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Fall 2008

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Campbell Cuts Ribbon on Dream Come True The Mission Field is All Around Us We’re Ready for Some Football!


Your gift. Your legacy. “We were happy when Nathan and Rachel made their decision to attend Campbell. While Campbell University does not look the same as it did when we attended, the atmosphere and educational excellence have remained the same. We are pleased they each will receive an education along with the support to grow in their Christian faith.” – Angie (Bowen) Herrmann

Campbell University Magazine Fall 2008 Volume 3 • Issue 3 Cover Photo: Back rowSarah Hill, Kelin Bidelspach, Jonathan Rodriguez, Preston Dodson, Jake Fose and Katie Stallings. Front row-Lauren Arthur and Lynisha Ochogu. Photo by Bennett Scarborough.

President Jerry Wallace Vice President for Enrollment Management and Marketing John Roberson Director of University Communications and Publications Haven Hottel Assistant Director of Publications and Contributing Writer Shannon Ryals Graphic Designer Tammy Maddrey Staff Writer Susan Welch

Herrmann Family: Rachel, freshman, majoring in Business. Brett Herrmann (‘81) Business Degree. Nathan, junior, majoring in Business. Angie (Bowen) Herrmann (‘82) Home Economics Degree.

A Campbell University Legacy is the greatest gift. Share your Campbell experience with the next generation. Contact the Office of Admissions at 800-334-4111 ext. 1290. Arrange a campus visit via telephone or online at www.campbell.edu

Founded in 1887, Campbell University is a private, coeducational institution where faith and learning excel. Campbell offers programs in the liberal arts, sciences and professions with undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees. The University is comprised of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law, the LundyFetterman School of Business, the School of Education, the School of Pharmacy and the Divinity School. Campbell University was ranked in the top tier of Best Universities in the South offering master’s degrees by U.S. News and World Report in its America’s Best Colleges 2008 edition and named one of the “100 Best College Buys” in the nation by Institutional Research & Evaluation, Inc.


Campbell Cuts Ribbon page 4

Ready for Some Football page 8

Founder of Platinum Corral page 14

features

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Campbell Cuts Ribbon on Dream Come True The Mission Field is All Around Us We’re Ready for Some Football! Campbell Students Immerse Themselves in Italian Culture Two Legendary Bands Kick Off Campbell Performing Arts Series Social Work Majors Succeed in Their Field Sewell Founder of Platinum Corral Red, White and Orange Politics in Camel Territory Field Research Class Helps Save Frogs Students in Italy

Botanists Put Campbell Under the Microscope

schools

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Feature Briefs

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Faculty Spotlight

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Divinity School Horrell Prepares For Homeless Ministry

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page 11

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College of Arts and Sciences - Stovall And Greene Selected For Elite Research Program

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School of Business - Alumni Harris, Newkirk Honored at Campbell Business School Convocation

School of Education - Social Work Student Finds Her Voice In Study Abroad

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Athletics - Campbell on Top of A-Sun Men’s Soccer Poll for Third-Straight Year

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School of Pharmacy - The Ups and Downs of Independent Pharmacy

Campbell Athletics Earns High Marks in the Latest NCAA Graduation Success Report

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School of Law - Law School’s ‘Campaign for Raleigh’ Receives First $1 Million Gift

‘08 - ‘09 Basketball Schedules

Alumni Class Notes

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Left: Justine Brand, Student Government Association President, Harold Wells, Chairman of the Board of Trustees and Dr. Jerry Wallace, President took part in the ribbon cutting cermony. Photo by Bennett Scarborough. Right: Campbell University’s John W. Pope, Jr. Convocation Center.

Campbell Cuts Ribbon on

Dream Come True By Susan Welch, Staff Writer

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n Friday, Oct. 17, Campbell University officially dedicated a dream that has been years in the making, the John W. Pope, Jr. Convocation Center. Featured in the dedication ceremony were ribbon cuttings representing each of the buildings’ contributors—from major donors and board members to students, faculty and staff. “This was one of the greatest examples of giving and sacrifice that Campbell has ever known,” said university president Dr. Jerry M. Wallace. “I look into your faces and see stories and remember decisions pertaining to this building. I saw the smiles and the positive responses, ‘Count me in.’” The $34 million dollar center measures 106,000 sq. ft. and contains administrative offices, locker rooms and strength conditioning facilities for the men’s and women’s Fighting Camels basketball teams, volleyball team and wrestling team, as well as lab and classroom space for the Exercise Science program, video production areas and the Campbell Sports Hall of Fame. The focal point of the new building is the 15,360 sq. ft. Gilbert Craig Gore Arena which seats up to 3,782 for athletic events with additional seats for special concerts, graduation activities and other community and regional events. The R.P. Holding Sr. Student Fitness Center 

The entrance way that leads to the Sports Hall of Fame. Photo by Bennett Scarborough.


The Gilbert Craig Gore Arena. Photo by Shannon Ryals.

contains 5,944 sq. ft. and features state-of-the art exercise equipment including a climbing wall. Also featured is the McCall Practice Gym, which contains over 7,000 square feet. In addition, there are four concession stands and designated seating for season-ticket holders. “I’m really impressed with all of the work that went into the building,” said junior Rob Viohl. “I didn’t know it would be this big. I miss Carter Gym, but this is nice.” Stan Cole, associate athletics director for Media Services, said the building would boost morale. “No doubt we have one of the nicest facilities in the A-Sun Conference,” he said. “Ask coaches about players’ mentality when they walk into new buildings. Now we have help recruiting. They’ll see the Convocation Center and want to come back.” Space and facilities aside, it was the character and class of the center that impressed alumni Robert Blackman (’72). His daughter Ashley also attended Campbell, graduating in 2006. “I think this building is very appropriate and well-deserved,” he said. “It’s is what you would expect from this university.”

“This was one of the greatest examples of giving and sacrifice that Campbell has ever known.”

– Dr. Jerry M. Wallace

Approximately 600 people attended the dedication ceremony including major donors Arthur Pope, president of the John W. Pope Foundation; Ed and Dinah Gore, developers from Sunset Beach, N.C.; Frank Holding, son of Robert P. Holding, Sr. founder of First Citizens Bank of North Carolina; and Robert and Patricia Barker of the Bob Barker Company, a manufacturer of detention supplies. “We’re pleased and proud to be associated with Campbell University,” said Campbell graduate Ed Gore. “It began in the early 50s when I had the privilege and pleasure of sitting in Campbell classes and has continued throughout the years. Campbell challenged me to do my best. I can honestly say it has been one of the most important influences on my life.” The Gilbert Craig Gore Arena is named in memory of the Gores’ son.

Top: The Robert P. Holding, Sr. Student Fitness Center. Photo by Shannon Ryals. Bottom: Tables in the Gore Hospitality Suite. Photo by Shannon Ryals.




Club Mocha went to Ambo, Ethiopia. These were two of the girls the group worked with. Photo by Rhiannon DeBaylo (`06).

The Mission Field is All Around Us By Shannon Ryals, Assistant Director of Publications

“Dear children, let us not love with words or tongue but with actions and in truth.”

– 1 John 3:18

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lica Jones ‘10, a birth to kindergarten major, uses this verse as an example in her life. Jones, along with Meredith Brunson ‘09, mass communication major, and Jaime Chong ‘10, divinity student, founded Encounter Ministries. Brunson explained Encounter Ministries as a way to equip American students to outreach to the international students. “A lot of the international students are homesick and the American students don’t know exactly how to help,” Brunson said. “So we came up with three ministries they can focus on- welcome, listen and serve.” The three ministries are each led by one of the women. Jones leads the serve team which helps the internationals get acquainted with the Bible. There is a Bible study every Friday night. The night starts with a meal prepared by the students and leads into a Bible study and worship. 

“It has a community feel,” said Jones. Chong came to Campbell from Malaysia and leads the welcome team. She still remembers the day she arrived from Malaysia and Brunson was there to greet here. She was grateful to see a friendly face and that is her goal for the welcome team. “Sometimes the internationals feel lost in a new country,” Chong said. “We help them feel comfortable in their new home even if that means taking them to Wal-Mart.” Brunson leads the listen team which matches an American student with an international student. “The buddy system works great,” said Brunson. “They each learn more about the other’s culture. It’s a rewarding and eye opening experience for both parties and the friendships are so unique.” All three woman think Encounter Ministries is a great way to makes friends, help their peers succeed but over all show Christ’s love. “I felt called to be involved in missions,” said Brunson. “I have gone to other countries, but now realize the mission field can be right here in our own backyard.”


Nikki Crumley ‘11, a middle grade major, experienced the mission field this summer in North Carolina through Deep Impact. Deep Impact provides missions projects for churches such as construction work and children’s camp. Crumley was one of about 1,000 youth who participated this year. “It’s one thing to talk about faith, but it’s different to go out and get involved,” said Crumley. “It is a wonderful feeling to help others.” Although this was Crumley’s first year with Deep Impact, she plans to do it again. “I loved meeting the kids at VBS and building new relationships,” said Crumley. Rhiannon DeBaylo ‘06, mass communication major, found new relationships when she became involved with Mocha Club. Mocha Club is a nonprofit organization based in Nashville, Tenn. “I got involved with Mocha Club in March of 2007 when I went to a music showcase,” said DeBaylo. “In December, I found out about trips that Mocha Club was taking to Africa to give members a chance to experience the cause first hand. After much prayer and several events, I knew that this trip is what God had in store for me. But I never knew how life changing it would be.” DeBaylo explains Mocha Club was born as an inexpensive yet effective way for students to contribute to and make a difference. The seven dollar monthly contribution, the average cost of a couple of coffees, is what gave Mocha Club its namesake. The aid benefits 27 countries in Africa by building wells, providing orphan support, medical care, safe homes for child mothers and sex slaves, HIV/AIDS patient care and education. Most of the promotion of Mocha Club is done through musicians that have signed on to be Mocha Club Artists.

Singer-songwriters Dave Barnes and Matt Wertz are Mocha Club artists that are popular across the college community, but recent signees include the country act Lady Antebellum and Christian artists Sanctus Real. DeBaylo went to Ethiopia this summer where she spent most of her time in Addis Ababa working with different orphanages and study centers, planning activities with the kids. In relation to what Mocha Club was doing in Ethiopia they visited the small city of Ambo. “The project we supported in Ambo was the building of an additional five classrooms for 250 students that currently attend class in just three classrooms of less than moderate size,” she said. “Most of these students are orphans and are sponsored through Compassion International while the school is supported through the

“It’s one thing to talk about faith, but it’s different to go out and get involved.”

– Nikki Crumley

Kale Heywhet Church. This is where we got to witness our money in use. It’s amazing to see how far our meager seven dollars a month can go. It was such an incredible experience to see the faces and hold the hands of the little kids that will benefit from what Mocha Club is doing and to know that something that requires so little on my part will go so far in impacting their potential and future.” Although each of these women are serving in different areas and ways, they all have one common goal- to show Christ’s love.

Rhiannon and some of the students in Ambo, Ethiopia.




We’re Ready For Some

Carl Blain. Photo by Bennett Scarborough.

Football! By Patrick Love, Sports Editor of the Dunn Daily Record

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n the words of Campbell University student Josh Vassey, “It’s the first football game. You’ve got to go big or go home.” Campbell went big on Saturday, Aug. 31, welcoming the largest crowd in school history to its campus for the school’s first football game since 1950. The sea of orange, which numbered 5,845, including a raucous student cheering section, was treated to a highly competitive football game that pitted a Campbell team that hadn’t suited up in 58 years versus a Birmingham-Southern team that is in its second season of modern football.



The day brought Campbell alumni, students, faculty, fans and administrators together for a celebration the likes of which the 121-year-old Buies Creek university had rarely seen. The crowd packed into the newlynamed Barker-Lane Stadium, which was dedicated by Campbell President Dr. Jerry Wallace at halftime. “Having a football team will bring a lot of people to our school and a lot of excitement,” said senior Aimee Scott, who is studying physical education at Campbell. “I bet we’ll see a huge increase in our numbers and student support as a result.”

In the end, that season of experience paid dividends for Birmingham-Southern, which broke a 6-6 tie with a late touchdown pass to prevail, 12-6.

Another thing that was rarely seen on Campbell’s campus prior to Saturday was tailgating, but that didn’t stop a large number of tailgaters from feasting in the parking lot outside the stadium before the game.

“What an atmosphere,” said Campbell head coach Dale Steele. “The people were just so gracious in coming out and supporting us on a hot day like today, and I just hope we played well enough that they’ll come back and they’ll watch us again, because we’re going to get better and we’re going to get that W.”

One group of tailgaters included three Campbell faculty members and their families, including Mike Codgill, dean of the Divinity School, and his wife, Gail, Bruce Powers, a professor in the Divinity School, and Glenn Jonas, a professor of religion.


Above: Families came out to tailgate. Photo by Shannon Ryals. Left: Alumni came back to Campbell to participate in the festivites. Photo by Shannon Ryals.

“I think the students are most excited about all this, but the faculty is very positive about it too,” Dr. Cogdill said. Gene Bethea, who was an offensive guard for Campbell on the school’s last football team in 1950, choked back tears as he watched the pregame ceremonies. “It just gets ahold of you,” he said. “It’s nothing like it was when I was here, but they’re still Camels and they still wear orange.” The members of that 1950 team who are still living, along with head coach Earl Smith, were honored prior to the game. Campbell planned and prepared for this first game in earnest for the better part of the last two-and-ahalf years, ever since the April 2006 announcement that the school was resuming football. The team used the Aug. 30, 2008, date against Birmingham-Southern as a rallying cry as it practiced for what must have seemed like an eternity without ever playing a game last fall and spring. Even so, no one quite knew what to expect from the team when it took the field. When the Camels were finally unleashed against a real opponent, they proved themselves to be well-coached, athletically talented and physical. The defense forced a three-and-out on BirminghamSouthern’s first possession, invoking chants of “Defense! Defense!” from the crowd. On Campbell’s second offensive possession, quarterback Matt Vollono found receiver Kelvin Murphy with a 14-yard pass for the first of five first downs on a 14play drive that ended with a 30-yard Adam Willets field goal with eight seconds left in the first quarter. The Camels held a 3-0 lead at halftime and into the fourth quarter, when Birmingham-Southern finally broke through the Camel defense for a touchdown on a one-yard keeper by quarterback Joe Thigpen. The point-after-touchdown was missed, and Birmingham-Southern led 6-3.

“It’s nothing like it was when I was here, but they’re still Camels and they still wear orange.”

– Gene Bethea

Trailing for the first time in the game, Campbell marched right back down the field with a 14-play, 82yard drive that Willets capped with a 25-yard field goal to tie things at 6-6 with 6:10 remaining in the game. With the game coming down to the wire, BirminghamSouthern answered in only five plays when Thigpen scrambled to his left and found receiver Luke Chapman streaking down the field behind the Camel defense for a 48-yard scoring strike with 4:06 showing on the clock. It would prove to be the game-winning score. “In my mind, I was thinking ‘run, run,’ but then I see Luke just going down the field and the safety on his backside just wide open, and I’d never forgive myself if I missed that throw,” Thigpen said. “Obviously we’re disappointed,” Mr. Steele said. “We had the ballgame in a situation where we thought we could win it in the fourth quarter. We made a mistake on defense with a young player out of position on a quarterback scramble, but The cheerleaders pump up the crowd with different cheers. Photo by Bennett Scarborough.




Brad Brower makes the tackle. Photo by Bennett Scarborough.

that’s a correctable mistake. The mistakes that we made were not effort mistakes, and as I told the players in the locker room, we can correct being in position, we can correct the defensive calls, we can correct the technique. “But effort is something that’s got to come from inside, and it came from inside,” Mr. Steele said. “I’m extremely proud of the effort that our football team gave.” Campbell had a 100-yard rusher in Carl Smith, who carried the ball 23 times for 109 yards. Vollono completed 14-of-21 passes for 137 yards, and Murphy caught seven passes for 68 yards. Safety Christian Dixon and linebacker Milton Brown led the Campbell defense, posting nine and eight tackles, respectively. Overall, the Camel players spoke positively about the experience and the game. “It was a lot we gained today just by being out there. A lot of lessons,” said linebacker Jon Fleury. “Our coach

“We had an orange day today.”

– Stan Williamson just told us while we were out there, ‘Lessons learned on Saturday aren’t very expensive,’ and that showed.” “It’s been a long time coming,” Willets said. “We’ve been working our tails off for over a year. It was incredible feeling to be able to get out there and represent this university. The game experience, it was awesome. The crowd, the fans, the hype. It went very fast though.”

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Students get camel crazy at the first football game. Photo by Shannon Ryals.

One person in attendance who was extremely impressed with Campbell’s first outing was Birmingham-Southern coach Eddie Garfinkle, whose team experienced the same thing a year earlier. “They’ve done a heck of a job,” he said. “They’re way ahead of where we were last year for our first game.” Overall, the loss was the only hitch in a nearperfect first game day for Campbell. “It was a great day, and a great start for Campbell football,” said athletic director Stan Williamson. “Obviously we would have liked to win the football game, but everything fell into place. I can’t be more pleased with what happened here today and the game itself and the whole experience of college football.” “It was a nice atmosphere, filled with orange,” he said. “We had an orange day today.”


Campbell Students Immerse Themselves in Italian Culture By Susan Welch, Staff Writer

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n a 25-day study abroad program that took them from the Vatican in Rome to the leaning Tower of Pisa, six Campbell University students and their professors immersed themselves in Italian culture this summer. University professors Dr. Adam English, assistant professor of philosophy and theology in the Department of Religion and Philosophy, and Daniel Rodgers, professor of graphic design in the Division of Fine Arts, taught art history, painting, philosophy and an upper level course on Roman Catholicism in Italy. “The experience of study abroad is something that cannot be duplicated in the classroom,” said English. “Professor Rodgers would take his students outdoors with easel and brush and paint the scenery. Meanwhile, I would gather my group of students to discuss St. Augustine, whose classic autobiography is set in Italy. Students were able to connect what they were learning with the experiences they were having and the sites they were seeing.” Rodgers’ students, who studied art history and painting, were able to see famous works from each period they studied—medieval to baroque. “No one can describe the profound difference between seeing these works in a textbook or on the Internet versus seeing them in real life,” Rodgers said. “We painted from nature, trying to interpret the landscapes and cityscapes of Italy through the medium of water color.” Beginning in Rome, where the group toured the Coliseum, Vatican, the Roman Forum and numerous churches and museums, the group traveled by train to Perugia in Umbria, their main base of operations. There they spent 16 days studying, taking in the local culture and taking day-trips to surrounding towns such as Assisi, Orvieto and Spoleto. The group ended the trip in Florence, making a side trip to Pisa to ascend the leaning bell tower. From that first day in Rome where the group visited sites like the Capitaline Museum which houses the works of Caravaggio, Bernini and other masters, to

L-R standing on ledge: Casey Jordan, Katie Saunders, Cassidy English, Charissa English, Dr. Adam English, Johanna Hess, Elizabeth ‘Libby’ Austin and James ‘JJ’ Yang. In front: Elizabeth ‘Kiki’ Long. This is the groups first day in Rome. Photo by Professor Danny Rodgers.

the last day in Pisa where they scaled the tower, Italy was “indescribable,” wrote English’s wife Charissa in the travel dairy she and English kept of the trip: “Perugia is a wonderful medieval town built up the side and on top of the mountain. It is picture perfect with narrow winding streets and alleys, archways over cobblestone streets…,” she wrote. “It was an overcast day so this wonderful mist was hanging over the buildings and the fields of Assisi. All of the buildings are medieval architecture, lots of arched doorways, tiny windows carved out here and there. As you walk along the narrow streets, little alcoves, carved in the walls, may hold a statue or a vase of flowers, or some Italian saying carved into the wall, so lovely.” Students who participated in the trip were Libby Austin, Johanna Hess, Casey Jordan, Kiki Long, Katy Saunders and James Yang. Travel logistics were organized and arranged by Dr. Donna Waldron, director of the Travel Abroad program at Campbell. The Italy experience is becoming a regular part of the Study Abroad program and will be offered every two-to-three years. For more information about the program, contact Dr. Donna Waldron at 910-893-1576 or 800-334-4111, ext. 1576. 11


The Blind Boys of Alabama

Two Legendary Bands Kick Off Campbell Performing Arts Series

jazz

By Susan Welch, Staff Writer

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earing black sun glasses and bright orange suits, the incomparable gospel music of The Blind Boys of Alabama wowed audiences at Campbell University on Tuesday, Sept. 30. Performing with the legendary Preservation Hall Jazz Band of New Orleans, the highly charged talent of both groups virtually shook the foundations of stately Turner Auditorium. Even though three of their performers had to be led onstage, the Blind Boys’musical instincts were unexcelled. The group performed an entire spectrum of foot-tapping spirituals from the traditional “I’ll Fly Away” to a rousing contemporary rendition of “Amazing Grace.” The Blind Boys released the first of four consecutive Grammywinning recordings in 2001 and their version of “I Shall Not Walk Alone” was featured in an episode of the ABC drama “Lost.” One of their latest albums, “Down in New Orleans,” was recorded with The Preservation Hall Jazz Band.

Preservation Hall Jazz Band

Preceding The Blind Boys and joining them on several numbers was The Preservation Hall Jazz Band. The band carries on an unsurpassed musical tradition that began in New Orleans over 60 years ago. Many of the band’s musicians are direct descendants of original band members who, together with Louis Armstrong, Jelly Roll Morton and other greats, created New Orleans jazz. The band performed some of the genre’s greatest classics, including the subtle and smooth “I Don’t Want to Set the World on Fire” and a rollicking version of “When the Saints Go Marching In.” The Blind Boys of Alabama and The Preservation Hall Jazz Band are the first in a program of cultural and entertainment performances that are part of Campbell University’s Performing Arts Series. Upcoming concerts include world-renowned pianist Emile Pandolfi in a special Christmas Concert on Dec. 4, and international vocal artist, pastor and motivational speaker Wintley Phipps on March 12, 2009. Phipps has performed with the Billy Graham Crusades and The Gaithers gospel group. “The Preservation Hall Jazz Band and Blind Boys of Alabama concert was a wonderful beginning for Campbell University’s 2008-09 Performing Artists Series,” said Dr. John Roberson, vice president for Enrollment Management and Marketing. “Their engaging stage presence and never-ending energy drew the audience into the show.  It was wonderful to see hundreds of students and community members tapping toes, clapping hands and swaying with the rhythm.” For more information on the Campbell University Performing Arts Series, contact Kathy Crenshaw at 910-893-4700 or email her at Crenshaw@campbell.edu. All concerts feature a pre-show buffet in Marshbanks Dining Hall at a charge of $15 per person. Reservations are required and limited to the first 100 guests only.

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Mary Rhodes (`07), far right, works in South Africa teaching about HIV/Aids in the public schools.

Social Work Majors Succeed in Their Field By Shannon Ryals, Assistant Director of Publications

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ven though Mary Rhodes and Brooke Wargin graduated from Campbell University in 2007 with the same social work degrees, they didn’t know they would be working in such different environments. Rhodes works in South Africa teaching about HIV/ Aids in the public schools, while Wargin works in Hedgesville, W.Va. at the Hospice of the Panhandle.

“Campbell prepared me in ways I had never imagined,” said Wargin. “I learned humanity and compassion from Dr. Tina Hancock. I learned decisiveness and direction from Dr. Bruce Gay. I learned to accept others for whatever they are from Dr. Adam English. Dr. Constantine Kledaras prepared me with the literature of how to put it all together through my senior social work courses.”

“I really enjoy my job,” said Rhodes. “The material we teach is important because the children need to hear the truth about HIV and how it is spreads.”

Rhodes also learned the idea of acceptance from her Campbell experience.

Rhodes also has the opportunity to witness in the community. One day she was able to pray with a woman and her boyfriend about their pains. A week later she saw the couple. “The woman had tears in her eyes as she told us the pains were gone,” said Rhodes. “She said that she prays every night, but she had begun to wonder if God heard her prayers. I was able to share with her how I became a Christian and we went through the Romans Road verses.” Wargin enjoys meeting different types of people through her work. “It’s an honor to be invited into such an intimate part of someone’s life,” said Wargin. “I grow attached to the people and it’s hard to gain closure when they die.” The purpose of the Social Work Program at Campbell is to prepare practitioners for entrylevel practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. The program also seeks to provide service to the community.

“I think my social work degree helped me to relate to all sorts of different situations and people in a positive way and to see things from their perspective,” she said. “My experience with Campus Crusade prepared me to share my faith and also do Bible studies and helped me to have the confidence to be a leader.”  Rhodes currently lives in a one bedroom flat in Rustenburg, South Africa. Many of the people she works with live in impoverished conditions. “I will be in Rustenburg until Feb. 2010,” said Rhodes. “Then, I will probably go to seminary and pursue my masters in social work.” Wargin started her masters and plans to continue working in W. Va. She will be married next March to John Morris. For more information about the Social Work Department contact Shirley Hearn at socwork@campbell.edu or call 910-893-1638.

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Sewell Founder of Platinum Corral By Shannon Ryals, Assistant Director of Publications

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ashed potatoes, country vegetables, steakhouse steak and buttery rolls- it’s a menu for success. Billy Sewell, a 1988 business major, is President/Ceo of Platinum Corral, a franchise of 22 Golden Corral restaurants. “Entrepreneurship is most enjoyable for me,” said Sewell. Sewell became founder of Platinum Corral in 1996. He has a new store opening in Danville in January 2009 and another store in Charlotte in October 2009. He credits Campbell for his preparation for the business world. “Campbell instilled ethics, values, morals, integrity and work ethic, he said. “Campbell taught me relationships with people are important. The value of your word is your bond. Working hard will prepare you and is a tribute to becoming successful, whatever path you choose in life. Have a passion for what you do professionally or personally.” This year the North Carolina Restaurant and Lodging Association (NCRLA) awarded its prestigious Restaurateur-of-the-Year award to Sewell. The NCRLA honors those who have inspired and motivated the hospitality industry throughout the past year. “I was very honored and humbled to be chosen to become part of a select group of successful restaurateurs,” said Sewell. “Billy is an outstanding business leader in North Carolina who is hard-working and goal-driven, with morals and ethics as his compass and foundation,” said Lew Starling (`87) Campbell University board of trustee member. “He does a remarkable job with his chain of restaurants as noted and recognized by his receipt of the prestigious Restaurateur of the Year Award.” As Sewell climbs the ladder of success he wants people to know Campbell is still a special place to him.

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Billy Sewell is President/ CEO of Platinum Corral, a franchise of 22 Golden Corral restaurants.

“Campbell gave me the opportunity to earn a degree and to make lasting relationships,” he said. “Campbell teaches Christian higher education to its students. The Campbell experience prepares you for life’s struggles, blessings and opportunities. Campbell made a difference in my life and is part of the reason for my success today and in the future.”


Red, White and Orange Politics in Camel Territory By Sara McCarthy, Student Writer

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wo Campbell students keep their enemies close, but their friends closer.

“To me, Ashley was loud and didn’t have a chance,” said Raper with a grin as the two laughed at times gone by.

College Republicans President Ashley Bowman and College Democrats President Hank Raper struck up a friendship as classmates in Introduction to Christianity, a religion course required for all students. The next event in their lives set the tone for their current comradery— the race to become freshman class president.

The government majors carried their passion for politics into their sophomore year as the leaders of their respective political organizations on campus. In an intense election year, Bowman said their political stances don’t sour the friendship.

“I thought Hank was funny, but wasn’t much competition,” said Bowman of Raper about the campaign. The feeling was mutual.

“All the conversations we have turn into politics, but that’s never caused any negative feelings.”

– Ashley Bowman

“All the conversations we have turn into politics, but that’s never caused any negative feelings,” she said. In true form, Bowman added a light-hearted jab. “But it has made me question Hank’s intelligence,” she said with a mischievous smile as Raper retorted, and a debate ensued. Despite their preference of location on the political spectrum, Raper said they can still appreciate each other. “Ashley is dedicated, a driven leader, and motivating,” he said. Bowman elaborated that Raper’s role as her political adversary doesn’t prevent him from being a good friend. “Hank is trustworthy and candid, and a confidante,” she said. The quality of their friendship shines through after a heavy battle of beliefs. Voices raise, pointed fingers fire, and statistics litter the air. Once the dust settles, however, Bowman and Raper discuss details for an upcoming election debate on campus and plan to have lunch sometime soon. Ashley Bowman and Hank Raper may disagree about politics but their friendship remains strong. Photo by Sara McCarthy. 15


fighter practice takeoffs and landings are scheduled to occur annually, day and night. The impact on the wildlife habitat as well as the local population will be significant, Bartlett believes. Gates County is one of the potential landing field sites under consideration by the OLF project; therefore the NO-OLF Gates County Committee approached Bartlett’s class to help save the site by surveying and documenting it as an official EPA wetland. Bartlett explained the difficulty of the research. “Keep in mind we had to survey the location in the pitch-black of night, using some of the students as lookouts for cottonmouth snakes, to catch the frogs to test for fungus,” Bartlett said. “We also had to look for unusual wild life that could be used to classify the site as an environmental wetland.

Dr. John Bartlett of Campbell University conducts research on North Carolina wetlands during a five-week, full field ecology class he taught this summer.

Field Research Class Helps Save Frogs By Susan Welch, Staff Writer

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tudents in Dr. John Bartlett’s five-week, full field Coastal Wetlands and Ecology class wouldn’t trade anything for the experience of wading into murky swamp waters at night, braving daily 100- plus temperatures or having their tents raided by hungry raccoons. The term “full field” means 24 hours a day, five days a week for five weeks (Bartlett gave them the weekend off to do their laundry). It’s the first course of its kind to be offered by Campbell University or any other university the biology professor is aware of. One of the objectives of the research was to look for evidence in North Carolina’s swamps and waterways of the deadly fungus attacking the world’s frog population, Chytrid Fungus. Another was to help save an endangered wetland from the federal Outlying Land Field project or OLF. For some time the federal government has had plans to build a major landing field in northeast coastal North Carolina’s 30,000 acres of prime wildlife habitat. The 8,000-foot landing field will be used by Navy pilots to practice carrier takeoff and landing maneuvers. According to project guidelines, some 31,000 F/A-18 16

“One of our team members, Deborah Ayers, had more than her share of hardships,” Bartlett said. “She found a snake coiled in her tent on the first night, all of her gear got drenched by a rain storm and she was raided by raccoons that had somehow learned to unzip her tent and steal her food.” While surveying the site, the students found a bull frog measuring approximately eight-to-10 inches long, a possible world record that could be the salvation of the Gates County location. “We don’t have official confirmation that the bullfrog is a world record, but it will be close either way,” Bartlett said. “If the frog’s size does turn out to be a record, I don’t think the Navy will come in and disturb the site.” The students also found no evidence of Chytrid Fungus in the Great Dismal Swamp where the Gates County site is located. They found no evidence of Chytrid at any of the sites they surveyed. “Our task was to catch as many frogs as possible, rub their bellies with cotton swabs and take the swabs back to Campbell for DNA analysis,” Bartlett said. “We were delighted when no fungus was discovered.” Although the research was exciting and meaningful, one of its greatest outcomes was the hands-on experience. “I find that one of the most difficult things about teaching is keeping the students focused,” Bartlett said. “There’s no doubt that by combining the concepts of full immersion and experiential learning the students definitely stay on task.” The surveys were conducted in Woods Bay State Natural Area in Florence, S.C.; Myrtle Beach, S.C.; Merchants Millpond State Park, N.C.; Green Swamp, N.C.; and Atlantic Beach/Morehead City, N.C. Students who participated in the class were David Cox, Amber Williams, Sam Dail, Pheng Vue, Olivia Mak, Deborah Ayers, Jonathan Lazenby, Lauren Phillips, Lauren Blackburn, Jamie McCann, Kristin Myers (Iraq war veteran and mother of one-year-old Jayden who spent the entire five weeks with the class), Jesse Norris and Hannah Roller.


Feature Feature Briefs

Campbell University has once again been recognized in the top tier of best universities in the South with master’s programs by “U.S. News & World Report.”

The Richard Brunson family was recognized as Campbell University’s 2008 Family of the Year at the school’s second home football game. The Brunsons were selected based on their support and participation in their children’s education and an essay written by Campbell senior, Meredith Brunson. Over 100 veterans, spouses and family members attended a dinner to kick off Campbell University’s participation in a nationwide oral history project. Created by the United States Congress in 2000 as part of the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, the Veterans History Project collects and archives the personal recollections of U.S. wartime veterans to honor their service and share their stories with current and future generations. Campbell University’s School of Pharmacy held its annual Dr. Joseph W. Baggett Healthcare Enhancement Seminar. The focus of the free seminar for health care professionals was the efforts being made by scientists and clinicians to improve the availability of vaccines and the use of immunization services. Members of the class of 2008 continued Campbell Law School’s tradition of excellence on the North Carolina Bar Exam. Stedman Graham, best-selling author and CEO of a management and marketing consulting company, shared his formula for a rich and successful life with students from the Campbell University School of Pharmacy. Graham was the keynote speaker at the school’s opening convocation ceremony. Campbell has a record enrollment for fall 2008. There are 3,034 undergraduates on main campus and 6,834 for total enrollment including extended campus programs.  

Campbell University senior Anna Johnson redesigned the Harnett County Partnership for Children (HCPC) logo. It was part of an assignment given by Professor Danny Rodgers to his Graphic Design II summer class. Out of five students, Johnson’s logo was chosen to be used for HCPC.

A few faculty members from Campbell University attended the Annual Gathering of the Baptist World Alliance (BWA), a global organization of about 215 Baptist unions worldwide, in Prague, Czech Republic.  Dr. Tony Cartledge, associate professor for Biblical Studies, Lynn Buzzard, professor in the School of Law and Bruce Powers, professor in the Divinity School and his wife Jean, attended the BWA gathering. The department of Chemistry and Physics has announced the acquisition of a new Anasazi Instruments broadband Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometer.  Since nuclear magnetic resonance was first observed in 1945, it has grown to become a technique of monumental importance to modern chemistry.  The acquisition of an NMR spectrometer is not only a major milestone in the development of Campbell University’s chemistry and physics program, but also satisfies an important requirement in the department’s quest to offer a degree certified by the American Chemical Society. Members of Campbell University’s Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) chapter participated in the Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA-PBL) national Leadership in Action Conference in Atlanta, Ga.. The 11-member team delivered outstanding performances in 10 events, including a first place win by graduate Marsha McKoy, of Dudley, N.C., in Impromptu Speaking and a fifth place victory in the Financial Services competition by team members Christina Dell’Aguila, of Southport, N.C.; Dexter Dodd, of Reidsville, N.C.; and Zach McLawhorn, of Benson, N.C.

Some times even the most capable teachers need help in the classroom; different disciplines require different teaching strategies. Campbell University’s School of Education was asked by the university to develop a teaching resource where faculty members can pick up teaching enhancement literature; request individual guidance in the development of new teaching strategies, or just find a forum for open and on-going discussion. To facilitate continued education and promote excellence, the school has created the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning.

Third-year Campbell University pharmacy student Richard Smith, Jr., of Sanford, N.C., was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Air Force on Thursday, June 26. Smith was simultaneously awarded a full scholarship for health professionals from the Air Force. 

In order to maximize the safety of students, faculty, staff and visitors to Campbell University, the university has installed a new emergency mass notification system at no additional cost to subscribers. The e2Campus system is used in over 500 schools across the nation to convey time sensitive messages to the campus populations wherever they are located via cell phone, website, BlackBerry, pagers and other electronic means.

The attacks of Sept. 11 seem to have impressed upon everyone the idea that terrorists can strike within the United States; bioterrorism is also now a reality. Because of this looming threat, disaster preparedness was the focus of a Campbell University School of Pharmacy continuing education course conducted recently by the North Carolina Public Health Preparedness and Response Office. Campbell is the only university in North

Clement E. “Clem” Medley, Jr., of Dunn, N.C., has been elected to the Campbell University Presidential Board of Advisors. Medley is president and CEO of First Federal Bank in Dunn.

Carolina participating in this state-run pilot program to recruit pharmacists, technicians, pharmacy students and other volunteers to fill vital disaster preparedness roles.

Campbell University’s School of Pharmacy participated in this year’s Tour de Cure on June 7 and 8.  The Tour, sponsored by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), is a fund raising cycling event which is held in over 40 states nationwide. Over 344 riders registered for the 2008 North Carolina event.  Riders had several distances to choose from including: a 12-mile family ride, a 32-mile ride or a twoday ride of over 140 miles. Most members of Team Campbell participated in the 32-mile ride in Cary, N.C. Other members of the team participated in the two day ride, leaving Cary on June 7, 2008, cycling over 70 miles to Oxford, N.C and returning the next day.  Mabel Fetterman Held, of Clinton, N.C., has been elected to the Campbell University Presidential Board of Advisors. Held is a member of the Campaign for Raleigh Cabinet. Campbell alumna Deborah Holloway will never forget the friendship and guidance she received from fellow alumnus Warren Trent Strickland and his wife Clara. To honor that relationship, Holloway and husband Dennis have established the Warren Trent and Clara Greene Strickland endowed Scholarship Fund. Angier businessman Stuart Surles, president of Stuart Surles Insurance, Inc., has been elected to Campbell University’s Presidential Board of Advisors. A self-made entrepreneur, Surles put himself through Campbell University by farming five acres of his own tobacco and working part time jobs. He graduated in 1977 with a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and was the owner and CEO of his own insurance company by 1988. Campbell University’s Camp Lejeune campus volunteered at the Onslow Community Ministries Soup Kitchen and at Relay for Life Onslow County Cancer Chapter. The Campbell staff made 300 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and soup for the visitors of the Onslow Community Ministries Soup Kitchen.  A locally-owned boutique specializing in customized curved stair design was struggling to build clients and develop a marketing strategy. As part of the 21st annual Graduate Business Student Competition sponsored by North Carolina State University’s Small Business and Technology Development Center (SBTDC), the Campbell University team of Charles Hibbard, Marlisa de Fontes and Alison Smith came to the company’s aid. Competing against teams from Fayetteville State and East Carolina universities the Campbell team’s strategic assessment and recommendations improved company’s sales revenue and strengthened liquidity, earning Campbell the competition’s first-place award.

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Botanists Put Campbell Under the Microscope By Susan Welch, Staff Writer

L

ike the Crepe Myrtle that blooms in the front yard, most people call plants by their common names. But the Crepe Myrtle is a genus of around 50 species of deciduous and evergreen trees. Campbell University professors Christopher Havran and Stan Beard are collaborating on a project to document all of the trees on the Campbell campus. “Bio-diversity is decreasing at an alarming rate,” said Havran. “The first step in preventing the future loss of biodiversity is to understand the diversity of organisms around us. We can’t save plants unless we know what they are.” The professors not only intend to identify trees, but to explain their cultural significance to the campus, Havran said. “If the tree was planted in memory of a certain individual or event, we will document it for history and longevity, establishing the campus as an arboretum. This is our opportunity to link the bio world in terms of plants with the cultural history of Campbell University.” The two professors, Havran who came to Campbell in 2008 and Beard, who retired from the university in 1994 after 31 years of teaching environmental science and plant biology, have a love of botany.

Scholars

“Without plants there would be no animals,” Beard said. “I don’t think anything gives character to a

Dr. Christopher Havran and Dr. Stan Beard are collaborating on a project to document all of the trees on the Campbell campus. Photo by Shannon Ryals.

college campus like big oak trees. You ought not to destroy a plant unless you can replace it.” It is the professors’ intent to create a walking guide of the campus by year’s end that identifies labels for specific trees with their Latin and common names and the date and occasion the trees were planted. ���We want to establish a resource for our students and the community,” said Havran, “and to stamp out a condition scientists call ‘plant blindness,’ in which people are just walking through their lives not paying attention.” Dr. Christopher Havran received a Bachelor of Science from Lebanon Valley College in Pennsylvania and Master of Science from the University of Louisiana. He earned a Ph.D. in environmental and plant biology from Ohio University. Dr. Stan Beard received a Bachelor of Science from Furman University and a master’s degree and Ph.D. in Botany from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Scholarships

Scholarship Allows Riggins to Attend Campbell

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By Shannon Ryals, Assistant Director of Publications Sara Riggins, junior, received the J. Hunter & Mabel C. Strickland Scholarship as a senior in high school in December 2005 and is still reaping the benefits. The full scholarship is offered to students from the Johnston County area. Riggins is from Garner, N.C. and her parents are Tom and Jean Riggins. “Campbell is my home away from home,” said Riggins. “This is a great place to go to school. It’s such a friendly environment

and personal enough that your professors know your name.” Riggins is a government/pre-law major who is entertaining both ideas of law school or getting involved in state government after graduation. “I interned at the NC Department of Labor,” she said. “It was an amazing experience and I definitely caught the political bug.” Riggins is enjoying her college experience. She thinks her classes are challenging and she is involved in Campus Crusade.

Sara Riggins

“I really don’t know if there are words to fully describe how grateful I am to have been chosen to receive the Strickland scholarship,” said Riggins. “My time at Campbell so far has undoubtedly been one of the richest experiences of my life in so many ways. I truly feel blessed to have been entrusted with such a wonderful opportunity.”


Did you know that St. John’s wort has long been used medicinally to treat mild depression? Dr. Antoine Al-Achi’s book, “An Introduction to Botanical Medicines,” explains how, if used properly and safely, these and other natural herbs can play a major role in overall good health. However, Al-Achi, an associate professor of pharmacy at Campbell University, can’t caution patients enough about consulting their doctors before beginning any form of herbal treatment. Divinity Professor Dr. Tony Cartledge has published a book of imaginative and entertaining stories and scripts culled from over 40 years of preaching experience. “Telling Stories: Tall Tales & Deep Truths,” is designed to inspire others to effectively use stories in their own preaching.With this collection of original stories, monologues and dialogues, Cartledge illuminates biblical characters and truths. Dr. Ronnie Faulkner, associate professor of history, published two articles in the national journals, “ERBzine,” an online magazine dedicated to author Edgar Rice Burroughs, and “The Historian,” one of the most widely read scholarly journals in the nation. Dr. Robert B. Greenwood was recently appointed the associate dean for Academic Affairs after 21 years of service at the School of Pharmacy as a professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences and director of Pharmaceutical Sciences Programs. The position requires that Greenwood provide leadership in all aspects of academic affairs including the implementation and assessment of academic programs, creating appropriate policies and procedures, and enforcing academic program requirements. Ms. Borree P. Kwok has been named Director of the Carrie Rich Memorial Library at Campbell University. Kwok has served in a variety of capacities in the Carrie Rich Library since 1993, and has had extensive experience in both cataloguing and technical services.

Dr. Lloyd Johnson, professor of history at Campbell University, has reviewed a book for the Georgia Historical Quarterly on African American life in South Carolina. The book is titled, “African American Life in South Carolina’s Upper Piedmont, 17801900” by W.J. Megginson. Keith Hills County Club assistant golf pro Greg Martel has passed the PGA Playing Ability Test (PAT) to earn the designation of PGA Golf Professional. A Campbell graduate, Martel has been an employee of the university since 2001. Dr. James Martin, chair of Campbell University’s Government, History and Justice Department, reviewed the book “Jewish Life in Small-Town America: A History” by Lee Shai Weissbach for the “American Jewish Archives Journal.”

Dr. Timothy D. Metz has been named director of Institutional Research. As director of Institutional Research, Metz will conduct research that supports institutional planning, decisionmaking, management and external reporting and will oversee and coordinate the assessment functions of the university. Dr. Shahriar Mostashari, associate dean for External Relations and director of the MBA program at Campbell University, attended the annual Teachers Workshop at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). The Teachers Workshop program was created in 1998 to provide educators with information and skills to include the stock market across curriculum disciplines. Mostashari rang the closing bell at the NYSE on June 23.

Television, music, film - professors Elizabeth Rambo and Kenneth Morefield find literary motifs in modern media that illustrate how popular culture views religion and how the influence of classical literature continues to be felt. The professors’ new books, “Buffy Goes Dark: Essays on the Final Two Seasons of Buffy the Vampire Slayer on Television,” and “Faith and Spirituality in Masters of World Cinema,” respectively, are collections of essays from academic scholars, including Rambo and Morefield, that have been edited or co-edited by the professors. Dr. Russell Reeve, a statistician for the Campbell University School of Pharmacy’s Clinical Research Center and an adjunct professor of Clinical Research at Campbell, was one of 13 scientists and researchers from across the state to receive $540,000 in Education Enhancement grants for science curriculum projects from the North Carolina Biotech Center. Reeve, a statistician, received $33,650 to develop continuing education courses aimed at helping scientists around the state better prepare themselves to work in research-based pharmaceutical companies. A Campbell University professor was one of 50 alums honored by a college celebrating its 50th anniversary. Prince George’s Community College near Washington, D.C., selected Dr. Michael Ray Smith, professor of Mass Communication at Campbell, to be one of its Fabulous 50 Alumnae honorees. Associate professor of history, Dr. Jaclyn Stanke, presented a paper on the Cold War at an international conference at the Sorbonne in Paris. The focus of the conference, “Overcoming the Iron Curtain: Visions of the End of the Cold War in Europe,” drew experts from across the globe. Stanke’s presentation titled “Stalin’s Death and Anglo-American Visions of Ending the Cold War,” argued that Joseph Stalin’s death in 1953 offered the first real opportunity to either end the Cold War or at least bring about some kind of reversal in its course.

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Divinity School One of his most life-changing experiences was about midnight one evening when he and another city host met a street person who had been beaten in the face with a brick because she took someone else’s sleeping space on the street. They immediately called 911 for help, only to have the rescue squad and police do nothing. Because she would not agree to go to the hospital where she would have been extremely uncomfortable, they did not offer even water or aspirin, according to Horrell. He says the policeman did not get out of the car. Horrell and his friends approached her in Christ’s love and gave her water but, at that time, didn’t know enough about the city to offer any additional help. Some three weeks later, he saw her back on the street panhandling again. First Urban Ministry Students—Megan Joyner, Leah Anderson and Jason Horrell are three of the first social and urban ministry track students for Campbell University Divinity School.

Horrell Prepares For Homeless Ministry By Irma Duke, Director of Church and Alumni Relations

Jason Horrell began last summer as a homeless person on the streets of Toronto, seeing firsthand how homeless people subsist. He ended the summer with a confirmation of his call to be a minister of love and grace among the poor and homeless who are “too often marginalized by society and the church.” Horrell, who is completing his undergraduate degree in religion and beginning his master of divinity degree at Campbell, said his favorite part of the summer was sitting in the park, listening to homeless people. His official position was a “city host” for the Center for Student Missions, which coordinates youth mission trips in nine different cities. He was among 20 Campbell students who served in Toronto over spring break 2008. During this summer, he and four other young adults hosted up to 70 youth a week, exposing them to one of the most diverse cities in the world which is plagued with homelessness. Their initiation included being street persons for their first weekend in the city. They 20

donned dirty, ill-fitting clothes and searched for food and a place to sleep with fifty cents in their pockets. They soon started networking to find out where they could find free food and a relatively safe place to sleep. Even when they found the food, they were hesitant to eat much because they knew they were homeless only for the weekend. They didn’t want to deprive others who were dependent on meals for long-term existence. In addition to worrying about safety while sleeping, they had to be careful to find places where they would not be run off or jailed for loitering. As a summer intern, he helped the youth serve the disadvantaged but, more than that, to help them work through how God was present in the situations they faced each day and how their experiences should make a difference when they returned to their hometowns. He saw and wanted them to see that they “can be part of the solution even when things seem to be overwhelming.” He explains, “Missions is a lifestyle, not a one-week mission trip.”

In addition to hosting visiting youth groups and frequenting the parks, Horrell worked in a restaurant for the homeless where he says low-income people were fed in an Italian bistro setting for one dollar per meal. He said Franciscan monks ran the restaurant which provided quality service and quality food in a leisurely, comfortable atmosphere. The restaurant for the homeless, St. Francis’s Table, was Horrell’s “home away from home.” Horrell also worked at Scott Mission, one of the largest soup kitchens and shelters in the world. The faith-based nonprofit organization feeds more than 600 persons daily and provides day care and job training services for the working poor. Horrell is one of six students enrolled in the new urban and social ministries track at the Divinity School because he feels “a real and present need for the practical and tangible application of Christian faith to social justice.” He says that, “as a minister, I feel that I will be able to care for a person’s entire circumstance—spiritual as well as social and economic.” He believes that his time at Campbell Divinity “will be one of growth—personally, theologically, and spiritually. I hope that I walk away from Taylor Hall with a renewed and deeper sense of my calling to serve the people who need me most in whatever life situations they find themselves.” He says he wants “to struggle through the tough issues of the Christian faith” and to “leave as a humble servant of Christ to God’s people in a hurting world.” Divinity School


School of Education developing countries who wrote about child trafficking and living in poverty.” The object of “Zoom In!” was to find out how these children’s lives paralleled each other and to identify issues they had in common. The individual stories and pictures were compiled into a book and the project’s research presented to a group which included members of England’s House of Parliament, teachers, headmasters, health care providers and representative of other related fields. “The research served as an educational tool for teachers to help their students understand the issues young people of the same age face in other countries,” said Paksoy. Hopefully it will be used as a kind of voice for kids, one that will say, ‘These kids need help. They need more than education. They need somebody to protect them.’”

Kay Paksoy and fellow study abroad students stand in front of London’s Houses of Parliament and Big Ben. Paksoy participated in a Social Work research project that was presented before several members of Parliament. From left, Kay Paksoy, Michallynn Vilushis, Lezlie Halbach, Laura Cunningham and Neeaj Bhojawni.

As a Social Work major, Paksoy is more interested in policy and advocacy than direct client interaction. During the 2008-2009 Academic year, she will intern with the the North Carolina chapter of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) in Raleigh, N.C., where she will also have the opportunity to help influence policy.

Social Work Student Finds Her Voice In Study Abroad

“I’ll be sitting in Senate and House committee meetings and working a lot in the Legislative building with the NASW,” she said. In addition, Paksoy is working on a website which will link social work students and social work professionals internationally.

By Susan Welch, Staff Writer  It wasn’t her quarters near Notting Hill or the convenience of getting around on the Tube. It wasn’t even the wealth of the country’s cultural and historical resources. It was the opportunity to work with an international health care agency and become an advocate for children that ignited Kay Paksoy’s imagination during a study abroad program in England this summer. A Campbell University senior majoring in Social Work, Paksoy interned with Marie Stopes International, the United Kingdom’s leading provider of reproductive healthcare services. The nationwide network of over 40 healthcare clinics serves approximately 100,000 men and women each year. A registered charity, Marie Stopes also School of Education

works in 40 countries using surplus funds from the clinics in the United Kingdom to support reproductive health care programs in some of the world’s poorest regions. Paksoy worked with the company’s press office on a special project directed at youth called “Zoom In!” In this project, disposable cameras were sent to teenagers, ages 15-18, in 13 developed and developing countries. These young people were instructed to take pictures and write stories about the realities and issues that impact their lives. “Some children wrote about falling in love, while others wrote about teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases,” said Paksoy. “There were even those in

“The big plan is to have a website that will kind of open the door to international communication on the subject of Social Work,” she said. “Hopefully, it will give everyone the opportunity to see what Social Work is like around the world.” A native of Shelby, N.C., Paksoy is a member of the Baptist Student Union, the Social Work Club and the Social Work Honor Society. Although Campbell’s Social Work program is growing, Paksoy would love to see it develop even further. I would like to see more classes offered and mores students who take advantage of study abroad opportunities,” she said. “It was an amazing experience.” Paksoy is the daughter of John Paksoy and Lauren Rogers. 21


School of Pharmacy Campbell Trustees Approve Addition of Physician Assistant Program By Haven Hottel, Director of University Communications and Publications Campbell University’s Board of Trustees approved the addition of a master’s program in Physician Assistant Studies (MPAS). The University will now begin the development and accreditation process for the professional program, anticipating the enrollment of the first class in the summer of 2011. The 2 year program will have a projected enrollment of 32 students per class, to a total enrollment of 64 students. The program’s curriculum will be divided into two phases: educational training

in classrooms, laboratories and clinical facilities and a clinical training segment.

health care needs of our state in a more rapid fashion,” said Maddox.

Dr. Ron Maddox, Dean of the School of Pharmacy, said Campbell’s intensive 2 year, year-round Physicians Assistant program will help fill the shortage of primary care physicians in North Carolina.

Physician assistants (PAs) are academically and clinically prepared to provide health care services with the direction and responsible supervision of a doctor of medicine or osteopathy.

“Traditional physicians may spend up to ten years in medical school and rotations to prepare for their careers. Through the Physicians Assistant program, we have an opportunity to meet the immediate

Under the auspices of the School of Pharmacy, the program will seek accreditation with the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA).

The Ups and Downs of Independent Pharmacy By Andrea Pacheco, School of Pharmacy Alumni Relations Coordinator Wesley “Trey” Waters, III, Pharm.D. ’02, explains the pros and cons of his experience purchasing three independent pharmacies within a 12 month period. By the age of 12, Waters knew he wanted to become a pharmacist. His grandfather was diagnosed with diabetes and had no idea how to care for himself or what to expect from the medications he was prescribed. Watching his grandfather face these challenges, Waters knew he wanted to be the person who helped patients better understand their medications and their disease state. After graduating from the School of Pharmacy in 2002, Waters quickly found that independent pharmacy was the platform he was looking for to impact patient care and patient outcomes. He purchased his first independent pharmacy in February 2004 and another in May 2005. Driven by this passion, he purchased three more stores in just a 12 month period; placing himself on a steep learning curve in the world of business. This journey started in July 2007 when he purchased Sam’s Drug Store in Lumberton, N.C. located next to 22

Southeastern Regional Medical Center. In May 2008, Waters purchased his next store after being invited by Native Angels, a home health care and hospice agency, to open a pharmacy in their new medical complex in Pembroke, N.C. In July 2008, after an independent pharmacy in Aberdeen, N.C. was purchased by a chain drug store, Waters took a chance and opened his third store in a 12 month period in the nearby area. “I believe we have created a patient oriented environment that caters to patients’ needs and is driven by patient outcomes,” he explains. “The challenging part of the process for me is to create this type of environment in multiple locations across the state. I enjoy challenging myself, and in turn, challenging our staff to be the best we can be with the hope to win customers for life.” While weighing the pros and cons of owning a business, autonomy is a key factor for Waters. He likes to be able to make decisions regarding his own future and patients’ health care. Another pro he explains is, “having the ability to be a leader in the community and make a difference.” Waters is an

Trey Waters

active member of the Lions Club and PCCA, a pharmacy compounding organization, and serves on the NC Mutual Retail Advisory Committee as well as the Campbell University School of Pharmacy Dean’s Board of Advisors. On the other hand, Waters feels the cons of owning a business are the time commitment and financial strain. “You have to be ready to work a lot of hours,” he said. Waters admits the major roadblock so far has been having the selfconfidence to take risks. “Having zero experience in business has proved to be an interesting challenge. I’ve made so many mistakes compared to my successes. I hope to continue learning from each experience and perhaps one day I’ll have more successes than mistakes,” he said. School of Pharmacy


School of Law Law School’s ‘Campaign for Raleigh’ Receives First $1 Million Gift By Brit Davis, Director of Development for School of Law At a September 30 press conference in Raleigh, leaders of the Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law announced that the A. J. Fletcher Foundation has committed a $1 million challenge grant to establish Legal Clinic space within the Law School’s new Raleigh location. The grant will be applied to Campbell Law’s $27.5 million ‘Campaign for Raleigh.’ Funds raised toward the challenge grant will help underwrite the Legal Clinic’s operations, which will focus on critical community issues such as housing and needs of low-income seniors, among other important social justice concerns. “This grant is a wonderful fit with the mission of the A. J. Fletcher Foundation,” said Barbara Goodmon, president of the A. J. Fletcher Foundation. “My hope, our hope, is that this is the beginning of a new day in North Carolina that will start right here in Raleigh.” Campbell Law School Dean Melissa Essary noted, “The creation of the Legal Clinic will allow our students – the next generation of

community leaders – to work directly with those who often have no voice, and certainly no legal representation.” Essary continued, “It is our responsibility to help our students view the practice of law as a calling to serve others and we could not be more grateful for Barbara and Jim Goodmon’s support in accomplishing this objective.” “We congratulate Campbell Law School and the city of Raleigh for a job well done, but there is much work to be done,” said Jim Goodmon, President and CEO of Capitol Broadcasting. “Our support of Campbell Law is a challenge grant. We expect the community to step up and be involved with this historic project.” The Campbell Law School Legal Clinic will be dedicated to providing low-income and other residents of the greater Raleigh region with pro bono legal services. Led by experienced clinical directors, the programs will be staffed by second and third year Campbell Law students. In addition to providing valuable service to individuals who might not otherwise be able to retain an

Jim Goodmon, President and CEO of Capitol Broadcasting. Photo by Bennett Scarborough.

attorney, the Legal Clinic will present future lawyers with practical, hands-on experience. The new Law School facility is currently being renovated. It will open in the fall of 2009.

‘08 Marks Law School’s Thirtieth Graduating Class The Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law’s class of 2008 marked the School’s thirtieth graduating class. In such a short period, Law School graduates have more than proven themselves to be among the region’s most elite lawyers via following superlatives: A record of success on the N.C. Bar Exam that is unsurpassed

by any other North Carolina law school over the past 20 years

Back-to-back National Moot Court championships in 2007

and 2008, including Best Brief Awards in both years

Moot Court Program ranked in the top ten nationally by the University of Houston’s Blakely Advocay Institute Winner of the American Bar Association’s (ABA) E. Smythe

Gambrell Professional Award for having the nation’s best student professionalism program and the American Academy

School of Law

of Trial Lawyer’s Emil Gumpert Award for the having the top trial advocacy program among U.S. law schools More than 50 Campbell Law graduates serve as judges

across North Carolina in District and Superior courts, as well as on the North Carolina Court of Appeals

More than 3,000 graduates since 1979 who practice law

in 40 states and six foreign countries, including more than 2,000 who live and work in North Carolina

“The accolades that have been bestowed upon our students, graduates and faculty are well deserved,” said Dean Melissa Essary. “Campbell produces great lawyers. That’s a fact, and we’re so proud of the hard work, professionalism and commitment to serving others that our alumni show in all that they do. They’re not just lawyers, they’re Campbell lawyers.” 23


College of Arts & Sciences Stovall and Greene Selected for Elite Research Program By Susan Welch, Staff Writer Students, Daniel Stovall and Meredith Greene were selected to attend the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates (NSFREU) this summer, an exclusive program that supports active research participation by undergraduate students in any of the areas of research funded by the NSF.

a program like this because you’re competing with students from across the nation.”

The goal of the NSFREU program is to interest students in careers in the fields of Daniel Stovall fundamental sciences and engineering. A wide variety of projects are offered each “NSFREU is a very “It’s something that not many people get summer, including research in structural prestigious, very the opportunity to do, so I’m honored biology, biophysics, proteomics, protein competitive to have been chosen,” said Greene. and nucleic acid chemistry, membrane program,” said Dr. Stovall was president of Campbell’s biochemistry and molecular biology. Tim Metz, director Walker Biology Club during 2007of Institutional A native of Oxford, N.C., Stovall is 2008 and serves as vice president of Research. a biology major who would like to the club for 2008-2009. He was also a “It’s very get a Ph.D. in cell and developmental representative to the Interorganizational difficult to get biology to teach at a university. Council student organization on campus. accepted into In addition, he is a member of the Baptist “I’ve always wanted to teach since I Student Union and the Pre-Med Allied was a kid,” Stovall said. “Once I got to Health and Epsilon Pi Eta honor societies. Campbell, my interest in teaching was really Stovall also tutors two courses in the sharpened through the courses I took and Biological Sciences Department. the professors I had. They helped me hone in on a subject that I find really intriguing.” Greene is also active in extracurricular activities as a member of the honor Greene, a junior bio-chemistry major, societies Phi Kappa Phi, Epsilon Pi Eta said she was honored to be selected and Phi Delta Sigma. Additionally, she is for the NSFREU program. involved with the Baptist Student Union, Walker Biology Club and Chemistry Club - Treasurer for 2008-2009. Meredith Greene

Campbell Introduces New IT Program By Susan Welch, Staff Writer The demand for Information Technology professionals is increasing rapidly. In order to better prepare students for this and other highly competitive technology fields, Campbell University has redesigned its computer education program and created a new department, Math and Information Technology and Security (ITS). 24

“It’s a new program and a completely new degree,” said Dr. Meredith Williams, chair of the department. “We’ve taken the best of both programs, Computer Information Systems and Computer Science, and created a new program that will make graduates more marketable.”

Program disciplines include the World Wide Web and its applications, networking technologies, systems administration and maintenance, graphics and multimedia, web systems and technologies, service-oriented architecture, É-commerce technologies; interoperability; technology integration and deployment; object-oriented eventdriven programming; sophisticated application programmer interfaces; human-computer interaction, security applications and application domains.

School of Arts and Science


School of Business Alumni Harris, Newkirk Honored at Campbell Business School Convocation By Susan Welch, Staff Writer Six flickering candles welcomed audiences to Scott Concert Hall for the opening convocation of Campbell’s Lundy-Fetterman School of Business on Wednesday, Sept. 24.

the state Banking Commission. After graduating from Campbell in 1965, he formed his own accounting firm, Oscar Harris & Associates, PA, in 1979 and was

“The flame of knowledge began at Campbell and has indeed been a guiding beacon in their lives.” The candles symbolized the convocation theme—“Passing the Flame of Knowledge.” The ceremony welcomed new students and honored two outstanding alumni with the school’s first Distinguished Alumnus Awards. Receiving the awards were the Honorable Oscar Harris (‘65), mayor of the city of Dunn, N.C., and estate and investment manager for Bank of America Ryan Newkirk (’01), of Greensboro, N.C. Dr. Ben Hawkins, dean of the School of Business, explained the significance of the convocation ceremony. “Today we gather to recognize the wisdom of two alumni,” he said. “For these alums, the flame of knowledge began at Campbell and has indeed been a guiding beacon in their lives.” Dr. Shahriar Mostashari, associate dean for External Relations, presented the Distinguished Alumnus Award to Harris. “Mr. Harris’ exemplary life as an alumnus, entrepreneur, elected official, civic leader, husband, father, grandfather and former Marine uniquely qualifies him for this lifetime achievement award and sets the standard of distinction for other recipients,” he said. Harris, who is serving his third term as mayor of Dunn, was elected to the North Carolina Senate twice. He has served on the state Board of Transportation, the state Economic Development Board and

School of Business

– Dr. Ben Hawkins the first Campbell graduate to receive his license as a Certified Public Accountant. Ryan A. Newkirk, who received the 2008 Young Distinguished Alumnus Award, earned a Bachelor of Business Administration and a Master of Business Administration with a major in Trust and Investment Management in 2001, graduating with a 4.0 grade point average. He was named the Outstanding Trust Student of the Year. Newkirk began his career with BB&T in Winston-Salem, rising to the rank of Regional Portfolio Manager. He was promoted to the position of vice president and Wealth Management Advisor in 2003.

Dunn Mayor Oscar Harris and Ryan Newkirk received the Distinguished Alumnus award from the LundyFetterman School of Business at the school’s opening convocation. Photo by Shannon Ryals.

In 2008, Newkirk left BB&T to join the Bank of America, US Trust, in Greensboro and Winston-Salem. He currently serves as the primary point of contact for high wealth clients in the areas of trust and investment management, insurance and personal banking needs. He also serves as chairman of the Campbell University Trust Education Foundation. “These are people of integrity,” said Campbell President Jerry M. Wallace. “Their lives demonstrate the calling of Jesus, success, hard work and dedication. They are people all of us can emulate.” The Lundy-Fetterman School of Business welcomed over 185 new students for fall semester 2008.


Fighting Camels Athletics Campbell on Top of A-Sun Men’s Soccer Poll for Third-Straight Year By Stan Cole, Associate A.D./Media Services For the third-consecutive year, Campbell University was picked on top of the Atlantic Sun Conference men’s soccer pre-season poll. Senior midfielder Richard Jata was named the league’s pre-season player of the year. The Fighting Camels, who returned eight starters from last year’s club that finished 13-6-3, won the league championship tournament and advanced to the NCAA College Cup, garnered seven of the 10 first place ballots and 95 points overall in the poll of league head coaches. Last year’s regular-season champion and tournament runner-up Jacksonville was picked second with 88 points (two first place votes), while Stetson was third at 84 points. “It is a great honor to be chosen a third straight year as the pre-season favorite to win the conference, as we have obviously earned the respect of our fellow coaches in the Atlantic Sun,” said Campbell head coach Doug Hess, who is entering his seventh year in charge of the Camels. “While we are grateful for the recognition, we know full well that these are pre-season honors and mean nothing in terms of actual wins. While we have found ways to produce winning teams the past three seasons here at Campbell, winning is not a birthright for anyone on the team this year.”

Team captain Justin Madrid and the Fighting Camels hope to celebrate a secondstraight A-Sun title at home in November. Photo by Bennett Scarborough.

Since winning the 2005 A-Sun regular season title and advancing to the league tournament final, Campbell has been picked as the conference’s pre-season favorite each year. Campbell also owns a 16-4-4 record in A-Sun regular season matches since the start of the 2005 campaign and a 3-4-0 record against nationally-ranked foes in that same span. Overall, the Camels stand 36-19-6 over the past three campaigns. A two-time All-South and first-team allconference selection, Jata repeated as pre-season A-Sun player of the year. The

26

Port Richey, Fla., product was also named to the 2007 A-Sun all-tournament team. Jata scored the game-winning goal during a 2-1 victory Oct. 31, 2007 at North Carolina. On the year, Jata finished with 22 points on nine goals and four assists. He ranked fourth among league leaders in points (22), points per game (1.05) and goals (9), fifth in goals per game (0.43) and game-winning goals (3), while standing ninth in assists (4). Campbell is unbeaten (12-0-1) in games when Jata scores a goal since the start of the 2006 season. He was joined on the pre-season all-conference team by Camel seniors Aaron Johnson and Stephen Oyuga, plus sophomore Josue Soto. In 2007, Johnson set the Campbell single-season goalkeeping record for minutes played (1888), while tying the school keeper marks for matches played (20) and started (20) in a year. Oyuga earned all-conference first-team honors in 2007 after gaining secondteam recognition in 2006. The native of Nairobi, Kenya started 21 games last year in the central defense, helping guide the Camels to the second-best goalsagainst average (1.17) in the A-Sun. A third-team All-South Region choice in 2007, Soto was also named MVP of the Richmond/Nike Challenge Cup, where the Camels defeated Duquesne (2-1) and Richmond (2-1) to win their first in-season tournament since 1988. “I am pleased for Richard, Stephen, Josue and Aaron,” said Hess. “It is indeed a privilege for Richard to be selected two years running as the pre-season player of the year, but I am certain he would give up those honors again to repeat as A-Sun champions.” Campbell hosts the Atlantic Sun Conference men’s soccer championship tournament in mid-November. The six-team event begins Wed., Nov. 12 with first-round games at 4:00 and 7:00 p.m. The top two seeds will then meet first-round winners on Nov. 13 in 4:00 and 7:00 p.m. semifinals. The championship match is set for a 3:00 p.m. kickoff on Sat., Nov. 15. The A-Sun tournament champion receives the league’s automatic berth in the NCAA College Cup Championship. Fighting Camels Athletics


Campbell Athletics Earns High Marks in the Latest NCAA Graduation Success Report By Stan Cole, Associate A.D./Media Services Campbell University had eight sports post a graduation success rate of 100 percent, to lead the Atlantic Sun Conference in the NCAA’s 2008 Graduation Success Rate Report released Oct. 15. During the most recent evaluated six year period, Campbell had eight programs – including six women’s teams (basketball, cross country/track & field, soccer, softball, tennis and volleyball) – that were at 100 percent in the graduation success rate. The women’s program in general had a graduation success rate of 97 percent for the evaluated student-athletes during that period. The Campbell men’s programs of golf and soccer also reached the 100 percent graduation success rate. Across all sports, 11 of Campbell’s 13 teams bettered the national average. The Graduation Success Rate is based upon the number of athletes who graduate in addition to those who left Campbell prior to graduating but would have been academically eligible to compete. The NCAA graduation rate is determined by the percent of the students who entered school during the 2001-02 school year and graduated within six years (by August 2007). This is the most recent graduating class for which the required six years of information is available. Wrestling Team among nation’s most improved in Academic Progress Rate The latest Academic Progress Rating (APR) leaders were also recently released and Campbell was named in the elite group of schools. The wrestling team, led by head coach Billy Greene, was rated as one of the most improved teams in the nation during the 2007-07 school year. The National Wrestling Coaches Association (NWCA) announced the list of schools that had improved an APR rating more Fighting Camels Athletics

The Campbell wrestling program ranked ninth nationally in 2007-08 in team GPA.

than 15 points. Campbell checked in at No. 3 in the list of most improved schools after it jumped 22 points.

averages among Division I programs. The team was ninth in the nation after posting a 3.109 during the 2007-08 school year.

“I was pleased to see Campbell University wrestling recognized by the National Wrestling Coaches’ Association on their list of “most improved APR scores” among Division I wrestling programs,” said Greene. “Of course, the true credit belongs to the returning wrestling squad members that made the commitment to stay at Campbell and stay eligible.”

“I am proud of the commitment the returning wrestling squad members have made to the essence of our team vision: compete to win as a collegiate wrestler during your four years of eligibility, leave Campbell with a degree, and earn a grade point average within your degree that will qualify you as a competitive applicant in your respective professions,” said Greene.

The wrestling team was honored earlier this season by having one of the best grade-point 27


‘08 - ‘09 MEN’S BASKETBALL SCHEDULE Date

Day

Nov. 24

Mon.

Nov. 29

Sat.

Dec. 10

Wed.

Dec. 13

Sat.

Dec. 15

Mon.

Opponent

Location

‘08 - ‘09 WOMEN’S BASKETBALL SCHEDULE Time

Date

Day

Virginia Military Institute

Buies Creek

8:15

Nov. 24

Mon.

Appalachian State

Boone

3:00

Dec. 9

Tues.

Virginia Military Institute

Lexington, VA

7:00

Dec. 13

Sat.

* Florida Gulf Coast

Fort Myers, FL

3:15

Dec. 15

Mon.

* Stetson

DeLand, FL

7:00

Dec. 18

Thurs.

Opponent

Location

Time

Charleston Southern

Charleston, SC

7:00

High Point

Buies Creek

7:00

* Florida Gulf Coast

Fort Myers, FL

1:00

* Stetson

DeLand, FL

11:30

UNC Asheville

Buies Creek

7:00 1:00

Dec. 20

Sat.

UNC Pembroke (DH)

Buies Creek

3:15

Dec. 20

Sat.

North Carolina A&T

Buies Creek

Dec. 29

Mon.

Chicago State

Orlando, FL

4:30

Dec. 22

Mon.

Winston-Salem State

Winston-Salem

7:00

Dec. 30

Tues.

UCF or Penn

Orlando, FL

4:30/ 7:00

Dec. 30

Tues.

Winthrop

Rock Hill, SC

7:00

Jan. 3

Sat.

* Mercer (DH)

Buies Creek

3:15

Jan. 3

Sat.

* Mercer

Buies Creek

1:00

Jan. 5

Mon.

* Kennesaw State (DH)

Buies Creek

8:00

Jan. 5

Mon.

* Kennesaw State

Buies Creek

5:45

Jan. 8

Thurs.

* Lipscomb

Nashville, TN

8:15 cst

Jan. 8

Thurs.

* Lipscomb

Nashville, TN

6:00 cst

Jan. 10

Sat.

* Belmont

Nashville, TN

7:15 cst

Jan. 10

Sat.

* Belmont

Nashville, TN

5:00 cst

Jan. 17

Tues.

* Jacksonville (DH)

Buies Creek

3:15

Jan. 17

Sat.

* Jacksonville

Buies Creek

1:00

Jan. 19

Mon.

* North Florida (DH)

Buies Creek

8:00

Jan. 19

Mon.

* North Florida

Buies Creek

5:45

Jan. 22

Thurs.

* East Tennessee State

Johnson City, TN

7:00

Jan. 22

Thurs.

* East Tennessee State

Johnson City, TN

4:45

* USC Upstate

Spartanburg, SC

1:00

Jan. 24

Sat.

* USC Upstate

Spartanburg, SC

4:30

* Florida Gulf Coast

Buies Creek

7:00

Jan. 31

Sat.

* Kennesaw State

Kennesaw, GA

7:00

* Kennesaw State

Kennesaw, GA

7:30

Feb. 2

Mon.

* Mercer

Macon, GA

5:00

Thurs.

* Lipscomb

Buies Creek

7:00

* Belmont

Buies Creek

1:00

* Jacksonville

Jacksonville, FL

5:00

* North Florida

Jacksonville, FL

2:00

* East Tennessee State

Buies Creek

7:00

* USC Upstate

Buies Creek

1:00

Jan. 24

Sat.

Jan. 28

Wed.

Jan. 31

Sat.

Feb. 2

Mon.

* Mercer

Macon, GA

7:30

Feb. 5

Feb. 6

Fri.

* Belmont

Buies Creek

7:30

Feb. 7

Sat.

Feb. 9

Mon.

* Lipscomb

Buies Creek

7:00

Feb. 12

Thurs.

Feb. 14

Sat.

* North Florida

Jacksonville, FL

4:15

Feb. 14

Sat.

Feb. 16

Sat.

* Jacksonville

Jacksonville, FL

7:15

Feb. 19

Thurs.

Feb. 21

Sat.

* USC Upstate (DH)

Buies Creek

3:15

Feb. 21

Sat.

Feb. 23

Mon.

* East Tennessee State

Buies Creek

7:00

Feb. 26

Mon.

* Florida Gulf Coast

Buies Creek

7:00

Nashville, TN

7:30

Feb. 28

Thurs.

* Stetson

Buies Creek

1:00

Nashville, TN

TBA

Mar. 4-7

Wed.-Sat.

Nashville, TN

TBA

Project1 Feb. 27 7/28/08 Fri. Mar. 4-7

Wed.-Sat.

* Atlantic Sun Opponent

11:03 * StetsonAM

Page 1

Atlantic Sun Championship

(DH) Doubleheader Carter Gym

* Atlantic Sun Opponent

Atlantic Sun Championship


Alumni Alumni Class Notes

1974

Alice S. Warren (’74 BS) was named Assistant Vice Chancellor and Director of the McKimmon Center for Extension and Continuing Education for the office of Extension, Engagement and Economic Development at North Carolina State University.

1982 Joan Wicker (’82 BS) has been promoted to principal at Overhills Middle School from assistant principal at Overhills where she has been since 2005. From 1982 to 2005 she worked in the Lee County System where she trained teachers, was a technology specialist, on the reading task force and served on school improvement teams.

1985 Teddy J. Byrd (’85 BA) has been promoted to colonel in the Army Reserves. He has been commander of the 362nd Quartermaster Battalion since 2005 and was one of just 8 % of officers chosen. He is also the owner and president of Teddy Byrd Insurance Agency, which has offices in Angier and in Coats where he resides with his family. Frances McDonald (’85 BS/’90 Med/’05 MSA) is now Principal of Gentry Primary School. She has worked in the school system for 23 years and taught at Lafayette, Lillington Elementary and Harnett Primary before getting into administration when she went to work as assistant principal at Coats Elementary. She was also the 1999 Harnett County Teacher of the Year in Gifted education.

Do you have news you want to share with your classmates?

1988

Cynthia Anne Mills (’88 JD) and Robert Edward Farish, III were united in marriage on April 5, 2008 at the Chiesa di Atrani, Italy. Cynthia is the managing partner in the law firm of Mills & Economics, LLP in Greenville. Robert is the Chief Executive Officer of Farish Music, Inc. and is the president of Farish Investments, Inc.

1989

Tom Horner (’89 JD) was elected president of the N.C. Conference of District Attorneys at the meeting at New Bern in June. He will serve through June 2009.

Campbell Alumni Named to “Best in America” List Smith Moore Leatherwood LLP attorneys populate Woodward & White’s

list of The Best Lawyers in America as a record-breaking 53 from the firm were selected for inclusion in 2009. In all, 15 Smith Moore attorneys earned the distinction of being named to the list ten or more times, while the firm scored top practice area rankings in North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. Elizabeth Bondurant `84 and David York `99 were among those on the list. Bondurant works in Atlanta, Ga. and specializes in Insurance Law. York works in Raleigh, N.C. and specializes in Land Use and Zoning Law. The Best Lawyers list is based on nearly two million detailed evaluations of lawyers by their peers. The evaluations are primarily completed by attorneys listed in the previous edition of Best Lawyers, who participated in surveys to assess each candidate for the 2009 listing and who voted based on each nominees’ individual merits. For more information about Best Lawyers standards for membership, please visit BestLawyers.com.

Name_______________________________________________________________________________ Degree(s) and Year(s)__________________________________________________________________ Address_____________________________________________________________________________ City, State, Zip_ ______________________________________________________________________ Phone______________________________________________________________________________

Let us know about your professional and personal accomplishments and we’ll include it in an upcoming issue of the magazine.

Email address_ _______________________________________________________________________ Employer____________________________________________________________________________ Job Title_____________________________________________________________________________ Degree(s) from other schools____________________________________________________________

Fill out the form and send to: Alumni Relations: Angela Clark PO Box 26 Buies Creek, NC 27506 or E-mail clarka@campbell.edu Alumni Class Notes

Your news___________________________________________________________________________ _ ________________________________________________________________________________ _ ________________________________________________________________________________ 29


Gerald Franklin Hemphill (’89 BA) was elected Secretary-Treasurer of the Professional Insurance Agents Association of Virginia and DC at the June Convention and Trade Fair in Virginia Beach. He holds CIC and LUTCF Designations. His wife, Lori Britts Hemphill (’88 BBA) works with him in the agency. They reside in Richmond with their daughters Ashley and Taylor.

1990

Amy Ausbon Grimes (’90 BBA) and Branton Thomas Grimes proudly announce the birth of their daughter Ava Madison Grimes, born June 14, 2008. Amy is employed by BB&T as a Trust Compliance Officer in Raleigh, N.C. Amy and her husband reside in Knightdale, N.C.

1991 Molly Varnadore Campbell (’91 BA) has received the 2008 Michigan Education Association’s Outstanding Person in Education Award through the Bay College Faculty Association in Escanaba, Mich. David (’91 BBA/’93 MBA) and Melanie Pound (’91 PH) proudly announce the birth of Mason Alex. David works with Nobles financial planning and Melanie works in the School of Pharmacy.

1992 Michael Ervin (’92 BAS) has been promoted to lieutenant of N.C. Marine Patrol District 3, which covers the southern coastal waters of the state. He currently lives with his wife, Leanne and two children Michael, Jr. and Mallory in Jacksonville. Kevin Jackson (’92 MBA) has been named interim President of Bladen County Hospital in Elizabethtown as of September 29, 2008. Kevin previously served as Vice President of Surgical & Emergency Services with Cape Fear Valley Health System. He also served as Vice President of Support Services and Director of Management Engineering.

Campbell Graduate Designs Jerseys for NBA By Shannon Ryals, Assistant Director of Publications

Sgraphic kye Dillon, a Campbell University design major, designed five

jerseys for the NBA Latin Night project. The NBA hosted Latin Night for five NBA teams: Phoenix Suns, Los Angeles Lakers, Miami Heat, San Antonio Spurs and New Jersey Nets. These teams have a large Hispanic fan base. Each team was sporting jerseys with the team’s nickname written in Spanish. “For each team, I was assigned to design a conservative update to the teams’ current jerseys, as well as a more contemporary design with more of a Latin design influence,” said Dillon. “Each team then picked the version they desired to use for the event.” The NBA Latin Night project was one of Dillon’s assignments while interning at Frederick & Froberg Design Offices in Montclair, N.J. last summer. Dillon recently graduated and plans to work full time at Frederick & Froberg. “I also plan to maintain and build my freelance business,” he said. “This way,

Kobe Bryant, Lakers, wears Skye Dillon’s (`08) design on his jersey. Summited photo.

I will be able to work with elite clients such as the NBA, MLB, NHL, etc. while also establishing myself as a premier solo designer focused on identity branding.” This past year, Dillon was able to create the identity for the newest WNBA franchise, the Atlanta Dream. He also completed brands for the Edenton (NC) Steamers baseball team, Meredith College and the Fort Wayne Freedom (CIFL). He is currently working on the new identities for the UEFA Cup and the Arizona Diamondbacks’ AAA affiliate, the Reno Aces. For more information about Skye Design Studios check out his website at www.skyedesignstudios.com.

Childers Promoted To NC Cooperative Extension Director

LNCisaCooperative Childers (`99) was promoted to Extension Director of

Harnett County. Childers majored in Family Studies with a concentration in Child Development. Her new position requires her to serve as the administrative leader for the overall Extension Service in Harnett County. This includes the areas of: Agriculture, 4-H and Youth Development, Community Rural Development and Family and Consumer Sciences. “The best part of my job is getting to work with a great team of people who work hard to provide excellent educational programs for the citizens of Harnett 30

County,” said Childers. “I can’t tell you how exciting it is to see the programs we offer in action. Whether it is a parent coming to us for parenting or child care education, a homeowner with questions about fire ants, or a young person who wants to get involved in a community project –this organization has so much to offer and it is so exciting to see.” Childers is also a new mom, who finds it a challenge to balance work and family. “I am lucky in that I have a great family support system which makes it possible for me to take on this new position,” she said. “It is a nice feeling to go home at

Lisa Childers

the end of the day and know that I work for a county and an organization that is creating a better future not only for my little girl Anna Renee but also for other children and future generations.

Alumni Class Notes


1993

CommunityONE Bank, N.A. announced that Jim Watts (’93 BBA), senior investment strategist for the banks wealth management division, has been selected to serve as chair of the IRA Steering Committee for the American Bankers Association. He joined CommunityONE in 2000 and resides in Asheboro, N.C.

1995 Douglas “Dee” Stewart (’95 BA, ’03 MBA) was named a Rising Star in the June 2008 issue of Politics magazine. Dee was one of 10 Republican political professionals under the age of 35 to receive this honor from the leading industry publication. He owns a political consulting and public relations firm in Raleigh. Jessaca Senechal Giglio (‘95 BA) and Joe Paterno Giglio are proud to announce the birth of their son, Jackson Louis. Jackson was born on February 7, 2008. Jackson joins his three-yearold brother James Vito. Jessaca is an Assistant Design Editor at The News & Observer. Joe is a sports writer and ACC Now blogger at The News & Observer. They reside in Raleigh.

1996 Michelle Marcano (’96 MA) has been appointed Veterans Service officer for Union County. For the past nine years she has served as program manager for the Army Career & Alumni Program. Bethany Bryant Collins (’96 BS) was named the 2008 Elementary Teacher of the Year for Tazewell County, Va, Public Schools. This is her 11th year with Tazewell County.

1997 Cathy Hooks Allen (’97 PH) and husband Cory, announce the birth of twin sons on Feb. 14, 2008, Michael and Daniel. The boys join big sisters Hannah (5) and Grace (3).

1999 Carey Ledford Roberts (’99 BA) and Timothy Roberts proudly announce the birth of Henry Dixon Roberts, born April 2, 2008. Henry’s big brother Jackson Forest is 3 -years- old. Carey is the owner of Carey Roberts Design Co., a floral design business specializing in weddings and events and Timothy is the owner of Cottage Keepers Real Estate and Property Management. They reside in Belmont, N.C.

Alumni in Service: Ken Burgess (‘84) and Lisa Morris (‘04) Burgess, a partner at Poyner & T wo Campbell Law alumni, Lisa Morris Spruill in Raleigh, was selected by and Ken Burgess, have been recognized for their significant pro bono efforts.

Morris was named Mecklenburg County’s 2007-08 Children’s Rights Pro Bono Attorney of the Year. She participated in the Children’s Law Center Pro Bono Attorney and Custody Advocate Training in December of 2004 and has distinguished herself as a star Guardian ad litem with the CAP Team. With over 20 years experience as a nurse, Morris is a 2004 Campbell Law graduate. Her daughter, Erin, is a 2008 graduate of Campbell Law. “Early on, as a neophyte lawyer, Morris was eager to put her legal knowl edge to use and often served on cases as both the Volunteer Attorney and Custody Advocate,” said Whitney-Marisha Allsopp Jackson of The Council for Children’s Rights. “During the last fiscal year, Morris contributed just over 300 pro bono hours to representing children in our Custody Advocacy Program.” She is on pace to offer substantially more pro bono hours in the current year.

Alumni Class Notes

the Jessie F. Richardson Foundation (Portland, Ore.) as their 2007 National Volunteer of the Year. The award was based on Burgess’ efforts to support the renovation and expansion of a shelter for homeless seniors in Jinotepe, Nicaragua. The facility will be both a home for its residents and a center of health care for the entire community. The center is the first of its kind in Nicaragua, and one of the few in Central America. In addition to expanding the center itself, resources raised by Burgess and Poyner & Spruill is helping with a number of related projects designed to ensure the center’s long-term financial stability, bring medical care to the residents and help train some of the 500,000 abandoned street children of Nicaragua in services they can provide to seniors at the center or elsewhere. “Few things I’ve ever done have given me such a sense of satisfaction as this project,” said Burgess.

Jeff Williams (’99 MBA) has been named vice president, commercial lender for the bank’s Raleigh office. Jeff will be responsible for commercial lending, business development and community relations for the Wake County area.

2000

David (’97 BA/’00 MDiv) and Kristen Clippard are the proud parents of a new baby girl, Carleigh Rose, born April 22. David is now pastor of Woodlawn Baptist Church in Gastonia. Joe (’00 MDiv.) and Amy (’02 MDiv) Stertz are the proud new parents of Sophia Ann Stertz was born on July 23, 2008.. John (B.S. ‘00, MEd ‘03) and Jen (B.S.’99, MEd ‘02) Black proudly announce the birth of twin girls. Paxton Jean and Peyton Ellen were born on June 20,2008. April Gail Price (’00 BA) and Blaize Anthony Stewart, II were married on June 2, 2007 in the chapel of Southport Baptist Church. Both April and Blaize are employed by New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. They currently reside in New Orleans, La.

2001 David Dawson (’01 BS) and Heather McClain Dawson (’03 BBA) proudly announce the birth of their first child, Alexandra Nicole, born on May 12, 2008.

2002

Niki Davis Goad (’02 PH) and Brandon Goad would like to announce the arrival of thier second son, Nathan Eli Goad, born June 24, 2008. He has a big brother Hunter Davis Goad who is 3- years- old.

2003 John Essick (2003) has been called as Assistant Professor of Church History at Baptist Seminary of Kentucky. He will begin this position in January 2009. Ken (2003) and Kristen Thompson welcomed child number two on April 3, 2008, Nathanael James Thompson. Susie Shepard (’03 MA) will be the new principal at Rosewood Middle. Shepard has served as assistant principal at Rosewood Middle and Dillard Middle. She has also worked as Title I Home Coordinator at Goldsboro High, as well as a school counselor at Dillard Middle and Goldsboro High. She has also served as a teacher at Spring Creek Elementary and Goldsboro High. She earned her bachelors degree in Family Consumer Science Education in 1972 at North Carolina and A&T State University in 1972. She holds a master’s degree in School Counseling and completed a master’s in School Administration from Campbell University in 2003. Jennifer Leigh Grantham (’03 BA) and Jordan K. Shepard were united in marriage on August 2, 2008 at First Baptist Church in Goldsboro. Jennifer is a teacher at Estes Hills Elementary in Durham and Jordan is a receiving manager with Ferguson Enterprises Incorporated in Raleigh. They reside in Durham, N.C.

31


2004 April Barefoot (’04 BBA/MBA) has been promoted to the role of assistant vice president and credit department manager for New Century Bank in Dunn, N.C. April joined New Century in 2006 as an administrative assistant and was promoted to credit analyst in November 2007. Stephen F. Renfrow, Jr. (’04 BS) graduated from Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University in May 2008. He is now in his first year of a three-year pediatric residency at Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte. He and his wife Tracie (’03 BS) also celebrated the birth of their first child Lily Katherine on March 14, 2008.

Special Forces Soldier is Awarded the Second Highest Medal for Combat

Master Sgt. Brendan O’Connor

A

David (’04 MDiv) and Jennifer Durham along with big brother Samuel welcomed their second son, Luke Christopher, to the world on June 26, 2008.

7th Special Forces Group (Airborne) Soldier was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross during a ceremony at Bank Hall, Fort Bragg, N.C., for valorous actions during Operation Enduring Freedom.

Bryan Thompson (’04 BA) is the new town manager for the Town of Erwin. Bryan previously worked as the town manager for Mount Gilead, N.C.

On his 20th year of military service, Master Sgt. Brendan O’Connor, who earned his BS in Health Science at Campbell and was formerly a senior medic on a 2nd Battalion, 7th SFG (A) Operational Detachment Alpha, was presented the award while he stood before family, friends, and fellow Soldiers.

Chanda Michelle Nelson (’04 PH) and Zachary David Wadsworth were united in marriage on April 19, 2008 at Truett Memorial First Baptist Church. Chanda is a pharmacy manager at Ingles Pharmacy and Zachary is employed with Advanced Digital Cable in Hayesville. They now reside in Hayesville, N.C.

“For the men who were with him that day, Master Sergeant O’Connor is a savior,” said Adm. Eric T. Olson, commander of United States Special Operations Command, who presented the award to O’Connor. “For all Americans, he is a hero, and for all members of special operations across the services, he is a source of enormous pride.” O’Connor was instrumental in keeping his team alive during an intense battle with over 250 Taliban fighters in southern Afghanistan on June 22, 2006. “I’ve never been more honored, but this medal belongs to my whole team,” said O’Connor. “Every member was watching out for the other, inspiring each other, and for some, sacrificing for each other. We all fought hard, and it could just as easily be any one of them standing up here getting it pinned on; every one of them is a hero.”

Small Writes Book of Poems By Heather Small Maloney (`90)

A

s a child growing up, I spent many summers in Buies Creek with my grandparents, Lonnie Dalton and Elgie Lee Small. Many of you may remember that Mr. Small was the Vice-President of Business Affairs for forty years until 1989, when he retired. My grandfather was a man of great passion for many things, one of which was Campbell University. On a recent visit to the campus I was extremely proud and excited to see the growth that has taken place in Buies Creek since my graduation. Prior to the retirement of my grandfather, he had written and shared with many family members and friends a book of poetry entitled “From My Heart,” in which he dedicated each poem to a person or persons who had made a lasting impression on his life. He wrote many of these poems while sitting in his swing at the cottage by the sea at Holden Beach, N.C. I can remember how dear each of these individuals was to him, and he would recite some of his poems to me and then explain their significance. Over the years since his passing, I have read and re-read my copy of his poetry, feeling a great sense of pride and comfort from his written words. Often wishing I could share these works with everyone, I undertook several months ago the responsibility of having “From My Heart” republished. This little book, which has touched my heart so dearly, is now available on the campus of Campbell University at the bookstore. I hope and pray that the poems offered in this collection touch you and yours as tenderly as they have touched my family and me. 32

Lonnie Dalton and Elgie Lee Smalll.

Alumni Class Notes


2005 April Lenette Horne (’05 MBA) and Matthew Paul Obin were married on November 10, 2007. April is a project manager with Intergraph Corp. on Fort Bragg and Matthew is employed with the Department of the Army on Fort Bragg as an information technology specialist. They reside in Fayetteville, N.C. Maria G. Kraay (’05 BS) and Timothy A. Gruppen were married on Dec. 29, 2007. They are both fourth year doctoral students in Clinical Psychology at Wheaton College. Erin Pittman (’05 BS) and Richard Matthew Brown were married on February 2, 2008. Matt is a National Guardsman and was a Campbell student until 2005 when he went to serve one of two tours in Iraq. Erin is employed as an Outreach Coordinator at Roanoke Rapids Memorial Hospital.

Friends We Will Miss Bill Adams, ‘65, August 6, 2008 Donna Wilson Alley, ’69, June 9, 2008 Willard Auburn Brown, ’65, September 5, 2008 Julia Taylor Bryan, ’56, September 12, 2008 Joseph B. Collins, ’65, April 22, 2008 Paul C. Hines, Jr., ’51, July 12, 2008 Ronald Lewis Hurd, ’81, June 6, 2008 Patrick Mark Jenkins, ’03, June 13, 2008

2006 Mary Frances Prosser (’06 MBA) and Andrew Mebane Southerland were united in marriage on September 6, 2008 in Charleston, S.C. Mary is currently the Assistant General Counsel of the University of Virginia Health Services Foundation. Andrew attended both North Carolina State University and the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University and is a resident physician in the Department of Neurology with the University of Virginia Health Services. They reside in Charlottesville, Va.

Mary Gay Jones, ’72, July 16, 2008 Amy Pope McLamb, ’94, August 17, 2008 Luke J. Mercardante, ’02, April 15, 2008 Craig L. Price, ‘71, July 29, 2008

Ida Woodard mailed this postcard in 1907 when she was a student at Buies Creek Academy.

Reverand Ray Hodge, Ida’s son, submitted this postcard. If you have a picture you would like to submit please mail it to Shannon Ryals, PO Box 567, Buies Creek, NC 27506 or email it to ryalss@campbell.edu. Alumni Class Notes

33


Jennifer Nicole Crist (’06 PH) and Matthew Leslie Clements were married on October 27, 2007 in Charleston, S.C. Jennifer is an assistant professor at Shenandoah University College of Pharmacy in Winchester, Va. Matthew received a degree in mechanical engineering for Clemson University and is employed as an engineer for GE Lighting. They reside in Winchester, Va. Christopher Charles Tucker (’06 BBA) and Shannon Nicole Huffman were united in marriage on July 12, 2008. Christopher is a lieutenant serving in the U.S. Marine Corps and Shannon a graduate of East Carolina University, is a certified occupational therapy assistant. They reside in Jacksonville, N.C. Michael A. Myers (’06 JD) an attorney with the law firm of Bell, Davis & Pitt, P.A., has been named to a three year term on the Board of Directors of SciWorks, a Winston-Salem based hands on science center and educational park. Aaron R. Jackson (’06 BA) has been appointed by the Northeast Piedmont Chorale as music director for the 2008-09 concert season. Aaron also serves as a minister of music at Calvary Baptist Church in Raleigh and as adjunct faculty at Montgomery Community College as an online professor of religion.

2007

Jennifer C. Norris (‘07 MBA) and Blake Norris proudly announce the birth of their first child, a daughter, Avery Christine, born on May 31, 2008.

David L. Knight (‘07 BBA) took a position with the Department of Veterans Affairs in Fayetteville, N.C. There he works with severely disabled veterans and their builders implementing government grants to adapt the veteran’s home to suit their individual needs. Cara Lynn Vogel (’07 MACE) and Jamie Vogel are the proud parents of a baby boy, Jesse James Vogel, born April 10, 2008. Michelle and Chris Dawson (’91 BA/’07) proudly announce the birth of Trevor Alan Dawson, born April 19, 2008. Nita and Marshall Danenburg (‘07) are the proud grandparents of twins born June 19, 2008. The boy is Cameron Everett and the girl is Morgan Ann. Merrill Ruth Gordon (’07 PH) and Jeffrey Wayne Sawyer (’03 BBA) were married on June 7, 2008 in Monroe. Merrill is employed as a pharmacist with Kmart in Virginia Beach and Jeffrey is a district manager with Auto Bell in Hampton Roads, Virginia. They reside in Chesapeake, Va. Carrie Stokes Wylie (’07 PH) and Craig Michael Schmiesing were united in marriage on July 19, 2008 at Linwood United Methodist Church. Carrie is employed with North East Medical Center in Concord as a clinical pharmacist. Craig graduated from the University of North Carolina in Charlotte and is employed as a mechanical engineer at ARENVA in Charlotte where they now reside.

Brittany Christine Hunter (’07 BS) and Steven Mitchem Royster were married on July 26, 2008 at Mt. Carmel Baptist Church in Chapel Hill. Brittany is employed by Carolina Ophthalmology Association of Chapel Hill and Steven a graduate of UNC, is employed by State Employee’s Credit Union. They reside in Chapel Hill, N.C. Keleigh Canter (’07 BS) and Joseph May (’08 BBA) were united in marriage on August 2, 2008 at Community Bible Church in High Point. Keleigh is employed as an ESL Teacher for elementary school in Harnett County. Joseph is employed as Assistant Professional at Hillandale Golf Course in Durham. They currently reside in Cary, N.C.

2008 Alana Elizabeth Safrit (’08 BS) and Jason Reynolds Fox were united in marriage on September 6, 2008 at West Corinth Baptist Church. Alana is employed with Elite Food Sales and Marketing in Salisbury. Jason graduated with a degree in Criminal Justice from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and is a K-9 police officer with the Salisbury Police Department. They currently reside in China Grove, N.C. Sara and Chris Greenwood (’08 MDiv) had their first baby boy June 28, 2008. His name is Josiah Potter Greenwood.

Radford Names Beeler Assistant A.D. for Athletic Communications

R adford University Director of Athletics Robert Lineburg announced the hiring of

Joey Beeler (`02) as Assistant Director of Athletics for Athletic Communications. Beeler comes to Radford with a wealth of knowledge in the sports information business, which includes extensive website and publication development.

Beeler, who has spent the last three years as the assistant sports information director at Davidson College in Davidson, N.C., will oversee communications for the Highlanders’ 19 Division I varsity sports, including the athletic department’s website, publications and media relations. A 2002 graduate of Campbell University with a Bachelor’s degree in Mass Communications, Beeler worked in his alma mater’s athletic department for five years, in both sports information and marketing. While an undergrad, he worked under Associate Athletics Director for Athletic Media Services 34

Stan Cole as a student assistant and later continued his role as an assistant director from 2004 to 2005. During his time, he served as the primary contact for several of the Camels’ athletic programs and was the webmaster for Campbell’s athletics website (www. GoCamels.com). Along with assisting every aspect of the sports information office, Beeler doubled as the broadcasting assistant and marketing intern. For five seasons, he performed play-by-play and color analysis duties for Camel basketball, baseball and softball games. As a student broadcaster, he hosted “Campbell SportsTalk,” a weekly halfhour radio show, and served as the sideline reporter for basketball broadcasts. As the marketing intern, Beeler assisted in corporate sponsorship sales, oversaw internal and external game promotions and was the director of the “Camel Crazies,” Campbell’s student-based fan group.

Joey Beeler. Photo by Tim Cowie.

He is a member of the College Sports Information Directors of America and Basketball Writers Association. Beeler and the former Carrie Glass were married in May of 2004. They are the parents of Kayleigh Addison, who is 18 months old.

Alumni Class Notes


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December 4, 2008 7:00 p.m. Turner Auditorium www.campbell.edu for tickets

P.O. Box 567 • Buies Creek, NC 27506


Campbell University Magazine (Fall 2008)