In 2017, CRY held its 16th annual Parliamentary Reception. The House of Commons Terrace Pavilion was completely packed as CRY volunteers, supporters, Research Fellows, myheart members, 16 MPs and CRY Patron Andy Scott came together to discuss how CRY is working to save young lives. A key focus of the event was the launch of our #CRY4Friends campaign and new ‘A Friend’s Grief’ booklet. Guest Speaker Montana Brown (left) – who was featured on ITV’s ‘Love Island’ and has presented for MTV News – spoke about her support of this initiative in memory of her friend, Harry Faulkner, who tragically died in 2013. Montana has interacted with the campaign with her phenomenal social media following, so it was brilliant that she could attend the Parliamentary Reception and join our speakers. For the full article about the event, go to page 36.

Steve Bailey and Nathan Shaw on BBC Radio Stoke November 26 After suddenly losing their friend, Daniel, Steve Bailey and Nathan Shaw started supporting CRY and were

8

This is why CRY launched the ‘A Friend’s Grief’ booklet and started the #CRY4Friends campaign, to encourage friends to speak up and share their grief and to remind them that they are by no means alone. It’s been so rewarding to see a large reaction to these new initiatives, and we hope that they will continue to provide comfort to more friends going forward as well.

December Frank Arentz’s story on BBC News December 4 Frank Arentz was diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy at a CRY screening that completely changed his life. Frank can no longer play rugby, but he’s emerged from this life-changing diagnosis with a

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


News from the Chief Executive

Frank (right) coaching his old rugby team

positive approach and has made adjustments accordingly, pursuing a new-found love of photography and coaching the sports he used to play himself.

cope in life and make real positives out of that and then think ‘what more can I do for other people?’ He’s been so giving of his time and his talents in order to help other people. It’s a real inspiration for the whole school.”

Frank and his mum, Hannah, spoke with BBC News to discuss what going through the experience of a diagnosis is like and how grateful they are for screening. “We are incredibly grateful,” Hannah said. “That testing has meant that we’re not a family who’s suffered a tragedy. There are plenty of families out there like that, though… Screening has prevented him from doing something that would have killed him. He could have been the kid dead at the bottom of the rugby scrum.” Year by year, CRY continues to screen more young people, including a new yearly record of 27,542 in 2017. Screening is so critical when it comes to saving young lives and revealing conditions that warrant the kind of lifestyle changes that young people like Frank have made. Hopefully, in the years to come, the word of CRY and the number of people screened by us will continue to increase.

CRY end of year message December 19

Harry Steel’s fundraising on ITV News December 5

2017 was an important year for CRY. We saw progress in all areas, from launching a new version of our main website and witnessing Professor Sanjay Sharma’s team publish a ground-breaking paper on ECG interpretation, to screening more people than ever in a single year (27,542), launching a powerful booklet on ‘A Friend’s Grief following a young sudden cardiac death’ and introducing Facebook bereavement support groups.

11-year-old Harry Steel and his mum, Lisa, were both interviewed by ITV News to talk about his remarkable fundraising efforts after the loss of his uncle, David White, to sudden cardiac death and his dad, Steve, to cancer within an 11-month span. Harry’s fundraising has included raising money for CRY, which recently involved him participating in CRY’s Great Cake Bake as he sold a wide selection of cakes to his fellow students at Churchill Community College, all while raising awareness with CRY balloons, literature and banners dotted around his stand.

Looking forward, the more people we screen, the more we are able to take forward our research programme. This year, Professor Sharma has led his team in publishing a series of the most important screening papers to date. Not only have they published new international screening guidelines, which are changing the way young people are tested, but in doing so they have also created a blue print for others to follow.

“We’re immensely proud,” said Harry’s head teacher, David Baldwin. “He is an inspiration not just to his friends, but to me and the other staff in terms of how you can

www.c-r-y.org.uk

Thank you to all of you for everything you are doing to help save young lives. If you would like to watch my end of year message, you can do so by visiting CRY’s YouTube channel here: http://bit.ly/2CmSQO8.

9


CRY Online As part of the CRY Online segment we will include Facebook posts from Chief Executive Dr Steven Cox (found at drstevenjcox), providing thoughtful responses to news and events from the last few months.

CRY was asked to attend a meeting with the NSC as part of the consultation in October 2013. During the meeting we stressed the importance of correcting the figures for the incidence of young sudden cardiac death. The NSC chose not to engage in the discussion or to read a report we had compiled detailing post-mortem results of over 1,400 young people who had died suddenly, the majority of whom had post-mortems conducted at the CRY Centre for Cardiac Pathology in recent years. We provided further evidence the figures were incorrect; we fund the expert cardiac pathology investigation of over 200 post-mortems on SADS deaths each year at the CRY Centre for Cardiac Pathology.

The National Screening Committee’s recommendation on screening A number of people have commented on how frustrating it is when the UK National Screening Committee (NSC) position is used to “balance” the debate when talking about the work of CRY and how we want every young person from the age of 14 to have the choice to have cardiac screening. Unfortunately, so often there are just a few seconds to convey what is quite a complex debate and although I will give the reasons why we do not accept the current position of the NSC, this may be edited out of the interview. Here are some of the concerns we had with the last NSC report. The NSC report on cardiac screening published in August had many errors, and it was very disappointing that CRY’s response to the initial evidence review, published in 2014, did not have an impact on the final version. This report has resulted in the government receiving incorrect information from their policy advisors. When trying to understand the role of screening in the prevention of young sudden cardiac death, the first and most fundamentally important question to address and accept is how many young people in the UK are dying. Confusing SADS (Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome) with all young sudden cardiac deaths is a major oversight. The implication from the report is there is less than one young sudden cardiac death a week. Indeed, it was stated this is an area of contention, even though the Department of Health and other leading heart charities recognise much higher figures.

10

After the meeting we emailed the medical director of the National Screening Committee the key paper, published in 2009, analysing the Office of National Statistics data which informs the widely accepted “12 a week” figure. This email was acknowledged and we were advised this would be passed on for the report. However, there was no reference to this key scientific research in the final report. The focus of the NSC during the discussion was on the lack of randomised control trials (RCTs). RCTs, in the context of preventing young sudden cardiac death, are unethical. It would not be acceptable to withhold scientifically proven clinical advice from a person with a potentially lifethreatening condition to observe the outcome (i.e. if or when they die). Another major oversight is to report that there are no management strategies for people at risk. It was disappointing that more people in the cardiology community did not challenge this, many of whom operate NHS and private services which contradict this statement. For instance, there are many clinicians who routinely ablate common conditions like WPW syndrome, a similar procedure to the one Tony Blair had. It is also well established in the scientific literature that certain drugs and medications must be avoided if you have specific conditions like long QT syndrome. The report makes the argument that the perceived lack of management strategies would leave those diagnosed anxious, particularly about exercise. It is very important to understand the psychological impact of living with a potentially life-threatening condition. For example, the risk of a cardiac arrest during sport. Nonetheless, the significant majority of people who receive expert advice will be told they can continue exercising – moderate exercise is important and this is a message we

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


CRY Online stress, even for those with a diagnosis. In competitive sport, where intense exercise will be a daily routine, many people with a diagnosis will still be told they can compete whilst taking more care and adhering to specific lifestyle/medical advice. All 13 of the potential podium London 2012 Olympic athletes we identified with cardiac conditions during our Philips-funded screening programme were able to compete for their country. A private member’s bill in 2005 resulted in the National Service Framework (NSF) chapter 8 on arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, a guideline for doctors after a young sudden death or when a young person experiences symptoms. This management protocol is now part of our current NHS practice. The NICE TLoc (transient loss of consciousness) guidelines for people to be referred for medical examination after passing out is based on scientific evidence and is also part of recommended practice within the NHS. Even in the US, a number of the most long-standing antagonists to cardiac screening, primarily because of a misconception that young sudden cardiac death is as rare as being killed as lightning, now acknowledge that there is a role for screening with an ECG. The most recent AHA guidelines provide a review of the scientific evidence, much of which was excluded from the NSC report. Another major concern of the NSC was the test, the ECG. It would once again appear that the NSC is taking a position which directly contradicts current NHS policy as presented on NHS Choices. Web pages for Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, Brugada syndrome and long QT all identify the ECG as a powerful test for identifying a person with one of these conditions. The NHS is under-resourced and the infrastructure required for a national screening programme would be considerable. The partnership between CRY, St George’s Hospital and the University of London is an excellent example of an innovative, non-profit programme providing an important service to the public. CRY’s operations are funded by families whose children have died suddenly and who are dedicating their lives to saving the lives of others. In doing this CRY families are funding a new generation of cardiologists with an interest in young sudden cardiac death.

In some careers screening is mandatory; like flight pilots, for obvious reasons. Most elite athletes are now routinely screened, and for many it is mandatory. England rugby players have no choice but to be screened if they want to represent their country, similarly to football players and cyclists. But the people at greatest risk are those in grassroots sport and that is why so many countries are looking to the work of CRY to see what can be achieved. Policy advisors are wrong to say: “Sudden cardiac death in young people is always shocking and very sad. This is in part because it is so rare. The chances of sudden heart attacks in apparently physically fit young people are tiny.” The NSC recommendation can be found at: legacy.screening.nhs.uk/suddencardiacdeath. Young sudden cardiac death is not shocking and sad because of its rarity. It is horrendous because a young person has died and the impact of this will rip families apart and throw shock waves through communities. The incidence may be small compared to the fact we will all die one day. However, it is an insult to the thousands of families whose children have died that policy advisors should be so dismissive and refer to the incidence as “tiny”. Whilst CRY will do all it can to prevent unnecessary deaths through screening and research whilst supporting affected families, so much more could be achieved if it was widely acknowledged that there are 600 young sudden cardiac deaths every year. 12 a week is not “sad” or “tiny” – it is catastrophic.

To follow Dr Steven Cox on social media and to see more posts like this, go to: @Drstevenjcox drstevenjcox

It is because of what the families are doing now that there will be an infrastructure of specialists in the UK to take forward a national screening programme in the future. Over 23,000 young people were screened last year and over 100,000 have been tested to date.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

11


CRY Online Social media Social media is a vital part of how CRY interacts with supporters and, first and foremost, raises awareness of young sudden cardiac death and what can be done to tackle it – from preventative measures (screening) to bereavement support for those affected by a tragedy. In this new CRY Online segment, we’ll look back at the four-month period the Update covers and include a small selection of social media highlights, such as Facebook posts that reached an amazing amount of people, or supporters who tweeted memorable photos at us. This November, we were pleased to publish our new booklet ‘A Friend’s Grief following a young sudden cardiac death’, with powerful, personal stories from some of our supporters. The interaction received by our Facebook post on the booklet was very encouraging, with 908 likes and 521 shares ensuring that word of the booklet reached 75,221 people through Facebook alone (the amount of people that saw the post on their personal feed). On Instagram, photos from our events and from supporters continued to raise our following. The ‘throwback’ post of Sian Thomas at Trafalgar Square in 2009 raising awareness of CRY after the death of her brother, Gareth, received 185 likes.

CRY’s most popular Instagram post was from the night of our 16th annual Parliamentary Reception. It’s an integral part of CRY’s calendar each year as we rally support from MPs, and Parliament just so happened to be lit up in red as well – a fitting addition to the evening. Our followers across Instagram, Twitter and Facebook all grew significantly from the end of 2016 to the end of 2017, resulting in CRY entering 2018 with a total of 43,017 followers across all social media platforms.

An increase of 6,377 from the end of 2016 makes it clear that CRY’s online presence and reach through social media is growing well. Interacting with us on social media is an easy way to keep up to date with any CRY information you might need. You will receive updates on upcoming events and screenings; and photos from fellow supporters. Every share of a post helps spread awareness about CRY a little further. So, if you’d like to follow along, here’s where you can find us:

CardiacRiskintheYoung CardiacRiskintheYoung @CRY_UK

12

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


CRY Online

Behind CRY’s Facebook page (over 26,600 likes), the CRY Twitter feed is our most-followed social media account with over 15,500 followers. One of CRY’s top tweets from the September to December period was a new infographic video, which relays key messages and statistics in a neat, concise manner. Tweets such as these, especially when retweeted 76 times, are perfect for raising awareness. Meanwhile, the tweet to the left helped spread the word of CRY to a whole new audience. Former England cricketer Kevin Pietersen MBE visited CRY’s centre at St George’s Hospital, London, to undergo some check-ups. He shared a video of his exercise test with his 3.59 million followers. A highlight from October came in the form of more support from parliament. Abby Lang shared a great photo with us as Luke Graham, MP for Ochil and South Perthshire, signed CRY’s pledge to help save young lives through increased cardiac screening. Thank you to Kevin and Abby for sharing these photos with us! Between September and December, CRY’s primary Twitter and Facebook accounts tallied a total of 2,883,598 ‘impressions’ (the number of times a tweet or post is displayed on someone’s personal feed). Our reach on Twitter in particular has grown, with a total of 835,791 ‘impressions’ easily surpassing the 754,167 recorded in the same period in 2016.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

13


#CRY4Friends campaign

A huge part of CRY’s September to December period in 2017 was the launch of the #CRY4Friends campaign. To go alongside the release of CRY’s ‘A Friend’s Grief following a young sudden cardiac death’ booklet, the purpose of the campaign is to encourage people to share their memories, emotions and grief after losing a friend. Sometimes friends feel like it’s not their place to grieve whilst family members are grieving, but we want #CRY4Friends to reassure them that they are just as entitled to do so. The loss of a close friend that you interact with every day, that you sit next to at work or have known since your days in school can have a devastating impact on a person’s life. People can have closer relationships with these dear friends than they do with family members, so it was incredibly encouraging to see so many sharing with #CRY4Friends on social media. Posts using the hashtag #CRY4Friends have been gathered and featured on the webpage www.cry4friends.org.uk. The page was quickly flooded with photos and heart-warming comments after the launch of the campaign, including posts from CRY Patron Pixie Lott (who posted to her 2.3 million ‘likes’ on Facebook) and CRY’s Parliamentary Reception guest speaker Montana Brown (who reached out to her 255,000 Twitter followers). To push the value of the campaign even further, it was a key topic of speeches at CRY’s 2017 Parliamentary Reception. CRY Founder Alison Cox MBE and Montana Brown both spoke about our ‘A Friend’s Grief’ booklet and the importance of friends being able to speak up and share their emotions,

14

which Montana said would have helped her immensely at the time she lost her friend, Harry Faulkner, to sudden cardiac death. Before the Parliamentary Reception had even come to a close, video of Montana’s speech was posted on the Daily Mail website, ensuring that her message and word of the campaign reached an increasingly vast audience. Media coverage hasn’t stopped with celebrity figures either. More awareness has been raised by many others, including a piece published by the Daily Mail on the stories of Victoria Roberts and Jessica Spokes, who both lost a friend at a young age. The article also featured comments from Alison Cox and can be read in full here: http://dailym.ai/2AR9uYL.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


CRY Screening Report Between September and December 2017 CRY screened over 7,900 people; and 27,542 in 2017 overall, mostly through family memorial screenings 668 people were screened at our National Screening Centre at St George’s Hospital, London, funded in memory of Jack Thompson and by donations from the BGC charity day. Sports screenings included: Sale Sharks Premiership Rugby, England Cricket (senior men’s team), Lawn Tennis Association, Coventry City FC, Bath EIS, Loughborough EIS, Team Sky pro cycling, Sheffield EIS, Birmingham EIS, Arsenal FC Youth Academy, Gloucester Rugby U18s, Scarlets Welsh Rugby, Exeter Chiefs Premiership Rugby U18s, England Women’s Cricket Academy, Leeds EIS, Cumbria Rugby League, Ipswich Town FC, Rugby Football League (London), Rochdale Hornets Rugby League, Wasps Premiership Rugby U18s. A total of 694 athletes were screened. At 57 family memorial screenings 5,488 people were screened. These were held in memory of: Rory Embling (West Yorkshire), Matthew Cragg (Cobham), Daniel Hughes (Stoke on Trent), Andrew

Murch and Michael Yorston (Musselburgh and Aberfeldy), Christopher and Steve Phillips (Stafford), Lewis Marsh (Sandhurst), Alex Reid (Sheffield), Lucy Jessop (Peterborough), Harry Dubois (Cheshire, Stockport and Oldham), Robert Poysor (Worcestershire), Craig Lunt (Strang, Isle of Man), Claire Reed (Hampshire), Ben Daniels (Kent and Orpington), Gary Stewart (Aberdeenshire), Gideon David Baws (Leigh on Sea), Sam Wright (Derby), David Moss (Stoke on Trent), Kevin Paterson (Sunderland), Tom Reid (West Yorkshire), Luke Rogers (Pembrokeshire), Gregg Shoults (Kent), Jamie Loncaster (Yorkshire), Matthew Dewhirst (Staffordshire), Tom Clabburn and Claire Prosser (London), Charlie Ibrahimi (Middlesex), Mark Hancock (Stoke on Trent), Owen Morris (Cardiff), Harry Faulkner (Hertfordshire), James Nicholas (St Helens), Lee Wilson (Plymouth), Johnny Barker (Shrewsbury), Josh Merrick (Manchester), Katrina Christopher and Cheryl ChristopherWebber (Leyland), and Aaron Dixon (Worcestershire). 282 young people were screened at 3 school screenings held at: St Edmund’s College, Ware; Bedstone College, Shropshire; and Sedbergh Medical Practice, Sedbergh. At 7 further screenings 779 people were screened. These were held at: XPO Logistics, Bradford; Knutsford Community First Responders, Cheshire; Bedstone College, Shropshire; Esom Financial, Kent; Football Fightback, Tonbridge; Dungannon, Northern Ireland; Marks & Spencer, Lisburn, Northern Ireland.

What happens at a screening? The basic test is an electrocardiogram (ECG) which is a simple non-invasive and painless test that examines the electrical activity within the heart. Small stickers are placed at strategic points on the chest, arms and legs. Flexible leads (called electrodes) that extend from the ECG machine are then attached to these stickers. The electrical rhythm of the heart is recorded and printed out. This part of the process only takes two to three minutes to perform. The ECG printout is then reviewed by a doctor in conjunction with a personal and family history questionnaire. If a more detailed image is needed (about 5–10% of individuals), an echocardiogram can be taken – this is similar to the ultrasound scan that is used for a pregnant woman to check the health of her baby. Soundwaves echo against various parts of the heart and they are recorded on a screen. This provides a detailed picture of the heart’s structure and how well it is functioning. This takes about 30 minutes to perform. The screening programme is under the aegis of Professor Sanjay Sharma.

Football Fightback helps CRY screen 1,000 young people in Kent In December, Sports Minister Tracey Crouch went to Tonbridge Angels Football Club in Kent where she attended the screening of the 1,000th person funded by the Football Fightback fund. Football Fightback was formed as a response to the deaths of two young footballers who played for Tonbridge Angels, Jack Maddams and Junior Dian.

Screening 1,000 people in this area of the country was obviously a huge milestone for CRY, one made even better by the awareness that was raised by Ms Crouch’s interview with BBC News. In 2015, she pledged to look into cardiac screening for athletes.“Before I made that pledge, nothing was happening. Now, something is happening,” Ms Crouch said to the BBC. “More sports are getting involved in screening their young, but we would like more to happen.” Having the support of figures like Tracey Crouch is crucial for CRY moving forward, and can help ensure that we not only spread awareness, but receive further backing from those in government who can help make a difference.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

15


CRY Screening Report screening team to our region. The date had been in the diary for almost a year and all 200 places on offer had been booked prior to the event. The £7,000 cost was covered by past donations to Jamie’s fund at CRY. “Ralph Knox, the CRY van driver/screening coordinator arrived at South Hunsley School at 4pm on Monday 30th October and met with Graham Loncaster to set up the venue. The caretaking staff at South Hunsley School and Sixth Form College had already created a basic layout for the event within the newly formed multi-use indoor sports and dining facility inside the sport centre.

Screening held on Saturday 28th October at Garforth Academy, Leeds, in memory of Tom Reid “The Reid family would like to thank the CRY team who attended: Peter Lewis, Lisa Ashton, Helen Budding, Teresa Brennan, Jason Baker, Jan Forster and Dr Hamish MacLachlan. “Thanks in particular to Lily Donaldson at CRY, who was exemplary in organising this event.

“The space was vast, but with careful positioning of screens and tables, a good sized reception and registration area was formed along with three ECG bays, an ultrasound bay and a separate room was set up for the consultant cardiologist to review the ECG print outs and talk to patients. “Ralph brought with him all the necessary equipment needed to run the event. In came ECG machines and associated tables and equipment, along with fold out beds and all necessary ancillary items such as pillows and additional privacy screens. By 5pm the room was ready and the sports centre staff locked the room for overnight safety. “The next morning the full team arrived at 8.30am to prepare for the two days ahead. They had all travelled from various parts of the UK the previous evening and stayed locally at the Premier Inn at Hessle. “The team consisted of Ralph and Alice as coordinators/ registration team with Teresa, Sheila and Helen carrying out the ECG work. Donna was in charge of any required ultrasound tests and assisted with all the weighing and measuring of patients. “Consultant Cardiologist Bashar was the CRY Research Fellow in attendance and was joined by an MSC student Liz to evaluate the ECG printouts and talk to patients. “Graham and Jenny joined the team for most of the two days and transported them to and from the hotel, as well as providing lunch for the team each day.

“Thanks to Garforth Academy for the venue and for raising awareness among the young students at the school. This was the 5th screening held by the family in memory of their son, Tom Reid, who passed away on 28th September 2009. “The screening was also attended by local Councillor Mark Dobson.” Halina and Antony Reid.

Autumn half term screening, in memory of Jamie Loncaster “Autumn half term 2017 saw the return of the CRY mobile

16

“They chatted to a few of the people who had attended for the free heart screening and spent some time promoting the event live on social media to fill the spaces available when people failed to turn up. Sadly, that statistic always seems to be around 10% for these events. They ensured the CRY team made it to the local station on time to catch their various trains back home to London, Birmingham and Norfolk. “Over the two days, the team screened 201 young people. Of those screened, 3 had an additional ultrasound echocardiogram and 1 person was referred to their GP for further investigation.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


CRY Screening Report “CRY statistics show that 1 in 100 people screened will have an irregularity with their heart and 1 in 300 will have a potentially life-changing condition. These statistics are seemingly borne out by the results of this two day event.

500th young person screened by the Jamie Loncaster Memorial Fund

“Another event is being held at South Hunsley School and Sixth Form College on Saturday 25th and Sunday 26th November 2017.” Jamie Loncaster Memorial Fund.

“During the recent two-day weekend screening event held at South Hunsley School, the Loncaster family were pleased to see their 500th young person screened in Jamie’s memory. “Local teenager, Luke Wilson, a former pupil of Hull Collegiate School, was pleased to be able to join the family for a photograph to mark this milestone moment.

November screening, in memory of Jamie Loncaster “Less than a month after the previous screening event the CRY team were back in our region over the weekend of 25th/26th November 2017 to carry out more screening for local young people. The £7,000 cost was covered by past donations to Jamie’s fund at CRY. “The team consisted of Peter and Jason as coordinators/ registration team with Pauline, Irish and Helen carrying out the ECG work. Jan (Saturday) and Lorna (Sunday) were in charge of any required ultrasound tests.

“Luke’s ECG was performed by Irish Rosario from Cardiac Risk in the Young and subsequently reviewed by the CRY Cardiologist and Research Fellow in attendance.” Jamie Loncaster Memorial Fund.

“CRY Research Fellow and Cardiologist Dr Stathis Papatheodorou was in attendance to evaluate the ECG print outs and talk to patients.

CRY holds cardiac screening clinics for those aged 14 to 35 across the whole of the UK. CRY also holds regular screening clinics at St George’s Hospital, London.

“Graham and Jenny once again joined the team for most of the two days and transported them to and from the hotel, as well as providing lunch for the team each day.

Most CRY screenings are funded in memory of a young person who has died from a young sudden cardiac death.

“On Sunday evening they took the CRY team to the local station in time to catch their various trains back home to London and Norfolk. “Over the two days, the team screened 213 young people. “Of those screened, 13 had an additional ultrasound echocardiogram and 9 were referred to their GP for further investigation.” Jamie Loncaster Memorial Fund.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

To see CRY’s full list of upcoming screening events and to book into one at a location near you, go to: www.testmyheart.org.uk.

17


Alison’s Column The critical issue of family screening

Alison Cox MBE CRY Founder

In 1995 when I started taking calls – nearly always from distraught mothers after the sudden death of their child – one of the most important things I knew that I needed to clarify was whether they had any other children because of the risk of another family member having the same condition.

Few pathologists, in those days, considered evaluation to be urgent ‘because the young person is dead and so being told what condition they died of will make no difference’. It was not unusual for pathology results to take in excess of 18 months before the family received the cause of death. The long wait was not only excruciating, but left family members (unknowingly) exposed to the terrible risk of another child dying. Only well informed pathologists were aware of the genetic implications and there were few specialists. There was also the hazard of a misdiagnosis, another reason why other children remained at risk. In addition to pathologists lacking expertise in the 1990s, few cardiologists had much experience of identifying these conditions as well. The most commonly diagnosed, if there was an unaccountable young sudden cardiac death, was the heart muscle condition hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a structural defect of the heart. So, not only did the family (including mum and dad) need to accept that family screening was strongly recommended because the condition was genetic, but also that it needed to be done by a specialist, which involved persuading their GP that the local hospital was not suitable. This, almost invariably, left the family confronting a significant (and often expensive) journey to the specialist cardiologist – a daunting prospect in itself when managing young children. Consequently, it was not unusual for the devastated person who I spoke with to be unable to contemplate screening for the family to identify whether any other family member was carrying the same condition. Without an accurate diagnosis, a cocoon of secrecy could develop about the unaccountable death which had social ramifications in the community. The family were sometimes treated with suspicion. No one had heard of sudden death syndrome. They became vulnerable to whispering campaigns about drugs being the cause of death if an adolescent had died, or child abuse if a younger death occurred, which greatly exacerbated their suffering.

18

Another anxiety for parents was that the testing would expose one of them as being the ‘culprit’ carrying the deadly gene. They were fearful that they would not be able to bear the burden of responsibility of having a condition that had killed their child. Sometimes a member of the family would refuse to be screened, claiming potential complications with their mortgage, or that receiving a diagnosis might affect their job prospects. Because it was all such a very delicate issue it would only be several calls later that we could start to discuss how to get the other children tested and the importance of family screening. It had to be emphasised that it was crucial for mum and dad to be screened as well, because it would not only help inform the doctor of the condition that affected the family, but if either were diagnosed it would have ramifications for siblings. In 1998, heart rhythm problems started being considered as a cause of death when 26-year-old Anna Loyley died suddenly at the end of the Bath Half Marathon. Anna’s finish photo shows her with a radiant smile as she crosses the line. 10 steps later she collapsed and died. St John’s Ambulance were near the finish line, but their team were unable to operate the defibrillator immediately, delaying the machine’s impulse to jolt her heart until its 9th attempt. Anna’s father was determined to expose what he felt was the incompetence of the St John’s Ambulance team. Historically, they had never been challenged in their 97-year history and Mr Loyleys’ law suit made national news. It also raised the important issue of being aware of dangerous heart rhythms which, if not identified and treated, could result in sudden death. It was not a structural heart abnormality that killed Anna; it was a faulty heart rhythm which could not be identified after death when the heart had stopped beating. This was a major problem for the pathologist and the heart was classified as ‘morphologically’ normal. With 2 causes identified, the statistics for young sudden cardiac death escalated rapidly from 1 death a week to at least 4. But still nothing formal was done to help families get screened after their tragedy. And then, in March 2004, the “Cardiac Risk in the Young (Screening) Bill” successfully presented by Dari Taylor MP to the House of Commons resulted in a new Chapter (8) being included in the National Service Framework. This was a massive breakthrough for CRY. We finally were able to refer to Chapter 8 when encouraging both young people with symptoms and families affected by a tragedy that they had a right to be screened on the NHS. Chapter 8 emphasised the critical importance of screening after a young sudden cardiac death because these conditions were genetic and family members had a 50% chance of having the inherited condition.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Alison’s Column In 2005, it was agreed that there should be a 5-year consultation period to be held in the Department of Health and overseen by the ‘Heart Tsar’ Professor Sir Roger Boyle. Everyone considered to be affected by the complicated issues involved was to be consulted; cardiologists, GP’s, nurses, physiologists, pathologists, associated charities, and coroners among them. Interest in both the medical profession and the media was generated and the importance of specialist referrals for young sudden cardiac death was finally recognized. Crucially, GP’s became aware of symptoms that, if referred to an expert, could be treated and young lives could be saved.

because a family member has died and being able to talk about it, discuss your worries together, and refer back to it together afterwards can mean you are more likely to feel comfortable about the whole process. At the CRY Centre we find that if the family are seen together, it facilitates the doctor being able to seamlessly compare your results, whilst also allowing every family member to question the same doctor. It creates a more comfortable base from which there can be ongoing discussions at home. The diagnosis is often challenging, bringing together many different pieces of a puzzle to get as accurate a picture as possible. This is why specialism is so important. Furthermore, different cardiologists can have different opinions and when families are not seen together the inconsistent information can cause a stress for them when trying to restructure their lives. As these tests are NHS referrals CRY does not get involved with the organisation of the tests, but will send you information as to how to proceed if you contact the CRY office.

Professor Sharma speaking at the launch of the CRY Centre at St George’s

In 2010, CRY established a Centre for Inherited Cardiac Conditions and Sports Cardiology under the aegis of Professor Sanjay Sharma at St George’s hospital, Tooting, where families affected could expect to have all the relevant tests together on the same day. These included an ECG (electrocardiogram), echo (ultrasound) and exercise test. If they were found to need further investigation, the follow-up ajmaline or MRI test would be booked as soon as possible. An optional genetic test was also considered. At the conclusion of the family’s tests they saw a doctor who answered their questions and discussed their family history prior to giving his/her diagnosis. Before leaving St George’s they were fitted with a 24-hour tape called a Holter Monitor which needed to be returned to the hospital to be included when finally assessing all results. All St George’s referrals must be made through the GP, and all tests are done by leading cardiac and physiology specialists. If I talk to a parent after their tragedy and prior to the screening, I always stress the value of the family being seen together, something which Professor Sharma strongly agrees with. There is inevitably significant anxiety prior to the screening and if you can all be together, the screening becomes a part of the grieving process. You are there

www.c-r-y.org.uk

CRY Research Fellows past and present, with Professor Sanjay Sharma and Professor Mary Sheppard at the 2017 CRY Parliamentary Reception

Our CRY Centre of Inherited Cardiac Conditions and Sports Cardiology is reputedly one of the busiest ‘first referral’ clinics in the UK. This is because patients are prepared to travel from all over the country to get their diagnosis at our centre. CRY’s doctors are always willing to work with the family’s own cardiologist in their local hospital after their diagnosis, if that is their preference. This culture of sharing information is one that Professor Sharma has always insisted on with his team of Research Fellows training at St George’s. It is reflected in how generously he shares his research and why so many doctors attend our annual medical conference in London – just to get updated on CRY’s latest research. It also contributes to why Professor Sharma is in such demand to present at international conferences. Nothing better illustrates the way in which the CRY Centre operates. That, above all, it is only the well-being of the patient that matters, which is every doctor’s obligation to respect and be dedicated to.

19


CRY Centre for Cardiac Pathology (CRY CCP) Report

By Professor Mary Sheppard Professor Mary Sheppard, Consultant Cardiac Pathologist

Susanna Cooper, Laboratory Technician Khari Edwards, Laboratory Technician

The CRY pathology laboratory is a national referral centre for the pathological investigation of young sudden cardiac death, with an established national database.

Causes of death – September to December 2017

Eleni Konstatinou, one of our biomedical scientists, has left our department to join the NHS. A new scientist, Susanna Cooper, was appointed in October 2017. Khari Edwards and Susanna Cooper, our laboratory bioscientists, are now very experienced in handling the cases referred to us. Both are very knowledgeable concerning the complex procedures we employ within the laboratory to examine the hearts sent to us from families who are bereaved due to a sudden cardiac death. We had 153 cases from September to December 2017. This is maintaining our numbers compared to previous years. There is a very good turnaround time for issuing a report to the coroner, with an average of 11 days in 2017. We also obtained consent to retain tissues for research in 50% of the cases referred to us, which is valuable for forming a biobank for research into the causes of sudden cardic death. We are also increasingly getting splenic tissue material with 221 in 2017, which is valuable for doing genetic investigation of the sudden cardiac deaths (the molecular autopsy) which will be valuable for families in the future.

Visitors

us on these important topics.

Tania Meditskov-Efthymiadov, a visiting pathologist from Greece.

CRY Research Fellow Dr Chris Miles is studying arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy and sudden adult death.

Marios Margaritis, a visiting cardiologist from Leicester doing a project on Coronary Artery Dissection. Sheriff Hosney, a visiting orthopaedic surgeon. CRY Chief Executive Dr Stephen Cox and CRY trustees Dr Timothy Bowker and Dr Anthea Bishop visited on December 6. Professor Robert Anderson, a world renowned cardiac anatomist, is a member of our department studying congenital cardiac anomalies which can cause sudden cardiac death. Dr Angeliki Asamaki is a scientist doing basic research into pathophysiological mechanisms in arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy and channelopathies such as Brugada syndrome. She is collaborating with

20

CRY Research Fellow Dr Gherardo Finocchiaro is studying hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and idiopathic left ventricular hypertrophy.

George’s, London. •

Lecture on cardiac cardiomyopathies at MSc Course in Sports Cardiology; “Conditions predisposing to sudden cardiac death,” St George’s, London.

Lecture on arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy; “Not so right–sided after all,” CRY Conference, Cavendish Conference Centre, London.

Chair – International Cardiovascular Genomic Medicine Conference, Cardiff.

Lecturing British Association of Forensic Medicine – Sudden Cardiac Death, Dublin.

Dr Michael Papadakis is studying the incidence of SADS over time. Dr Stathis Papatheodorou is studying clinical follow up of SADS families. Dr Belinda Grey from Australia is studying sudden infant death.

Invited lectures/meetings •

Lecture on cardiac storage disease at European Society of Pathology, Amsterdam.

Lecture/presentation at the Association for Inherited Cardiac Conditions, Belfast.

Lecture on cardiac anatomy at MSc Course in Sports Cardiology; “Conditions predisposing to sudden cardiac death,” St

MSc Lecture on cardiac pathology (sudden death in the young and forensic aspects), St Mary’s College, London.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Research News Variation in ECG interpretation and its financial implications Former CRY Research Fellow Dr Harshil Dhutia (left) has completed a valuable study funded by CRY into the variation in ECG interpretation among cardiologists of differing experience, entitled “Inter-Rater Reliability and Downstream Financial Implications of Electrocardiography Screening in Young Athletes.” CRY has transformed the interpretation of ECG results with its refined criteria released in 2016, which have been so successful that the guidelines have been incorporated into the new international guidelines published in the European Heart Journal and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, in February 2017. Nevertheless, there can be issues in ECG interpretation when cardiologists have different levels of experience. As is the case in other subjective investigation, the results depend on the individual analysing the test. Whilst major anomalies are easier to identify, there can be room for interpretation with other anomalies and what may warrant further testing. To complete the study, Dr Dhutia used the first 400 consecutively addressed athletes’ ECGs from CRY’s 2014 screening events and had eight cardiologists interpret the results. ‘Experienced’ cardiologists were defined as those who had been working in a specialist sports cardiology unit for 2+ years and had independantly conducted preparticipation ECG screening in 1,000+ athletes. Meanwhile, ‘inexperienced’ cardiologists were those who did not routinely report on athletes’ ECGs. Dr Dhutia found that inexperienced cardiologists recommended further evaluation for 17.7% of the 400 ECGs, whereas experienced cardiologists only recommended further evaluation for 7% and highlighted ECGs as abnormal with a higher interobserver reliability (used to assess the extent to which cardiologists agree on ECGs being abnormal or not). Overall, the study revealed that inexperienced cardiologists were at least 44% more likely to identify an ECG as abnormal than experienced cardiologists. One of the ECGs analysed for the study – from an athlete with potentially serious cardiac disease – was identified by all eight cardiologists taking part. Finding these potential serious conditions is ultimately the most important purpose of an ECG, so this finding reaffirms that. However, as Dr Dhutia revealed, there is an obvious discrepency in the determination of other abnormalities between inexperienced and experienced cardiologists.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

At CRY screening events, false positive rates are low and excellent ECG analysis is maintained by experts (our CRY Research Fellows) who specialise in young sudden cardiac death. The fact that these experts train under Professor Sanjay Sharma, a world renowned leader in sports cardiology and young sudden cardiac death, strengthens CRY’s screening programme even more. To read more about this paper and CRY’s research, turn to page 22 for interviews with Dr Dhutia and Professor Sharma.

CRY’s new echo machine at St George’s, London Research and clinical teams at the CRY Centre for Inherited Cardiac Conditions and Sports Cardiology at St George’s, University of London, are delighted with the installation of a new echocardiogram (echo) machine. Echo machines are used when a more detailed image of a person’s heart is needed following the initial ECG at a CRY screening; this is typically the case for 5-10% of individuals and the test takes approximately 30 minutes. An echocardiogram records soundwaves that echo against various parts of the heart to provide a more precise look at the heart’s structure. As Dr Steven Cox explained: “The echo is one of the most important tests a family can have when referred to an inherited cardiac conditions centre after a young sudden cardiac death. Through being able to look in detail at the structure of the heart it is often possible to determine if the family has a genetic condition, like a cardiomyopathy, within the family.” Professor Sharma commented: “Any new additions and upgrades to our machines mean we can be assured of providing the most accurate and up-to-date testing for the thousands of young people who come to us to be tested every year – whether elite, professional athletes or members of the community who have been identified with potential cardiac problems.”

21


Q&A with Dr Harshil Dhutia Why did you investigate the variation in ECG interpretation among cardiologists of differing experience? As with any subjective test, there is concern regarding the variation of the ECG as a screening tool. Prior to this study, there was a limited appreciation of the degree of variation in ECG interpretation in athletes from small studies. Furthermore, I wanted to investigate the impact of newer ECG criteria on ECG interpretation, as well as investigate trends in clinical practice amongst cardiologists when faced with a relatively large real life sample of athlete ECGs. How did you conduct your study? Eight cardiologists (including four who routinely screen young athletes with ECGs) independently reported on the ECGs of 400 young, competitive athletes consecutively screened through the CRY programme in 2014. The cardiologists were blinded to the clinical history of the athletes and reported the ECG in accordance with three major interpretation criteria including the refined criteria, which was derived from research supported by CRY. In addition to reporting the ECG findings, the cardiologists provided recommendations on further investigations following ECG interpretation based on their routine clinical practice. We then investigated the inter-observer agreement for ECG interpretation and further investigations amongst the two groups of cardiologists. Even with differences between inexperienced and experienced cardiologists, does the use of CRY’s refined criteria help increase the detection of abnormalities overall? The refined criteria improved the degree of inter-observer agreement for ECG interpretation, especially amongst less experienced cardiologists, and reduced the gap in agreement between experienced and inexperienced cardiologists. This is pertinent as screening is often undertaken by a variety of physicians of different experience. The study was not designed or powered to test detection of disease. However, we have already shown that the refined criteria significantly reduces the proportion of abnormal ECGs from screening requiring further investigation without compromising the ability to identify serious cardiac disease (Dhutia et al, JACC 2016). Is CRY continuing to work on the reduction of false positives and the cost of ECGs/further testing? Research from CRY has formed the blue-print for the recently published international recommendations for ECG interpretation in athletes. We have shown that these new guidelines have further reduced the false positive rate to the 3% mark and reduced the cost of screening (Dhutia et al, JACC 2017). Such a low false positive rate represents

22

significant progress in our understanding of ECG patterns in young athletes and will likely be acceptable to the most stringent critics of ECG screening. The cost of cardiovascular evaluation per athlete was $175 for inexperienced cardiologists and only $101 for experienced cardiologists. There was also a notable margin in the amount of ECGs categorised as abnormal and the amount of athletes referred for further testing between both groups of cardiologists. What do you think is the best way to tackle the difference, both financial and technical, between inexperienced and experienced cardiologists? We found that inexperienced cardiologists were more likely to categorise ECGs as abnormal compared to experienced cardiologists with lower inter-observer agreement rates. However, even amongst experienced cardiologists, interobserver agreement was moderate at best. These findings suggest that whilst experience is useful, formal training and possibly accreditation is required to support physicians involved in ECG interpretation in young athletes, either for screening or for diagnostic purposes. The MSc in sports cardiology and the ECG interpretation course at SGUL are examples of tangible methods to achieve the necessary training for ECG interpretation in athletes. Likewise, inexperienced cardiologists were more likely to request a higher frequency of further investigations (e.g. echocardiogram, MRI, exercise test, Holter) following ECG interpretation with poor-fair inter-observer agreement for these tests. Experienced cardiologists demonstrated a higher degree of inter-observer agreement (ranging from fair-moderate) than inexperienced cardiologists, which is reflected in the lower cost per athlete screened for screening performed by this group. These findings are not entirely surprising given that there is very little guidance on investigating asymptomatic young athletes with ECG abnormalities. In this regard, the recently published international recommendations are unique in that they provide a list of minimum investigations for ECG abnormality. Such guidance will hopefully reduce variation in individual clinical practice which should improve efficiency and reduce costs. What do you hope to research next? I hope to report on the outcomes of the CRY general population screening programme of nearly 27,000 young individuals. The results are highly anticipated in the scientific world as it is now appreciated that sudden cardiac death in non-competitive athletes is higher than previously thought, questioning the ethics of limiting screening to elite athletes, as is the case at present. The preliminary findings were presented at the American Heart Association and EuroPrevent with excellent feedback.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Q&A with Professor Sanjay Sharma What is the impact of exercise on the heart? Participation in regular intensive exercise (more than four hours per week) is associated with a collection of structural and functional changes within the heart that also impact on the surface ECG. The ECG in athletes shows sinus bradycardia and large QRS complexes. The magnitude of these changes is dependent on several factors, including age, sex, ethnicity and type of sport. On occasion, the ECG may show features that overlap with those also observed in patients with cardiomyopathy. This issue is particularly relevant in athletes of African or AfroCaribbean origin (black) and endurance athletes. Why is it important to understand these changes? Recognition of these factors is important to reduce the false positive rate during ECG reporting in athletes. The original European Society of Cardiology (ESC) recommendations for interpretation of the athlete’s ECG were associated with a high false positive rate because they did not allow for ethnic differences and focused mainly on leisure athletes rather than highly competitive athletes. Studies in predominantly white athletes have shown that the false positive rate with the new recommendations is less than 3%. Why are these new international recommendations for interpreting ECGs so important? There have been several developments in the interpretation of the athlete’s ECG since 2010 (Seattle criteria and the refined criteria) which are all incorporated in the new international recommendations. Most of the studies leading to these developments were conducted at St George’s, University of London, and funded by CRY. The international recommendations seek to provide just one set of uniform recommendations that all sports cardiologists adhere to. The paper discusses the evolution of ECG criteria and refers to the foundation set by the ESC 2010 recommendations. What are the major changes to the way ECGs are interpreted in the new recommendations? As opposed to just two categories – normal (type 1 patterns) and abnormal (type 2 patterns) – the current recommendations have a borderline variant category. This category has been derived from two large studies published in the European Heart Journal (EHJ) in 2014, which revealed that (1) voltage criteria for atrial enlargement of axis deviation in isolation don’t usually represent cardiac pathology in young athletes and (2) voltage criterion for right ventricular hypertrophy is common in athletes and does not equate to right ventricular pathology (Zaidi). Based on these findings we have proposed that asymptomatic athletes with just one borderline variant do not require further investigation. Such practice has been validated in two large studies from the UK and Qatar which have shown increased specificity without compromising sensitivity. Indeed the false positive

www.c-r-y.org.uk

rate with the ESC 2010 recommendations was as high as 25%, but with current recommendations is expected to be less than 3%. Our own experience in the UK reveals a false positive rate of 2.5%. How has your research into black athletes impacted the new recommendations? The new recommendations are more specific about the normal repolarisation patterns in black athletes (anterior T-wave inversion preceded by J-point elevation and ST segment elevation). This data is also derived from the largest study in black athletes, published in the EHJ in 2010, which showed that 12% of black athletes reveal this repolarisation pattern in the absence of any overt pathology on cardiac MRI, exercise stress test and Holter. As such, these patterns are now classified as normal variants. The previous guidelines did not include the black athlete’s ECG pattern in any category. How are the new recommendations approaching T-wave inversions? The new recommendations incorporate T-wave inversion in leads V1 and V2 in the normal category based on data in 14,000 young white patients, of which 350 (with anterior T-wave inversion) were investigated comprehensively for cardiomyopathy. The recommendations also demonstrate methods of differentiating anterior T-wave inversion in athletes from anterior T-wave inversion observed in black and white patients with cardiomyopathy based on the preceding J point and ST segment which was published in the EHJ (2015). Why is age an important part of the new recommendations? For the first time the ECG recommendations consider age and make allowances for anterior T-wave inversion (V1-V3) in athletes aged under 16, which was absent in the 2010 recommendations. These recommendations are also derived from large cohorts of paediatric athletes and one paper was published in the EHJ. What about long QT and short QT? How are these new recommendations different? The QT interval cut-offs are less conservative. The basis of a definitely prolonged QT interval in the athlete (> 500 msec) was also published in the EHJ in 2008, but was not clear in the ESC 2010 recommendations. The new definition of a short QT interval (< 320 msec) in an athlete has been validated in a study of over 10,000 young British individuals (Dhutia), which was published last year. What is a take home message for those interested in taking forward screening? How will this paper help? For the first time the authors propose a minimum set of recommendations for investigating athletes with specific ECG abnormalities, which was totally absent in the 2010 recommendations.

23


CRY Conference 2017

From the initial set up of equipment as the sun came up across London, to the array of insightful talks throughout the day, the annual CRY International Medical Conference was a fantastic success in 2017. CRY Consultant Cardiologist and world renowned expert in sports cardiology, Professor Sanjay Sharma, was a key part of the event. He served as the chair to many presentations to moderate and ask questions, whilst also presenting himself. Professor Sharma gave the third talk of the day, entitled ‘International recommendations; Bringing it all together.’ He began by emphasising just how much research is happening because of CRY’s support and proceeded to explain how the analysis of ECG results has progressed in recent years. After the 2010 European Society of

Cardiology guidelines led to high false positive rates and failed to account for ethnicity, the Seattle Criteria (which were developed in 2013) addressed these issues somewhat, but still left room for improvement and could not detect certain anomalies that can appear on ECG readouts. CRY research between 2010 and 2016 ensured that these anomalies were considered in the improved refined criteria (or CRYteria), which also introduced a new system that Professor Sharma explained in detail. To analyse results in more depth, a new ‘borderline’ category (the ‘amber zone’) was introduced to go between the categories of normal (the ‘green zone’) and abnormal (the ‘red zone’) ECG findings. Having two nonspecific anomalies categorises someone in the red zone and results in further investigation, but if someone has just one anomaly, is asymptomatic and has no family history, then no further tests are required. Despite these changes, the refined criteria have maintained excellent levels of sensitivity in finding cardiac diseases; and reduce costs of ECGs and follow-up tests at the same time by as much as 21%. Professor Sharma didn’t finish his presentation before sending a laugh through Cavendish Conference Centre either. As photos of CRY Research Fellows were shown on the screen, a not-so-accidental image of George Clooney appearing in Professor Sharma’s place was definitely the comedic highlight of the morning.

Professor Sanjay Sharma delivering his presentation on ECG interpretation

24

CRY was also well represented by several of our Research

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


CRY Conference 2017 the hearts of men and women and mentioned some startling statistics in their respective rates of sudden cardiac death (SCD): men are 10 times more likely to die of SCD than women in professional sports; and 20 times more likely to die of SCD in recreational sports.

Some of CRY’s sponsors with their stands

When Professor Sharma asked for more explanation on the reasons why women are less at risk of sudden cardiac death, Dr Finocchiaro listed hormonal and genetic differences as possibilities, in addition to the factor that men may be forced to push their bodies to greater limits in certain sports more often than women. This could further influence the vast disparity of the 20-1 figure in recreational sports, but more research is still required to find all the concrete reasons, added Dr Finocchiaro.

Fellows, including Dr Aneil Malhotra, who spoke after Professor Sharma on ‘Screening elite football players; The FA experience.’ Dr Malhotra stressed the prevalence of cardiac issues in adolescent football, which was the leading cause of death (35%) in 23 adolescent football players who died between 2002 and 2016. Screening is typically mandatory for elite athletes and professional footballers, whereas young people at an amateur level sadly don’t have the same luxury. With CRY continually striving to increase the level of screening across the UK, hopefully this will be less and less of a problem in the years to come. Former CRY Research Fellow Dr Harshil Dhutia reiterated the same message in his presentation on ‘ECG Screening of young individuals; Myths and reality?’ One of the biggest issues with sudden cardiac death among young, grass roots level athletes is that so few are screened. This only heightens the importance of CRY’s screening programme and the need to raise awareness. After the first break of the morning, CRY Research Fellow Dr Gherardo Finocchiaro continued the day with his presentation, ‘Adaptations of the female athlete’s heart.’ Dr Finocchiaro discussed some of the differences between

Professor Mary Sheppard (above), Consultant Cardiac Pathologist at CRY’s Centre for Cardiac Pathology, gave a talk that highlighted just how much CRY’s research is progressing. Professor Sheppard began by thanking CRY for its support, adding that the increasing number of referrals received (including consent for research purposes) at the CRY Centre for Cardiac Pathology greatly helps CRY’s research into better understanding the causes of young sudden cardiac death. Alongside members of CRY’s research team, other experts such as Professor Mats Börjesson from Gothenburg, Sweden, also made it apparent just how big an impact CRY has. Before he dived into his presentation on the ‘Prevalence of coronary artery anomalies; Data from a large CT database,’ Professor Börjesson congratulated CRY for its annual conference, saying it’s one of the best meetings in sports cardiology there is. As a first-time spectator of the event it was encouraging to see how valued CRY is to so many people; not just for families who have been tragically affected by a young sudden cardiac death, but in the cardiac research community as well.

Dot Medical, one of CRY’s primary sponsors at the 2017 conference

www.c-r-y.org.uk

Tom West

25


Simplyhealth Great North Run 2017

Congratulations and a huge thank you to the 62 runners who took part in the Simplyhealth Great North Run for CRY on Sunday 10 September 2017. The streets of Newcastle quickly started to fill with runners and supporters from 8am. As always, the huge crowds covered the whole route, providing a great atmosphere and much needed encouragement for all the runners. Barry Holcombe was, yet again, the first CRY runner to visit the marquee after the run, with an incredible time of 1:29:09. He said of the day: “The Great North Run is always the greatest half marathon to run and this year was no different. The crowds are fantastic with support all the way along the course. The atmosphere and energy from everyone is second to none and as this was my fifth year in a row running the event it still gives me the same feelings. The run itself is not the easiest with a few ups and downs, but the final mile is so special along the seafront. If anyone wants to know why this half marathon is special, then put your name down for 2018 as it’s by far the greatest half marathon event I’ve completed.” For the first time this year, CRY held a Selfie Board Competition for the best selfie uploaded on social media, with the winner awarded a CRY goody bag. We are pleased to announce that the winner of the Selfie Board Competition was Steve Flintoft (right)! It was wonderful to meet and congratulate the 36 CRY runners who came to visit us at the charity marquee and hand them a CRY medal and refreshments. We would like to say a huge thank you to CRY volunteers Iris Dove, her grandson, Jordan, and Jordan Dwyer, who kindly helped out on the day. We look forward to welcoming new and past CRY runners next year, and hopefully seeing some of this year’s runners again! If you would like to run for CRY in the 2018 Great North Run on Sunday 9 September, please email your interest to events@c-r-y.org.uk. To view more photos of the day, please visit our Flickr page at http://bit.ly/2GcwX6J. Once again, we would like to thank each and every one of our runners for their huge efforts in completing this half marathon and fundraising for CRY. They should all be extremely proud of their wonderful achievement.

26

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Simplyhealth Great North Run 2017

CRY runners were: Sarab Amin (in memory of Jannik Lam) | Hannah Atkinson, Gaby Banks (in memory of David Elliot) | Arianna Barclay, Jody Barford (in memory of Linda Barford) | Robert Bass (in memory of Kevin Paterson) | Gabby Broadhurst (in memory of David Green) | Thomas Brooks (in memory of Madeline Siddall) | Owen Browell (in memory James Cook) | Laura Burton (in memory of Joe Leyland) | Ash Canavan (in memory of George Watson) | Rory Canavan, Will Clydesdale (in memory of Nathan Butler) | Alan Dolby (in memory of Kris Cook) | Robert Dunn (in memory of Emily Rose Dunn) | Catriona Farrant (in memory of Craig Lunt) | Steve Flintoft (in memory of Mike Scott) | Kim Fuller, Sara Gamble (in memory of Mike Scott) | Andrew Guy (in memory of Alexander Parker) | Daniel Harrison (in memory of James Campbell)| Nicola Hill (in memory of Richard Hill) | Barry Holcombe (in memory of Andrew Holcombe) | Adam Ibbotson (in memory of Steven McKay) | Marie Irving (in memory of Madeline Siddall) | Paul Kellington (in memory of James Moorfoot) | Paul & Janice Klitzke (in memory of Nicola Klitkze) | Paul Lane, Chris Mann (in memory of Graeme Bell) | Alan Middlemast (in memory of Keith Middlemast) | Frances Mihailovic (in memory of Sophia Forrester) | Linda Millership (in memory of Madeline Siddall) | Lesley Nicholas (in memory of James Michael Nicholas) | Sam Ogle, Sophie Palmer (in memory of Natalie Viner) | Alison Parker, Alex Pawlitta, Helen Phillips, John Pickering, Matthew Proudfoot, Annika & Camilla Ratcliffe (in memory of Jemima Wilson) | Kathie & Sylvia Rees (in memory of Madeline Siddall) | Anne Siddall (in memory of Madeline Siddall) | Emma Smith, Pamela Stronge, Rosie Stubbington (in memory of Keith Middlemast) | Lauren Taylor (in memory of Stephen Rogers) | Daniel, Linda & Kristopher Ternent (in memory of Graeme Bell) | Amy Thornley (in memory of Stephen Rogers) | Marina Tomsett; Jayne, Judith, Emma, Jim & Victoria Welsh (in memory of Nicola Klitzke) | Helen Winn

www.c-r-y.org.uk

27


CRY Heart of Durham Walk

Town Hall and Durham Market Place – where CRY had an awareness stand and water station situated. The walk will have greatly helped to raise awareness of CRY’s ongoing work that aims to reduce the incidence of young sudden cardiac death. The event was attended by CRY staff Rebecca Zouvani, Ben Robinson, Cara MacMillan and Lily Burke. Ben kindly drove the CRY team and equipment/literature from Leatherhead to Durham. Thanks to the staff at Durham Amateur Rowing Club, we were able to set up on the Friday night, saving valuable time on the Saturday morning. The day started dull, cloudy and chilly, but the warm autumn sun shone through as walkers assembled at the Rowing Club and it remained for most of the day. Hot drinks and bacon sandwiches were laid on by Durham Amateur Rowing Club before the walk for the participants.

Over 230 CRY supporters took part in the 8th CRY Durham Walk, newly rebranded as the CRY Heart of Durham Walk to reflect the revised route which includes Durham’s historical city centre

Throughout the morning, participants checked in at the registration desk, picked up CRY balloons and chatted amongst themselves, looking at the CRY displays and taking selfies using CRY’s selfie frames. As we waited for everyone to arrive, CRY staff and the photographer, Doug Moody, took details and photos for the local press. Thanks to our supporters, the event once again enjoyed some local press coverage before the event, including an article in the Durham Advertiser and the Northern Echo.

Thank you to everyone who attended and helped to make the day so special. It was, as always, an emotional sight to see everyone coming together with family and friends, to walk in memory of a young person.

The vast majority of people who took part – some for the first time, others for the second or third time, and some who take part year after year – did so in memory of a young person who they had tragically lost to young sudden cardiac death.

The event once again included iconic sites such as Durham Cathedral and Castle, the River Wear, Durham

Just before 11am, once everyone had checked in, we assembled outside the Rowing Club. CRY Fundraising

28

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


CRY Heart of Durham Walk

Manager Rebecca Zouvani made a short introductory speech to thank the Rowing Club, product suppliers, Steve Percival, Jeff Morland and all the volunteers on the day for their help; and all the families for taking part. Jeff Morland welcomed everyone and gave some background about the walk and why everyone was there. “Unfortunately, when you look around, each year we see new families,” Jeff said. “Which means that the CRY family, so to speak, grows year on year because of the 12 [young sudden cardiac deaths] a week and all of those families that are affected by it. So, we know why we’re here: we’re here to show people that we are going to beat this thing, we are going to save young lives. That’s what it’s all about.” He then introduced Steve Percival, who talked about the new route and gave out some safety instructions; and, as has become customary, a few interesting and amusing facts about the number 8, referring to the number of years that the Durham Walk has taken place. He also read out the names of the young people in whose memory people were walking or helping out, before starting the walk. You can watch the speeches by Jeff and Steve here: http://bit.ly/2jM0MV0.

by volunteers Marilyn Robinson and Jean Spence, who were unable to take part with their families but wanted to help on the day. Walkers were given a CRY medal and a feedback form and were encouraged to record their thoughts in the “Today’s Thoughts” book. Durham Amateur Rowing Club once again opened the bar and generously provided delicious paninis, curry and chips for CRY staff, volunteers and the walkers on their return. We would love to see everyone again next year, and, with the new route, hope to see more people taking part. Next year’s event has been provisionally booked with Durham Amateur Rowing Club for Saturday 6 October, so please save the date. If you would like to upload your own write-up and photos, you can do so by going to www.c-r-y.org.uk/upload. As always, we never forget that most of the walkers who take part in the Durham Walk do so for very personal reasons – and all of us at CRY appreciate their tremendous effort and courage in taking part. We are also very grateful to the following companies and organisations for their support of this event: •

After all the photos had been taken, the walkers (with wheelchairs, buggies, toddlers and dogs) set off on the walk, picking up bottles of donated Northumbrian Water and chocolate bars on the way. They were able to pick up more water and donated Hippeas snacks along the route at the CRY stand in Durham Market Place, manned by Kenny and Maralyn Bowen and Kellie Ellis. First aid cover was provided by North East Rescue and Medical Services (NERAMS) again this year.

Durham Amateur Rowing Club for providing a great venue at a discount, year after year; and to Mark Bell and his team, Elliot and John, for making us so welcome and helping out with setting up and packing up.

Durham Safety Advisory Group and Asset Management Team for approving the route.

Durham University for allowing us the use of the cricket club’s car park.

Each walker was welcomed back to the Rowing Club

Hippeas for donating snacks.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

29


CRY Heart of Durham Walk

Northumbrian Water for donating bottles of water.

Radflex for donating chocolate bars. This donation is secured each year by David (Joe) Crow.

Colin Wilkes and Durham Markets Company Ltd for providing CRY with a free awareness stand in Durham Market Place.

The Rothley Trust for covering the cost of producing the Heart of Durham Walk leaflet.

Finally, special thanks, once again, must go to Jeff Morland and Steve Percival, the instigators of the walk, for helping to organise the event and making it all happen each year.

CRY would like to thank all the local organisers and volunteers for their help before, during and after the event: helping to organise the event and attending meetings; obtaining necessary permissions; carrying out a risk assessment; marking out the route; promoting the event; driving; pre-event telephone calls and emails; marshalling; assembling walkers’ packs; distributing walk leaflets; registering walkers; inflating balloons; manning a stand, handing out water, chocolate bars, medals and feedback forms; and clearing up. We could not run an event like this, so far away from the CRY office, without the help of our dedicated volunteers: Dick Ainsley, Kenny and Maralyn Bowen; David (Joe) Crow; Kellie Ellis; Linda and Geoff Goodwin; Jim Henderson; David Jewell; Marie Miller; Aran Morland; Jeff Morland; Marianne Mortemore; Wendy Moss; Steve Percival; Janette Pollard; Ted and Emily Philo; Marilyn Robinson; Carole Robson; Jean Spence; Steve Wharrier; and Mark, Elliot and John from Durham Amateur Rowing Club. Also, a big thank you to the participants who kindly agreed to assist with media for the walk. This resulted in some articles appearing in the press early on.

This year, participants were walking and volunteering in memory and in support of Jack Balfour; Christopher George Britton; Andrew Callender; Stephen Carey; Katrina Christopher and Cheryl Christopher-Webber; Ashley Goodwin; Jessica Hamilton-Griffin; Dean Henderson; Damien Jewell; James and Leon Johnsen; Eleanor Keeler; Stephen Lamb; Alan Lumley; Stephanie Charlotte McLean; Levon Morland; Andy Oliver; Kevin Paterson; Alexandra Pope; Mike Scott; Alex Smith; Robert Daniel Smith; Callum Staple and David White.

30

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


CRY Great Cake Bake Thank you to all the supporters who took part in the 2017 CRY Great Cake Bake and helped us raise over £31,000!

In 2017, we did our CRY Great Cake Bake awards a little differently. We decided to use two categories, Biggest Media Impact and Best Cake Design, to acknowledge a variety of cake bakes and the awareness they raised.

Biggest Media Impact from the CRY Great Cake Bake 2017 1st place – Harry Steel

Harry’s cake bake at Churchill Community College in memory of David White was featured on national ITN News.

The sixth CRY Great Cake Bake took place on Friday 24th November 2017, as part of Raising Awareness Week. We would like to thank everybody who took part in the CRY Great Cake Bake and for helping to make the event such a success. Money is still coming in, but we are thrilled to say that we have raised over £31,000! We had over 115 people sign up for Great Cake Bake information packs which has made this year the most successful Great Cake Bake since the introduction of the event.

2nd place – Graham and Anne Hunter

Mims Davies, the Local MP for Eastleigh, attended Graham and Anne’s event in memory of Claire Reed. They were also interviewed by ITV Meridian and featured on BBC Radio Solent.

We have received some great stories about people’s events and seen some lovely photos of all the hard work that went into making them. And of course, we couldn’t let the CRY Great Cake Bake pass without baking some cakes of our own!

www.c-r-y.org.uk

3rd place – Adrian and Amanda Topp

Adrian and Amanda’s cake bake in memory of Bethany Mycroft was featured on Elastic FM and Peak FM, and was written about in the Derbyshire Times.

31


CRY Great Cake Bake Best Cake Design from the CRY Great Cake Bake 2017 1st place – The red CRY themed cake from Graham and Jenny Loncaster’s cake bake

As always, it was incredibly difficult to choose the winners, but our panel of CRY employees thought long and hard about their favourites and managed to whittle down the many options. Once again, thank you to everyone who baked, ate and donated!

2nd place – The tiered heart themed cake from Sarah Clayton’s cake bake

3rd place – The Alice in Wonderland cake from Sally Openshaw’s cake bake

A Cut Above Hair Salon raised £217.48 (left).

Donna Ainsworth raised £115 in memory of Evan Shonfield.

Lynne and Tony Beadle raised £1,050.60 in memory of their son, Matthew (above):

“Tony and I have been members of White Oaks Leisure Centre in Swanley, Kent, for over a year, so we thought it would be an ideal place to have the CRY Great Cake Bake and reach many people of all age ranges. A meeting with Kevin Stanley, the centre manager, was more than successful. Not only did he offer us a day for the cake bake, but he suggested we have as much space as we needed in the reception foyer for the whole of CRY Awareness Week. So, it was decided that we would sell cakes all week, along with CRY merchandise and a raffle. The centre supplied numerous prizes for the raffle, including a free 3-month centre subscription, a 10-week junior

32

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


CRY Great Cake Bake swimming lesson course and several free 1-week centre passes; plus several bottles of wine for those not completely health conscious! Members of staff also donated prizes and our local Tesco gave a £20 voucher, so we had plenty to offer. We were thrilled to have such support from the centre, but soon realised how much hard work it would be for us both. A quick email to CRY soon sorted that and before we knew it we had several CRY volunteers offering their time at different hours throughout the week to run the stand, enabling Tony and I a few hours’ break each day. They also offered to bake or bring cakes, which was a great help to me as the thought of baking cakes to last a whole week was daunting!!! “With a timetable set up for the volunteers, promotion leaflets and posters displayed everywhere possible (including local shops and supermarkets), contact with the local paper organised and the week before spent baking like a demon, we were ready to go. We didn’t know what to expect and after a slow couple of hours people emerged from the gym, swimming pool and different fitness classes, passing the stand on their way out and coming over to take a look. Before we knew it cakes and raffle tickets were selling like hot cakes!!! It slowed down during lunch but the afternoon and evening was busy again with swimming, karate, badminton and squash clubs. Nearly all the cakes went, but more importantly we handed out leaflets to everyone who passed us and spoke with so many people. We were amazed at how many people knew of someone who had suffered a sudden death but had no idea of how many young people it happened to each week, or about CRY and the help they could offer. By the end of the day we were shattered but elated by how many people had taken on board the information we gave them. “Day two followed as day one and we were panicking that we would run out of cakes, when a friend of Llara, one of our volunteers, called in with fresh supplies. Other friends of hers did the same the following few days, so along with the cakes that all the other volunteers brought with them and a few extra I did, we had enough to last us all week – thank goodness. In the end, we were able to keep the stand open from 9am till 8pm Monday to Friday, Saturday morning and Sunday afternoon. By Sunday we were out of nearly all the literature on the stand, as well as the cakes. The raffle had gone well and the donation bucket was feeling full. All in all, it was a hugely successful week, raising £1,050.60 for CRY and raising awareness to so many people – even more than we had imagined. “Our grateful thanks go to Kevin and all the staff at White Oaks for all their support, but more importantly to the volunteers who gave their time. Without them we could not have spoken to and reached so many people. So, a sincere thank you to David and Mary Crowhurst, Jan and Roger Williams, Hali Long, Clare Northcott, Ian Williams, Marie Fitzgerald and Llara Cameron, from Lynne and Tony Beadle. We couldn’t have done it without you and look forward to meeting you again.” Lynne and Tony Beadle.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

Becky Beesley raised £150 in memory of Daniel Wood.

Robyn Bibby raised £429 in memory of Reece Jeffrey.

Judy Brookes raised £556 in memory of her son, Greg. • Lisa Butler

raised £120 in memory of her brother, James Devlin. • Sarah Clayton

raised £3,000 in memory of her brother, Matthew. • Caron Coates

raised £230 in memory of Danielle Rowe (left): “This was the second CRY Great Cake Bake I’ve been involved in since losing my 24-year-old daughter in May 2016 to sudden cardiac death. “I had 20 colleagues and friends bake for the event and what a selection there was. It took place at break time at the school I work at in Shropshire, with colleagues and sixth formers donating to the collection.” •

Jackie Cousins raised £40 with the help of her granddaughter, Daisy, in memory of Bruce Cousins (right).

Heather Coxon (Wrekin Products Ltd) raised £143 in memory of Andy Shaw (right).

Penny Criddle raised £210.

33


CRY Great Cake Bake

Crown Estate Agents raised £213.52 in memory of Rory Embling (left).

Bethany Dean raised £136.06 at Middlesbrough and Stockton Mind (above):

“Middlesbrough and Stockton Mind hosted their first Great Cake Bake in aid of CRY on Friday. The organisation is committed to raising awareness of important issues, especially when staff have direct experience of cardiac conditions. The charity raised over £130 and hope every penny will make a difference to people and their families.” •

Dawn Dunk raised £520 in memory of her son, Richard (left).

Kerry Dyke raised £181 in memory of Whitney Morris.

Susan Dyson raised £1,029 at NHS England in memory of Olivia Woodward (bottom left).

Laura Godtschalk raised £165 (left).

Rosemary Goodman raised £900 in memory of her son, Alexander.

Gymophobics raised £185.50 in memory of Ceri Palmer née Howells (below):

“Alison Howells is a member of Gymophobics Nantwich and organised the event in memory of her daughter, Ceri. Gym members were extremely generous in donating a vast range of delicious cakes and others supported by buying and eating them. Another gym member made some beautiful tissue holders to sell in aid of CRY – some were Christmas themed and others for any time of the year, which made excellent Christmas presents. Everyone was really supportive of CRY and positive about being able to contribute to further local heart screenings. A grand total of £185.50 was raised overall.”

34

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


CRY Great Cake Bake •

Paula Hesmondhalgh raised £250 in memory of her son, Matthew:

“This is a photo of my friend, Sarah Taylor, and myself. It kind of represents our efforts at our week long raising awareness stand and participation in the CRY Great Cake Bake. We’re very grateful to everyone who made and donated all the lovely bakes, especially as I ran off mid-week down to the CRY Parliamentary Reception! The event raised £250 and was kindly hosted once again by Kepple Lane Pharmacy and Garstang Medical Practice.” •

HR in Flow Ltd raised £165:

“We are HR in Flow in Buckingham. Our purpose is to reduce stress and energise people in the workplace. We are currently introducing ourselves to the neighbouring businesses on our business estate, developing awareness of CRY and tempting them to something sweet in return for a donation. Their generosity for cakes, or possible action to send us away from their premises, has bowled us over! Other awareness activities from HR in Flow include a social media footprint on CRY, and for our clients and friends who are just a little too far away to sample our wonderful bakes, we have set up a JustGiving page. We hope to have a few more activities in the new year, so watch this space. As they say, every little helps.” •

Alison Howells raised £234.50 in memory of her daughter, Ceri Palmer née Howells:

“On Friday 24 November 2017, a cake bake was held at South Cheshire College in memory of Ceri Palmer née Howells to help raise more funds for CRY heart screenings. It was a really busy morning with lots of staff and students calling at the stall to buy delicious cakes and support the raffle.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

“There were also great opportunities to raise awareness of CRY and the life-saving work they are doing. Some students volunteered to help Alison (mum of Ceri, who works at the college), which was amazing support to have and they seemed to really enjoy being able to help. There were so many cakes donated that a member of staff and students took trays filled with cakes and visited staff all over the college so they didn’t miss out on the chance to buy cakes and support CRY. Alison explained to many people that there will be an upcoming CRY screening held at South Cheshire College in February 2018.” •

Graham and Anne Hunter raised £700 in memory of their daughter, Claire Reed:

“We made £95 from a bottle of House of Commons champagne donated by our MP for Eastleigh and CRY supporter, Mims Davies; which was signed by Prime Minister Theresa May. Mims Davies also attended the event. The event was very well supported by many people and we had fantastic support from our family and friends. The choir Anne sings in, Singsational Voices, sang for us, which went down very well with the guests and their tea and cake! ITV Meridian also interviewed us at the event and this was their lead story on the local news at 6pm that evening. Earlier in the day BBC Radio Solent gave us a publicity slot to advertise the event and raise awareness of CRY and SADS.” •

Lisa Jeffrey raised £429.90 in memory of her son, Reece Jeffrey.

Elizabeth Kerwood raised £320 in memory of her daughter, Jennifer.

Alexandra Koufali raised £120.

Maria and Charlotte Leyland raised £738.42 at Cheadle Cricket Club in memory of Joseph Leyland.

Graham Loncaster raised £2,000 in memory of his son, Jamie:

“Friday 24th November 2017 saw the annual coffee morning and Great Cake Bake fundraising event take place at St. Barnabas Church Hall, Swanland. This was the third such event in memory of Jamie Loncaster, who died suddenly and unexpectedly in March 2015 from an undetected heart condition. The family had spent quite some time planning and promoting the event, which seems to get more popular each year! Banners, posters, flyers, social media and word of mouth were all used to publicise the event in the weeks beforehand. “There were many donations of cakes on the day and the family had also baked cakes and buns for the event

35


CRY Great Cake Bake too. There were some real showstopper cakes created by local friends and family and these were added to the cake raffle, which has proved to be a very popular stall! “The event ran from 9am to noon and saw around 200 people pass through for coffee, cake and a chat. It’s always a well attended event and gives the community an excuse for a sit down and catch-up with their friends whilst enjoying some baking delights at the same time. On the day, over £1,600 was collected with further donations that week topping the figure up to £1,700. By the final count up, with direct online donations included, the family are pleased to announce that over £1,940 was raised and they have now rounded this up to £2,000 in total. Jamie’s family would like to thank everyone who baked, attended and donated. The money raised goes to Jamie’s Memorial Fund at CRY and is being used by the family to offer free heart screenings for local young people aged 14-35.” •

Stephanie Mayou and her son, Joseph (below), raised £415 in memory of her brother, Jonathan Hooper:

“Here is a photo from our CRY cake sale in memory of my brother, Jonathan Hooper, who passed away suddenly in 2004. We raised £440. Family and friends joined us at home and have given generously. The leftovers were enjoyed by the staff at my work place, Pheasey Park Farm Primary School, who also gave generously. My son, Joseph, was a brilliant help. He informed our guests that a take-away service was available, passed out leaflets and ensured everyone had donated!” •

Natasha Mohammed raised £205.27 in memory of Bernadette Lutman.

Clare Northcott raised £150.11 in memory of her daughter, Arabella Campbell.

Sally Openshaw raised £2,169.25 at The Jelly Roll Cafe (below):

“At the end of November, we held our CRY Great Cake Bake sale. Never have I seen so many people, friends and family, turn out in such force. You were all awesome! Thank you. “There was family that travelled a 4-hour round trip to surprise me! Friends of friends, family friends, cake lovers and people that have their own personal reason to support the charity were all gathered together in one place, spilling out onto the street! The total taken on the day was a staggering £1,800!!! Jaw dropping! But we knew we still had some cake to sell (Debbie kindly said she would continue to sell the cake in the cafe as well as collecting donations as the cafe’s chosen charity). We were so close that it would have been nice to round it up to £2,000, wouldn’t it?! I also shared my fundraising page on Facebook for those that didn’t make it to donate their coffee and cake money and the total began to rise… later that day when the piece in the Gloucestershire Echo went out with a link to my fundraiser page, we received even more donations – some from people I know and some that I don’t! “So… drum roll please… As it stands, we have raised the staggering amount of £2,169.25 including Gift Aid. Thank you all so much from the bottom of my heart.” [This is an excerpt from Sally’s blog ‘Fitting into my New Genes’.]

Ellery McGowan raised £494.68 in memory of her son, James (below):

“On Friday 24th November, we held a successful Great Cake Bake morning at Charterhouse Club, raising £430 for CRY – specifically, for James McGowan’s Memorial Fund. James died suddenly almost two years ago and this is one way that we can not only raise money for screening and research, but also keep James’s memory alive. I could not have done this without the help of friends who baked and donated, Elior Catering at Charterhouse who also made trays of brownies and carrot cakes, and above all Charterhouse Club who provided the venue.”

36

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


CRY Great Cake Bake •

Rita Ponting raised £264 in memory of her son, Richard.

Angela Price raised £560 in memory of her son, Alden.

Kate Relph raised £263.85 in memory of her sister, Jo White.

Jeremy Ridley raised £237 in memory of Ben Daniels.

Natalie Sharp raised £785.09 in memory of Katrina Christopher and Cheryl ChristopherWebber.

Sarah Shaw raised £420 (right).

Lesley Sheridan raised £300 in memory of her son, Paul (right).

Peter Shonfield raised £900 in memory of his son, Evan.

Harry Steel raised £245 in memory of David White:

“My son, Harry, held a bake sale/awareness stall at his school. Some of his year group helped to bake over 300 cakes for this event. Harry baked cakes at home and staff and parents from the school also kindly donated cakes. A reporter and camera man from ITN News covered the event as they are running a story on Harry’s fundraising for part of the Inspiring Britain programme.” Lisa Steel. •

Magda Tageldin raised £68 with the help of Jackie Hollands in memory of Anthony Fitzgerald (right). Mary Tomsett raised £134.60 in memory of Andrew Carter:

“This autumn we held a number of fundraising events for

www.c-r-y.org.uk

CRY. These included: a table sale with donated items at a charity fair; a workplace cake sale; the sale of Mary’s homemade Christmas cards; and a CRY brunch weekend (there wasn’t a cake in sight, but homemade cheese straws, cheese pinwheels savoury scones, muffins and biscuits were very popular).” •

Amanda and Adrian Topp raised £4,209.59 at Low Road Nursery in memory of Bethany Mycroft:

“This year we held our CRY Great Cake Bake over two days on Friday 24th and Saturday 25th November 2017 from 9am–6pm. In order to promote our event and raise awareness, we organised vinyl banners to be printed which were displayed outside of our cake bake venue on the weeks leading up to our event. Our event was publicised through the use of Bethany’s Memorial Facebook page, Instagram and Twitter. We also managed to enlist the support of two local radio stations and local media and the weekend before our great cake bake event was spent hand delivering over 1,000 leaflets within Bethany’s local and neighbouring villages. “On the days of our event we had very early starts and welcomed our first visitors very early. Throughout our Great Cake Bake event we held many different fundraising activities. We held cake and coffee sales and our supporters had a wide variety of cakes and some savoury options to choose from. We also held a hamper raffle, a bespoke dolls house prize draw, homemade pickles and preserves, handmade crafts, bottle tombola, guess the teddy bear’s name, a chocolate explosion draw and guess the weight of our CRY themed cake. “After a busy few weeks on the run up to our event and a very successful two days we raised a tremendous amount of £4,209.59, surpassing our totals from previous years. All will be donated to CRY in memory of Bethany Mycroft.” •

Janice Tuite raised £464.30 in memory of Ceri Palmer née Howells.

Hilary Wagstaff raised £2,550 in memory of Ethan Jones (right).

Stephanie Young raised £649.

Susan Young raised £204.70 at North Tyneside Council.

37


CRY Parliamentary Reception

CRY’s 16th annual Parliamentary Reception, hosted by Kevan Jones MP (pictured speaking above), was a glowing success and featured a wide range of speakers, indicating the strength of support that CRY has from all areas of the UK. The House of Commons Terrace Pavilion was full with CRY families, current and former CRY Research Fellows, Trustees, Representatives, Bereavement Supporters, myheart members, CRY Patron Andy Scott and our guest speaker Montana Brown, all gathered around intently to listen to the speakers and offer their support to CRY. CRY Chairman Hugh Mulcahey emphasised the fact that 12 young people die every week in the UK from sudden cardiac death and highlighted CRY’s aims going forward, including the pursuit of increased backing from MPs. Later in the evening, CRY Consultant Cardiologist Professor Sanjay Sharma offered his expertise and spoke about the importance of CRY’s refined ECG criteria – which has changed the way ECG results are analysed and has helped reduce the rate of false positives in ECG screening from 15% to 3%, whilst reducing the cost of subsequent tests by 21% – and the need for all young people to be screened. “It’s our aspiration that a day will come – and I promise that day is not far – when a young individual comes to our screening, and is found with an abnormal ECG, that they will go home that day with a diagnosis,” Professor Sharma said. “We will perform every single test we need to in one hit, provided we are given the support of NHS tariffs.” In addition to the vital cause of seeking support from MPs

38

to back a national strategy for screening, a key focus of the event was the launch of the #CRY4Friends campaign and the booklet ‘A Friend’s Grief following a young sudden cardiac death’, which launched on 13th November and immediately resonated with people. The booklet features 29 young authors telling their stories of losing a friend and how they have tried to handle the unique grief that surfaces after this kind of heart-breaking loss. CRY Founder Alison Cox MBE, who was instrumental in assembling this new addition to CRY’s ‘Grief Library’, talked about this in her speech on the night: “We have always felt that a friend’s grief should be highlighted too, but did not realise just how much their stories needed to be told, or how cavernously deep their feelings were, until they started coming in. “There has been an unprecedented response to CRY’s Friend’s booklet. In the first week it was read 640 times online and 431 booklets were posted. We have also had much wider ranging requests for this publication – from schools, hospitals and counsellors – than we have ever had before. “We feel that we have finally given friends a voice,” Alison added. “Somewhere that they can confidently express the overwhelming emotions that they have protected and harboured – some for many, many years.” With her phenomenal social media following and personal connection to CRY’s cause, we have also received fantastic support from Montana Brown, who appeared on

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


CRY Parliamentary Reception

Donna Faulkner and Montana Brown with copies of CRY’s ‘A Friend’s Grief’ booklet

CRY Research Fellows past and present, with Professor Sanjay Sharma and Professor Mary Sheppard

ITV’s ‘Love Island’ and now presents for MTV News. The #CRY4Friends campaign particularly struck a chord with Montana due to the loss of her friend, Harry Faulkner, in 2013, to sudden cardiac death. Montana has engaged with the campaign on social media and shared her heartfelt story at this year’s Parliamentary Reception, expressing just how important the campaign is for people who may have lost a friend and could be suffering in silence: “I was so broken and perplexed,” she said when describing the loss of Harry. “At the time, I remember feeling so much guilt, because in my head Harry was honestly the most selfless and admirable person I knew at school. I couldn’t get to grips with why something like this would ever happen to a boy like Harry… “A charity like CRY could have helped me so very much when I was in my teens. I hope this gives children and adults a place to go and talk about their feelings and speak to professionals to help them through the torment that so many people have to go through on their own.” There couldn’t have been a better conclusion to the evening’s speeches than CRY Chief Executive Dr Steven Cox’s powerful talk to rally the support of MPs: “At a time when there is so much division in politics, we hope there can be unanimous agreement that more should be done to prevent these tragedies. And that is where we need the support of MPs. We have 47 MPs who have already signed up to support this, which on one hand is fantastic, but we will need many more to create the political will for change. “So, we are asking MPs to please discuss this with your colleagues and ask them to help us. For those MPs who do not feel it is necessary to do more, it is important to know why. Maybe they do not think this is such an important issue. Maybe they believe that it is only one

www.c-r-y.org.uk

CRY Patron Andy Scott with CRY Founder Alison Cox MBE, Ruth and Liam Scott, and CRY Chief Executive Dr Steven Cox

death a week, not 12. Maybe they need to visit the CRY Centre for Cardiac Pathology. Many MPs have written back to CRY families in essence saying that enough is already being done and quoting the current UK position that screening is not recommended. “And, yes, AEDs are important and, yes, more CPR is essential, but most of the young deaths will occur at rest or during sleep when these will not help. We need to identify those at risk before they suffer a cardiac arrest. “When we consider the family, the children, the partners, the parents, the grandparents and the relatives, as well as the friends of those who have died, we can see there are thousands of people who are having their lives ripped apart every year. And that is why we need the support of MPs, because it is simply not right for this to continue.” Hopefully as the number of people CRY screens increases year by year, so too will the support we receive from MPs. Thanks to the attendance of 16 MPs on the night and the poignant speeches delivered to encourage more involvement, this year’s Parliamentary Reception certainly kept CRY moving in the right direction.

39


Our Fundraisers Regular Donors

Someone Special

CRY received regular donations from the following supporters in 2017:

CRY received the following online donations from Virgin Money Giving Someone Special pages in 2017:

John Aitken • David & Frances Allen • Lorna Anderson •

Adam Birch’s fundraising page in memory of Ben Birch raised £2,434.26.

Mark Blease’s fundraising page in memory of Matthew Blease raised £110.

Lisa Bramwell’s fundraising page in memory of Dave Bramwell raised £565.

Elizabeth Bramwell’s fundraising page in memory of Kenneth Bramwell raised £800.

Jon Boast’s fundraising page in memory of Joanne White raised £1,505.

Gemma Bolton’s fundraising page in memory of Ivy Taylor raised £528.

Michelle Bourne’s fundraising page in memory of Harley Brandon raised £215.50.

Patricia Connor’s fundraising page in memory of Stephen Connor raised £245.

Paul Daniels’ fundraising page in memory of Ben Daniels raised £100.

Rosalyn Day’s fundraising page in memory of Thomas Day raised £305.

Naomi De Silva’s fundraising page in memory of Kevin De Silva raised £546.22.

Lauren Dean’s fundraising page in memory of Jake Dean raised £16,595.12.

Sue Dewhirst’s fundraising page in memory of Matthew Dewhirst raised £47,362.33.

Donna Fell’s fundraising page in memory of Josh Fell raised £2,557.06.

Stephen Fisher’s fundraising page in memory of Michael Fisher raised £10,295.

David Fraser’s fundraising page in memory of Matthew Cragg raised £765.23.

Melanie Gooder’s fundraising page in memory of Amy Osborne raised £14,216.

Roy & Betty Bagguley • Leslie Baker • Matthew Bancroft • Amanda Barker • Carl Barnes • William Barnett • Mark Bartlam • Ann Bath • Edna & Richard Blanchard • Christine Booth • Nicola Brackenridge • Anna Brewer • Jacqueline Brinck-Johnsen • Alison Button • Karen Byrne • Stewart Clark • Richard Clark • Mr & Mrs Cook • Joyce Dale • Mark & Caroline Davies • Ann Estridge • Mr A Fallon • Wendy Fletcher • Michelle Foley • Barry Gilbey • Rainee Gilroy • Francis & Frances Gomez • Carole Green • Adam Guest • David Hall • Christopher Hammond • Benjamin Herson • John Joseph Holland • Philip & Kathryn Howorth • Margaret Howroyd • Christine Anne Hustwit • Fatema Ibrahimi • Trina Ingledew • Alistair Jackson • Peter James • David James • Mr P N Jarvis • Dave Kenyon • Jonathan Krish • Graham & Jenny Loncaster • Roy Lovatt • Vanessa MacLeod • Edward Magee • Donna Mayall • Lynn McBrearty • Sandra Merrick • Carmel Merrick • Helen Mestchian • Angela Meyers • Mr A Miller • Victoria Mizen • Resham & Dalbag Nagra • David Nuttall • Dr & Mrs D M Parham • William Thomas Perring • Hayley Pizzey • Lisa Power • Mrs S A Rintoul • Doreen Roberts • Carlton Rose • Julie Rust • Jeanette & Chris Simpson • Rob & Penny Simpson • Geoff Sindrey • Brenda Soiza • Philip Sparrow • Andrew Spurling • Arielle Stealey • Cliff & Gwen Stewart • Judie & Geoff Street • Mike Styles • Patricia Tayler-Jones • Sally Thorn • Chris & Katy Turberville • Nicola Turnbull • Rejia Ullah • Steve Walters • Andrew Watson • Brian Weeks • Mr R Wheeler • Michael & Deborah Wilkin • Rebecca Wilkin • Julie Williams • Kelvin Wilson

40

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers •

Stephen Hammond’s fundraising page in memory of Ben Hammond raised £17,676.88.

Charlotte Henderson’s fundraising page in memory of Martyn Luckett raised £746.

David Hughes’ fundraising page in memory of Daniel Thomas Hughes raised £31,138.78.

Oliver King’s fundraising page in memory of Miles Reid raised £2,603.

Graham Loncaster’s fundraising page in memory of Jamie Loncaster raised £7,238.92.

Rebecca McKay’s fundraising page in memory of Steven McKay raised £1,672.

Andrew and Rachel Mitchell’s fundraising page in memory of Rosie Mitchell raised £25,152.50.

Yvonne Moss’s fundraising page in memory of Luke Moss raised £952.

Wendy Panton’s fundraising page in memory of Taylor Panton raised £390.

Clare Perry’s fundraising page in memory of James Colman raised £8,693.50.

Loretta Pettifer’s fundraising page in memory of

James Pettifer raised £175.50. •

Kirsty Fitzpatrick’s fundraising page in memory of Elise Fitzpatrick raised £7,418.23.

Sean Reading’s fundraising page in memory of Ed Reading raised £6,857.62.

Karen Salem’s fundraising page in memory of Paul Salem raised £1,850.

Rosa Sherwood’s fundraising page in memory of Jack Boulton raised £10,536.

Kenny Seymour’s fundraising page in memory of Matthew Seymour raised £680.

Linda Smith’s fundraising page in memory of Robert Daniel Smith raised £273.67.

Sally Smith’s fundraising page in memory of Lee Smith raised £573.

Adrian Standerwick’s fundraising page in memory of Samuel Standerwick raised £10,779.30.

Emma Steers’ fundraising page in memory of David Dee Wild raised £373.70.

Mary Stiller’s fundraising page in memory of David Stiller raised £133.

Entries appear in the following section according to when CRY sends written receipt for funds raised. The following fundraising was receipted from September to December 2017.

Corrections from last issue

In Memory of

Ashley Goodwin

Unfortunately, due to having so many fundraisers to acknowledge and there being some overlap with memorial fund names, there can occasionally be mistakes. We always strive to enforce new methods to eradicate such administrative errors, but we apologise if you have ever been affected in some way by this. If you see a mistake in the Update or you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me at tom@c-r-y.org.uk. Here are corrections from issue 73.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

Two donations that should have been included in issue 73 of the Update in memory of Ashley were missed. We apologise to the Goodwin family for making this mistake. The donations were as follows: •

Linda and Geoffrey Goodwin sent in donations totalling £230 raised as follows: £130 from a car boot and eBay sale and a £100 donation from Joan Dawn and Daniel McCarrick.

Linda Goodwin sent in £247.70 raised at a recent screening event at The University of Gloucester.

41


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

In Memory of

• Kate Bome sent in £6,053.15 raised through the Remembering Charlotte Summer Ball:

Michael Ainsworth raised a total of £1,270 when taking part in the Brighton Marathon 2017.

Charlotte Adams

“The 2nd year of this summer ball at the beautiful Lion House, Boreham, Essex. Compère Joe Fryd did another amazing job of entertaining over 100 guests along with Magic Circle magician John Riordan. Thank you to all who attended, raising £6,035.” •

Birkett Long LLP sent in £400 raised in respect of the Asher Prior Bates will storage deposits.

Birkett Long LLP sent in a further £826.93 representing monies left over from an acquisition and will storage deposit balances.

Colin, Greg, Sam and Steve took part in the Travel Trade Crusade and raised £2,426:

Jocelyn Marlowe Ainsworth

In Memory of

Leigh Aldridge

Lisa Ashwood organised the Leigh Aldridge Memorial Football Match and raised £2,636.

In Memory of

Robert Allan

Pauline Allan sent in £123 raised from a coffee morning.

“Thank you SO much to Colin Pegler and Greg Armstrong (Elite Island Resorts), Steve Gilchrist (Virgin Holidays) and Sam Dowling (Kuoni) who drove 1,500 miles around Europe in the Travel Trade Crusade in full fancy dress and a car costing less that £650! £2,381 was raised. Well done.” Kate Bome.

In Memory of

Simon Askew

Andrew Howes and Kris Howes took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £185.

In Memory of

Jack Atkinson

Team “Jack A”; Melanie Garnham, Sally Garnham, Amy Ling, Darren Ling, Louise Whitfield, Michelle Hinchcliffe, Mark Hinchcliffe, Kim Spacey, Ted Day, Hayley Owen, Murf Atkinson, Terri Giles, Richard Baker, Lee Jamieson, Sarah Wiseman, Michelle Campbell, Alisha Blake, Lauryn Stichbury, Charlie Clark, Jamie West, Charlie Mallion, Steven Bruff, James Smith, Stanley Taylor, John De La Cruz, Tom Atkinson, Lauren Baynham, Harry Atkinson, Daniel Sargent, Sam Wood, Paul Adams, Mitchell Campbell, Billy Fermor and Darcy Redd, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £828.

In Memory of

Stuart Attridge

Alexis, Ben, Simon, Aiden, Paul and Neil took part in the South Coast Challenge and raised £3,752.

42

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

In Memory of

Adrian Michael Badon

Andrew Baker

• Julie Badon sent in £360.

Amy and Team took part in the Royal Parks Half Marathon and raised £3,884.54.

• David and Shirley Vermond sent in £250 received in lieu of wedding gifts.

In Memory of

Johnny Barker

In Memory of

Alan Bain

Sam and Claire sent in donations totalling £489.22 raised from the sale of tea, coffee and cakes at a recent screening event.

• Rachel Harris set up a pop-up ‘Charity

Shop’ and raised £502. • Nancy Gibson sent in screening donations totalling £350. •

Scholes Chartered Accountants sent in £2,132.14 raised through taking part in the Wild Hearts Foundation’s Micro Tyco Challenge; and from their Big Fat Quiz of the Year.

In Memory of

Tom Elton Barratt

Andrew Mulvey sent in £277 raised through the junior squash tournament at Bishop’s Stortford Squash and Racketball Club.

In Memory of

George Balance

In Memory of

Cecilia Barriga

Gail Balance sent in £106.75 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes.

• Peter Lunney sent in £165. • Lynn Howell sent in £323 raised from a recent event at St John’s Church.

In Memory of

Bob Baldwin

Mike Fleet sent in £127 on behalf of Mr P Lunney.

Christine Bloomfield sent in £140 raised from a darts tournament and raffle.

In Memory of In Memory of

Jack Balfour

Wilf Batley

Jenny Batley sent in £372.50 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes for her husband.

Tonileigh Balfour sent in £564.

In Memory of

Aston Banbury

In Memory of

Matthew Beadle

• Lynne and Tony Beadle sent in £1,203:

• James Banbury sent in £310. • Michael Cox organised a folk night and raised £500.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

“Suzanne and Gordon Wright are members of the National Garden Scheme and open their garden to the public three times a year. They supply cake and drinks for the visitors, with the

43


Our Fundraisers •

Jessica Hill organised a Cirque D’Amour evening and raised £420.

CRY Representative Paul Daniels collected a donation of £2,442.71 raised through the Ladies Captain at Petts Wood Bowling Club for choosing CRY as the club’s Charity of the Year.

Frank Ashby and Graham Christian completed a skydive and raised £1,390:

“Both Frank and I had known our good friend, Matt Beadle, since our primary school days and we had all stayed good friends throughout our lives together. We sadly lost Matt in 2012 to an undiagnosed heart condition when he was just 32 years young. money raised going to a charity of their choice. This Bank Holiday weekend, on 26th and 27th August, they asked if Tony and I would like to run the stand for CRY in memory of our son, Matt. “We jumped at the chance and as Suzanne said we would need about 20 cakes, I spent the week before baking cakes and cakes and more cakes!!! Luckily, Suzanne baked 10, I did 12 and we had two more donated by Honeydale Tea Rooms along with giant cookies, so we had more than enough – or so we thought!!! “Saturday arrived and seeing as it was a beautiful, sunny day, so did the people all wanting refreshment after enjoying the 1-acre garden. In four hours we had used 14 of the 24 cakes we had made and Suzanne told us that Sunday is always the busier day! After a short panic, Suzanne suggested we contact a local tea room who sold homemade cakes. They were just about to close, so it was a mad dash to get there and relieve them of their last 10 cakes. “Sunday was another beautiful day and the crowds came again and, as Suzanne had told us, many more than Saturday. Thank goodness we had our friends Tracey and Des Samaroo, along with Suzanne’s granddaughter, Natalie, to help us with the serving and washing up! By 4pm on Sunday we were exhausted and caked out, but with a full cash box so it was all worthwhile. “We broke two records: the most visitors (380) since Suzanne and Gordon started opening their garden several years ago; and the most money the refreshments have ever made. But, more importantly, we talked to so many people, handed out leaflets and spread the word about CRY. “We are thrilled to be sending in £1,203 in memory of our precious son, Matt Beadle.”

44

“Matt was a funny, energetic, witty lad. A professional dancer who excelled in just about anything he did with a great attitude and zest for life. His massive smile and positivity would light up a room and he would befriend just about anybody he came across. All of this is why his sudden and unexplained death was so shocking and traumatic to so many people. “While Frank and I helped to carry his coffin into the crematorium, I remembered something I had been told years before... ‘You can tell how successful a person has been in life not by how much money or material possessions they have, but by how many people attend their funeral’. This was all evident on the day of his funeral, which was attended by over 800 people at the church and memorial service. “Since we lost Matt, countless members of his family and friends have raised money for CRY in his memory. When the suggestion of doing a skydive came up, Frank and I didn’t hesitate to get it booked and start raising funds for this amazing charity ourselves. In the months leading up to our skydive, Frank and I had a few conversations along the lines of ‘what the hell are we doing?’ but we never once considered not going through with it as we both wanted to do it for two very good reasons: CRY and Matt. “On the day of the skydive, we arrived early at a very sunny Headcorn Airfield in Maidstone. There were a few nerves between us, but mainly excitement and an enthusiasm to get the job done. Supported by a 15-strong crowd of our friends and family, at around 11am we had suited up and were taking in some last-minute tips from our instructors. As we walked towards the plane I was told I would be the first one out! Undeterred by this information I climbed in with everyone else and waited for them to start the takeoff procedure. There must have been about 12 of us in the plane in total... instructors, camera men, sky divers, oh, and the pilot, obviously!!

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers He was good!

“As we started to take off they pulled the see-through shutter door down on the side of the plane which I was sat right next to. I watched us take off and start to climb in altitude. There was a gauge at the back of the plane which read all the way round to 12,000 feet. I was told by my instructor that when we get to 11,000 feet we would start to prepare for the jump. Frank and I were sat at opposite sides of the plane and it was really noisy. Apart from sharing a few cheeky (and slightly nervous) grins we didn’t really communicate until we met on the ground afterwards. “Before we had got in the plane, we had a made-up hand signal that we agreed we’d both use on the way down. It was simply an ‘M’ shape for Matt. In no time at all, it was go time. The shutter door was opened and I looked at the ground beneath me... two and a half miles down... Crikey!!! “A lone diver went out first and I watched him disappear from view, then it was my turn. My instructor (called ‘H’) and I shuffled towards the edge of the plane, I tucked my lower legs under the plane and pulled my head back onto his shoulder as instructed. My camera man, Lee, was perched on the edge as well, ready to jump and half hanging out of the plane as the adrenaline was pumping. Then we rolled forward and we were falling through the clear blue sky with the wind rushing through us. “The initial feeling of falling was very scary, but within about 5 seconds we had hit terminal velocity (120 miles an hour). At this point it felt like I was floating and the whole experience went to another level of awesomeness. Taking in the amazing view while falling through the sky and shouting ‘woo hoo’ didn’t stop me from remembering what and who I was there for. In view of the camera man, I pulled the ‘M’ symbol with my hands and spared a thought for my friend. “Not long after this, my instructor pulled the cord and I felt the brakes come on as the parachute opened successfully. The initial rush was over, but we were still hanging in the sky and floating back down to earth. ‘H’ let me take control of the parachute and we did some tight turns and tricks. The view was still awesome and the whole experience was so surreal. I started wondering how my mate, Frank, was getting on and then ‘H’ pointed him out over in the distance just before we prepared to land...

www.c-r-y.org.uk

“We touched down perfectly and Lee was already on the ground ready to film our touchdown. I stood up, feeling a mixture of elation, excitement and relief. Lee gave me a short interview about the jump and who it was for. I was still proudly wearing my CRY t-shirt for all to see, as was my friend, Frank. I went over to find Frank, who had landed about 50 feet away, and gave him a massive hug. We sat in the field waiting to be collected by the mini bus to take us back to the airfield and started to exchange our experiences with each other. “We both agreed on three things: it was amazing, we would definitely do it all again (especially for charity), and we were both really glad we had done it in memory of Matt Beadle. We then went back to see our friends and family who were waiting for us and went to a local pub for a welldeserved pint and some grub. “I have to say a massive thank you to everyone at CRY (especially Rosie Peploe) for helping and advising us on fundraising and the event. I also want to say a big thanks to all the skydive team for giving us the most amazing experience and for always being professional, safe and fun. Last but not least, a huge thank you goes out to our friends and family for supporting us. And, of course, all of the friends, family, colleagues and strangers who donated to our cause. Special mention to Pure Jeanius Hair Salon in Swanley and Eden Barbers in Strood for fundraising for us. “Frank and I will always miss our good friend Matt and he will never be forgotten. I found out recently that his condition would have been treatable had he known about it. This is why CRY is such an important charity and must continue to do such amazing work, to hopefully prevent the world from losing wonderful young people. Thanks for reading our story.” Graham Christian.

In Memory of

Gareth Beckett

Lewis Littlechild took part in a Tough Mudder and raised £580.

In Memory of

Steve Bedford

Richard Woodward took part in the Bournemouth Marathon and raised £633.

45


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Graeme Bell

• Gemma Cannell sent in £600 raised at the West Denton Fire Station Social Club. • Daniel Ternent raised a total of £1,635 when taking part in the Great North Run 2017.

In Memory of

Steven Bicker

Christian Smith took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £470.

In Memory of

Maxwell Biles

• Thomas Stewart sent in £100 from The Henstridge Line Dancers raised at the North Dorset 7s Rugby Tournament. • Frances Aviss organised a Zumba to the

MAX event and raised £1,254: “On 18 August 2017, representatives from North Dorset Rugby Football Club (NDRFC) hosted ‘Zumba to the MAX’, a charity Zumba event in memory of one of the club’s most loved first team captains, Max Biles, and in aid of CRY. “Rugby players, their partners and their children danced, pranced and strutted their stuff to Zumba fitness and ‘Strong’ by Zumba, which was followed by a raffle and barbeque. “£1,254 was raised for CRY and everyone is calling for this to be an annual event. #BoysDoZumbaToo.”

46

James Fox organised the North Dorset 7s Rugby Tournament and raised £2,521.80.

Eddie Casey at North Dorset Rugby Football Club held the North Dorset 7s Rugby Tournament and raised a further £787:

“North Dorset 7s, the annual men’s and women’s rugby 7s festival that has been running since 2013, has now raised over £10,000 for CRY. The news comes as event organisers announced that £4,644.90 was raised from this year’s tournament. “Hosted by North Dorset RFC, the event was created to raise money and awareness for the club’s nominated charity, CRY, after losing club captain, Max Biles, in 2009 at the age of 29. In 2013, its inaugural year, 16 teams attended, which subsequently increased to 24 teams in 2014 and 32 teams in 2015 and 2016. “The 2017 tournament, held on 22nd July, expanded once again and attracted 40 teams and nearly 500 players who competed across a variety of competitions. “This year’s Men’s Open Cup final saw the RAF Spitfires and Nomads competing for the Worthington Cup, newly named in honour of David Worthington, a much loved member of North Dorset RFC and the local community, who tragically lost his life in September last year. “With both teams having gone undefeated throughout the day, a closely contested game eventually saw the RAF Spitfires run out worthy 26-14 winners.” James Fox.

In Memory of

Jordan Birchall

“Team Jordan”; Jason Birchall, Leonnie Birchall, Harry Birchall and Alfie Birchall, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £1,586.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Amy Black

Neil and Linda Black sent in £1,487.03 from Hedon Town Council.

Hugo Brunsdon took part in the Cotswold Way Challenge and raised £105.

June Boulton sent in donations totalling £851 raised as follows: £572 from Marcus Woodward’s Charity golf event; £221 from the Jack Boulton Memorial Trophy; and £58 from a collection box at Keynsham Cricket Club.

In Memory of

Steven Blair

• Susan Blair sent in £190. • Susan Blair sent in £235 raised from collection boxes.

In Memory of

Steven Blair and Mark Gallagher

Jack Ralston took part in the Glasgow Half Marathon and raised £203.10.

In Memory of

Lesley Boden

Team “Lessels”; Ally Leach, Katie Leach and Carol Clark, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £130.

In Memory of

Jack Boulton

• June Boulton sent in £1,904 raised

“The 2017 Jack Boulton Memorial Trophy was played on 14 October at Saltford Golf Club. There were 26 teams of four and the winning team is pictured. From left to right: Carol Lake, Dave Boulton, Oliver Parkinson, Keith Parker and Keith Bees. It was a very sociable day and enjoyed by all who played, as it provides a good opportunity for all sections of the club to play with each other as teams are drawn at random. A donation of £221 was raised for CRY.” •

June and David Boulton, friends, family and colleagues took part in the Cotswold Way Challenge 2017 and raised £9,753:

“Full Challenge: 100km (62 miles) – Saturday 1 to Sunday 2 July 2017. A continuous walk from Bath to Cheltenham. Saturday morning 6.40 am start, going through day and night for a Sunday afternoon finish at 14.45, a total of 32 hours. We decided to take part in the Cotswold Way Challenge in memory of Jack. The magical Cotswold Way crosses areas of outstanding natural beauty with fantastic panoramic views, and it was a great setting for our 100km walking challenge. As expected, it was tough,

from a disco: “We held a disco on 2nd September at Saltford Golf Club to raise funds for CRY and to celebrate the Cotswold Way Challenge. The disco was a great success and we had a packed dance floor for the entire night. There was a raffle and auction as well, and overall £1,904 was raised. Dave, June and Lucy Boulton are pictured, before the disco really got going. Local friends and the community enjoyed it so much they want another!”

www.c-r-y.org.uk

47


Our Fundraisers •

Debi Vaughan sent in £105 in respect of Michelle’s participation in the Great Newham 10K.

Janet and Tommy sent in £140 in respect of Michelle’s participation in the London to Brighton Cycle.

In Memory of

Emma Broad

• Richard, Julie, Chloe and Carys took

part in the Isle of Wight Festival and raised £775. even gruelling in places. For Jack’s memory, for CRY and for ourselves, we did it. What a great achievement! We’re all relieved, pleased and have pretty sore feet. Team members were Dave and June Boulton, Liz Parr, Nigel Kay, Sam Pollinger and Toni Clothier. Many thanks to our supporters and the many donations we have received.”

In Memory of

Ian Bowen

Maralyn Bowen sent in £120 raised by Shirley and Christine who made a Christmas cake; and Davina Vaughan who organised a lottery numbers fundraiser.

• Stephanie Addison took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,935. •

Maddie Tait took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,534.17.

In Memory of

Alex Brown

Marcus, Adam, Ben, Duncan and Simon completed the Midlife Peaks and raised £419.10.

In Memory of

Connor Brown

In Memory of

Craig Bradley

Gary and Ryan completed a skydive and raised £956.

Matt Hill sent in £1,148.57 raised through GingeFest.

In Memory of

Harley Curtis Brandon

• Michelle Bourne sent in donations totalling £960 raised through taking part in the Great Newham London Run, raised as follows: £195 from Steve Appleton; £225 from David and Susan Wiles; £50 from Stan Van Geleen; and £490 from Douglas Bourne. •

Michelle Bourne took part in the Great Newham 10K and raised £200.

Michelle Bourne took part in the London to Brighton Cycle and raised a further £202.50.

48

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Katrina Brown

CRY Patron Bill Neely took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £10,238.

donations are still coming in!

In Memory of

“It was the hardest yet most fun experience of our lives. Unfortunately, our CRY t-shirts were a little ruined by the end! We are just so amazed by the donations we have had so far and are so pleased to support an amazing charity that helps to fund life-saving screenings for young people.” Ellie O’Neill.

James and Olly completed a 213-mile cycle from Durham to Birmingham and raised £472.

In Memory of

Anthony Browne

In Memory of

Leanne Brownhill

• Lynne Brownhill sent in donations totalling £2,581.20 raised as follows: £1,560 from The Leanne Brownhill Summer Ball; £98 from Ludlow Fish Bar; £707 from The Leanne Brownhill ‘Alternative’ Summer Ball 2016; and £216.20 from donations. •

Mark Hume took part in the National Three Peaks Challenge and raised £672.

Holly Walters organised the Horse Run around her local estate and an ‘80s themed spinning session and raised £845.

Ellie, Gemma, Ryan and Louise took part in the Tough Mudder Half Midlands and raised £875.65:

“On Saturday 13th May, Ryan Bowers, Gemma Pinchin, Louise Brockway and Ellie O’Neill took part in the Tough Mudder Half, raising money for CRY in memory of Leanne Brownhill (Little Red). All the people of Ludlow, Shropshire, have already, amazingly, raised nearly £800 and the

www.c-r-y.org.uk

Alex Buckler

John Archer sent in £500.

Rosalind Buckler sent in donations totalling £446 raised as follows: £400 in lieu of gifts to celebrate Charlotte’s recent wedding; and £46 from a raffle held at Ballands Bowmen’s annual Major Archer Memorial Shoot.

In Memory of

Carl Buckley

Harry Cobley took part in the Birmingham Half Marathon and raised £584.

In Memory of

Jennifer Bucknell

• Hilary and Bill Durrant held various

outdoor awareness events and raised £3,000. • Dr J M Pole sent in £500.

49


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Jordan Burndred

• The Rotary Club of Burslem sent in £259. • Jill Salt sent in £270.91. •

Jan Booth sent in £150.

Usman Shah sent in £100.

Helen Burndred sent in £160.67 raised from a tombola at Natwest Bank in Congleton.

Lisa Burgess took part in a Born Survivor event and raised £480.

Nicola Burndred sent in £2,562.16, including: £350 raised at a fun day; £348.50 raised through a dance show; £266.18 raised from a cake sale at Creations hair salon and the High Spirits shop; and £1,597.48 in donations.

“The amount of team work and support from my crew, family and friends was absolutely astounding. I realise now more than ever how important it is to work together, share responsibilities and accept there are some things which we are better to delegate rather than try to control. When you are in the sea, miles from anywhere next to a boat with your support crew you have to accept their decisions (not without a little bit of a fight, though). Sometimes others see things you cannot, so you must always remember help is there on hand and the team will always want the best outcome, whether that be safety or success or both. I can’t thank everyone enough for all the lovely messages of support. I could not have done it without you all.

In Memory of

Richard Butcher

Sarah Butcher organised a ball and raised £3,385.

In Memory of

Grant John Butler

Lorraine Ayres completed an English Channel swim and raised a further £3,145: “So, after some 14 hours in the water and some 32 miles swum, I didn’t actually touch down in France. Instead, I skirted along the shoreline before being pulled safely from the sea and onto the boat. Well, what an experience, one I don’t think I could ever beat. It really was truly amazing. I learnt so much along the way; how to keep calm and focused even though all around me things were changing. Why worry about the things you cannot change? “The call came to start the swim on Friday, then cancelled 15 minutes before the swim was due to begin (at 3am on Saturday morning). Then, the call came again on Saturday afternoon and the swim was due to start at 5am on Sunday 2nd July… which it did. Different boat to the one I was expecting, but none of that mattered. Being agile and accountable certainly came into the frame.

50

“I would especially like to thank GLL (www.gll.org/b2b) for their support and encouragement to ensure regular gym sessions to keep myself strong and injury free for the swim. Swim coach, Beth French, support from my husband, Stuart, and daughter, Lucy, and all the crew onboard the boat itself: Pilot Eddie Spelling, Andre, Erin, Ali and Russ, many of whom made the journey to Dover twice in two days with very little/no sleep. But thank you to all my friends who helped me to raise a total of £5,049.25 for CRY in memory of Grant Butler.”

In Memory of

Nathan Butler

• Alex Lockett took part in a White Collar

Boxing Match and raised £1,220. • Angela Butler sent in £6,150 raised through a memorial cricket tournament organised by Daniel Hancock.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers •

Mr G Lunn sent in £500 in respect of the Phoenix League competiton.

Terry and Claire Lovell sent in £420 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes, in memory of their wife and mum, Linda.

Phil and Alan sent in £160 from a football quiz night.

Angela Butler sent in £270 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes, in memory of Arthur Butler.

Will Clydesdale raised a total of £240 when taking part in the Great North Run 2017.

Eddie Foulkes took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,350.

In Memory of

John Robert Michael Byatt

Mrs B Byatt sent in £722.57 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes.

In Memory of

Alistair Calvert

Emma Titterton sent in £750 representing donations received in lieu of gifts to celebrate her husband Ian’s 50th birthday, her son Jonathon’s 21st birthday and other son Matthew’s 18th birthday.

In Memory of

Alex Camilleri

Team “Alex Camilleri”; Susan Camilleri, Marion Dowling, Anne Watson, Jo Gilks, Susan Couchman and Karen Sadler, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £1,458.

In Memory of

Arabella Campbell

• The Manchester Metropolitan University Cheshire Netball Squad organised various fundraising activities and raised £223.42.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

Nikki Rotheram sent in £295 raised by the MMU’s Cheshire Netball Squad:

“We are Manchester Metropolitan University Cheshire Campus, based in Crewe, Cheshire. We held an hour and a half charity netball tournament event in aid of CRY. We raised £300 overall in our event, which included students from all different clubs/societies within our campus. “We will be raising money throughout the year for CRY as they are a charity close to our club’s heart, as one of our members lost a friend, Arabella Campbell, to cardiac arrest. “As a club, we cannot wait to fundraise throughout the year for this amazing charity.” Emily Thomas.

51


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

James Campbell

• Dave Chisnall took part in the Great Manchester Run and raised £150. • Neil Mason sent in £100 in appreciation of a screening he received. •

Karen Ramrekha sent in £820 donated by Prissick Rovers.

In Memory of

Andrew Cannon

George Cannon sent in £100 received in lieu of a Christmas gift.

In Memory of

Simon Carloss

Michelle Carloss sent in donations totalling £876.18 raised as follows: £326.18 raised from events in 2016 and £550 from a skydive: “It was a huge rush and very, very exciting. I had a very patient and supportive instructor who was keen to know why I was doing this. After explaining how I lost my husband to a heart condition and was raising money for CRY to help and, hopefully, prevent others being in my position, Dave talked to me about his personal issues. Everyone has a story. If there is anything I understand more from my own experience, it’s that. “Once the amazing rush of the freefall was over and the chute was opened, it was a very calming experience. Dave said to me that he believes in signs; and the one he sees

very rarely during his skydives is a circular rainbow, a sign that they’re still there looking out for you. I kept my cool the whole time – from the ground, to the aircraft and even on the freefall – showing no emotion and being brave about the whole affair. “It was when we approached a cloud when I saw it. Then lost it. It’s called a Brocken Spectre. I’m sure a scientific person can explain the angles of light vs. cloud formation, etc. that creates this image; but I can tell you that my Simon was with me. Just then, right there. “There is not a day that goes by that I don’t think of Simon. Not a day I don’t shed a tear. I know I am not alone, but, boy oh boy, sometimes I feel so very alone. I often create some sort of charity event to raise money for CRY. Sometimes it’s a simple quiz night. I’ve held a masquerade ball. Skydiving... I do these things to fundraise, but mostly to find that moment I can be as close as possible to him. In doing so, I am reminded that I am not alone. None of us are. It is easy to fall into that rut, but I would like to remind people that it is just as easy to get out of it.” Michelle Carloss.

In Memory of

Trevor Carter

Ron and Jenny Carter sent in £125 raised at a get-together to commemorate their son Trevor’s birthday.

In Memory of

Vijay Chadha

Poonam Jagota organised a comedy evening and raised £3,010.

52

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers Joanne Oakes, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £905.

In Memory of

Anthony Child

Jack and Angela Child sent in £1,280 raised from a raffle, tombola and the sale of homemade cakes at their annual line dance.

In Memory of

Richard Clark and Emily Higgs

Tracie Clark sent in £500 raised from a golf day.

In Memory of

Philippa Chowne

Andrew Chowne and Lisa Chowne took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £250.

In Memory of

Katrina Christopher and Cheryl ChristopherWebber

Team “Trina and Cheryl”; Paul O’Rourke, Viv Christopher, Jimmy Forgie, Irene Forgie, Daphne Merchant, David Merchant, William Merchant, Terry Plumb and James Webber, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £797.

In Memory of

Tom Clabburn and Claire Prosser

• Munson’s Coffee & Eats sent in £250. • “Team Tom” and “Team Tom and Claire”; Chris Pearson, Julie Malesci, Tim Carpenter, Baerbel Carpenter, Gordon Prosser, Claire Matthews, Peter Matthews, Anne Marie Reilly, Jim Ballantyne, Paul Clabburn, Ellen Clabburn, Timur Onder, Megan Lilian Jones, Julie Lefebve, Paul Newell, Aaron Pearce, Jacky Hems, Claire Hems, Ema Ambrose, Javeen Bentley, Alastair Clunas, Jed Howells, Hannah Langan, Joely Langston, Helen Lewis, Alison Montgomery, Lisa Neaverson, Neil Prosser, Alan Rodney, Joshua Rodney, Kate Riley, Jamie Saunders, Mikey Scott, John Stanton, Helen Barnes, Steve Barnes, Richard Prosser, Linda King, Jan Pears, Camilla Baird and

www.c-r-y.org.uk

In Memory of

Matthew Clayton

Sarah Clayton sent in £1,500 raised through a cake bake, dress down day, raffle and various other fundraising activities: “Throughout the week I sent out daily awareness emails to all my colleagues in Brindley Place (approx. 1,000). Within these emails I detailed exactly what CRY offers for support, awareness, screening and research and added stories from people who have been affected by sudden tragic loss of life. I also attached facts such as #12aweek and provided links to the CRY website. I received really positive responses from these awareness emails as few, if any, had previously heard of CRY and the facilities you offer and, although emotional to read, they found the personal stories really got the message across how this can happen to anyone.

53


Our Fundraisers “On Thursday 23rd November we held our fundraising day. The whole building dressed down for £1 and our fundraising stall was opened from 10.30 to 2.30. Our Great CRY Bake Off was judged at 10.15 by three impartial judges (one being my dad, David Clayton). They thoroughly enjoyed tasting the cakes and took the role very seriously with quotes of “good bake” and “no soggy bottoms” being thrown around. “After much deliberation, our first, second and third place were declared based on taste, appearance and texture. As you can see from the pictures, they were outstanding cakes. “Other games we had included a raffle, tombola, guess how many hearts in the jar, label the heart, pin the heart on the body and our silent auction. We had some amazing donations from local businesses to use as prizes. These included: Novotel night for 2; Jury’s Inn night for 2; Zizzi’s 3 course meal for 3; BANK lunch for 2; 2 Wagamama’s vouchers; 5 mission burritos vouchers; Baguette du Monde; Slug and Lettuce meal for 2; and Red Peppers vouchers. Without these donations I know our day would not have been as successful as it was and for that I am so grateful. We were busy for the entire four hours we were open and right up until the closing seconds people were buying raffle tickets for a chance to win one of these prizes. “I was so humbled by the support of my colleagues and I really hope that taking part in this raising awareness week has gone a little way to promoting CRY and encourages people to get tested to try and prevent further heartache, like I have had to endure. “Overall, we raised an amazing £1,500, which Lloyds will now match, totalling £3,000. I would like to donate this in memory of my brother, Matthew. Matthew tragically died in his sleep on Friday 6th March 2015. The loss of Matthew was so sudden and even now it seems hard to believe. We miss him every single day. We had no idea he had a genetic default in his heart; there were no signs, no warnings, he just went to sleep and didn’t wake up. “I hope this money can go a small way towards the much needed research and raising awareness needed to help other families.”

54

In Memory of

David Cochrane

Ray Newton sent in £1,075.25 raised by Lodge Hopetoun St John, No. 1232, taking part in sponsored walks and a bowling competition.

In Memory of

James Colman

• Lucy Clarke took part in the Bristol Half Marathon and raised £210. • Richard Ponsford raised a total of £1,301.20 when taking part in the Brighton Marathon 2017. •

“Team Colman”; Kellie Myers, Paul Myers, Kyra Burton, Amanda Hall, Kerry Boccilini, Jane Chapman, Sophie Chapman, Clare Perry, Steve Perry, Katie Ponsford, Richard Ponsford, Jessica Ponsford, Lynette Young, Paige Wood, Millie Wood, Kirsty Dixon, Jerri Dixon, Clare Arnitt, John Arnitt, Poppy Arnitt, Jack Arnitt, John Colman, Natalie Wood, Charlotte Maycey, Mandy Kewley, Ellie Kewley, Isabella Kewley, Barbara Hallam, Dave Hallam, Hannah Long, Anne Wade, Howard Chapman and Dan Tomlinson, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £425.

In Memory of

Gemma Collyer

Doug Collyer sent in £300 raised by his colleagues at Twenty Recruitment.

In Memory of

Daryl Comac

Mairead O’Hagan completed a skydive and raised £165.

In Memory of

Stephen Connor

Whittle & Clayton le Woods Cricket Club sent in £310.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Kris Cook

Kayleigh Phelan-Smith raised a total of £615 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100.

Luke Downings raised a total of £685 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100.

want to say a special thank you to Cafe Sport in Swinton, who allowed us to place a bucket in their pub, raising £36.06. As usual, thank you to everyone who made it such a great event organised by Bruce’s friend, Nathan Fareday, and supported by his friends and family.”

In Memory of

Rowena Crabb-Minshall

Jane Wylde-Minshall organised a belly dance show and raised £680.55.

In Memory of

Daisy Cope

Susan Naylor held a plant and rummage sale and raised £150.

In Memory of

Matthew Cragg

• Ryan Goggin took part in Thruhiking the Pacific Crest Trail and raised £6,173.58.

In Memory of

Bruce Cousins

• Jackie Cousins sent in £239.92. • Paul and Debbie sent in £3,050 raised through Mattfest.

• Jackie Cousins sent in donations

totalling £122.40, including £18 raised from a non-uniform day. •

Jackie Cousins sent in £354.55 raised as follows: £274.50 raised at her market stall; £30.05 from Bruce’s Annual Get Together; and a donation of £50 from Brian Chippendale.

Jackie and Alan Cousins raised £208 through their market stalls.

Riah, James and Rowan donated £100 raised through a sponsored walk.

Paula-Jane Shepherd sent in £350 raised from a Christmas fair.

John Haskey took part in the Hamburg Ironman and raised £415.

Jessica Brown took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,320.

In Memory of

Charlie Craig

Jackie Cousins sent in £729.21 raised as follows: £455.75 from Bruce’s Annual Get Together; £130 from the family of Mark Green; £107.40 raised from a market stall; and £36.06 from a local pub collection:

“We are pleased to send CRY a total of £729.21, the proceeds of the night out and my market stall. Also, a special thank you to the family of Mark Green, who donated £130 to us from a collection made after his death in May 2017. I also

www.c-r-y.org.uk

• Fiona Hawkins sent in £242 raised from the Chimp Management workshop with Tim Buckle. • Samuel Russell cycled the Sa Calobra every day in March 2017 and raised £1,150.33. •

Alice Banister raised £770 through singing at a fundraising event.

Norah Thackray took part in Ride for Charlie and raised £3,062.48.

Team “Ride for Charlie”; Jim Evans and Gloria Roscouet, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £480.

55


Our Fundraisers •

Julian Burgess took part in the Great Manchester 10K and raised £510.

In Memory of

Jonathan Crowhurst

David Crowhurst, Mary Crowhurst, Holly Crowhurst, Brian Bunning, Reuben Bunning and Elijah Bunning took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £695.

In Memory of

Adam Dabell and Bob Mainstone

John Dabell sent in £500 raised from the annual Adam Dabell football match held at East Grinstead Town Football Club: “On the evening of Thursday 12th October, East Grinstead Town Football Club were host, once again, to the 14th annual Adam Dabell Memorial Cup and Trophy football match between Imberhorne and Sackville schools – in celebration once again of the life of my son Adam Dabell; and to raise voluntary contributions to CRY. “In front of a large crowd of mainly our town’s wonderful young people, Sackville (right) took the Cup and Trophy, beating their Imberhorne friends (below) 4–2 (reversing last year’s result!). The crowd looked forward to enjoying an evening of great sportsmanship and the two teams did not disappoint. Coming out at the start of the evening looking evenly matched and, with the great skill we have come to expect, they entertained us all with 90 minutes of terrific football.

Freddie Webb, who scored a hat-trick, and Harry Bryant. It was another hugely successful evening for both schools and indeed the local community as a whole, physical and skilful. “Imberhorne are currently still leading 8-6 in the overall head-to-head. Watch this space! “At the start of the evening and in my announcements at the end I made special mention of fellow Town Councillor Bob Mainstone, to whom the evening was jointly dedicated. Bob, himself a former teacher at both Sackville and Imberhorne, very sadly recently lost a short but determined fight against cancer. Most will remember that Bob presented the cup and trophy both last year as our Town Mayor and the year before as Deputy Mayor. Bob is greatly missed by his town and council friends. “Rex Whittaker, our Town Deputy Mayor, who always attends for the entire evening, had photos taken with both teams and presented the cup, trophy and medals at the end. As always, he had been most impressed with the standard of the football and by the fantastic spirit of the young people of the town, attending this now well-known community event. “Thanks, as always, to Richard Tramontin and EGTFC for their kind support of this annual memorial event in memory of Adam; and also Steve Hill, the West Sussex Sports Coordinator, who, with Simon Bunn, originally had the idea for the match. I spoke briefly to declare the event another huge success and asked that everyone dig deep in support of CRY.

“By half-time the score stood at 2-0 to Sackville despite a determined second-half fight back by Imberhorne, with goals by Jake Radcliffe and Dan Goss, it simply wasn’t enough to stem the tide. Sackville’s goal scorers were

56

“It is now 13 years since the death of Adam to an undiagnosed heart condition. Indeed, Steve himself has only recently discovered – and, thankfully, is now on the mend following an operation to rectify – just such a heart condition. Voluntary contributions on the night of the match, plus donations from Adam’s family, raised £500 for CRY for which we are very thankful.”

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

In Memory of

Freya Rose Dalrymple

Thomas Day

• Ingrid Dalrymple sent in £300 raised

Ros and Team Tommy took part in the Three Peaks Challenge 2017 and raised a total of £10,565:

from the Kirkwall Firefighters Union. • Ingrid and Dave completed a walk around Kirkwall and raised £240.

In Memory of

Ben Daniels

“Well, we made it! The National 3 Peaks Challenge finished in just over 24 hours, raising over £10,000 for CRY. “Thank you, Team Tommy – you’re a great set of friends. No wonder Tom loved you all so much!” Ros Day.

• St Augustine’s Church coffee shop donated £100. • Conor, Jack, Tom and Lee took part in the Windsor Half Marathon and raised £1,540.99. •

Paul Daniels took part in the Hampton Court Half Marathon and raised £1,081.20.

Paul Daniels took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £12,488.26.

In Memory of

Shawnton De Four

Adrian O’Connor sent in £200 raised at the inaugural memorial game between Rosslyn Park Nomads and Old Elthamians.

James Pickles sent in £250 raised from the inaugural Old Elthamians vs RPFC Nomads annual rugby match.

In Memory of

Matthew Slaffer sent in £200 raised from a charity auction at Rosslyn Park.

Chris Hoofe raised £807.40 from a 20-mile walk.

Aled John sent in £550.

James Plaistowe donated £220.

Daniel Hayden sent in £506.72.

Jonathan Jones sent in £310 raised from the Rosslyn park RFC Charity Auction.

Andrew Morgan sent in £300.

Martin Docherty donated £460.

Joshua McKinnon donated £260.

Ellen Davis

In Memory of

Andrew Dawson

Ann Bath sent in £158.35 raised by selling cakes at the RRC Running Races.

Ann Bath sent in a further £200.

Robbie McLaren and Katie Mitchell took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £6,337.05.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

57


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Kevin De Silva

Naomi De Silva sent in £1,859.47.

In Memory of

Neil Desai

Urmi and Ravi donated £4,000.

In Memory of

Michael Dean

Patricia Dean sent in £100.

In Memory of

Jake Dean

In Memory of

Neil Desai and Matthew Cragg

Thomas Hewett took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,044.

• Zoe Farley raised £371 through the Oval Owner Club Cruise. • Ben Rowley took part in a Tough Mudder

and raised £262.50. •

Erika and Kirsty took part in the Potters Arf Marathon and raised £341.

Chloe Riley cut off her hair and raised £200.

Sam Holmes sent in £123 raised by organising a staff vs students charity football match at Newcastle-underLyme College.

Lauren Dean completed a parachute jump and raised £2,527.

Jonathan Turnock swam 80 lengths at South Moorlands Leisure Centre and raised £510.

Lauren and Marvin took part in the 1,000ft Labyrinth Challenge and raised £140.

In Memory of

Matthew Dewhirst

• Sue and Chris Dewhirst sent in donations totalling £9,357.27 raised as follows: £6,500 from Jeevan’s Legacy Ball; £24 from St Martins W.I. and Boathouse; £45 from a raffle; £1,480 from Ken Lawton, Alpha Omega; £520 from Eat Curry for CRY; £700 from Christmas markets; £58.27 from Brine Leas School cake sale; and £30 from Sol Blytt Jorgens’ donation.

“Following the tragic death of Jeevan Dhanda in 2014, his family – Raj, Cathy and Manveer – set up a legacy in his memory to support the needs of young people. They held a ball coinciding with his 21st birthday to raise money towards the ‘CRY for Matthew’ fund and to provide heart screening for their friends and Jeevan’s hockey teammates at Cannock Hockey Club. In total from the raffle, auction and sale of cakes and samosas, £6,500 was raised and donated to the Matthew Dewhirst memorial fund with CRY.” Sue Dewhirst.

In Memory of

Claire Dee Shapland

• Nick Dee Shapland sent in £510.83. • Mark Dee Shapland sent in £438.56 raised from wedding funds.

In Memory of

Thomas Demaine

Seana and Charlotte took part in Ocean City Half Marathon and raised £542.06.

58

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers •

Ms Whitehouse organised a cake-athon and raised £776.

In Memory of

Debbie Durrant sent in £1,232.10 raised from the Whitchurch Wasps Swimming Club event:

Sally Diack took part in the Hertfordshire Triathlon and raised a further £255.

“With online donations through Virgin Money Giving and sponsorship, the Whitchurch Wasps raised over £1,200 for heart screening in Shropshire. The money was raised for the Matthew Dewhirst memorial fund and is enough to screen 24 young hearts locally. “The swimmers swam a mile in relays. Many of them are too young to be eligible for heart screening, but they understand the importance of what they were doing for others in their group. “Chris Dewhirst, Matthew’s dad, presented each swimmer with a CRY badge and wristband and thanked them for all their hard work and training.” Sue Dewhirst.

William Diack

In Memory of

Olivia Diamond

Ben Spedding completed the Peel Park Cycling Challenge and raised £804.30.

In Memory of

Luke Dickinson

Samara Barnes completed the Yorkshire Three Peaks Challenge and raised £675.

In Memory of

Christopher Dillon

Emma Fleming took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £678.40.

In Memory of

Aaron Dixon

• Deborah Dixon sent in £2,737 raised by Northwich Rotary Club. •

Ruby Armstrong-Twigg took part in the Chirk Half Marathon and raised £496:

“Ruby Twigg ran her first half marathon. She achieved an amazing time and raised £496 for heart screening in Shropshire. Ruby’s brother, Toby, was a Shropshire rugby teammate of Matthew.” Sue Dewhirst. •

Team “CRY for Matthew”; Sue Dewhirst, Chris Dewhirst, Cathy Gray-Upton, Chloe Gray-Upton, Alan Upton, Dara Byrne, Paula Straker, Nigel Straker, Lauren Straker, Megan Straker, Jonathan Lane, Chloe Straker, John Straker and Julie Straker, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £1,273.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

• Deborah Dixon sent in £118 from Gadbrook World Class Charity. •

Deborah and Gary Dixon sent in £4,000 from the JD Foundation.

Hollie, Debbie, Gary and team took part in the Yorkshire Three Peaks Challenge to commemorate Aaron’s 30th birthday and raised £4,776.09:

“On 23rd September 2017, on what would have been Aaron’s 30th birthday, myself, my husband Gary, daughter Hollie, friends, and Aaron’s close friends took on the Yorkshire Three Peaks. “We arrived in Yorkshire on the Friday evening where we had dinner and discussed what lay ahead the following day. We had an early start on Saturday morning, leaving our hotel at 6.30am. The day was full of laughs and

59


Our Fundraisers

reminiscing about Aaron and how he would be looking down on us all laughing. “We finished the day by celebrating at the hotel with dinner and lots to drink. The day was a huge success and we raised a total of £9,312.09.” Deborah Dixon.

Pier at midday and enjoyed a lovely afternoon cruising up and down the Thames with a DJ playing some really good music. “Some very kind people had donated raffle prizes and the event raised a total of £785.66.” Julie Donnelly.

In Memory of

Adam Drawbridge

In Memory of

Christopher Dixon

In Memory of

“Team Adam”; Sarah Drawbridge, Les Drawbridge, James Drawbridge, Kim Ballard, Sandra Gould, Shirley Blackman, Phil Tinsley, Sheila Tinsley, Debbie Fenn, Steve Fenn, Guy Harrison, James Skinner, Kate Skinner, Mandy Bulley, Steve Bulley, Val Riches, Phil Riches, Karen Shaw and John Shaw, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £2,095.

Mr N Dobson sent in £350 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes in memory of his father.

In Memory of

Richard Thompson sent in £220.

Gordon Dobson

Peter Dubery

Rob and Anita sent in £815 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes.

Rob Dubery organised a charity golf tournament and raised £215.

In Memory of

Adam Donnelly

Sandra Clark organised a riverboat disco and raised £785.66: “Our very good friend Sandra Clark organised a riverboat disco for CRY in memory of Adam on Sunday 25th June. The sun was luckily shining on the day! We boarded the boat at Tower

60

In Memory of

Harry Dubois

• Daniel Gooding, Wai Lee, James Leeming and Nick Grogan raised a total of £525 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 2017. •

Neil Land took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,010.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers £1,082.67 raised from a bucket collection at Wakefield Trinity Rugby League ground, at Wakefield’s victorious game against Wigan.

In Memory of

Emily Rose Dunn

• Caroline and the Compass Minerals Team took part in the Great Manchester Half Marathon and raised £612.50.

Chris Embling sent in £200 from the sale of eggs.

Chris Embling sent in donations totalling £572.36 raised from a screening.

Chris Embling sent in £405 raised at a Halloween fancy dress event:

• Francesca Dunn took part in the Great

Manchester Run and raised £460. •

Richard Dunn raised a total of £1,185 when taking part in the Great North Run 2017.

“The photos below are from our Halloween fancy dress event at which we raised £405 for Rory’s Foundation at CRY.

In Memory of

Annie Edwards

Mike Bonsor took part in LEJOG 2016 and raised £7,671.65.

“Ellanna Duncan as Pennywise the clown (bottom left) was the winner of the junior fancy dress prize. “Ellanna’s dad, John Duncan (bottom right), won the adult fancy dress competition as The Hound from Game of Thrones (pictured with Rory’s uncle, Andrew Wright).

In Memory of

“Also pictured are Amanda Roberts, Andrew Wright and Rory’s mum, Anne, as Maleficent (top right).

Jackie Edwards and Stuart Ranson raised a total of £2,050 when taking part in the Torbay Half Marathon 2017.

“Julie and Martyn (top left) made an individual donation of £50 at the event, providing a heart screening for one young person. We are so grateful for their generosity and support.” Anne Embling.

Joseph James Edwards

In Memory of

Timothy Edwards

Janet Kendall took part in the Great Manchester Run and raised £717.80.

In Memory of

David Elliot

Eileen Elliott sent in £100.

In Memory of

Rory Embling

• Chris Embling held an Italian evening and raised £254. • Chris Embling sent in donations totalling

www.c-r-y.org.uk

61


Our Fundraisers •

Chris Embling sent in £200 from Ackworth Parish Council.

Chris Embling sent in £302 raised through a cocktails and karaoke night at Rory’s Return.

Chris Embling sent in £175 on behalf of Crown Estate Agents.

Holly and Megan Charlesworth, aged 11 and 7, donated £300.

Chris Embling sent in £220 raised at a musical evening with Joseph O’Brien:

“These photos are from our musical evening with Joseph O’Brien, who is a wonderful singer and entertainer and a great supporter of Rory’s Foundation. We raised £220 on the evening which was greatly enjoyed by all who attended.

Grace Blakeley completed a skydive and raised £749:

“The photo shows Grace Blakeley – Rory’s sister, Francesca’s best friend. She performed a sponsored skydive to raise funds for Rory’s Foundation at CRY. “She managed to raise a wonderful £749. Many thanks to all who supported her and us. And most of all a very special thank you to the amazing Grace!” Anne Embling.

In Memory of

Sebastian English

“The photos show one of Joseph entertaining us; one of Jo Mills, who, as always, worked very hard on the evening; and one of Rory’s grandma Barbara (Joseph’s greatest fan) with friend Linda.” Anne Embling. •

• Richard Kimber completed a 420mile cycle ride from Angelsey to Lord Wandsworth College and raised £3,305.

Francesca Embling organised a Christmas floral workshop and raised £403.50.

• Joanna Ford took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £3,321.20. •

Dr Elaine English sent in £400 raised through playing “Heads and Tails” at the reunion of the Welsh National School of Medicine Class of ‘82, in memory of Sebastian, Howard English and Keith Newton.

In Memory of

Morgan Evans

• Andrea Newbery sent in £250 raised from profits of a car sale. • Lindsay Deans took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,381.

62

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Martin Evans

Rebecca Newton-Howe took part in various fundraising events, including a 15-mile bike ride, organising tombolas, raffles, cake sales and bag packing in Tesco and raised £206.38.

Steve Saunders sent in £200.

Gareth Evans took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,625.

In Memory of

Harry Faulkner

• Julian Craxton sent in £381 raised

from the latest Radlett Junior Squash Tournament. • Berkhamstead Raiders Community Football Club sent in £3,205.40 raised from various fundraising events in memory of Harry, and Paul Beard.

In Memory of

Harry Faulkner and Alex Hubbard

Keith Preedy took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,350.35.

In Memory of

Conor Feeney

• Maria Feeney sent in £100 given to the proprietor of the Hollybush Public House. • Team “Feeney”; Maria Feeney and Aiden Triggs, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £770.

In Memory of

Michael Fisher

• Stephen Fisher sent in a further

£1,345 raised through the 2016 Michael Fisher Memorial Trophy. • Stephen Fisher sent in £4,340 raised from the 2017 Michael Fisher Memorial Trophy:

“On 6th August 2017, the Michael Fisher Memorial Trophy was contested at the Dub Playing Fields in Belfast. The day started out a little grey as the weather closed in with rain, wind and dark skies. However, we didn’t lose any enthusiasm for the day and had faith that the sun would shine through – and it did! Around 1pm the rain had stopped and we were all set up, ready for the first teams to start playing. “13 teams took part this year and after a number of rounds, quarters, semi finals and penalty shootouts the eventual winners were crowned. There was plenty of fun and various levels of football skills were on display, watched by many spectators throughout the day. “This year’s winners were ‘Chamakh My Pitch Up’ who can be seen in the photo alongside this write-up. Well done to them and we hope to see you next year to contest the trophy!

In Memory of

Josh Fell

• Rich and Donna Fell sent in £1,025 raised as follows: £400 from the ex Tigers charity football match and family fun day; £250 from Alison and Frank White; £25 from a further funeral donation from a friend of Donna; £150 from Alan Binks Timber Limited; and £200 representing donations received in lieu of gifts to celebrate a friend’s birthday. •

Victoria Cross sent in £1,590.58 representing donations received in memory of her husband.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

“There was a refreshment stand stocked with food and drinks kindly baked, made and donated from many sources. A big thank you to everyone who did this. “The raffle this year was an enormous success with

63


Our Fundraisers in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100. •

Kiley Ganderton, Simon Vevers, Nicholas Blomfield, Ben Jacobs and Christopher Ellis-Keeler raised a total amount of £11,866 together when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100.

Teddy Bevan raised a total of £305 when taking part in the Vitality London 10,000 2017.

approximately 50 prizes being donated locally and nationally. Congratulations to all those who won a prize. “We had a great time organising it and were delighted with the day. It was a great success and we continue to honour and celebrate our little brother Michael’s life and memory and raise much needed funds for CRY.

In Memory of

Elise Fitzpatrick

• “Team Elise” and “Braintree Dental

Centre”; Kirsty Fitzpatrick, Sean Fitzpatrick, Connor Fitzpatrick, Macie Fitzpatrick, Tilly Fitzpatrick, Isla Fitzpatrick, Ailie Vinter, Carol Jefferson, Lisa Bishop, Jo Massidda, Libby Brown, Russell Jones, Lisa Hutchinson and Mark Burchett, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £433.

“We raised just over £4,500 this year, which is an incredible amount of money. Thank you to The Botanic Inn for facilitating and allowing us to participate. “Thank you to all those who donated their money, prizes, time, effort, baking and football skills; it’s all so very much appreciated. We hope you enjoyed the day and we will be back to do it all again next year, bigger and better.”

In Memory of

Anthony Fitzgerald

• Teams “Ant”, “Anthony Fitzgerald”, “Young at Heart”, “Mayfair Marchers”, “Fitzgerald”, “LiverpoolOne” and “Team Fitz”; Steven Murphy, Kelly Murphy, Agnes Murphy, Ryan Murphy, Laura Fitzgerald, Noel Fitzgerald, Alison Fitzgerald, Marie Fitzgerald, Kiley Ganderton, Andre Jean-Baptiste, Magda Tageldin, Jackie Hollands, Nimisha Patel, Simon McDonald, Krishan Patel-Watts, Kevin Watts, Elaine Manalad, Tina Baines, Tracey Sell, Gemma Murphy, Lynn Grace, Antonia Fallows, Mark Fallows, Francesca Fallows, Paul Brannigan, Becky Brannigan, Connor Brannigan, Stephanie Jacobs, Orla Mooney, Frances Thompson, Demi Kemp, Izzy Cole, Kaine Devo, Carmel Osborne, John Osborne, Michael Fitzgerald, Liz Fitzgerald, Lorraine Dunbar, Tracy Webber, Louise Webber, Emmie Webber, Charlotte Webber, Zoe Webber and Peter Collings, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £275. •

Demi, Magda and Izzy took part in a skydive and raised £1,340.

Katie Creedon took part in the London Mini Marathon and raised £195.

Amy Boswell raised a total of £1,148 when taking part

64

Jeanine and Sophie took part in the Para 10 and raised £310.

Kirsty Fitzpatrick took part in the Para 10 and raised £3,890:

“On September 3rd 2016, we lost our beautiful Elise; she was only 24. Family and amazing friends took part in a gruelling challenge which is normally done by the parachute regiment and we raised an amazing amount in honour of Elise and to raise awareness for CRY. “Thank you to all for your support.”

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

In Memory of

Sophie Rhodes took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,160.20.

Charlotte Geen took part in the Marathon Des Sables and raised a further £3,484.68:

Andy Forbes

In Memory of

Joanne Fotheringham

Ullapool High School pupils hosted a Chez Roux fine dining charity event and raised £765.

In Memory of

Matthew Gadsby

Josephine Geen

“Day 0 – After arriving in camp the night before, I went for breakfast with my tent mates and then for kit checks at the time given for my race number. There were about five different tents: one that weighs your bag, one where you hand in a form declaring your kit and food, one for ECG and medical form, one for salt tablets and SPOT tracker (they didn’t really check the rest of your kit unless you were randomly chosen). We also had to hand over anything we wouldn’t be using during the race, which we wouldn’t see again until the hotel in Ouarzazate. I wore clothes that I would leave behind for this day to keep my race kit as fresh as possible. The rest of the day was spent in my tent chilling and getting to know my tent mates. Dinner was also provided in the evening.

David Davies sent in £100 from family, friends and members of the Newton Regis Golf Society.

In Memory of

Andrew Gard

• Caroline Gard sent in £381.22 raised from donations and collection boxes. • Sam Mitchell took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £4,566.80. •

Christian Tendeng took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,307.20.

In Memory of

Stephen Gately

Team “Steo” and Team “Catherine Mostyn Scott”; Lenie Keizer, Sarah Rodriguez, Catherine Mostyn Scott and Bernie Williams, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £100.

In Memory of

Jaimie Gault

Margaret Gault sent in £500, including: £140 from Farmers and Friend; £210 from a 50th wedding anniversary; £125 from donations received in lieu of sending Christmas cards; and a £25 donation.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

“Tent mates are really important and mine were amazing. We had such jovial camaraderie between us; it felt like I had known them a lot longer than I had. We were all on the same wavelength, here to complete and have fun. We named ourselves ‘the special tent’ and probably annoyed those in surrounding tents! I had so much fun during the MDS and this was down to my tent mates. When I was finding times tough I pushed through because I knew I had them to return to and have a laugh with. There is also so much support on the course from other participants, especially the others with GBR after their name. When a stage was tough, you could guarantee that someone would give you some words of encouragement, as you would to them. “Day 1/30.3km – Woken up bright

65


Our Fundraisers and early at 5am by the sounds of others getting ready. Everyone was rather nervous as we didn’t really know what to expect. We started with a breakfast as heavy as we wished because we wouldn’t have to carry it, as it doesn’t count in pack weight. A surprising number of people opted for a wet military ration pack. Personally, I avoided the orange gloop and went for Taste the Difference Belgian waffles with a caramel sauce, followed by some fruity baby food and malt loaf, washed down with some Lucozade. “We went to the start line and listened to Patrick’s talk and then began running to the ‘Highway to Hell’. Everyone has a strategy for Day 1 – some people like to go steady and ease into the race, but I knew myself well enough to know that I would go into motorway mode, where I just keep overtaking people until I can find my own bit of space. I probably went a bit too fast on Day 1, but it didn’t feel it to me and had no repercussions later on, so it was a good start to the race. It was a relatively flat day, a bit of an introduction to sand dunes but nothing too difficult. (I completed this stage in 4hrs 43 and came in 490th.) “Day 2/39km – Everyone was saying that Day 2 was a tough one, so I was feeling slightly nervous about this stage. We had the Bou Laadam Jebel relatively early on and then some more hills and sand dunes before Jebel El Awful (Otfal). This climb was right at the end of the day, after lots of energy-sapping sand dunes, so it was a bit of a leg burner. The views at the top were incredible and it was possible to see the bivouac we would spend the night at from there. There was a very steep, sandy decent from the top, which was a lot of fun but in the back of my mind I was dreading having to go back up this beast tomorrow. (Got back to camp in 7hrs 20 and came in 569th place.)

comparison. We saw the start line go up facing a large ascent which everyone scrambled up. When we got to the top, I heard people saying “at least that is one of the three jebels done.” I couldn’t resist telling them that actually that didn’t count as a jebel in the roadbook, so we still had another 3 to go! “Day 4/86.2km – The big day, the one that “separates the men from the boys,” allegedly. We had all gone to bed hoping to get some good kip in before this stage; sleep had been pretty good up until this point and then BAM! We were woken up to some huge gusts of wind, with sand blown in our faces as our tent came down on my side. I barely slept a wink, so didn’t go into Day 4 the way I would have liked to and wasn’t really feeling top form that morning. The day started off nicely, though, through an oasis and then a dried up lake, followed by a few sandy climbs and then an oued (my favourite, love an oued! Generally flat and forgiving underfoot). “After having a pretty low moment between the bivouac and Checkpoint 1 where I was feeling really tired and dehydrated due to a lack of water given out, when I got to Checkpoint 1 I took all the water I could possibly find. A Berber man getting rid of the empty bottles helped me and I think I may have proposed marriage to him! I then spent Checkpoint 1-2 trying to re-hydrate myself again. Soon I felt great and felt like I could take on the world. It was coming up to the peak heat of the day so people were slowing down, but as I cope with the heat better than most I started to speed up and overtake loads of people; this felt great so I just kept going, whizzing through all the checkpoints. I saw two of my tent mates at Checkpoint 4; they had stopped to eat, which I should probably have done too but I just took the water and kept going. I felt a hotspot on the ball of my foot, looked at my Garmin and said to myself, ‘nah, it’s only another 18 miles, I’m not stopping’. I felt great. “I got to Checkpoint 5 when it was dark and bumped into two of the guys from the tent next door, so stayed with them until Checkpoint 6. I put my speakers on and we were listening to music whilst traipsing through the neverending dunes. During the day you have pink spray painted rocks every 500m to guide you, but during the night you have the lights of all the other competitors which is an amazing sight. When I got to Checkpoint 6, the sugar high ended and I came crashing down.

“Day 3/31.6km – Reading the roadbook went something like this: sandy ascent… sandy climb… sandy incline… sandy slope… sandy passage… sandy bank… sandy… sandy… sandy… jebel… jebel… jebel… sand, jebel, sand, jebel, sand – you get the gist! Well, that was a great description of the day. Everyone had been saying that Day 2 was going to be hard. Well, that was nothing in

66

“I set off again, just wanting to get to the bivouac to rest. The dunes were relentless and about half way to Checkpoint 7 I met another three Brits and we carried on together until the next checkpoint. When I got to Checkpoint 7, I was swaying all over the place. When I collected my water they asked me if I was OK; of course my response was ‘yes’ as I didn’t want to attract any medics. They weren’t sure as I had to hold the handrails

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers to prop myself up, but they gave me my water and I legged it before they could flag my number up to anyone. I sat down which was probably a big mistake. Some others had bedded down here for the night and I was so tempted but I kept telling myself ‘it’s only 10km until the finish’ – 10km of yet more sand dunes that would actually take hours to get through, but your brain processes 10km as something that you could easily do within an hour, because you can at home under normal circumstances. “I set off again with a British girl, and I really have her to thank for getting me through this stage. I walked behind her, moving my feet as she did, just wanting to get to the finish. My feet were in agony and I had no energy left. The sand dunes looked so comfy, I could have just laid down there for a few hours but I kept saying to myself ‘just keep swimming’. I kept counting to 100 on repeat, over and over and over again until I could see the bivouac. When I saw the bivouac I was so happy, I thought it must be so close now… it wasn’t. It was never ending. It took at least an hour to actually reach it with me hobbling over a painful stony plateau. The British girl had more in her and wanted to get there within 19 hours, so I told her to go for it as I didn’t want to feel like a hobbling burden. I then went back to counting to 100 again. (Got to camp in 19hrs 09, 517th place.) “Day 5/0km – Today was mainly spent horizontal. My body ached and I was so tired from 2 nights of no sleep. Somehow, I took a nap with my legs in the air and started sleep talking, my tent mates found this hilarious and took a photo… Apparently, I look like the Pokemon Caterpie! A common theme for today was that everyone’s hips really hurt. I’m no biomechanics expert, but I would put this down to the quantity of sand dunes and the sand unbalancing and moving your body in ways the flat surfaces wouldn’t as legs slide about more. I found rolling around on a water bottle helped loosen my hips a bit. “Day 6/42.2km – No one even thought about this day really. After Day 4 we all believed the race to be in the bag and after all it was ‘just a marathon’. Well, it was a very painful one! My feet were so swollen and blistered, I ended up having to take painkillers after Checkpoint 2 because the ground was so stony. This was the day that competitors that had paid for the family package had their loved ones come out and meet them. Personally, it felt like we were dinosaurs in Jurassic Park. There were 4X4’s driving past us, with passengers pointing, waving and taking photos. It felt really peculiar. “The route took us through some amazing ruins and it was a really scenic day and probably one of the hottest as the temperature had continued to rise all week. You could see the finish line probably a mile away. I hobbled my way across the stony plateau and began to pick up speed for the finish line. I started a slow jog and overtook

www.c-r-y.org.uk

a few people. I was just about to cross the finish line and someone tried to overtake me… Well, I didn’t expect to end the Marathon Des Sables with a sprint finish! But I won, with my amazing tent mates cheering me over the line! (Finished in 8hrs 40, 853rd – I mostly hobbled.) “Overall, I took 47hrs 05mins and came in position 635/1,167 and 80th woman, which I am very happy with. Before I got there my only aim was to complete the race but others told me it was better to have a goal in mind, so I set myself the aim of top half, which I came pretty close to. On reflection, though, I should have probably just whacked down a load of painkillers for the marathon stage and gone for it, as my feet were the only thing preventing me from going faster; my energy levels and the rest of my body were surprisingly fine.

“I would recommend to anyone planning on doing the MDS in the future to allow time to stop, catch your breath and take some photos, especially on the top of jebels. I did and have lots of photos, videos and memories of the experience which I can fondly look back on. “Day 7/7.7km Charity Stage – This doesn’t count in the overall timing of the race but you must complete it. It is tradition for participants to walk this with their tent mates, so that’s exactly what we did and we came in last, but had such a laugh! We got our roll mats out and started surfing down the dunes, the boys got their kit off because they wanted naked photos in the sand, and then we realised that we had only covered about 3km and weren’t even half way, so we got a wiggle on and did the Can-can over the finish line together.”

In Memory of

Salena German

• Jackie German sent in £282, including:

£140 raised from a collection box at her brother’s shop and a £142 donation.

67


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

In Memory of

Joshua Gilbert

David Green

Mr and Mrs Gilbert sent in £1,783.57 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes.

Gabby Broadhurst raised £325 from taking part in the Great North Run 2017.

In Memory of

Phillip Goillau

In Memory of

Oliver Griffin

Alan Goillau sent in £100.

• Fran Waite organised an 18-hour hair cutting marathon at Daniel Fairfax Salon and raised £2,358.46.

In Memory of

Ashley Goodwin

• Linda Goodwin sent in £200 raised from car boot sales and eBay sales. • Linda and Geoff Goodwin sent in £231 raised as follows: £164 from a coffee, cake and book sale, and £67 from a car boot sale.

• David Bird took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £380.

In Memory of

Kayleigh Griffiths

Leon Griffiths sent in £1,563.54 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes.

Ashlei Kearns took part in the Royal Parks Half Marathon and raised £860.

In Memory of

Craig Graham

Linsay and Robert raised £252.60 from taking part in the Edinburgh Half Marathon.

In Memory of In Memory of

Jordan Grant

CRY Representative Ruth Lowe collected a cheque for £750 from Dave Whitworth raised through the Cadley FC Portugal Football Tournament.

Rochelle Grogan

Team “Rochelle’s Rubies”; Mehmet Ahmetoglu, Daniel Casey, Rory Jury, Sophie Grogan and Sharon Thorpe, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £112.23.

In Memory of

Brenda Guest

Lesley and Russell sent in £170 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes, in memory of their mum.

In Memory of

In Memory of

Grahame Coleman raised £350 from taking part in the Prudential RideLondonSurrey 46 2017.

• Andy Hunt raised a total of £1,293 from taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100:

Adam Green

68

Matthew Hadfield

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers “I would like to thank all the helpers and supporters who helped make my day a wonderful experience.

In Memory of

Shamil Hamid

“The cheerers on the route really made a difference just when I needed it the most. These included my fantastic wife waving her flag in Piccadilly, the lovely lady in Leatherhead who gave me a big smile and raised my spirits, the wonderful group in Wimbledon – without whom I wouldn’t have made it up the hill – and the volunteers opposite the Houses of Parliament, who were the loudest group I heard anywhere on the route! All of their encouragement and lovely, smiling faces made the ride so much more enjoyable. “Thank you also for the warm welcome from the wonderful CRY staff and supporters at Green Park Hilton, especially the guys giving the massages and the ladies organising the showers! They all made the day such a great experience. Also, thanks to any supporters along the route who I didn’t get to see and apologies for not seeing you. CRY manages to do these events so well and long may it continue.” •

“Team Matt” and “The Mallens”; Diana Hunt, Andy Hunt, Marc Hadfield, Eraldo D’Atri, Angie Hadfield, John Hadfield, Dan Watts-Read, Craona Watts-Read, Margaret Allen, Chris Allen, Peter Jones, Scarlett Morgan, Julia Arkell, Will Arkell, Lollie Arkell, James Arkell, Elaine Kidd, Oliver Hunt, Nick Holman, Benjamin Hough, Maja Naskret, Holly Hunt and James Hogan, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £1,695.

In Memory of

Emmanuel Haizel

Jonathan Haizel took part in a Tough Mudder and raised £325.

In Memory of

Wendy Hallam Chamberlain

Ian Chamberlain sent in £468.50 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes, in memory of his wife.

In Memory of

Joseph Halliwell

Alan Purchase sent in donations totalling £430.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

The Kuwait English School sent in £2,755.10.

In Memory of

David and James Hamilton

“Team Hamilton”; Rachel Hamilton, Steve Connelly, Rose Connelly, Kathleen Coleman, Steve Crawford, Nicola Hamilton and Louise Smith, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £115.

In Memory of

Ben Hammond

• Phil Sweatman took part in the London

Marathon 2017 and raised £6,130.83. • Stephen and Sheralyn Hammond sent in £10,100. •

Fiona and Elizabeth took part in the South Coast Challenge and raised £2,756.

Alexandra White sent in £135 raised by the Tenterden Cake Club.

Team Ben Hammond took part in the 50km South Coast Challenge 2017 and raised £2,859.72.

Team Ben Hammond took part in the 100km South Coast Challenge and raised £3,618.

In Memory of

Alexander Hampshire

Chris and Mary Morgan sent in £100.

In Memory of

Kyle Hancock

• Oliver Spence took part in the Great Manchester 10k and raised £500.

69


Our Fundraisers •

Ian and Debbie sent in £2,200 raised as follows: £1,200 from funds raised from the sale of a book ‘The Valley’ written by Kyle’s great uncle, and £1,000 donated by Nicola Hill from the Richard Hill Fund.

In Memory of

Mark Hancock

Angela Hancock sent in £1,880 raised through the 3rd Mark Hancock Memorial Ride.

Angela Hancock sent in £302.90 raised at Tony and Amy Whittingham’s after-wedding party, ‘Wedfest’.

Simon Poole took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,938.

In Memory of

Megan Harding-Jones

• Terry and Katharine took part in a sponsored walk and raised £100. • Margaret Crowe sent in £1,045 in respect of a talk given by CRY Representative Caroline Gard at the Kelvedon Rotary Club.

Sophie Ahern took part in the TH96 Fun Run and raised £276.

Francesca, Ellie and Ian took part in the TH96 Fun Run event and raised £585.46.

Scott Hardy took part in the TH96 Fun Run and raised £300.

Kate Greenwood took part in the TH96 Fun Run and raised £130.

William Purser took part in the Firefighter 2up Duathlon and raised £535.

Gwen Edwards sent in £100 raised at the annual cricket match at Heywood Cricket Club.

In Memory of

Thomas Hardman

• Jennifer Coxey took part in the TH96 Fun Run and raised £127. • Leeds Beckett Athletic Union raised £984.97. •

Chris Hardy took part in the TH96 Fun Run and raised £367.

In Memory of

Josephine Harris

Ms B Harris sent in a family donation of £610.

70

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Matthew Harris

Steve and Emma Coffey took part in the New Forest Marathon and raised £100.

In Memory of

Brian Hazelhurst

Mrs Hazelhurst sent in £180.30 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes, in memory of her husband.

In Memory of

In Memory of

Coleg Llandrillo Rhyl sent in £131.50 raised through a sponsored walk.

Caroline Ford raised a total of £205 when taking part in the Vitality London 10,000 2017.

Kate Heckman raised a total of £1,055 when taking part in the Vitality London 10,000 2017.

Megan Walker raised a total of £505 when taking part in the Vitality London 10,000 2017.

Jodie Bradley raised a total of £415 when taking part in the Vitality London 10,000 2017.

Kevin Harrison

In Memory of

David Harrop

Neil Heckman

Fiona Barrett donated £100.

In Memory of

In Memory of

Marilyn Hawes and John Hawes took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £250.

Deborah Anderson and Team Deano took part in the CRY Heart of Durham Walk 2017 and raised £1,767.

Jennifer Hawes

Dean Henderson

In Memory of

In Memory of

Anthony Hayes

Richard Smith sent in £235 raised at the Heaton Mersey Lacrosse Club opening fixture.

Kelly Mannion took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £5,804.35.

Joseph Herrington

Sam Segameglio took part in the Leeds Half Marathon and raised £332.

In Memory of

Matthew Hesmondhalgh

In Memory of

Jonathan Hayman

• Paula Hesmondhalgh sent in donations

totalling £812.85 raised as follows: £140 from a Spanish party at the Franks; £255.40 from the Team Matt market stall; £367.45 from the jumble sale organised by Samantha Richmond; and £50 donated by Mr G Kirkham.

• Marion Hayman sent in £644,

including: £494 raised from the Community Matters programme at Waitrose in Sidmouth and £150 raised from the purchase/sale of a golf trolley and bag. •

Megan Collins took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,050.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

Anne Whittingham took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,296.22.

71


Our Fundraisers •

Lizzy and Mary completed the LEJOG and raised £1,250.

In Memory of

Paula Hesmondhalgh sent in donations totalling £1,626.69 raised as follows: £118.51 from Myerscough Open Day & Country Fair; £778.18 from ‘Owd Nell’s 10th Cider Festival raffle; £370 from Twilight Treasure Hunt; and £360 from Mark Gavagan.

Nicola Hill sent in a total of £1,880.71 raised as follows: £1,700 from taking part in the Great North Run 2017 and £180.71 from a second hand book sale held at Eyam Surgery.

Paula Hesmondhalgh sent in donations totalling £355, including: £40 from the sale of Mr Waite’s book ‘A ramble round Catterall & District’; £60 from Chris Baggleys’s online mini auction; £91 from Samantha Richmond’s party; and £161 from the toy fair at St Helen’s (Catterall) Stay and Play.

Richard Hill

In Memory of

Laura Hillier

• Tony and Joan sent in donations

totalling £780.35 raised as follows: £582.05 from donations received at the Blisworth Canal Festival; £30 from P Hemshall; £100 from Mrs E Eady; and £68.30 from the sale of trolley tokens.

In Memory of

Matthew Hesmondhalgh and David Quinney

Tony and Joan Hillier sent in £500 raised from the Blisworth Canal Festival.

Tony and Joan sent in donations totalling £110 raised as follows: £20 from Mr and Mrs Orton; £30 from the sale of trolley token key rings at DW Sports Club in Northampton; and £60 from “the ladies that lunch”.

Tony Hillier sent in £140 representing: £40 from Tiffield History Society given in lieu of a fee for Tony’s presentation, and a donation of £100 from Lerryn Rolt who raised £100 from handmade cards.

Paula Hesmondhalgh sent in £327.08 raised from a market stall.

In Memory of

Oliver Hewitt

Julie Collins sent in £200 raised through donations and a car boot sale: “In 2006, our handsome, kind, intelligent son, grandson, brother, nephew, cousin and friend passed away in his sleep suddenly and unexpectedly. CRY gave us wonderful support and naturally we wanted to fundraise for them. We had tremendous support and were able to hold a screening day in Oliver’s home town of Aldridge. To this day we still remember CRY. “Oliver’s work colleagues have never forgotten him and donate each year. Family members, friends and neighbours all play a part in some way in helping to support CRY.”

In Memory of

Benjamin Hilton-Woosey

Faye Kelly took part in the Tough Mudder North West and raised £2,169.42.

In Memory of

Chris Hoggarth

Ian Walmsley sent in £1,500 from the Keswick to Barrow Walk committee.

In Memory of

In Memory of

“Team Tigger”; Jacqueline Hicks and Katie Thomas, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £735.

Samuel Bell raised a total of £1,125 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondonSurrey 100 2017.

Ed Hicks

72

Ian Hoggarth

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Nicholas Holland

Katie Jones sent in £114.93 raised from the Spinney Rally: “Each year Spinney hosts a rally for their customers who are part of the Spinney Club. This is for people who have bought either a caravan or motor home from us. “It’s held on our Rally field, which is part of the family owner’s land, in a marquee. This year our theme was Mexican, which went down a treat and the weather was kind to us, too. To add a bit of a twist, we decided to do it differently by getting everyone into teams to encourage participation in the weekend’s events and aim to win a hamper full of goodies!

“As everyone arrived on the Friday they were greeted with refreshments and then given a ticket which entitled them to one of four gifts, ranging from a sombrero hat to a moustache, so everyone had an item to dress up with over the weekend! People either formed their own teams or we put them in one. “Later on Friday evening we hosted a Mexican themed quiz, followed by ‘Pin the moustache on the Mexican’. Each team earned points from each activity. Saturday started with a bit of zest with a Zumba class, where at least one team member had to participate to earn points for their team. Once everyone had recovered, the afternoon was slightly more relaxing with a display from ‘Wings and Things’, who talked (and showed us) about everything from snails to snakes. This ended with a photo shoot of a team member holding an animal!

www.c-r-y.org.uk

“During the day we had a mini bus transporting guests to and from our dealership site, where they had to get a ‘selfie’ with staff members on site! This caused much amusement as I didn’t pre-warn the staff! “The evening began with burgers frying whilst team members fought it out on the rodeo bull (the last activity for point scoring) with a live Mexican band in the background to enhance our theme. “Drinks flowed and the excitement began for the results, to hear who had won the hamper. It was a close call between three of the 22 teams! Everyone got very competitive in a nice way and added to a great atmosphere. The evening ended with a singer and DJ to sing and dance the night away...

“The reason CRY means a lot to Spinney is due to the family losing their eldest son suddenly seven years ago, just nine weeks after his daughter had been born. She’s called Grace, which is why Spinney also has the Gracie Bear. Every new customer receives a bear with their new vehicle in memory of Nick Holland.”

In Memory of

Lauren Holly

Nick Butler sent in £470 donated by Hartley Park Farms Ltd.

In Memory of

Jonathan Hooper

“Team Jonathan Hooper”; Simon Hooper, George Hooper, Theo Hooper, Peter Hooper, Diane Hooper and Jennifer Anthony, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £200.

73


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Janet and the team took part in the Nice to Caracassonne Cycle and raised £325.

Melissa Horne sent in £485.19 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes.

Janet Wastall sent in donations totalling £1,118.22 raised through her 70th Birthday celebrations and sponsorship for her bike ride in Germany:

Gary Horne

In Memory of

Samuel Hovhannisyan

Teams “Armenians Go” and “The Hovhannisyans”; Naneh Hovhannisyan, Paul Hovhannisyan and Satenique Hovhannisyan, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £465.

In Memory of

Stewart Howard

Jane Howard sent in £200 raised at a yard sale.

In Memory of

Fay Howell

Colin Harding and Jessica Harding took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £490.

In Memory of

Dylan Howells

Alistair Griffiths took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,628.79.

Anwen Howells took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,545.

Ian Keith took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,001.

“From the 2nd – 9th September, I undertook a sponsored bike ride in memory of my beautiful granddaughter, Liana. I was raising money for CRY to help their research into heart problems in young people. The Black Forest is a beautiful area, but I had never seen such steep mountains. It was, by far, the hardest week’s cycling that I have ever undertaken. “In the first part of the week, we stayed high up in the mountains, so the outward run in the morning was all downhill into the valley, but we knew we had to face this climb back to the hotel at the end of the day. For the second half of the week, we moved to a hotel on the edge of Lake Constance. Of course, the land around the lake was pleasantly more level, but once turning inland, there were the steep mountains again. “It was all rather daunting, but I felt Liana spurring me on. All went well until the third day when I had a ‘run in’ with a railway crossing barrier. Fortunately, I was tossed away from the line, as shortly after falling, the train came rushing through! I think they call it German precision, as in the UK you can wait several minutes before the train appears. The next couple of days, being slightly battered and bruised, I didn’t manage the full mileage, so I’m in the process of making up the lost mileage here at home.

In Memory of

Liana Hoyland

• Mandy Thompson took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,405.99. • Jo Cook took part in the East Midlands 10k and raised £1,358.03.

74

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers “In all, we covered around 400 miles. My brother, Mike, from America, who is holding the t-shirt, hadn’t told me that all his friends and work colleagues are semi professionals, so it was a case of the hare and the tortoise. I will leave it to you to guess who the tortoise was! “All in all, it was a great experience. The following week was my 70th birthday, and family and friends were again very generous in giving donations to CRY. I know Liana would be delighted that we are, hopefully, helping to prevent other families from facing such a tragedy, and I am delighted to say that, due to everyone’s generosity, I am able to forward a cheque to CRY for just over £1,400.”

In Memory of

Alex Hubbard

Claire Wadey raised a total of £746.88 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 46 2017.

Rona Hopkins sent in £2,215.10 raised by Ollie, Julian and Tom in respect of a BBQ, drinks and registration fees for The Memorial Tournament.

Sam Barnes raised a total of £1,225 when taking part in the Brighton Marathon 2017.

Team “Bearly There Yet”; Emily Mann, Libbie Trusselle, Oliver Hopkins, Louise Harvey, Ben Hunt, Amelia Deacon, Ellie Casey, Caroline Forster, Nicole Glover, Janet Mann, Amanda Casey, Sarah Deacon, Alice Ward, Sarah Burns, Nicky Peck, Jessica May, Caroline May and Matthew Thomas-Davies, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £1,687.

In Memory of

Daniel Hughes

• Kim Hughes took part in a Born Survivor event and raised £285. • David Hughes sent in a total of £2,134.40:

“It’s been a busy summer of fundraising for Dan’s memorial fund which started in May with 20 of Dan’s friends and family taking on a 10k Born Survivor assault course at Capesthorne Hall in Cheshire. There were 30 obstacles to climb over and under, mud to wade through, tyres and barbed wire to crawl under and 2 water jumps to negotiate. We started the day in bright orange t-shirts but finished soaked and covered in mud. Altogether the team

www.c-r-y.org.uk

raised over £1,200 and had a really good time doing it. “On 3rd June we held the second Dan Hughes 7-a-side Football Tournament at Audley Football Club. There were 8 new teams competing this year as we increased the number from 8 to 16. One of the new teams was a ladies team captained by Dan’s sister, Kim. They didn’t win a game but their efforts were well appreciated by everyone who attended on the day. Organising over 112 footballers proved to be a challenge, but the event went without a hitch on a lovely June afternoon. The eventual winners after a marathon penalty shootout were Audley F.C. under 21’s. The day raised £1,784 for Dan’s fund. “A week later, 5 of us walked the 13 miles of the Potter’s Half Marathon course with collection buckets and took £175 in collections on the way around the course. “Not to be outdone by the lads, Dan’s mum Sue, sister Kim, and 11 other women decided to take on a 5k colour run at Aintree racecourse in Liverpool. This entailed clambering over inflatable obstacles whilst having coloured powder paint thrown and sprayed at them as they went. They all completed the course, had great fun in the process and raised £764. “On August 13th we staged what is quickly becoming our biggest day of fundraising, the Dan Hughes 8-a-side Cricket Tournament. The day started at 9am and ran through until around 10pm. As well as the cricket, there was a dedicated children’s play area with bouncy castles, slides and lots of other things to keep the kids amused. We had a special 10 overs per side game between a team of ex Stoke City footballers and local veterans, which proved to be a real success. “Local businesses got more involved this year and we were also happy to have the local scout group on hand to help with car parking etc. The local radio station, HitMix, broadcast live from the event and the day ended with people dancing the night away to their music. Raffles, spot auctions, face painting, stalls and plenty of food plus excellent weather made the day a real success. The cricket proved to be entertaining and competitive, with Hosts Wood Lane winning a close fought final. The event really brings the community together as there is something for everyone and the generosity of the local

75


Our Fundraisers people meant that we raised £5,800 from the event. “A week later and another change of sport; we held a 12hour darts marathon at a local pub, the Boughey Arms. It was another success as the event raised over £1,200 and we were able to spread the word and raise awareness to a whole new group of people. “On 28th October, one of Daniel’s close friends, Nathan Stubbs, organised an event he named CRYing with Laughter at the Mitchell Arts centre in Stoke on Trent. 4 comedians entertained around 230 people during the evening which raised £2,800. “During the summer, we spent several weekends collecting and raising awareness in supermarkets and at various events around the area. We have received donations from other sources as well. We are also very grateful for the continued support and interest shown by Unite Union in the East Midlands and we are working together to increase awareness and raise funds for further screening days in that region. Altogether during the summer, over £25,000 was raised and over 500 young people have been screened via the Dan Hughes memorial fund. Thank you to everyone who has contributed and supported us.”

In Memory of

Matthew Hughes

In Memory of

Charlie Ibrahimi

Cathy Ibrahimi sent in £4,860 in respect of a screening event.

In Memory of

Camilla Irvine

Ginny Dick sent in £500.

In Memory of

Nadeesha Jayawardena

Giuseppe Giambalvo took part in the Birmingham Half Marathon and raised £190.

In Memory of

Philip Jefferies

Cathy Jefferies sent in £100.

In Memory of

Reece Jeffrey

Derbyshire County Welfare Officer sent in £250.

Mr K Simpson sent in £5,000 on behalf of the Chaddesden Jubilee Club.

Frances Hughes sent in £100.

In Memory of

Reece Jeffrey and James Nicholas

Michael Hayes sent in £150 raised from guessing the time of birth of his child.

In Memory of

John Ibbotson

Sue Ibbotson sent in £1,400 raised from the annual Fish and Hits Night.

Russell Clarke raised £750 when taking part in the London Marathon 2017 and Prudential RideLondonSurrey 100 2017.

76

In Memory of

Janine Jeffries

Nigel Jeffries held a musical soiree and raised £367.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Nina Jelen

Annie Dixon took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £3,221.20.

In Memory of

Paul Jevon

Jamie Caswell sent in £1,020 raised at a golf day from an auction, raffle and disco.

In Memory of

Stevie Jivani

In Memory of

John Jenkins

• Naeem Iqbal sent in £200.

Kim Pearson took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £195.

• Patsy, Elaine, Lorraine and Paul sent in £200. •

Margaret Bailey from Uncle Tommy Fishcakes sent in £200.

Cristina De Piano took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,332.20.

In Memory of

Nathan Jennings

• Tina Smith organised a memorial cup

competition at Mid Kent Golf Club and raised £1,066. •

In Memory of

James and Leon Johnsen

David and Jenny Jennings organised a memorial golf day and raised £1,540.

Margaret Wilson took part in the CRY Heart of Durham Walk 2017 and raised £552.

In Memory of In Memory of

Sean Jepson and Matthew Hesmondhalgh

James Johnson

Neil Salt raised donations totalling £17,595 via BTMyDonate.

Mrs D Jepson sent in £159.65 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes for her husband.

In Memory of

Vicky Johnson

Donna Johnson sent in £135.

In Memory of

Lucy Adena Jessop

Tracey Jessop-Thompson sent in donations totalling £233.40 raised as follows: £170 from a hamper raffle at The Packhorse pub and restaurant in Northborough, and £63.40 from a collection by June, Pete and Di Jessop.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

In Memory of

Ethan Jones

Keith Weston sent in donations totalling £791.60 raised from talks at various organisations.

77


Our Fundraisers •

Keith Weston sent in donations totalling £160 raised through giving talks at Wallington T.G., Box Hill Dames, Bexley Heath T.G. and the Thursday Club.

Dominic Toms took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £3,687.20.

In Memory of

Judith Krish

• Jonathan Krish sent in £250 in lieu of Christmas cards. • Team “Krishes”; Jonathan Krish and Gillian Krish, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £1,455.

In Memory of

Natasha Kay

“Team Tash”; Emma Tilley, Paige Westhorpe, Christine Atkins, Perlita Harris, Alexis Kay, Leah Fisher, Leah Mooney, Hannah Millard, Lara Nugent, Sian Nugent, Faye Nugent, Teresa DiMartino, Amy DiMartino, Vince DiMartino, Kai Moonesawmy, Jordan Critchley, Isabella Cecci and Grace Hegley, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £1,600.

In Memory of

Rishi Kukar

• Parvin Kukar sent in £200 to commemorate Rishi’s 20th birthday. • Parvin Kukar sent in £250 in memory of his son.

In Memory of

Eleanor Keeler

Annette and Christopher Keeler took part in the CRY Heart of Durham Walk 2017 and raised £100.

In Memory of

Jannik Lam

• Mick Harvey raised a total of £537.30 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 46.

In Memory of

Jeanette Kelly

Jon Ephgrave sent in £135 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes in memory of his partner.

• Mun Seng and Birte sent in a total of £4,813.25. •

“Team Jannick”; Marie Batey, Michael Batey, Colette Wilkinson, Jude Bayly, Bethany Jo Harvey, Lewis Michael Harvey, Birte Harlev-Lam, Mun Seng Lam, Casper Lam, Katie Harvey-Lam, Nora Lucey, Ellie Nutkins, Sarah Ashton-May, Kathryn Branson, Susan Higginbotham, Apollon Leontas, Charlie Allen, George Assinder, Grace McLarglin and Anthony Strait, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £1,240.

Burston Garden Centre sent in £148 raised from collection boxes.

Burston Garden Centre sent in £276 raised through their Halloween themed event for children.

Alice and James took part in the Paris Marathon and raised £530.

In Memory of

Jenny Kerwood

• Rebecca Day took part in the Isle of Wight Challenge and raised £1,108. • Ross Kerwood took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £5,336.28. •

Claire James raised a total of £265 when taking part in the Vitality London 10,000 2017.

In Memory of

James King

Iain Brown raised £1,585 from the Stirling Marathon.

78

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

In Memory of

Adam and Jenny Lambert

Tom Elton Layton

Jane Lambert, Freddie Bagley, Amelia Evangelista, Louise Gear and Luke Knight took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £414.

Jenny Layton sent in £440 in lieu of gifts to celebrate her 70th birthday, in memory of her son.

In Memory of

In Memory of

Philip Lamin

Dartford Grammar School held various fundraising activities at Dartford Grammar School, including a cake sale, basketball shootout and individual charity projects and raised £2,365.76.

In Memory of

Robert Lancaster

Margaret Lancaster sent in £280 donated on behalf of a shooting syndicate.

In Memory of

Michael Land

Miriam Lee

Emily Capay raised £1,459 when taking part in the Brighton Marathon 2017.

Brooke Weston Academy sent in £205.62.

“Team Miriam” and Team “MC Mizza”; Amy Cieciura, Emily Cieciura, Nicole Lee, Kate Martin, Erin Wootton, Katie Searle, Emma Scofield and Annie Tyagi took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £3,114.

In Memory of

Huw Lewis

Jean Steward sent in £258 received from funeral donations in memory of her partner, Brian Robert Wiggins.

Kevin Johnson sent in £460.23.

In Memory of

Joseph Leyland

In Memory of

George Langston

Ashley Purcell sent in £386 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes.

In Memory of

Carli Lansley

Karl Lansley sent in £428.95 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes, in memory of his wife.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

• Ian and Maria Leyland sent in donations totalling £1,566.44, including: a donation from Mr and Mrs Lomas at The Star, Cotton; £330 from a sponsored walk by Luke Neal; £51 from the sale of wristbands; £405 from a Cheadle Staff Morrisons bag pack event; £300 from a Body Shop party; and £360 from Party in the Park:

“What a fantastic day yesterday was! Thank you to everyone who came to either buy or chat to us at our stalls at Party in the Park! We had a brilliant day raising awareness of CRY and through our bric-a-brac and cake stalls we raised £360! Thank you to everyone for your continued support!” Charlotte Leyland.

79


Our Fundraisers •

Sarah Bromley took part in the Stafford Half Marathon and raised a further £287.

Kevin Lomas organised a quiz night at the Star Pub and raised £135.

Laura Burton raised £475 when taking part in the Great North Run 2017.

In Memory of

St Thomas Catholic Primary School organised a coffee morning and raised £485.73.

Vickie Harris took part in trekking three volcanoes in Sicily and raised £590.

In Memory of

Kevin Andrew Lloyd and Paul Davis

Trevor Green sent in £1,232 raised through the ‘Ugly Ducklings’ and ‘Jamie’s Total Warriors’ who completed a coast to coast cycle ride and the Total Warriors course.

Edward Lovegrove

In Memory of

Martyn Luckett

Charlotte Henderson took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,524.50.

Tamsin Winter took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,243.19.

Marie Lloyd sent in £615 raised by Barry Smith at the Midland Accordian Festival.

In Memory of

Jamie Loncaster

In Memory of

Alan Lumley

• Graham and Jenny Loncaster sent in

donations totalling £1,600 raised from a PDR Construction golf day.

• Barnard Castle School sent

in £210 raised through the Old Barnardians autumn gathering.

• Graham and Jenny sent in £117.50 raised

through Jane Wride and colleagues at Hull Royal Infirmary Medical Outpatients Department holding a cake sale.

• Nicky Harris completed a skydive and raised £2,418.

Dan Toffolo took part in the Hull Marathon and raised £130.

Andrew Chow took part in the Great Manchester Run and raised a further £570.75.

Ava, Lily, Izzy and Ella took part in the Lifestyle Project and raised £281.35.

Helen Whatmough and the Team at DLA Piper took part in the Great Manchester Run and raised £860.

Sean Lewis took part in the Total Warrior Leeds and raised £784.

Team DLA Piper sent in £375 raised from the Great Manchester Run entry fees.

Peter Loncaster sent in £100 to commemorate his grandson’s 16th Birthday.

Ross Oldroyd took part in the Great Manchester Run and raised £280.

Christine, Howard, Tom and Jess Dawson donated in £100 in lieu of sending Christmas cards.

Graham Loncaster sent in screening donations totalling £310.

Graham Loncaster sent in donations totalling £190 collected at a recent screening.

In Memory of

Aaron Lundy

Monica Kelly sent in £250.

80

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Craig Lunt

Catriona Farrant took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,717.04.

In Memory of

Sean Luty

Victoria Settle held a collection at Tesco Express and raised £171.42.

In Memory of

Andrew Macleod

• Mrs M Macsween sent in £250 on behalf of Nicholson Institute Parent Council. • Megan Macsween at The Nicholson Institute donated £360. •

Kenneth Mackenzie, proprietor of the Cala Hotel Group, sent in £1,694.42.

a horrific phone call from our best friend, Claire. She broke the shocking news that her best friend and sister, Cheryl, had suddenly died without any warning or illness... she just didn’t wake up from a night’s sleep. Cheryl left a massive hole in her family’s lives, leaving a loving sister, father and her beloved four-year-old daughter. Cheryl was a kind, caring, funny woman and an amazing sister, mother, daughter and friend. Greatly missed! The loss of Cheryl can never be repaired but her family and friends would like to raise awareness of Cardiac Risk in the Young. It has been a tremendous support to the family. “By completing the Edinburgh Marathon, which is an epic challenge in itself, Amanda and I hope we can show our support and would love as many donations as possible for this amazing charity in memory of such an amazing person. Amanda and I completed the Edinburgh Marathon and raised £1,452 (with gift aid) and we are immensely proud. Thank you to all our friends and family for the love and support.”

In Memory of

Jack Maddams

Ken Thomas sent in £1,000 on behalf of the Tonbridge Lions Club to the Football Fightback fund.

In Memory of

Laura Main

Jamie Dryburgh took part in the Edinburgh Marathon and raised £809.

In Memory of

Cheryl Males

In Memory of

Nathan Malyon

Ray Osborne took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £650.

Sarah Ward took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £720.48.

Emma and Amanda took part in the Edinburgh Marathon and raised £1,165: “A year ago on 14th January 2016, Amanda and I received

www.c-r-y.org.uk

81


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

In Memory of

Balinder Mann

Dean Mason

• Jarinder and Narinder Mann completed a Just Walk event and raised a further £311.68.

• Hannah Williams took part in the Swansea Half Marathon and raised £380. • The Poddlies sent in £100 raised from Morris Wrightman’s 60th Birthday celebrations.

• Jas Mann took part in a Tough Mudder and

raised £715. •

“Team Binny”; Hardip Mann, Paige Mann, Jarinder Mann, Narinder Mann, Jaskiern Mann, Tanisha Mann, Pavendeep Mann, Hambindal Mann, Karmjit Mann, Calvin Mann, Lavina Mann, Balbinder Chutti, Hardeep Chutti, Ashil Ramhulawon, Ruth Thompson, Peter Thompson and Chloe Thompson, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £720.

In Memory of

Ollie Marsden

Daniel Marsden took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,645.14.

In Memory of

Lewis Marsh

• Justin Bayliss took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,010. • Karen Wright took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,900.

In Memory of

John Marshall

• Hayley Crosbie sent in £234. • Maureen Marshall sent in £250 raised from collection boxes at Edge Hill University. •

82

Maureen Marshall sent in donations totalling £242.96 raised as follows: £44.60 from carrier bags at Edge Hill University; £51.72 from Slimming World; and £146.64 from Sue Murrin-Bailey. Sue Murrin-Bailey took part in the Great Manchester Run and raised £272.50.

Camrose Vintage Working Day Committee sent in £725 raised at the Camrose Vintage Working Day.

Gwenfair Mason sent in £2,196.75 raised by Llanboidy Market Hall Committee by hosting a ladies evening.

Camrose Vintage Working Day Committee sent in £750.

Celtic Classic Car Rallies sent in £2,815.

Joyce Green took part in a half marathon and raised £500.

Huwel Mason donated £8,370.60 in lieu of 60th Birthday presents.

Landsker Riding and Trec Club sent in donations totalling £983.32.

Narbeth and Whitland Round Table donated £600.

Stepaside School sent in £150 in respect of their school ball.

Mr Doy sent in £250.

Gwenfair Mason sent in £162.30 raised from a bucket collection at Narbeth Carnival.

Naw-I-Ni Fundraising Group sent in £500 raised through a Bingo Night.

Celtic Classic Car Rally in Ireland sent in £3,500.

Wisemans Bridge Inn organised a quiz night and raised £306.20.

The Irish-Welsh Tractor Run sent in £4,626.97.

Gwenfair and Alun Mason sent in donations totalling £1,015.53 raised as follows: £392.24 from an August screening event; £170 from a wedding tradition ‘Rope Across Road’; a £70 donation from Jan and Myrna; and £223 from a January screening event.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Richard Mason

Gareth and Sarah Mason sent in £655 representing donations received in lieu of gifts to celebrate Gareth’s 40th Birthday.

Reece Hill took part in the Peterborough Great Eastern Run and Tough Mudder London and raised £260.

Team “#LaughADay”; Hayley McCann, Paige McCann, Owen McCann, Simon Mullin, Laura Cox and Gary Cox, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £290.

In Memory of

Claire Mayger

Alison Mayger raised a total of £1,235 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 46 2017.

In Memory of

Caitlin McCart

Courtney Forrester held a charity evening with family and friends and raised £3,361.

In Memory of

Pete McAvoy

Harris Academy sent in £416.10.

In Memory of

Michael McCullough

Stephen Kelly took part in the Belfast Half Marathon and raised £1,330:

In Memory of

John McCall

• Ruth Agnew sent in £320 raised from the Newry Outdoor Bowling Club President’s Day. • Janette and Malcolm Pollard sent in £450 raised from a sweepstake on the length of speeches at their son’s wedding.

In Memory of

Aine McCann

Aravon McCann sent in donations totalling £1,000, including: £76.13 from Maguiresbridge Running Club; £121.56 from Frazer’s Shop collection pots; K9 Kennels donating tips; and a donation of £72.31 from Aravon.

In Memory of

Paul McCann

Alastair Cowin sent in £150 from the ASLEF Peterborough Branch raised through the Paul McCann Memorial Cup.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

“On Sunday 17th September, I took part in my biggest running challenge to date, in memory of Michael McCullough. “After 16 weeks of tough training, race day weather was perfect on this mostly flat course. I thoroughly enjoyed it and even more so once I had crossed the finishing line! I would highly recommend anyone to take on a big running challenge, or any another challenge like this, for that matter, and raise money for this amazing charity. A massive sense of achievement alongside raising a substantial amount of money felt fantastic. “The encouragement from well-wishers along the route also helped massively and it was a great relief to see my wife and family at the finish line. “A brilliant day for my family and I.”

83


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

In Memory of

James McGowan

Richard Merriman

Susanna Riviere and Christine Goodair took part in the Prudential RideLondonSurrey 46 2017 and raised £1,576.

• Nicola Merriman sent in £250 raised by Mandy Taylor and Martin Brower from organising a football card and raffle on their social club trips. •

“Team Richard”; Michaela Stratford, Chris Ottaway, Nicola Merriman, Paul Merriman, Marion Turney, Kenneth Turney, Susan Mulvey, Nicola Sanders and Julian Mustoe, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £335.

Paul and Nicola Merriman organised a quiz night and raised £1,100:

In Memory of

Sean McGuinness

Jason Regan took part in a 10k run and raised £150.

In Memory of

Steven McKay

Adam Ibbotson took part in the Great North Run 2017 and raised £390.

In Memory of

Steph McLean

Team “Lenstore”; Alex Matthews, Louise Matthews, Fraser Matthews, Christina Kruger, Christoper Schmid, David Williams, Jason Thompson, Jon Davies, Peter Mehtar, Tom Garnell and Vivian Truong, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £780.

“Our quiz night went very well and we raised £1,100 for CRY. Everyone brought their own food and drinks and it was great! Some tables were like bars and some were like banquets! “We had a raffle with fab prizes. Our quiz master, Ian, who volunteered with his wife, Jeanett, and daughter, Georgie, did us proud and made our night in memory of our son special. “Thank you to all our family and friends for supporting us. It was a brilliant night!” Nicola Merriman.

In Memory of

Liam Meadows

• Dalla Jason took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £787.40. • “Team Liam”; Sarah Meadows, Becky Marklew, Lauren Marklew, Nicola Bennett, Kirsty Ellis, Gavin Ellis, Louie Meadows, Ted Ellis, Felix Kwateng, Luke Tyler and Ben Taylor, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £602.50.

In Memory of

Josh Merrick

Miller Newsagents sent in £103 from collection boxes.

84

In Memory of

Joseph Merritt

• Tim Tennant sent in £100, in memory of his grandson. • Teams “The Bear Church”, “Walk for Joseph” and “Team Pippa MacDonald”; Dean Fudge, Rebecca Keer, Jonathon McBride, Amanda

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers Merritt, Philippa MacDonald, Lily MacDonald, Max MacDonald, Phoebe Light, Grace MacDonald, Olivia Merritt, Emily Adlington, Gracie Adlington, Kori Hutchinson, David Hutchinson, Soloman Hutchinson, Felix Hutchinson, Rebekah Bell, Elliot Chapman, Clare Hargreaves, Holly Jones and Eva Jones, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £838.36.

In Memory of

James Moorfoot

The Beaverbrooks Charitable Trust sent in £1,000 from the staff at the Doncaster Branch.

In Memory of

James Moorfoot and Josh Fell

In Memory of

Keith Middlemast

• Ash Grayston took part in the Hornsea Third Marathon and raised £266.53.

Alan and Rosie Middlemast raised £270 when taking part in the Great North Run 2017.

• Robert Lewchenko took part in the Hornsea Third Marathon and raised £250. •

In Memory of

Adam Miller

Tom, James, Richard, Rachel, Leley, Tracey and Rob took part in the Hornsea Third Marathon and raised £366.

Jill Miller sent in £100.

“Sadly, in February 2017, our wonderful friend, colleague and teacher lost his life whilst playing football; James was just 28. It was then suggested to enter a staff team into the Hornsea Third Marathon in James’ memory.

In Memory of

“We chose the charity CRY because a few years ago we at Hornsea School also lost a wonderful young man called Josh Fell; Josh was only 15. Josh’s family work tirelessly to raise awareness for CRY and make a massive difference in our community with regular screening programmes. Although James didn’t die from the same condition, it was something close to the hearts of the school.

Shelly Mills

Leoni Brooks completed a climb of Mount Snowdon and raised £858.34.

In Memory of

Carly Misson

Modus Sports Management sent in £3,805 raised from The Rae Shaw Dart Memorial.

“Eight members of staff took part and finished the event with one of our fellow English teachers, Richard Buckle, actually coming in first! So, a great achievement all round, I think you will agree. A total of around £1,700 has been raised and I for one feel very privileged to have been part of it.” Team HSLC.

In Memory of

Rosie Mitchell

• Annie Davis sent in donations totalling £5,056 raised at a silent auction. • Gerald Mohabir took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £3,015. •

Jordan Griffith sent in £150 on behalf of Invigorate Training.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

85


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

George Morgan

Melanie Barlow, Andrew Morgan, Harriet Morgan, Sarah Muller and Megan Price took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £743. Sarah Morgan took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £220.

In Memory of

Jonathan Morgan

In Memory of

David Moss and Jordan Burndred

John and Marie Smith sent in donations totalling £1,005 raised in lieu of gifts to celebrate their golden wedding anniversary.

In Memory of

Stephen Mountford

• Reverend L Morley donated £100.

• Sue Ainsworth sent in £261 from an

annual walk from Goathland to Egton. • Carol Tebboth sent in £350 raised from a plant sale.

• Mr and Mrs Mountford sent in £1,362.30 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes.

In Memory of

Pauline, Matthew and Rosaleen Moyle

In Memory of

Owen Morris

• Robert Bleehen raised £533.50 from the Cardiff-Merthyr-Cardiff Cycle Ride. • Judith and David Hassey sent in £430 from a cake sale held during the Cardiff Half Marathon. •

Kathleen Moyle sent in donations totalling £150 raised from a coffee morning in East Budleigh.

Roger and Mel raised £100 from a bike ride.

In Memory of

Madeleine Mulcahey

In Memory of

Thomas Morris

John Parman sent in £100.

Anne Brown completed the South Wales Three Peaks Trial and raised £110.

In Memory of

In Memory of

Whitney Morris

Tracey Donovan and Cian Glover took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £580.

In Memory of

David Moss

Dawn Moss sent in £335.

86

Paul Mulford

Colin Mulford and Sandra Mulford took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £250.

In Memory of

Andrew Murch

• John Divine sent in £572.74 raised through Perth and Kinross Council.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers •

Alastair Cruikshank sent in £1,000.

Aberfeldy and District Rotary Club sent in £500 in respect of manning the water station at the Highland Perthshire Marathon.

In Memory of

Pardeep Nagra

Jaya Nagra took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £3,135.

In Memory of

James Murgatroyd

• Josef Saxon raised a total of £600 when taking part in the Vitality London 10,000 2017. • Matt Truswell and Dale Platts raised a total of £2,325 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 2017. •

Rose Murgatroyd sent in £7,138 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes and from a ‘JimJam’ music event:

“We had an amazing response to our music event, JimJam, on 9th June, with almost 300 people attending a fantastic evening. The venue was actually where James and his band had previously played. Three bands kindly offered to play, including one of James’ band members who made a solo appearance. We also held a raffle with some great prizes, including a trip to Bruges for three days (James’s favourite place – purely because of the Belgian beer!). It obviously had a great impact on everyone as they are all asking for the event to be repeated next year.

In Memory of

Lizzie Nee

Rob Chapman sent in £679 raised as follows: £135 through taking part in the Great South Run; and £544 in respect of SAACKE Combustion Services Ltd holding a social event.

“Apart from it being a great fundraising event, we were able to spread the word about CRY – leaving leaflets on every table – but I think the most impact came when my eldest son, Paul, and myself took to the stage and explained what CRY meant to us and why we were doing this (very emotional moment).”

In Memory of

Ben Newton

James Salter-Boyden took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,924.

In Memory of

Dominic Newton

Joel Haverson took part in the Cotswold Way Challenge and raised £730.

Trinity Saint David Student’s Union sent in £2,590.40 raised at a charity basketball event:

“The annual Dom Day was held on Saturday 18th November at the LC Swansea with donations from all attending going to CRY. This year there was more than just a tournament at this event – there was also

www.c-r-y.org.uk

87


Our Fundraisers it out until the very end. Congratulations must go the winners and 2x champions of Dom Day, the UWTSD Owls! Another congratulations must go to the ‘Gnarliest Team’ of the day, Team POW! “Both of these teams were awarded trophies for their efforts on the day. We would like to thank Valley Mill for donating the Dom Day champion trophy (which was made out of slate!) and we would also like to thank Dorian Heel bar for donating a trophy for the ‘Gnarliest Team of the day’ and a Swansea FC football. “This event could not have gone better and we managed to raise over £3,000 once more, which now brings our total up to over £8,500 for CRY. Hopefully with this money, we will be able to get a screening held in Swansea to allow students and other young adults in the Swansea area to be screened. “We would like to say a huge thank you to everyone who turned up on the day, including Dom’s amazing family who travelled down from Bristol to be there! Yet again we would like to thank the LC Swansea for everything they have done to help this day run as smooth as possible and for allowing us to use their venue. A big thank you to everyone who helped sell raffle tickets, sold/made cakes, sell merchandise, and help run the event – you know who you are! “Loads of cupcakes and Welsh cakes were also donated by Tino’s in Swansea, so thank you so much for these, they tasted great! Also, a big thank you to Lil London for holding the Dom Day after party there! The food and the venue was amazing! “Once again, a massive thank you to everyone who made the event a big success and also to Cardiac Risk in the Young for all the hard work you do to help young adults!” entertainment going on throughout the day, which included a cake sale, raffle, a live DJ, a CRY stall selling merchandise and Christmas cards, and a basketball shooting game for children. The tournament will be held every year in November in memory of Dominic Newton, who died from an undiagnosed heart condition in October 2016. The tournament is organised by players from the UWTSD Owls Basketball team. “Eight enthusiastic teams took part in the event coming from surrounding areas such as Lampeter and Baglan. It was also nice to have staff from UWTSD taking part in this event and supporting an amazing cause. During the day, around 20 matches were played, lots and lots of cakes were eaten, and over 1,000 raffle tickets were sold. “With close games happening throughout the day, we were then down to the final game where we had the UWTSD Owls vs Carmarthen Kings. Both teams battled

88

In Memory of

Juma Ngqobowana

Team “All for J”; Adesola Ajeigbe, Tolutope Adeoye, Theresa Purkiss and Jibola Akano, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £610.

In Memory of

James Nicholas

• Kevin Nicholas took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,900.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers •

Jill and Chris Forster sent in £420.35 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes, in memory of Jean Forster.

Charlotte Own took part in the CRY Heart of Durham Walk 2017 and raised £1,784.50.

Sally Eaton took part in the CRY Heart of Durham Walk 2017 and raised £265.

In Memory of •

Stacey Jenion took part in the Great Manchester Half Marathon and raised £230.

Amy Osborne

Laura Jennings and Hannah Tweedle raised a total of £2,640 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 46.

In Memory of

Butterflies Dance and Performing Arts organised a salsa dance night and raised £261.04.

Kerrie Atkin sent in £715 collected at work.

Annabel Twiddle sent in £150.

Melanie Gooder took part in the Yorkshire Three Peaks Challenge and sent in £5,665:

Andy Ninham

In Memory of

Barry Nivett

Jenny Boag took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £4,307.45.

In Memory of

Peter William Norman

“So... we did it. And, as I’m sure those of you who watched our progress on Facebook will have seen, the weather conditions on that weekend were not exactly kind to us. In this order we had: sunshine, rain, hail, wind, fog and then torrential rain and horizontal winds. But we battled on, and all in all over the weekend 25 peaks were ascended and descended. Jacquie, Nick, Suzy, Lucy and I did 3 each. My husband Phil, Lucy’s hubby Andrew Procter, my cousin Annabel Twiddle, Sophie, Jess and Sophie’s boyfriend John did 1 each and Miranda (and, of course, Gromit) did 4 (she’s such a show off!).

Maureen Fletcher sent in £100 in memory of her son.

In Memory of

Andrew Oliver

• Andy Edmond sent in £110 raised at the Ferryhill Wheelers Andy Oliver Memorial Road Race. • Chris Oliver sent in £1,245 raised from holding a coffee afternoon. •

Zyrofisher Ltd donated £500.

Tracey Bell organised a bottle raffle at work and raised £150.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

“When I had the idea back in April that I wanted to raise some money for Cardiac Risk in the Young in memory of Amy I never dreamt that we would raise such a huge amount of money – £22,000 including Gift Aid – and that my family and friends would be so supportive and generous. It certainly makes those 25 miles, 3 huge mountains (think Everest), 2 visits from the AA to mend Jacquie’s car, objectionable Airbnb hostess, sore calves, blisters, bodies soaked to the skin and not being able to drink wine for 2 nights very, very worth it.

89


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Amy Osborne and Camilla Irvine

Miranda Osborne sent in £10,000 in respect of Jo Ropner organising the Camp Hill Fair.

“All of us are bowled over by the sum of money raised, although it has come to my attention that there were some who perhaps doubted my capability and the fact that I would actually do it. Tut, tut! As my fellow mountaineer Sir Edmund Hillary said: ‘With practice and focus, you can extend yourself far more than you ever believed possible’. And I think that’s what we all did, spurred on by all the messages of support we had and the thought that the money we have raised will make a huge difference to CRY. “Along with the money raised by Sophie’s friends, Laura and Hannah, who did the RideLondon-Surrey bike ride, we have not only raised the profile of this wonderful charity, but – along with other friends who have events in the pipeline – allocated over £25,000 to Amy’s memory.

In Memory of •

Bernadette Murby took part in the Yorkshire Three Peaks Challenge and raised £325.

“If the money that we have all raised can help other families get through the terrible trauma of losing a young member, or can prevent it happening in the first place through heart screening, then we will have achieved something.”

Teams “Tom’s Crew”, “Tommy’s Team” and “Padmores”; Rosalyn Stevenson, Andrew Stevenson, Paul Padmore, Karen Padmore, Carol Urbanowicz, Lesley Fry, David Fry, Rachel Fry, Hannah Fry and James Henderson, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £371.

Thomas Padmore

In Memory of

Ceri Palmer née Howells

• John Harrison took part in the Waters

Wilmslow Half Marathon and raised £790.11.

90

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers •

Rebecca Waller raised a total of £421.20 when taking part in the Brighton Marathon 2017.

In Memory of

Robert Palmer

• Teams “Robert Palmer”, “Team Palmer” and “The Rob Palmers”; Nadine Watkin, Andrew Watkin, Jack Watkin, John Palmer, Irene Palmer, Frank Tester, Karen Hale, Neil Coult, Alison Elliot, Helen Best, Colin Doherty, Josh Gomersall, Nicola Gomersall, Mark Ireland and Kelly Moles, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £1,260. •

Andrew Watkin sent in £1,600 raised from a gala awards evening:

“CRY is a cause that is very personal to me and my family as my brother-in-law, Robert Palmer, died in his sleep last October at just 30 years of age. He was fit and active, lived life to the full and never had any serious medical issues. The post-mortem was inconclusive, as was the enquiry into his death. They put it down to natural causes associated with his heart. “We raised money on the evening by playing heads or tails. People were asked to stand up and choose whether to be heads or tails. If heads, you put your hands on your head, and if tails, you put your hands on your tails. A coin was then flipped and whoever chose correctly remained standing and got to play again. Those who chose incorrectly sat down and played no further part. We then repeated this exercise until just one person was left standing and declared the winner. Every participant was asked to put a nice crisp bank note (the larger the better) into the envelope on their table, and during dinner these were collected and the money counted. £100 was handed over to the winner, with the balance going directly to the charity. “Everyone was really supportive and interested in CRY.”

In Memory of

Shaun Palmer

Keelie Palmer completed a skydive and raised £485: “I’ve always wanted to do something special for my brother, Shaun, and raise money for his memorial fund and also raise awareness.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

“I recently had my baby boy, Blake, and wish my brother was here to meet him. It was a lovely feeling to be up in the sky, floating down thinking this is the nearest I can be to Shaun. It was quite surreal. I loved doing this skydive and would most definitely do it again.”

In Memory of

Simon Pangborn

• Michael and Judy Downing sent in £115 in lieu of gifts to celebrate their golden wedding anniverary. • Andrej Vaughan raised £1,530 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 2017.

In Memory of

Taylor Panton

• Drumpellier Golf Club have donated £350 raised from the Pro-Am golf event and dinner held at the club. • Karen Deighan took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,269.50.

91


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

In Memory of

Alexander Parker

James Patrick Patterson

• Elaine Phillips sent in £225.

• Peter Patterson sent in £100 representing the proceeds from the winnings of a parish 100 club lottery.

• Andrew Guy raised a total of £1,052.50 when taking part in the Great North Run 2017.

In Memory of

Andrew Parr

Chris and Julie Smith sent in £432.20 raised from a raffle and curry night at The Silk Route in Preston.

• Edward Galgano sent in £500 raised from an evening in London in memory of his cousin’s son.

In Memory of

Jenni and David Paul

Stuart Paul took part in the DIFC London to Brighton Cycle and raised £795.

Kathy Reed sent in £300 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes in memory of her mum, Audrey.

In Memory of

Christopher Parr

• Lynne and Andrea organised a summer ball at Leek Cricket Club and raised £450. • Richard Gill took part in the London

In Memory of

Paul Payne

Marathon 2017 and raised £6,615.13.

In Memory of

Kevin Paterson

“Team Paul”; Michelle Ruben, Nathan Ruben, Mary Perrior, Hayley Richardson, Lisa Noel, Claudette Noel, Emma Tate, Paula Porter, Lisa Monttidy and Helen Esquilant, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £1,067.

• Patricia Toft sent in £560 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes for her father. • Patricia Toft took part in the CRY Heart of

In Memory of

Connor Pearce

Durham Walk 2017 and raised £100. •

Anna Semens took part in a Tough Mudder and raised £120.

Kathryn Cowen raised £5,063 through her JustGiving page.

In Memory of

Andrew Patterson

• Jan Ayirgan took part in the Ironman UK and raised £110.

Rebecca Clark sent in donations totalling £292.55 from Greenwich Free School.

“Team Connor Pearce”; Susan Wyborn, Nicci Wyborn, Andrew Wyborn, Rhys Wyborn, Oliver Wyborn, James Piggott, Sophie Piggott, Cameron Pearce, John Bull, Deborah Campbell, Mark Pearce, Tracey Willats, David Willats, Brenda Campbell, Joanne Butler, Darren Butler, Luke Davis, Amy Davis, Jake Davis, Pennie Forrest, Julia Woodrow, Sue McGaughey, Rosalind Wright, Anthony Pearce, Doreen Pearce, Tina Bell, Joanne Howes-Watson, Jessica Navin, Deborah Navin, Rhiannon Davies, Terry Hancock, Janet Hancock, Pauline Brett and Michael Brett, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £160.

• Charlie Thompson took part in the Amsterdam Marathon 2015 and raised £435.

92

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Adam Pearmine

Karen Pearmine sent in £220 raised at an international yoga day at Tadley Community Centre in Hampshire.

Karen and Charles sent in £280.50 raised at a yoga day.

In Memory of

Dylan Pemberton

Jacqueline Simpson raised a total of £150 when taking part in the Brighton Marathon 2015.

In Memory of

Duncan Phillips

• Jonathan Eales took part in the Leamington Brakes sponsored walk, run or ride and raised £1,511. • Matt Turner took part in the Leamington Brakes sponsored Walk, Run or Ride and raised £335.

In Memory of

James Phillips

Antony Jaycocks raised a total of £1,005 when taking part in Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 46 2017.

In Memory of

Benji Percival

• Darren Tristram raised a total of £560

when taking part in the Brighton Marathon 2017.

In Memory of

Sara Pilkington

• Isobel Giles raised £2,097.47 when

taking part in the Brighton Marathon. • Jenny Cox raised a total of £1,322.42 when

taking part in the Brighton Marathon 2017. •

• Lucy O’Connor completed the Yorkshire Three Peaks Challenge and raised £560.

Ms J Cox sent in £305.

In Memory of

Sandra Pisa

In Memory of

James Pettifer

Bernie Hennah sent in £2,330 raised by The Sacred Heart Language College through organising events.

Margaret Peach took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,560.

Natalie Farrar sent in £185 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes, in memory of her mother.

In Memory of

Gary Pope

“Team Gary”; Alan Fisher and Sue Tabor, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £616.

In Memory of

Christopher and Stephen Phillips

Jane Phillips sent in £3,716.75 raised as follows: £3,500 from fundraising events throughout the year and £216.75 from screening day donations.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

In Memory of

Craig Powell

“Team Pringle”; Helen Fleming, Mark Powell, Luke Powell, Holly Grumley, Marlene Upham, Rodney Upham, Anne Rowe, James Rowe and Winnie Powell, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £750.

93


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

In Memory of

Graham Lysaght raised £500 through collection buckets at the Birkhenhead Gang Show.

Amit Joshi raised £5,604 through his JustGiving page.

James Poynton

Ketan Radia

In Memory of In Memory of

Robert Poysor

Katie Ray

Craig Wake took part in a Total Warrior event and raised £620.

Diane Tolley sent in £1,100 raised as follows: £300 from a bag pack in a Tesco’s store in Kedderminster; £300 from a bag pack at a Morrison’s store in Kidderminster; and £500 raised at a recent screening event.

In Memory of

Claire Reed

Mims Davies MP took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,107.

In Memory of

Alden Price

Angela Price sent in £2,054.27 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes, in memory of her son.

In Memory of

Mark Price

Suzanne Thomas and Nicola Cottrill took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £4,265.92.

In Memory of

Maurice Price

In Memory of

Alexandra Reid

Keith Price sent in £200 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes.

• Jane Lockwood collected a donation of £100 on behalf of her neighbours hosting a hog roast. • Sheffield High School for Girls sent in £445.07.

In Memory of

Stuart Pybus

Joan and Gerry Pybus donated £1,000 in lieu of gifts to celebrate their golden wedding anniversary.

94

Ella Johnson took part in the Plusnet Yorkshire Half Marathon and rasied £1,200.

Aneesah Kabba-Kamara took part in the Paris Marathon and raised £1,761.56.

Anya Lotay and team SUPRA completed the Yorkshire Three Peaks Challenge and raised £160.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Miles Reid

Oliver King took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,603.

Graham Rich

Jackie Edwards sent in £680 received in lieu of floral tributes.

In Memory of

In Memory of

Ben Rendall

Dan Starnes took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,702.

Kate and Team TriathlonForBen took part in the Immortal Spring Triathlon and raised £3,711.79.

In Memory of

Jeni Clegg completed a skydive and raised £495.

In Memory of

Debbie Rendle

• Mousehole Carnival Committee sent in £100. • Leon and Sylvia sent in £524.56 raised as follows: £303 from a coffee morning and £221.56 from Solomon Browne Memorial Hall concert donations. •

Oliver Burt organised a 12-hour ‘footballathon’ and raised £125.

Cornwall College, St Austell, sent in £165.48.

Stephen Ridgley

Sarah-Jane Ridgley sent in £1,227.10 raised through the sale of car air fresheners: “I wanted to do something in memory of my husband, Stephen Ridgley – who sadly passed away on 24th March 2017 due to SADS – and raise money for Cardiac Risk in the Young. Steve was a huge car enthusiast and made hundreds of friends through his passion for cars. It took me months to think of what to do and I knew it had to be car related and then suddenly, at a rather unsociable hour, the idea hit me: car air fresheners! “Working for TC Branding Group, a leading promotional merchandise distributor, I was lucky enough that I already knew the right contacts. I emailed one of our trade only suppliers and I had told them about Steve and sent them the link to read my story on the CRY website. I informed them of what I had in mind and the figure I wanted to raise and they were fantastically supportive and supplied the air fresheners absolutely free of charge, which enabled all of the profit to go to CRY. “One of Steve’s friends, Michael Johnson, kindly designed this air freshener for us. The thumbs up design was already so key to Steve as it followed the design of the car stickers his friends made for the funeral procession (which are still up and down the UK on people’s cars).

In Memory of

Scott Rennie

Stevie Rennie sent in £160 raised from various donations from friends during the year.

In Memory of

Peter Reynolds

Andy, Pete and Adam took part in the Ironman Triathlon and raised £745.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

95


Our Fundraisers “I also wanted to raise awareness at the same time and incorporate the charity, so I contacted CRY and got permission to use their logo and had approval of the design before it went to print.

In Memory of

“I took delivery on a Friday afternoon and within 24 hours raised almost £1,000. I knew they would be popular, but I completely underestimated just how much! These sold out within a few days and were so successful that I have more on order and hope to raise even more money. “So many people from all over the UK purchased these. I spent days posting them up and down the UK and made several trips to the post office, sending these to all of his car friends. It was incredibly overwhelming and I have raised a staggering £1,362.62! “I’d like to say a huge thank you to Maura and the team at MSM Promotions in Ireland for their help in supplying these air fresheners and enabling me to reach well over my target with my fundraiser! Also, a massive thank you to every single person who donated in memory of Steve. CRY is a fantastic charity and I am determined to do as much as I possibly can to raise funds so they can help other families like ours, and most importantly fund screening and research.”

Sian Roger

Keir Roger raised a total of £1,368.16 when taking part in the Vitality London 10,000 2017.

Andrew Siveter raised a total of £1,051.20 when taking part in the Brighton Marathon 2017.

Teams “Team Lee”, “Sian Roger” and “Team Sian”; Lindsey Lee, Wendy Ellis, Harrison Lee, Patrick Griffin, Susan Griffin, Anna Griffin, Marie Browne, Maria Kirkby, Thomas Browne, Katie Collins, James Collins, Katherine Campion, Sebastian Campion, Richard Campion, Edward Campion, Bernie Sharkey, Vincent Sharkey, Joe Sharkey, Laura McDonald, Stuart McDonald, Emily McDonald, Kathy Griffin, Greta Faulkner, Val Gedge, Helen Harris, Martin Harris, Libby Harris, Philippa Hallam, Geoffrey Parker, Joan Braine, John Braine, Nicola Evans, James Griffin, Andrew Kirkby, Elizabeth Muldoon, Carl Muldoon, Karyn Robinson, Shaun Robinson, Hannah Wooldridge, Jean Wyatt, Emily Boynton, Brenda Hayes and Maggie O’Sullivan, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £500.

In Memory of

Luke Rogers

Angela Rogers sent in £161 raised through selling books at her local hospital.

In Memory of

Liam Ross

Anthony White took part in the Liverpool Santa Dash and raised £225.

In Memory of

Evan Robertson

Endre Hanak took part in Europe’s Toughest Mudder and raised £485.

In Memory of

Adam Rowbottom

In Memory of

Sabrina Roddy

Carol Roddy and Terry Roddy took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £250.

96

“Team Adam Rowbottom”; Ulrike Rowbottom, Anthony Rowbottom and Lizzie Rowbottom, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £215.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Danielle Rowe

Claire Berry sent in £420 in lieu of gifts to celebrate her 25th wedding anniversary: “On Saturday 29th July 2017, my sister, Claire, and her husband, Stuart, had a party to celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary. Instead of receiving presents they asked guests to donate towards a memorial fund in the name of their niece, Danielle Rowe, who suddenly lost her life to sudden cardiac death in May 2016 at the age of 24. “During the evening, my sister made a speech about sudden cardiac death and how losing Danielle has affected the whole family. They wanted to raise awareness as well as raising funds, and at the end of the evening donations totalled £420.”

In Memory of

John Severs

John Severs sent in £125.09 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes, in memory of his father.

In Memory of

Demi Sharif

Chloe Lake completed a skydive and raised £707.

In Memory of

Richard Shaw

Team Vic Shaw; Wendy Akers, Vic Shaw and Molly Shaw, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £257.

In Memory of

Paul Salem

In Memory of

Paul Sheridan

Karen Salem sent in £250.

Team “Sheridan’s”; Emma Dallimore, Michael Sheridan, Kate Fender, Rhys Fender, Sara Sheridan and Lesley Sheridan, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £105.

In Memory of

Kevin Sayer

Matthew Sadler took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,193.

In Memory of

Elizabeth Sheriff

In Memory of

Neil Schuyleman

“Team Neil”; Helen Davies, Peter Davies, Anna Georgakakos, Minas Georgakakos, Alexia Georgakakos, Rose Georgakakos, Erin Georgakakos, Catherine Burton, Steve Burton, Harry Burton and Sophie Burton, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £1,790.

Elizabeth sent in £150.20 raised from collection boxes as follows: £14.26 from Alexander Mews; £37.12 from Washington Road Post Office; £83.62 from TC2 Hairstylists; and £15.20 from Missy Moo Balloons.

In Memory of

Evan James Shonfield

• Daniel Jones sent in £150. • Peter Shonfield sent in £455 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes.

In Memory of

Mike Scott

Steve Flintoft took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,858.87.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

Bernadette Summers donated £100.

97


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

In Memory of

Justine Shotton took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £9,425.74.

Lucy Sievert sent in £128 donated by Margaret and George Bignall raised through a craft fayre.

Joshua Shotton

Tom Sievert

In Memory of

Gregg Shoults

In Memory of

Ben Simpson

Dane Davies took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £3,426.20.

In Memory of

Madeline Siddall

Joe Simpson sent in £1,038 raised from an annual golf day.

In Memory of

Paul Sinclair

• Paul Marrison took part in the Ardbeg

Islay Half Marathon and raised £270.

Gillian Sinclair sent in £100, in memory of her husband.

• Robert Breese organised boat rips, cake sales and a pop up cafe at the Chesterfield Canal Trust and raised £500. •

Anne and Team Madeline took part in the Clumber Park Half Marathon and the Clumber Park 10k and raised a further £1,445.51:

In Memory of

Aashi Sinha

Dr Bhate took part in the Brighton Marathon 2017 and raised £1,265.

“The race went well today. It was my 10th for Team Madeline and CRY so far this year. More members of Team Madeline ran today, as you can see in the photos. “There was (in order of the photo of us together): myself, Marie Irving, Anne Siddall (Madeline’s mother), Linda Millership and Kathie Rees.

In Memory of

Aubrey Smith

Rod Smith sent in donations totalling £11,130.46.

In Memory of

Ben Smith

• Eddie Birchenough organised a charity golf day at Styal Golf Club and raised £830. • Rob Buckley took part in the Greater Manchester Marathon and raised £960.

“Today was a practise run for us all as we are training for the Great North Run. I have also signed up to a number of other runs, some of which I’m sure others will join me on.” Tom Brooks.

98

Amy Fisher took part in the Greater Manchester Marathon and raised £380.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

In Memory of

Benjamin Michael Smith

Sam Standerwick

• King Edward VI School sent in £122 collected at their afterprom party, hosted by Henry Southern.

• Adrian and Debra completed a 150mile bike ride and raised £2,173.60. • Adrian and Debra sent in £136.22.

Caroline Smith sent in £222 raised by the pupils at King Edward VI School.

Alan Jones took part in the Chester Half Marathon and raised £215.

Caroline Smith sent in £181 raised at a prize giving evening.

Adrian took part in the ZipWorld Velocity Challenge and raised £3,554.50:

In Memory of

Robert Daniel Smith

• Linda Smith sent in donations totalling £1,363.40 raised as follows: £150 from the Turnbell House Friendly Club; £941.84 from a charity fun day; £176.96 from a collection at the funeral of Ann Harle; and £94.60 from The Olive Stone Support. •

Shannon Thompson and Team Rob’s Army took part in the CRY Heart of Durham Walk 2017 and raised £296.50.

Linda Smith sent in £1,245 raised as follows: £57 from donations; £357 from a coffee morning; £280 from a Doncaster trip; £180 from Maureen Atkinson; £100 from Durham Land Registry; £251 from Michael Adam Robinson funeral donations; and £20 from a card sale.

In Memory of

Harrison Snedden

Mark Snedden took part in the Forth Road Bridge Walk and raised £225.

“Friday was a fantastic success, with all 26 people that took part having a successful ‘landing’. It will just be a case of getting the sponsor money in now and from what people taking part were saying, I think there is a very good chance that we will smash the ten grand mark by the end of May or first week of June. Also, the three people taking part in the Chester Half Marathon on Sunday all crossed the line despite injury. The two events did a great job of spreading awareness.”

In Memory of

Philip Standing

James Cooper took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,985.20.

In Memory of

Rupert Spurling

Sue Spurling sent in £1,365 raised from a food, fizz and fundraising evening.

Simon Balmford raised a total of £1,810 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 2017.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

In Memory of

Callum Staple

Angie Staple took part in the CRY Heart of Durham Walk 2017 and raised £195.

99


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Gary Stewart

Sykes, Owen Sykes, Dylan Sykes and Holly Sykes, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £540.

• Scott Cruickshank took part in the Aberdeen Kiltwalk and raised £329. • Scott and Karen Cruickshank took part in the China Open Trek 2017 and raised £5,804.

In Memory of

Alaina Taylor

Sonya Taylor donated £100.

In Memory of

Natalie Stewart

“Team Natalie”; Cliff Stewart and Gwen Stewart, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £350.

In Memory of

David Stiller

In Memory of

Claire Taylor

Team “Claire’s Clan”; Bill Taylor, Rosie Taylor, Katie Taylor, Rachel Taylor, Becky Rossall, Paul Betts, Jessica Dyson and Aled Wadkin, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £1,700.

“Team Stiller”; Mary Stiller, Jamie Stiller, Emily Stiller, Linda Stiller, Bryan Stiller, Kester Westcott, Emily Westcott, John Westcott, Chris Westcott, Karen Sheppard, Stuart Sheppard and Chris Carter, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £566.

In Memory of

Hannah Taylor

• Charles and Maureen Bull sent in £580 raised as follows: £500 raised at the Harwich Sea Festival; £55 from a car boot sale by Karen and Kai; and a donation of £25.

In Memory of

Nicola Swaysland

Katie Swaysland raised a total of £850 when taking part in the Brighton Marathon 2017.

In Memory of

Patrick Swinson

Jo Joyce took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,431.30.

Maureen and Charles Bull sent in £140 representing first prize at a soup evening.

In Memory of

Dale Tennent-Butler

• Jo Kedgley organised a Christmas shopping event and raised £1,787. • Angela Tennent-Butler sent in donations totalling £500 from JPM and NFCD Ltd.

In Memory of

Paul Sykes

“Team Sykes”; Carly Sykes-Blowers, Deborah Hyder, Susan Dillon, David Dillon, Thomas Sykes, Finlay Hyder, Olivia Blowers, Aakash Dillon-Patel, Anna Dillon-Patel, Isabel Dillon-Patel, Patrici Berry, Peter Sykes, Clare

100

In Memory of

Ryan Terry

Malcolm Terry took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £120.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

Gareth Thomas

“Team Thomas” and “Groovy Gecko”; Sian Regan, Andy Regan, Arianwen Regan, Antony Jones, Catrin Edwards, Anne Thomas, Trefor Thomas, Aled Hopkin, Eleri Hopkin, Wayne Griffiths, Jayne Griffiths, Rhys Griffiths, Jenny Griffiths, Hari Griffiths, Owen Hopkin, Mair Hopkin, Roger Nutt, Angela Nutt and Stephen Nutt, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £155.

Mark McFern organised a golf competition and raised £758.

In Memory of

Scott and Mike Thurlow

Chris and Wendy Thurlow donated £105.

In Memory of

Hollie Tillbrook

Jasmin Tillbrook sent in £100 in commemoration of Hollie’s birthday.

In Memory of

Jack Thomas

• June Thomas sent in £660.31 raised as follows: £314 from screening donations; £140.31 from collection pots at Brynmawr Asda; £90 from collection pots at Blackwood Asda; and £116 from collection pots at Markham Onestop shop. •

June and Grant Thomas sent in £838.92, including: £50 from Blackwood Asda donation pots; £83.11 from Brynmawr Asda collection pots; £550 from a coffee morning held by Alice Mee-Bishop; and £155.80 from Betty’s Boutique, Blackwood.

In Memory of

Jack Thompson

Wilmington Grammar School for Boys sent in £172.10.

In Memory of

Ollie Thompson

In Memory of

Scott Torrens

Joshua Hughes took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £3,855.28.

In Memory of

Ashley Trigg

Team “For Ashley”; Kerry Lawrence, Lisa Taylor, Kerry Hanrahan, Karen Trigg, Megan Trigg, Jessica Cooper, Amelie Cooper, Rachael Bloomfield, Joanne Cochrane, Wendy Hind, Trevor Hind, Charlotte Hind, Daniel Hind, Chloe Gibson, Louise Gibson, Jo Bhadesia, Tia-Dee Bhadesia, Milli Bhadesia, Sophie Mann, Peter Taylor, Graham Ambrose, Michael Waleed-Yousif, Louise Blackwell, James Yousif and Paul Cooper, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £5,100.

Vikki Smith took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £533.

In Memory of

Isabelle Tudisca

• Stewart Page raised a total of £795 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 46 2017.

In Memory of

William Thomson

Anne Lowther sent in £660 raised as follows: £500 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes in memory of her mum and £160 in respect of her mum’s quiz winnings.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

• The Rotary Club of Redbridge sent in £1,500. •

Cherie Nash took part in the Gung Ho 5K Obstacle Course and raised £202.19.

101


Our Fundraisers •

Team “#ForIssy”; Jacqueline Storey and Mia Olley, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £695.

Della and Leo sent in donations totalling £18,000 raised through various events, including: the For Issy Fun Day; the For Issy Chill Out Day; a golf day at La Sala; raffles; profits from the sale of jumpers and t-shirts; and screening donations.

In Memory of

Neil Walden

Teams “Jackson” and “Team Neil”; Julian Arriens, Ed Hickey, William Phizacklea, Greg Phizacklea, Sam Hickey, Ben Herson, Fiona Herson, Zoe Walden, Eve Dustin, Anna Jackson, James Jackson, Dorothy Burrows, Harriet Glover, Baz Inquai, Tony King, Anne-Marie Lombard, Emma Philip, Amme Prendergast Moone, Peter Walden and Ruth Wassermann, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £930.

In Memory of

Hannah Turberville

Anthony Rose took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,457.16.

In Memory of

David James Ward

Paul Davis sent in £560.

In Memory of

Charlie Van Der Craig

In Memory of

Neil Ward

Julie Parker, Rob Williams, Martin Holmes and Louise Glysen raised a total of £620 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 2017.

• Elaine Ward sent in donations totalling £3,191.36 raised as follows: £100 from The Rotary Club of Sheffield Vulcan in respect of a talk given by Elaine; £275 from Mrs M Warriss from donations at the funeral of her late husband, Ronald; £25 from Dronfield Tangent; £35 from a collection box at Sainsbury’s Dronfield; £525.05 from Whiston Women’s Institute, Rotherham; £60 from Derbyshire Federation of WI’s autumn council meeting in Derby; and £2,171.31 from Sainsbury’s carrier bags.

In Memory of

Lee Vine

Ben Lopez took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,944.08.

In Memory of

Chloe Waddell

Elaine and Ian Ward sent in donations totalling £4,707.70 raised as follows: £2,247.70 from Sheffield Keep Fit Association; £1,000 from Phil Basterfield’s contribution to the Amber Valley screening; £1,325 from Carlton Flower Arranging Group; £100 from Jackie Gregory; and £35 from Matlock Methodist ladies group talk.

Nigel Marsden took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,000.

• Chris Tarry took part in a 25-hour relay swim and raised £5,222.15. • Fiona Waddell took part in the Timberley Boneshakers 2017 bike ride and raised £250. •

Christopher Tait took part in Ironman Austria-Karnten and raised £234.63.

Louise Pulman sent in £125 from a dress-down day.

In Memory of In Memory of

Alison Denise Walden

Toni Timis sent in £500 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes from T&D Glazing and Installation Limited.

102

Alex Watley

• Martin Terrill sent in £425 raised at a charity golf day at the Avington Golf Club. • Ben Rhymes took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,925.53.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

In Memory of

George Watson

Neil Wickers

• Mr S Richards organised a charity

• Wendy and Sandra at Ewood Dress

music evening and raised £7,067.96.

Agency sent in £157.20.

• Claire Curley sent in £170 on behalf of Fulcrum Automotive Solutions Limited.

• The Mayor’s Chambers, Darwen, sent in £200 in respect of a talk given by Irene Wickers at a recent council meeting. •

In Memory of

Lily Webster

Stowmarket High School sent in £200 raised from a non-uniform day.

Irene and Bill Wickers organised a tombola at the Darwen market and Ashleigh School Christmas Fayre and raised £450.

In Memory of

Anthony Williams

Harry Williams completed a skydive and sent in £1,950:

In Memory of

Terrance Wellstead

Samantha Graycon sent in £684.68 raised through the Slinfold Village Day.

In Memory of

Christopher Wheatly

Ann and David French sent in £200.

In Memory of

David White

• Harry Steel organised a jelly welly walk and raised £665.03. • Lisa Steel took part in the CRY Heart of Durham Walk 2017 and raised £259.

“On Sunday 20th August 2017, I went to Skydive Swansea to do my 12,000 ft tandem skydive charity jump after 7 months of planning and fundraising. The jump was one of the best, most exhilerating moments of my life and I loved every second, including the 45-second free fall and 180 mph speed! “I chose to jump for CRY as in August 2005, at the age of 33, my amazing dad, Anthony Williams, died in his sleep of sudden cardiac arrest. CRY doesn’t get the same recognition and advertisement as other charities and I believe what they do is vital. So, by raising £1,500 both on and off-line, I hope the money will be a great help. “I can’t thank CRY enough (especially Rosie Peploe) for all the help, support and encouragement they gave throughout the fundraising efforts. Doing the skydive for this essential charity close to mine and my family’s hearts made it even more special. “Thank you to everyone who donated, supported and encouraged me – you know who you all are – and thank you once again to Skydive Swansea and CRY.”

In Memory of

Joanne White

• Jim Whittington took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,563.75. • Kylea Browne took part in a sponsored hair cut and raised £310.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

103


Our Fundraisers Hannah Fletcher, Richard Allinson, Jessica Spokes, Charlotte Brenninkmeijer, Clemens Brenninkmeijer, Jade Pinkerton, Lindsey Roderick, Andrew Wilson, Penny Wilson, George Wilson, Jess Harman, Louise Wilson, Ollie Wilson, Raffey Wilson, Peter Spokes, Freya Spokes, Katharine Coldman, Ben Cartwright, Sophie Scott, Annika Ratcliffe, David Ratcliffe, Camilla Ratcliffe, Eddie Yeatman, Nicola Conway, Alex Conway, Andrea Freeman, Emma Bohills, Tom Bohills, Robert Freeman, Caroline Court, Fergus Wilson, Brittany Reed, George Cockbill, Lorna Boyd, Jo Furney, Tracey Wells, Rory Harker, Max Peile, Uvie Peile, Coco Peile, Sylvia Peile, Robin Peile, Jo Young, John Young, Michael Young, Elizabeth Turner, Jocelyn Harrow, Andrew Harrow, Vicki Brown, Amy Maw, Nick Little, Melissa Ryall, Svetlana Sorokina-Wilson, James Wilson, Aksinya Wilson, Fyodor Wilson, Oscar Wilson, Birgitte Woehlk, Tim Fagg, Elissa O’Brien, Siobhan Stoves, George Gilligan-Court, Susie Baynham, Simon Baynham, Rupert Baynham, Olivia Baynham, Rory Baynham, Phoebe Baynham, Emma Hawkins, Jim Hare, Daisy Shirley-Beaven, Vicky Evans, Anna Chipperfield, Megan Hanson, Val Harris, Kate RussellPavier, Freddie Russell-Pavier, Louisa Saunders, Grace Golesworthy, Lola Golesworthy, Katie Carruthers, Andrew Stoves, Finlay Stoves, Alice Pakenham, Cassandra Hall, Lucy Handley, Sarah Bustin, Archie Wilson, Jamie Dunnett, Maya Latham, Josh Hornyold, Steph Rogers, Luke Rogers, Giles Court, Susanne Wild, Lara Newton, Tim Perkins, Caroline Townsend, William Benton-Diggins, Susie Baynham, Dan Bloomfield, Tom Bullough, Abigail Carruthers, Aaron D’Costa, Sally Keir, Emma Hawkins, Neil Harman and Amanda Harman, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £3,640.

In Memory of

Peter Williams

Sonya Edwards sent in £140 raised in respect of Peter’s birthday.

In Memory of

Suzie Williams

Team “Crazy Daisy”; Rob Williams, Sharon Williams, Daisy Williams and Fin Williams, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £915.

In Memory of

Chris Williamson

Claire Whiteman completed a canoe of the Thames and raised £805.

In Memory of

Sheila Williamson

Mike Williamson sent in £209.35 collected at the funeral of his mother, Sheila, dedicated to the memory of Alexandra Pope.

In Memory of

Joe Willis

Khimara Naidoo sent in £100.

“Team Joe”; Tabitha Crowson, Kate Crowson, Ryan Joseph, Elspeth Mathie and Jack Ferguson, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £1,020.

Alex Veys raised £1,310 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 2017.

John O’Brien raised £1,005 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 2017.

Michael Roderick raised £2,205 when taking part in Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 2017.

Paul Barnes raised £930 when taking part in Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 2017.

Team JKR took part in a Tough Mudder and raised £3,556.18.

In Memory of

Jemima Wilson

• Team “Jemima’s Puddleducks”;

Coral Briggs, Phoebe Horrocks, Katie Platts, Giles Court, Thomas Wilson, Kim Muckle, Natasha Kazmierski, Hannah Carvosso, Charlotte Henley, Anastasia Hicks, David Helps, Rohini Helps, Emma Pettinger, Alice Goss, Alison Yuill, Laura Phelps, Katy Gurney, Nathalie Proctor, Talitha Watson, Ash Vanstone,

104

In Memory of

Kevin Wilson

John Waszek sent in £100.

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


Our Fundraisers In Memory of

In Memory of

Kim Storey, Rebecca Beesley and Laura Stoneman took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £931.

• Elaine and Kevin sent in screening donations totalling £405, including a £200 donation from David Lear.

David Wood

Sam Wright

• Elaine and Kevin sent in donations totalling £190 raised as follows: £120 raised by Emma McCrea, who held a party for eight friends at her home, and £70 donated by friends Sally Timmins, Solveigh Holbrook and Angela Sharma.

In Memory of

Jake Wood

Jason Mitchell raised a total of £400 when taking part in the Brighton Marathon 2017.

In Memory of

Michael Yendell

David and Tracy Yendell took part in the River Leven Walk and raised £710.

In Memory of

Robert Worboys

• Alexander Parsons-Mills raised £1,570

when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100.

In Memory of

Michael Yorston

• Alice Swallow organised the Bedford’s

• Andrew Yorston sent in £155.13 from

Cresent House Run and raised £1,195. •

Nisha Jassal sent in £450 in sponsorship of the SLI team taking part in the Arran Challenge.

Luke Hall took part in the Plusnet Yorkshire Half Marathon and raised £275.

Laura Westwell raised a total of £1,116.70 when taking part in the Brighton Marathon 2017.

In Memory of

Julian Wort

the Mid Atholl Strings and Things music group. • Andrew Yorston raised £545 when taking part in the Highland Perthshire Sportive 2017. •

Clare Yorston organised a charity cycle race and raised £100.

Erin Watson took part in the Stirling Marathon and raised £206.34.

Andrew and Julia Yorston took part in the annual Highland Perthshire Tractor Run and raised £1,159.50.

Pat Wilkinson sent in £103.71 representing donations received in lieu of floral tributes in memory of her husband.

In Memory of

Matthew Wright

Claire Bland organised a fancy dress touch rugby tournament and raised £1,308.07.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

105


General Fundraising •

Dick Ainsley took part in the CRY Heart of Durham Walk 2016 and raised £310.14.

Amber Valley & Erewash Athletics Club sent in £125.70 from the club championship’s fundraising efforts, including a cake sale and raffle.

Claire Bishop sent in £415.

Blue John Gems Ltd sent in £584 raised from a charity fundraising evening.

Michelle Boon took part in the Man vs. Lake Challenge and raised £275.

Valerie Bond took part in the O2 Roof Walk Challenge to celebrate her 70th birthday and raised £100.

Bowdon CE Primary School sent in £184.27 raised from the enterprise challenge project.

Bromley High School sent in £355.

Andy and Dave Brooks sent in £3,665 raised through the London to Paris Cycle.

Jaqueline Brooman sent in £5,384.32 raised by the parents and children at Lingfield College.

Amey Group Services Ltd sent in £500.

Andrew and Kevin celebrated their 40th birthdays and raised £200.

Beth Andrews took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £800.

Chris Andrews took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £4,316.80.

Andy, Rob, Nick, Terry and Natasha produced a CD and raised £310.

Jean Arnold sent in £562 on behalf of friends of Freasley Mission.

Michelle Ashwell raised £167.50 when taking part in the Brighton Marathon 2017.

Tristan Brown took part in the Montane Yukon Arctic Ultra and raised £1,111.53.

CRY Representative Graeme Attridge collected a donation of £14,113 from Clandon Regis Golf Club.

Charlotte Byrne took part in the Race to the Stones Ultra Marathon and raised £598.50.

James Bailey took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,250.

Chris Carlier sent in £1,824.67 raised through Hillside Boarding House at Bradfield College.

Scott Bailey took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £5,954.85.

Carol, Laura, Barry, Victor, Steven, Edyta, Mark and James raised a total of £2,535.64 when taking part in Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 2017.

Rebecca Barnes completed the Three Peaks Challenge and raised £711.16.

Marcos Castro sent in £100 on behalf of The London Metal Exchange.

Barratt Homes (East Midlands Division) donated £250.

Sophia Charalambous sent in £250 in appreciation of a screening received by her son.

Lorraine Cheshire sent in £119 raised from a raffle held at the Independent Lewis Darts League.

Civica NI Ltd held a company BBQ and charity raffle and raised £700.

Russell Clarke raised a total of £750 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 2017.

Killian Connelly sent in donations totalling £2,300 in respect of a screening event held at Marks & Spencer, Lisburn.

Christopher Creissen took part in the London

• •

Gallagher Bassett donated £250.

Karrie Bassett took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £3,637.60.

Dr Sandeep Basavarajaiah took part in the Birmingham Marathon and raised £535.

John Battle took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,213.20.

Bella, Florence and Class C5 at Bickerton Holy Trinity CE Primary School organised an afternoon tea event and raised £428.86.

106

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


General Fundraising and raised £220.

Marathon 2017 and raised £2,077.50. •

Zoe Crown took part in the London Mini Marathon and raised £180.

Express Solicitors sent in £284.68 raised from their October dress-down day.

Istvan Csonka took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £507.50.

Anna Fair sent in £100 on behalf of Chrysalis Research.

Victoria Curtis took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £300.

Ben Fairburn and Richard Wesson took part in the London to Brighton Challenge and raised £455.

Andrew Darroch took part in the Big Heart Bike Ride and raised £3,785.19.

Rob Fallows donated £100 in appreciation of the screening he received.

John Davidson sent in £102 raised from a captain’s day at Redhill Bowling Club.

Sian Davies took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £320.

CRY Representatives Rich and Donna Fell collected a donation of £750 from the Anlaby Park Methodist Church Wives Group raised through various fundraising events.

• •

Delves & Co. Ltd sent in £314.73.

Alex Findlay took part in 14 events for CRY and raised £2,100.

Joanna Denton sent in £520 raised by Di Voci.

James Fowler took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,969.96.

Victoria Dunning sent in £256 raised at Carley Consult Ltd through their dress-down Friday.

Collin Fox raised £1,281.44 raised when taking part in the Brighton Marathon 2017.

Capital Group sent in £300 in honour of Liz Ramm reaching 10 years with Capital Group.

Sue Fox took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £1,136.

The Chrimes Family Charitable Trust sent in £500 raised from a Station 2 Station Cycle.

Mr and Mrs Gaiger donated £100 raised from their charity bike video.

Concise Technologies Ltd sent in £228 raised through their Share and Care initiative.

Niall Gallagher took part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 2017 and raised £1,720.

Ian Gillam took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £390.

Stephen Goodenough sent in £200 on behalf of the Royal Masonic Lodge in Bristol.

• • • •

Clive and Marion Chambers sent in £100.

Samantha Davies completed a skydive and raised £100.

Deep Blue Financial Ltd donated £100.

Sam Downs raised a total of £821 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 2017.

Carly Griffith took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,900.

Francesca Dunn sent in £1,905.07 raised through cake sales, talent shows, sponsored walks and dressup days.

Calum Haggett sent in donations of £720 in lieu of gifts to celebrate his wedding.

• •

Caroline Dyson took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £100.

Robert Hagon sent in £650 raised at a charity concert by the Bricket Wood Community Choir.

• •

Rosie Eaton took part in the Tewkesbury Half Marathon and raised £500.

Marguerite Hannaford took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £150.

• •

Jacob Edwards took part in a 24-hour football match

“Team Hannah”; Hannah Edwards, Annie Edwards, Gemma Lawrence, Katie Moore, Remmie Milner and

www.c-r-y.org.uk

107


General Fundraising Eleanor Yates, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £250.

Libby Jones and Michelle Sidwell raised a total of £755 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondonSurrey 46 2017.

Sam Jones took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £160.

Paul Jones took part in the Wales Velothon and raised £233.58.

Mr Harris donated £250.

Shelley Harris and Richard West took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £3,846.49.

Elliott Heward organised informative lectures for students and raised £116.55. •

Shiela Kelly sent in £600 raised through a charity day.

Alex Hill took part in the EUSC and Windriders Charity fun run and raised £390.

Keswick to Barrow Walk Committee sent in £1,500 raised at the Keswick to Barrow Walk.

Dean Hoad took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,030.99.

The Kiltwalk raised £431.20.

• •

John Hobbs took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £522.50.

Lagan Construction Group sent in a matched fund donation of £250.

Edd Hodson took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £352.67.

Lagan Construction Group Holdings Ltd sent in £250.

Lakeland Limited sent in a donation of £348.56.

Jennifer Holmes sent in £100. •

Sam Holmes sent in £280 raised by the public services students at Newcastle Under Lyme College.

Holy Trinity School PTA sent in £200 raised through a fayre.

Team “Lauren & The Pace-Makers”; Lauren-Emily Pepper, Clare Pepper, Martin Pepper, Dan Louder, Adam Hughes, Josh Van Cuylenburg, Ellie Boyle, Petra Brown and Malcolm Bulley, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £455.

• •

Brenda Howard sent in £100 collected at St Nicholas Church, Hockliffe.

Graeme Law took part in the Maserati Tour de Yorkshire ride and raised £1,168.24.

• •

Tristan Hughes sent in £136.86 raised by Ysgol Hiraddug collected during their harvest thanksgiving service.

Angeline Lee sent in £150 raised by Hockerill Interact Club.

Ben Leeves took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £785.71.

Mark Lennox took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £3,000.

Michael Levi sent in £100.

Liam, Dave, Berni and Jamie took part in the Yorkshire Three Peaks Challenge and raised £405.

Stuart Liddle raised a total of £1,637 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100.

Wilrona Ingall sent in £100.

Iona and Monica took part in the Highland Perthshire Sportive and raised £669.

Inner Wheel of Romsey Test sent in £110.50.

Andrew James-Wyllie organised a charity football match and raised £503.08.

Sam Johnson took part in the EUSC and Windriders charity fun run and raised £100. •

Rodney and Linda Luff donated £1,000.

Amanda Jones sent in £120 raised from the Barlaston village coffee morning.

Mr Lindley took part in the UMACCC’s 24-hour run and raised £452.77.

Mrs Jenny Jones sent in £250 from a member of the Old Crohamians Association.

Simon Lines sent in £326.26 raised by Environment Agency.

108

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


General Fundraising •

Callum Little and Zoe Hallett raised a total of £1,241 when taking part in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 46 2017.

Glen Longbottom took part in the Cotswold Way Challenge and raised £430.

Faye Lovendge sent in £141 raised through fundraising activities at Uxbridge College.

Raquel Murray took part in the Steel-Mortimer Trophy and raised £502.48.

Nathan’s Wastesavers sent in £388.80 raised from the sale of their rag bag.

Chris Nee sent in £120.

Heather Nicol sent in £197 donated on behalf of Mark Dolan, who took part in the BBC Celebrity Money for Nothing series.

Lucinda Nimmo organised a Christmas craft fair and raised £600.40.

Jean Noon sent in £286.18 raised from the Fun Charity Rally held by the British Leyland Camping and Caravan Association.

Norton Financial Services Ltd held a dress-down day and raised £170.90.

Lynne Low sent in £100 in appreciation of her son’s recent screening.

John Lundy sent in £2,700 from Marks & Spencer.

Paul Main climbed the Matterhorn and raised £133.

Jennifer Marshall organised a doggy walk and raised £682.

Lee Marston completed the L’Etape du Tour and raised £270. •

Norah O’Donnell donated £100.

Matthew Walker Sports & Social Club sent in £190 raised through a raffle.

Tadgh O’Donovan took part in the Mongol Rally and raised £119.44.

Megan, Darren and Kate took part in the London to Brighton Cycle and raised £675.

The Old Berkhamstedians alumni held a talent show and raised £814.57.

Lee O’Neill took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £280.

David O’Reilly took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £4,497.

Jack Overell took part in the EUSC and Windriders charity fun run and raised £190.

Alison Parker organised a ladies night and netball tournament and raised £1,150.

Gemma Parry-Williams took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,641.20.

Katya Partos took part in the Bath Half Marathon and raised £491.

David and June Paul sent in £350 raised at the timber off-cut sales at Haldane UK Ltd.

• •

Julia Memery sent in £200 in memory of Carolyn.

James Merry took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £105.

Messrs Hoare Trustees sent in £1,000 from the Linrod Fund.

Kiah Middleton and Training Course 168 completed Ride the Region in their fire kit and raised £173.

Jay Mikko took part in the River Dart 10k Swim and raised £400.

India Milner took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £839.

Rob Moody took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,892.40.

Katherine Moore sent in £745 raised from David Dean’s piano recital. •

Mrs Perkins donated £530.

Brice Morrow sent in £661 raised through a music event at House Collective.

Charles Phillips sent in £250 raised from the Bentworth village fete.

The Mount Batton School raised £892.71 through their NCS programme in Hampshire.

Tom Phipp took part in the London Marathon 2017

www.c-r-y.org.uk

109


General Fundraising

• •

and raised £1,067.50.

Beverley Sneezum took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,900.

Polly and Claire took part in the Maidenhead Half Marathon and raised £340.

Tina Spalding sent in £150 raised from the Heels on Wheels London to Paris Cycle.

Pooja and Simran took part in a Superhero Run and raised £266.

Jane Stilling organised a jelly walk and raised £130.

Sam Porter took part in a Station 2 Station bike ride and raised £3,093.80.

Dennis Tailor took part in the Three Peaks Challenge and raised £1,418.28.

Portland Victoria Bowling Club sent in £135.

Nick Tamblyn donated £500.

Jo Powell took part in the Great Birmingham 10k and raised £150.

Debbie Terras completed a 100k walk and raised £130.

Preston City Council donated £600.

PwC Foundation donated £147.30.

Andrea Thomson Morris sent in £840.06 raised through the National Citizen Service team in Cheshire West.

Quarry Product Association NI sent in £2,765 raised through their golf day.

The Trent Lodge No. 4269 sent in £100.

• •

Queen Mary University of London Students’ Union sent in £2,759.75.

Sara Turkington sent in £1,477 raised in respect of the screening clinic at Dungannon.

• •

Nicola Riches held a mini music festival and BBQ in her garden and raised £160.

Oscar Tuttiett took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £4,549.04.

United Utilities sent in £100.

Royal Wootton Bassett Academy sent in £344.90 raised from a non-uniform day.

David Verdon took part in the Great Manchester Run and raised £165.

Sara and Team “Chafing The Dream” took part in the Edinburgh Marathon and raised £435.

Veteran Horse, Pony & Rider Club sent in £100.

James Vortkamp-Tong took part in the Worthing Half Marathon and raised £171.51.

Amelia Vyvyan sent in £15,000 raised through An Evening with the President, an event including CRY Patrons John Inverdale and Simon Halliday:

• •

SEIB Insurance Brokers sent in £125 on behalf of Joanne Goodrich, who nominated CRY as her chosen charity.

Zenia Selby took part in walking Hadrian’s Wall and raised a further £322.

Rob Sellens sent in donations totalling £297.29.

Michael Shaw completed the Welsh 3000s Challenge and raised £565.

Shield Club sent in £250 in respect of the article which appeared in the booklet, issue number 09/2017.

Simon, Sarah, Jaden, Zach and Tom Haynes took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £898.

Smailes Goldie Chartered Accountants sent in £370 raised through a fundraising event.

110

“Guests at the glittering charity event held to celebrate the career of former rugby international John Spencer, current President of the RFU, raised a magnificent £30,000 for Cardiac Risk in the Young and Wharfedale RUFC. “John started his rugby career with WRUFC in 1964, making his England debut in 1969, before playing another 14 times for them throughout the 1970s. He was also selected to play for the 1971 British and Irish Lions tour to New Zealand, returning as manager of this year’s very successful Lions tour. “The event, which was held in a beautiful marquee in the scenic grounds of WRUFC, brought together a stellar sporting line-up, including: Sir Ian McGeechan, Bill

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


General Fundraising

Beaumont, Ian Robertson, Andy Irvine, Derek Quinnell, David Duckham, Simon Halliday (above) and sports broadcaster John Inverdale (below), who entertained the assembled 400 guests with their rugby anecdotes and stories. “The main sponsors for the event were Skipton Building Society and Pitchero, with the stunning audio and visuals donated by Simply Better Events.”

Michaela Waddup took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,594.90.

Jackie Walker sent in £350.

www.c-r-y.org.uk

Team “Waller Family”; Joanne Waller, Jamie Waller and Daniel Waller, took part in the CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2017 and raised £201.

Anna Ward took part in the Rutland Water Marathon and raised £758.60.

Warrender School donated £100.05.

Gregory Wass took part in the Robin Hood Half Marathon and raised £347.

Laura Wells sent in £1,463 raised by the Team 2 Wave 1 at NCS at the Salford Foundation.

Westhoughton Lodge of Amity No.7782 sent in £200 on behalf of the Worshipful Master, Ken Ogg.

Sofie Wheeldon took part in the Meangate Ultra and raised £100.

Jon Wilcox took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,435.60.

Sarah Wilcox took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £1,998.40.

Ellie Williams took part in the EUSC and Windriders charity fun run and raised £205.45.

Richard Willoughby completed the North West Cycle Challenge and raised £490.

Claire Woolford took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £2,020.

Nicola Wright and William Wright took part in the London Marathon 2017 and raised £5,676.

Team “Yurt Lush” took part in the Mongol Rally and raised £742.10.

111


CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2018

Join CRY on 24th June 2018 for the 12th annual CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk This event offers the opportunity to show support for CRY, remember young people, raise funds and help raise awareness of young sudden cardiac death. In 2017, over 1,400 people took part in the walk, helping us to raise over £86,000. When and where is it? Sunday 24th June 2018. Register from 9.15am at Potters Fields Park. The walk will start from here at 11.00am and end at Hays Galleria, near London Bridge. The route crosses 6 Thames bridges and includes great views of at least 12 of London’s famous landmarks, representing the 12 young sudden cardiac deaths that occur each week in the UK. Some of these landmarks include Somerset House, St Paul’s Cathedral, Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, Southwark Cathedral, the Tower of London, City Hall and HMS Belfast. How long is the walk? 11km (approximately 7 miles). As a guide, the route should take about 2.5-3 hours at an average walking pace. There is also the option of a buggy/wheelchair-friendly route which should take about 1 hour and is roughly 4km (2.5 miles).

www.c-r-y.org.uk

How much does it cost to enter? In advance: Adult = £12 On the day: Adult = £15 Children 16 and under = free, but must be accompanied by an adult. Your entry fee purely goes towards the cost of running the event safely. Who can take part? Anyone with a moderate level of fitness. All ages are welcome. Do I have to be in a team? No. Many people will be taking part on their own. Individual walkers will leave first as a group, so there will be an opportunity to meet others who are walking on their own. If you would like to take part as a team, why not get a group of friends, colleagues or family together. Register now at: www.c-r-y.org.uk/events/events/cry-heartof-london-bridges-walk-2018/ There will be an opportunity to register on the day but it will be more expensive. Please go to the late registration desk between 9.30 am and 10.45am if you wish to register on the day.

113


Fundraising Events 2018 Please contact the fundraising team on 01737 363222 or email events@c-r-y.org.uk if you are interested in any of the following events. For more information and a full list of events visit www.c-r-y.org.uk/category/upcomingcryevents All participants in mass-participation events who contact the CRY fundraising team (whether they have their own place or a CRY charity place) will receive a welcome pack containing sponsor forms, information, helpful tips and either a T-shirt or vest (depending on the type of event).

Spartan Race Series Throughout 2018

The Spartan Race series integrates obstacles with natural terrain to create the best racing experience possible. There are three levels of adult races, as well as a range just for children.

Parachute Jumps Assorted dates

Edinburgh Marathon Festival May 26-27

The Edinburgh Marathon Festival includes a marathon (voted the fastest marathon in the UK by Runner’s World in 2008), a half marathon, a 10k and a 5k.

London 10,000 May 28

Starting and finishing in St. James’s Park, runners will enjoy the sights of the city and pass some of London’s most iconic landmarks, including Nelson’s Column, St Paul’s Cathedral and Big Ben. CRY has places for this event and welcomes runners with their own place.

CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk 2018 June 24

countryside. If you would like to take part in either cycle, CRY has places and also welcomes any own place cyclists.

Cotswold Way Challenge June 30-July 1

The magical Cotswold Way crosses areas of outstanding natural beauty with fantastic panoramic views and picturesque villages. It’s a great setting for a new Ultra Challenge with a 100km route that heads out from the heart of Bath before finishing in Cheltenham.

Jurassic Coast Challenge July 21-22

A new Ultra Challenge for 2018, including a fabulous start by Poole Harbour, the spectacular Jurassic Coast, Chesil Beach and the sandstone cliffs of West Bay (featured on ITV’s ‘Broadchurch’).

AJ Bell London Triathlon August 4-5

Attracting over 11,000 participants and 30,000 spectators each year, this iconic triathlon has become a must-do event and caters for athletes of all levels.

Wye Valley Challenge August 11-12

Devils Dyke, stunning views, sunset and sunrise all lie ahead before the cathedral spire of historic Arundel comes into view with a welcome finish line after 100km.

Thames Path Challenge September 8-9

The Thames Path Challenge features beautiful scenery and a superb backdrop for a festival of river-side challenges with three unique events you can join.

Simplyhealth Great North Run September 9

The Great North Run is the world’s leading half marathon. The 13.1-mile course runs from Newcastle upon Tyne to South Shields and attracts many worldclass athletes.

CRY Heart of Durham Walk October 6

The 5-mile route starts and ends at Durham Amateur Rowing Club and passes along the River Wear and through the beautiful city of Durham. The walk is suitable for all.

Royal Parks Half Marathon October 7

Join CRY for the 12th annual CRY Heart of London Bridges Walk. This event offers the opportunity to show support for CRY, remember young people, raise funds and help raise awareness.

This new Ultra Challenge takes in the breathtaking Wye Valley on the England and Wales border, with areas of outstanding natural beauty for the entire 100km journey.

This stunning central London half marathon takes in the capital’s worldfamous landmarks on closed roads, and four of London’s eight Royal Parks – Hyde Park, The Green Park, St James’s Park and Kensington Gardens.

Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 46 and 100

South Coast Challenge

CRY Great Cake Bake

This challenge takes on some of England’s finest scenery as a walk, jog or run. An Eastbourne start, up the infamous Beachy Head, through the Seven Sisters Country Park and along the South Downs Way. A Brighton midpoint,

This is a fun and simple way to get involved in Raising Awareness Week. Get your family, friends, colleagues and children involved in baking, eating and raising money for CRY. Compete to see who will create this year’s showstopper!

July 29

This cycle was introduced after the success of the race event for the London Olympics. The event comprises a 100mile or a 46-mile cycle route on closed roads through the capital into Surrey’s

114

August 25-26

November 23

Issue 74 | September to December 2017


CRY Update 74 September to December 2017 Our Fundraisers By fundraising for CRY you will be helping to: • subsidise CRY’s national cardiac screening programme • fund CRY’s bereavement support programme to provide counselling and support to affected families • support research into young sudden cardiac death (YSCD) • develop the myheart Network to support young people living with cardiac conditions • provide all CRY literature and information free of charge • develop the CRY Centre for Cardiac Pathology (CRY CCP), and the CRY Centre for Inherited Cardiovascular Conditions and Sports Cardiology

The involvement of our fundraisers has been crucial to helping CRY raise awareness about YSCD. Whether you are carrying out your own activity or taking part in an organised event such as the London Marathon or the Great North Run, remember that CRY will always support your effort with posters, sponsor forms and other resources. If you would like to join our fundraisers, CRY also offers a range of fundraising challenge events, including parachute jumps, white water rafting and a selection of trekking and cycling events.

For further information please call the CRY office on 01737 363222 or visit www.c-r-y.org.uk/donations All your help is greatly appreciated.

Visit www.c-r-y.org.uk/charityfundraising-challenge-events for more information or contact the CRY office for a fundraising ideas pack.

Our Patrons

Our Mailings

The urgency of CRY’s mission and the quality of our work has compelled many high-profile personalities to give their time to become CRY Patrons. For more information visit www.c-r-y.org.uk/about-us/patrons

Sir Ian Botham OBE

Honorary President of CRY “It is not just athletes who are at risk of these heart disorders – it can happen to anyone. The problem has been swept under the carpet for too long and there have been too many excuses. I am a parent and a grandparent and I want to know that my kids and grandkids will be screened as a matter of course. It’s the only way we can prevent these sudden deaths occurring.”

Current Patrons of CRY: Rob Andrew MBE • John Barrowman MBE • Jeremy Bates • Ben Brown • Clive Clarke • Jack Clifford • James Cracknell OBE • Nick Easter • Jonny Evans • Baroness Ilora Finlay • Simon Halliday • Kathryn Harries • Michael Hoey • John Inverdale • Tom James MBE • Pat Jennings OBE KSG • Rob Key • Gary Longwell • Pixie Lott • Emily Maitlis • Graeme McDowell MBE • Lee Mears • Bill Neely • Lawrence Okoye • Phil Packer MBE • Sir Steve Redgrave CBE • Vincent Regan • Joe Root • Andy Scott • Roger Taylor MBE • Professor Gaetano Thiene • Gregor Townsend MBE • Andrew Triggs-Hodge MBE • Andrew Trimble • David Walliams • Alison Waters • Matt Wells • Ray Wilkins MBE • Sir Clive Woodward OBE

www.c-r-y.org.uk

There are many different ways you can donate to CRY. Online and cheque donations are the most popular methods, and we also accept credit/debit card donations over the phone.

1. CRY Update magazine Postal mailing of CRY’s regular (three issues a year) news and events magazine. Includes reports from the CRY CEO and Founder; supporters’ fundraising; articles about screening, myheart, research, pathology, raising awareness initiatives, massparticipation fundraising events; and much more.

2. CRY enewsletter Monthly email newsletter; 3 emails per year with links to the online version of the Update magazine; plus occasional emails about major CRY events and initiatives. If you would like to subscribe to – or unsubscribe from – either of these mailing lists, please let us know: • Complete the online form; www.c-r-y.org.uk/subscribe • Call the CRY office; 01737 363222 • Email the CRY office; cry@c-r-y.org.uk

115


Registered Charity No. 1050845

Our Mission When Cardiac Risk in the Young (CRY) was founded in 1995 it was the first organisation to draw attention to the range of conditions that can cause young sudden cardiac death (YSCD). Every week in the UK at least 12 apparently fit and healthy young people die of undiagnosed heart conditions. These conditions include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and other diseases of the heart muscle, as well as electrical heart disorders which can lead to sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS). CRY aims to reduce the frequency of YSCD through raising awareness amongst the general public and medical community, providing expert cardiac pathology, improving early diagnosis through screening, supporting young people diagnosed and funding research.

1 in 300 young people CRY tests will have a potentially lifethreatening heart condition.

In 80% of cases of young sudden cardiac death there are no prior symptoms of a heart defect.

CRY believes cardiac screening should be available to all young people aged between 14 and 35.

CRY publishes a range of medical information written by leading cardiologists that is easy to understand and made available to the public free of charge.

CRY also works to guide and support families and close friends affected by YSCD. We provide information to explain what the coroner does, bereavement support, help with NHS referrals and advice on the procedures that usually follow a YSCD.

We are very proud that over 80p in every £1 we spend goes into supporting CRY’s key aims.

For detailed information about cardiac conditions and CRY’s range of literature visit www.c-r-y.org.uk/ medical-information

Fundraising 16% Governance 4%

Without the fantastic support we receive this wouldn’t be possible.

Screening 38%

Awareness 17% Support 8% Research 17%

CRY is grateful for grants or donations from trusts and foundations. We would like to thank the following for the generous support they have given us:

n io rs ve it: e vis lin e, / on at k e d .u th Up .org e ive RY r-y rib ce C c- c re the w. bs To of ww su

A & R Woolf Charitable Trust • The Bailey Will Trust • Borrows Charitable Trust • Cecil Rosen Foundation • The Charles Wolfson Charitable Trust • CMS Cameron McKenna Foundation • The Edith Murphy Foundation • G C Gibson Charitable Trust • G M Morrison Charitable Trust • The Hospital Saturday Fund • James Tudor Foundation • The Joyce Kathleen Stirrup Charitable Trust • The Lady Forester Trust • Leathersellers’ Company Charitable Fund • The Oakdale Trust • The Oliver Stanley Charitable Trust • The Rachel & David Barnett Charitable Trust • The Redevco Foundation • The Rest Harrow Trust • Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners Charitable Foundation • The Stanley Grundy Foundation • The Steel Charitable Trust • Thomas Cook Children’s Charity • Tudor Foundation Inc • UKH Foundation • Vernon N Ely Charitable Trust

Tel: 01737 363222 Fax: 01737 363444 Email: cry@c-r-y.org.uk

Visit our websites: www.c-r-y.org.uk www.sads.org.uk

CardiacRiskintheYoung CardiacRiskintheYoung @CRY_UK

Profile for Cardiac Risk in the Young

CRY Update Magazine - Issue 74  

CRY’s update magazine with news and information about the charity and our supporters. Some pages have not been reproduced in this edition du...

CRY Update Magazine - Issue 74  

CRY’s update magazine with news and information about the charity and our supporters. Some pages have not been reproduced in this edition du...

Advertisement