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TRAINING

The Well-Fed Foot

Does your horse’s diet support good hoof health? The old adage “No Hoof, No Horse” can be a painful reality for owners who struggle with chronic hoof health issues in their horse. The four hooves of a 500-kilogram horse are expected to carry large amounts of body weight. When the compression force of work such as galloping is factored in, each of those four feet may be carrying as much as 3,000 pounds of force. Horses with hoof problems such as frequent cracks, fissures, or hoof texture that is shelly and fragile, are often candidates for time off due to lameness and the frequent loss of shoes. The owner of a horse that can’t keep a shoe on knows very well how frustrating poor hoof quality can be.

Achieving Healthy Hooves Through Husbandry

Hoof health will be significantly influenced by the horse husbandry provided. Management factors, such as footing and environment, play a major role in the health of the feet. Horses should have a comfortable, safe place to lie down, and as much as possible, the footing in stabling and pasture areas should be dry and free of mud. Regular cleaning of surfaces prevents accumulations of manure and urine. Research has shown that horses with healthy hooves are able to withstand adverse environmental conditions far better than horses with poor quality hoof horn. Poor footing and wet, dirty conditions can exacerbate hoof problems, stacking the deck against your efforts to achieve healthy hoof growth.

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By Shelagh Niblock, PAS

Your choice of a farrier and the timeliness of his or her visits are also important. Hooves not adequately trimmed or trimmed/ shod with poor angles and insufficient attention to the inherent characteristics of the hoof structures will be subject to more stress from everyday work. It is important to choose the type of trim and shoe necessary to facilitate the individual horse in his specific job. A qualified farrier can assist with your plan for good hoof health.

The Role of Nutrition

Nutrition plays an important role in many aspects of horse health, and its impact on the horse’s overall success and well-being is multifaceted. In mature horses, that impact includes tissue repair and immune function, as well as the horse’s ability to adapt to the physical requirements of his job. Research has shown that nutrition can be significantly involved in endocrine function. Diet is also implicated in the health and function of the fibrefermenting capacity of the hindgut, which is a major contributor to the overall health and energy balance of any horse. Although footing, environment, and a good relationship with a farrier are important, nothing is as essential to hoof health as nutrition. No horse cannot achieve good hoof growth without receiving the nutrients to facilitate it. A well-balanced diet, with sufficient nutrients to support the horse’s metabolic requirements for maintenance, work, and growth if required,


PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK/KARENGESWEINPHOTOGRAPHY

For the average horse at a gallop, the compression force on each hoof upon impact can reach 3,000 pounds per square inch.

will also adequately support good hoof health. Some nutrients are especially important in maintaining healthy hooves, and this is particularly true in horses with poorer quality hooves or horses undergoing stress or disease conditions.

Dietary protein is comprised of building blocks called amino acids. A total of 22 amino acids are potentially present in protein sources, and 10 of them are considered essential for horses. This means the horse must consume them in his diet because he cannot manufacture enough of them in his body to supply his complete protein needs. Two amino acids considered very important for hoof health are the sulfur-containing amino acids methionine and cysteine. Methionine is a limiting amino acid and therefore must be provided in the diet. Both cysteine and methionine are important constituents in the growth of keratin in healthy hooves. Horse hooves are comprised of a protein called keratin, and cysteine and methionine are found in the keratinizing epidermis of the hoof wall. Methionine is more associated with internal laminae structure; in healthy hooves, it is converted to cysteine through a unique metabolic process involving the B vitamin biotin. Newly manufactured cysteine then forms part of the fully keratinized external hoof wall. Diets that are low in protein can lead to cracked, fissured hooves in horses, and research suggests that it is the deficiency

PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK/LINDSAY HELMS

Protein and Amino Acids

Horses should be provided with a dry, safe, and comfortable place to lie down.

of methionine, and consequently cysteine, that can lead to this. As well, any problems associated with the metabolic pathway, which facilitates the conversion of methionine to cysteine, appear to have significantly adverse effects on the growth of a healthy hoof wall. SUMMER 2019

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HEALTH

An Inside Look at

T

he relationship between our horses and their joints can feel scary, conjuring up words like “arthritis” and “lameness.” Our focus on joint function and integrity, including how this plays a role in a healthy hoof mechanism and legs, is designed to create a knowledgeable foundation to support your horse for years to come. Hopefully, by the end of this article you will have a better understanding of joints — most specifically in the legs — how they function, how to help them last longer (preferably for the entire life of your horse), how to recognize when there is an issue, and how to address that issue in the best way. Put your geek hat on — we are diving in! When it comes to horses, we are looking at three main types of joints: • Synovial joints — the most common and most movable, making up the majority of the joints in the lower extremities; • Fibrous joints — immobile joints, such as those between the cranial bones; and • Cartilaginous joints — slightly movable joints occurring, for example, between the vertebrae.

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By Alexa Linton, Equine Sports Therapist

For this article we’ll focus on synovial joints, because they are the most common joint in the lower extremities and the most prone to injury and disease due to how mobile they are. A synovial joint is a bit of a wonder. These joints are formed when two bones come into relationship and are designed, in six different formations — pivot, hinge, condyloid, saddle, plane, and ball-and-socket — to create mobility and absorb compression. In order to perform those functions, a stabilizing joint capsule is developed by the body, made up of a fibrous capsule at each bony end, collateral ligaments (strong and stabilizing fibrous tissue), and at certain joints (specifically the stifle) cruciate ligaments, as well as other stabilizing ligaments and tendons. In the inner layer of the joint, there is a synovial membrane lining the sides of the capsule and responsible for secreting hydrating synovial fluid to lubricate, nourish, and cleanse the joint. The synovial fluid contains highly lubricating hyaluronic acid, a component you have probably heard of as it is often used in joint

PHOTO: ISTOCK/GLOBALP

Exploring Healthy and Resilient Joint Function in our Horses

PHOTO: DREAMSTIME/SVETLANA GOLUBENKO

JOINTS


EQUINE SKELETON

Ilium

Femur

Pelvis

Ischium

Scapula (shoulder blade) supplementation. Disease in the joint appears to commonly be connected to a depletion of hyaluronic acid, leaving the joint more susceptible to breakdown. Flexible hyaline cartilage covers the ends of the bone. It’s important Humerus to note that there is fluid stored within this cartilage, which is distributed over the surface of the cartilage during weight-bearing, and then reabsorbed when weight bearing stops. This information becomes applicable to our horses as we create our joint-happy warm-up routine. Contrary to what many of us have been taught, the best warm-up is one that promotes this distribution of fluid through healthy joint action. This means starting slow and allowing the horse to move at his own pace with a focus on the lubrication of the

Patella Fibula

Ulna

Tibia

Radius

Calcaneus

Carpus (Knee) Bone Metacarpal (Cannon) Bone

Talus Tarsus (Hock) Metatarsal (Cannon) Bone

Long Pastern Bone

Sesamoid Bone

Short Pastern Bone Coffin Bone SUMMER 2019

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CANADIAN HORSE JOURNAL

IMAGE Š CANADIAN HORSE JOURNAL

PHOTO: ISTOCK/GLOBALP

PHOTO: DREAMSTIME/SVETLANA GOLUBENKO

Synovial joints are the most common and most movable, accounting for the majority of the joints in the lower extremities. They are also the most prone to disease and injury.

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The

DREAM of Buying An Acreage Many people dream of leaving the city behind for the slower pace and more natural lifestyle of the countryside. The yearning for country living may be driven by the dream of keeping your horses at home, owning other livestock, developing a large garden, and enjoying a healthier way of life. But this idealized vision of rural life may not reflect reality for you and your family. There are many practical, environmental, and legal considerations to sort through, not to mention the financial costs. So before dropping a down payment on a piece of property, you have some homework to do, and there are some important factors to consider that might save you big headaches later on. 24

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The search for your ideal property starts by identifying your short and long-term goals, deciding what is most important to you, and setting priorities. Allow lots of time to fully research and understand all aspects of this major decision. By exploring and considering all the differences between urban and rural living, you’ll be prepared to make informed decisions. The average acreage has anywhere from one to twenty acres, but more often it is five to ten acres. If you’re considering an undeveloped piece of land, decide what both you and the land are capable of. Does the raw land have a good building site? It will require a lot of improvements, such as clearing trees, drilling a well, and installing a septic system. Does the property lend itself to good pasture or hay land, or is it rocky with poor soil, or wet and marshy in places? Or would you prefer to buy a property already set up so you can be settled in before the snow flies? The next step is to connect with

a realtor experienced in acreages and country homes. Your realtor needs a strong understanding of the real estate in the region where you are hoping to buy, as well as sound knowledge of the zoning and land use requirements, bylaws, and weather patterns in the area.

Zoning and land use “Zoning and water rights are perhaps the two most critical points to investigate when you purchase your acreage,” says Elya Byrne with Geen+Byrne Real Estate Team, Re/Max, Kelowna, BC. “Having an experienced professional to help you navigate these complex diligence items is critical to avoiding a host of potential issues that can come up if not thoroughly investigated.” She recommends that when it comes to zoning and property rights, buyers should have detailed discussions with the appropriate municipality or regional district or, as necessary, provincial and federal

PHOTO FACING PAGE: PHOTO: CANSTOCK/PURPLEQUEUE |

By Margaret Evans

PHOTO ABOVE: CANSTOCK/IRINA88W

A REALITY CHECK…


PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK/BONITA R CHESHIER

PHOTO FACING PAGE: PHOTO: CANSTOCK/PURPLEQUEUE |

PHOTO ABOVE: CANSTOCK/IRINA98W

Ask specific questions about the property and the region. For example, could the field across the road be developed into a residential subdivision, destroying your pastoral view?

Your local municipal office can answer your questions about the zoning and land use requirements for the property you are considering. Be sure to ask whether there are restrictions limiting your intended use of the property, such as the types and number of animals allowed. SUMMER 2019

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Horse Property For Sale Legal and Financial Considerations for First-Time Buyers By Kelly Starrak, Associate, Miller Thomson LLP, Vancouver, BC

T

here is a certain allure to purchasing property. For most people, this means a quaint home, a cute front porch, and a white picket fence. For horse people, this dream is multiplied. We seek limitless green pastures, a barn built for royalty, crisp and clean horse-safe fencing, and more. To turn this dream into a reality, careful planning is required. This article focuses on only a select few of the many legal and financial aspects to consider when making your first purchase of a horse property. This article does not provide legal or other professional advice. Those interested should reach out to their professional advisors as needed throughout their journey.

The Journey

The switch from browsing realtor listings to viewing and offering on properties is significant. There are several elements involved. Generally, the process is as follows:

PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK/BRETT BLIGNAUT

STEP 1 — You ensure you can afford it. Most people’s sources of payment include mortgage (borrowed) funds, savings and, in some cases monetary gifts. These financial aspects are touched on in more detail further in this article, but ultimately should be settled prior to your search for the perfect property. STEP 2 — You decide, within your affordability range, what amount you want to spend. You may be approved for a higher mortgage, or have the savings for a larger down payment, but also want to allocate certain funds to other parts of your life. It is up to you to consciously decide how much you truly want to commit to this property. You know your life goals and risk tolerance best. STEP 3 — You find the property of your dreams, or at least one that is within your means.

STEP 4 — You make an offer on the property that is conditional on: (a) financing, including appraisal by your mortgage lender; (b) physical property inspection; and (c) any other conditions specific to that property, i.e., water testing if on well water and septic inspection if sewage is privately held. If the offer is accepted, or a revised offer is negotiated and agreed upon, you proceed with conducting investigations to satisfy your conditions. STEP 5 — If you are satisfied with your review, meaning that you are comfortable that the property is physically and financially suitable for you, you waive your conditions in writing by the condition deadline set in your offer. In doing so, you render the deal unconditional. If you are not satisfied with your review, you can either walk from the deal or try to negotiate a reduction in the purchase price to accommodate any issues discovered. STEP 6 — Once the deal is unconditional, you finalize any outstanding items with your bank, and you meet with your residential conveyancing lawyer to sign final mortgage and purchase documents. You deposit with your lawyer the cash portion of the purchase price, and you arrange property insurance over the property effective as of closing date set in the offer. STEP 7 — On the closing date, your lawyer will request and receive the mortgage portion of the purchase price from your bank, and will transfer that amount along with the cash portion of the purchase price to the seller’s lawyer. The seller’s lawyer will confirm receipt of the funds and authorize key release to you, and the purchase will complete. Congratulations! SUMMER 2019

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Canadian Horse Journal

Wins BIG

Canadian Horse Journal and its talented writers were recognized for editorial excellence during the American Horse Publications 2019 Equine Media Awards held during the AHP High Desert Media Roundup annual conference held in Albequerque, New Mexico, from May 30 to June 1, 2019. Held annually since 1974, this year’s AHP Awards competition for material published in 2018 attracted 711 entries from 119 members representing the top equine media from across North America.

at 2019 Equine Media Awards

Senior Senator’s Triumph By Margaret Evans

1st Place – Feature Single Article (16 entries) The incredible story of a steeplechaser’s recovery from a broken neck to win the Maryland Hunt Cup for a second time. Judge’s comments: “The article was impressive and explained the complicated surgery and equipment clearly while keeping the focus on the horse. The writer gave the audience enough before and after the surgery to make for a compelling story about a complex procedure.” Published in the Autumn 2018 edition.

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Canada’s Horse Industry Builders By Margaret Evans and Kathy Smith

2nd Place — Equine-related Editorial Series (15 entries) The inspiring stories of 18 extraordinary Canadians who blazed uncharted territory and took our horse industry to new heights. JUDGE’S COMMENTS: “Quite a range of people in this series, from the founder of the Calgary Stampede to the owner of Northern Dancer to a former slave. An impressive series of stories covering 30 pages. Detailed research from their beginnings to how they died (unless still alive!). You will learn something, and you might be inspired to create your own worthy story.” Published in Canada’s Equine Guide 2018 (January/February edition).

550 Kilometres on Horseback on the Trans Canada Trail By Tania Millen

2nd Place — Equine-related Human-Animal Bond Category (15 entries) One woman, one horse, and 550 kms over and through the trestles, tunnels, mountains, and valleys of Southern BC. JUDGE’S COMMENTS: “What a great piece! The first-person narrative was so strong. The balance between history of the trail and trip diary was perfect. I felt like I was right there, but also am inspired to go see it myself. The intro immediately grabbed your intention and the author did a nice job of closing the loop by picking back up with that moment toward the end. The photos also helped paint the picture. Overall, this piece captured the bond between the author and her horse, as well as a trip of a lifetime.” Published in the Spring 2018 edition.

#MeToo in the Horse Industry By Margaret Evans

3rd — Feature Single Article (16 entries)

Our voices joined the worldwide conversation calling for gender equality, respect, and safe places. JUDGE’S COMMENTS: “The situation the article described needed to be brought to light and the author did a super job. The sidebar stories from other victims added a needed dimension to the piece. Nicely done. A good combination of information and emotion.” Published in the Spring 2018 edition.

Canadian Horse Journal’s roster of award-winning content includes: Ghosts of the Coal Mines: Pit Ponies and Horses By Margaret Evans

To Serve and Protect: The Death of Brigadier By Karen Briggs

1st Place — Feature Article 2018

1st Place — Feature Article 2006

The story of the horses and ponies that lived and died in one of the world’s most hostile and dangerous working environments.

Describes the tragic death of a Metro Toronto police horse that sent shockwaves through the city and spurred a call for action.

Published in Canada’s Equine Guide 2017.

Published in May/June 2006.

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PHOTO: BARBARA@BARBARASVISIONS.COM

SPECIAL FEATURE

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T H E MAG I C OF

IAN MILLAR As Captain Canada announces a partial step-down from international competition, his love for the horse and the sport remains stronger than ever, and he looks forward to sharing his knowledge and passion with the next generation. By Margaret Evans

H

Ian Millar would become an icon of the show jumping world with extraordinary talent and numerous awards. He is a ten-time Canadian Olympian, winning his first Olympic medal at age 61 in the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. He has competed in more Olympic Games than any athlete in history. He has won ten medals (including two individual gold and two team gold) in ten Pan American Games, more than any show jumper in history. He became the first show jumper to win back-to-back World Cup finals (1988 in Gothenburg, Sweden and 1989 in Tampa, Florida). He is a twelve-time winner of the Canadian Show Jumping Championship and a three-time winner of the coveted International Grand Prix at Spruce Meadows in Calgary, Alberta. He was made a member of the Order of Canada (1986) and awarded Ontario’s Athlete of the Year (1989) and an honorary doctorate by the University of Guelph (2005). Together with superstar gelding Big Ben, he was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame in 1996. In 2012, he was inducted into the Jump Canada Hall of Fame. In spring 2019, after over 50 years in the grand prix ring, Millar announced that he would be stepping down from team competition and competing in major games. He will continue to focus on coaching riders, developing young horses, and competing nationally and internationally as an individual. Born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in 1947, Millar began riding in Alberta where his fascination for horses was enriched by a deep

PHOTO: ROBIN DUNCAN PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO: BARBARA@BARBARASVISIONS.COM

e stared, glued to the grainy black-and-white television screen. It wasn’t the story of the cowboy heroes and villains that grabbed his attention. It was the horses. The bays, blacks, greys, pintos, and palominos. It was their speed and endurance and talent and extraordinary beauty. Seven-year-old Ian was transfixed. A passion kindled, murmuring in his soul. Maybe he knew somehow that those horses galloping across the screen in the mid-1950s were his destiny.

With Star Power in the CN International at Spruce Meadows in September 2012. 45


A

MORGAN

The stallion Triple S Doldust Correll stands at Raspberry Field Morgans in Rose Prairie, BC. 62

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PHOTO: DIXIE STEWART PHOTOGRAPHY

FOR EVERYONE


The Horse That Chooses You

PHOTO: HOWARD SCHATZBERG, COURTESY OF AMHA

“I had a home-bred Morgan gelding named Duncan,” says Tina Collins, office administrator for the Canadian Morgan Horse Association. “Duncan was the type of horse that had to investigate everything. He not only had a humorous personality, but he was incredibly trustworthy and a superior trail horse. “We attended a type of Poker Ride one summer. The majority of the horses were very large hunter types, rendering my 15.1 hand Morgan by far the smallest. As the day went on, the card placements became more challenging. There was nothing Duncan said no to — through water, over wooden bridges, through thick forest. At one point we came upon a large group of riders looking down into a ravine. At the bottom of an extremely steep hill was the card. Without hesitation, my little Morgan proceeded to the embankment. I gave him the reins and he carefully picked and slid his way to the bottom among the cheers from the riders above. Feeling quite pleased, I looked up and a feeling of dread came over me. Duncan turned his head to me as if to say Okay smarty-pants, now you’ve done it, how are we getting out of here? I grabbed some mane and, with one cluck, my little powerhouse got us safely to the top. For the remainder of the day, every difficult challenge was met with a chorus of The Morgan will do it!” Over the last 230 years, these plucky, versatile little horses have shown they can do it and have done whatever they have been asked, no matter the challenge. And it all began back in a time when settling a debt could be done not only with coins — but with colts! In Randolph, Vermont, Justin Morgan was a singing teacher, composer, farmer, and horse breeder. Born in West Springfield, Massachusetts in 1747, he moved to Vermont in 1788. To settle a debt, Morgan received a striking bay colt foaled in 1789 in Springfield, Massachusetts. He called him Figure. Morgan had no idea at the

PHOTO COURTESY OF BUTTE MORGANS

PHOTO: DIXIE STEWART PHOTOGRAPHY

By Margaret Evans

The Morgan stallion Ben’s Rhapsody, owned by Osage Hills Stable.

2013 foals at Butte Morgan Horses — Buttes Flamenco Dancer (chestnut filly) and Buttes Cielo de Noche (smoky black colt). SUMMER 2019

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Profile for Horse Community Journals Inc.

Canadian Horse Journal - Sample Issue - SUMMER 2019  

The Magic of Ian Millar | A Morgan for Everyone | Buying Your Dream Acreage | Horse Property For Sale - Fine Print for First-Time Buye...

Canadian Horse Journal - Sample Issue - SUMMER 2019  

The Magic of Ian Millar | A Morgan for Everyone | Buying Your Dream Acreage | Horse Property For Sale - Fine Print for First-Time Buye...