Page 1

Serving the producers of the Northwest

FARMER North Battleford, Saskatchewan

RancheR

Thursday, March 12, 2020

How farmers are using drones Technology is changing the way we farm The farmers of yesteryear might not be too familiar with their surroundings if they were to visit a modern farm. While the men and women who made their livings as farmers decades ago would no doubt still recognize certain farm features that have withstood the test of time, they might not understand the inner workings of the modern farm, particularly in regard to the role technol-

ogy now plays within the agricultural sector. Technology has changed agriculture in myriad ways. The methods farmers employ to produce food and improve the efficiency of their operations has changed as technology has evolved. One of the more noticeable changes that’s hard to miss on modern farms is the use of agricultural drones. Drones have been

around for decades. Sometimes referred to as “unmanned aerial vehicles,” or “UAVs,” drones can be utilized in ways that can save farmers money and protect the planet. • Monitor crops: According to senseFly, the commercial drone subsidiary of Parrot Group, drones can help farmers effectively monitor their crops. With a drone flying overhead, farmers can spot

and quickly identify issues affecting their crops before those issues escalate into something larger. • Soil analysis: Another potential benefit of agricultural drones highlights their role in analyzing soil. Agricultural drones utilize complex mapping functions to gather data about the soil, including areas where it might be stressed. That enables farmers to develop accurate soil samples

that can be used to guide decisions in regard to irrigation and fertilization. • Reduce waste: The data gathered by drones can help farmers determine the vigor of their crops at various stages of growth. Such information can prevent overfertilization and overwatering, thereby reducing waste and runoff, benefitting the planet as a result. • Planning: Drones can be used to collect data on

crop growth and health at various times throughout the growing season. That can help farmers develop accurate predictions regarding harvest quality and crop yield, making it easier for them to plan ahead. Agricultural drones are one of the many examples that illustrate how technology has changed and will continue to change the ways modern farmers conduct business.

‘Tis the season: Check for spring weight restrictions As the weather warms and the daylight-hours increase, truckers and shippers are being reminded to begin reducing truck loads on some provincial highways. During this time of year, secondary highways revert back to regulation weights, which will prevent damage to these roads. Due to mild temperatures in the forecast, winter weights are being removed. Effective Monday, March 9 at 12:01 a.m., existing winter weights were removed

across southern Saskatchewan and reverted back to normal regulation weight. Typically, winter weights are removed province-wide on March 15 weather permitting. Spring road restrictions are used by the province and rural municipalities to mitigate damage to infrastructure. Typically, these road restrictions start in March in southwest Saskatchewan and remain over a two to three-week period. “Preserving Saskatch-

ewan’s road network is vital for transporting goods to market,” Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities President Ray Orb said. “By reducing weights during the spring, we can reduce maintenance costs and ensure our roadways remain intact.” The road bans reduce allowable weights on RM roads and secondary weight provincial highways by 10 to 15 per cent and typically last about six weeks.

Originally, the ninemonth primary highways are designed and constructed to carry only lower secondary weight loads. Weights are reverted back to the design loads (secondary weight) during spring to reduce damage from the spring-thaw. As a large province with considerable difference in climate in the north and the south, there are different dates for when the primary weights are in effect. In the north of the province,

the annual weight increase on the nine-month primary highways are from July 1 to March 31 of the following year. In the south of the province, the annual weight increase on the nine-month primary highways will occur earlier, from June 15 to March 15 of the following year. This change will help to sustain road conditions in the south, where spring thaw occurs earlier. To check which highways are impacted by weight restrictions, please

visit truck weight classifications and restrictions at www.saskatchewan.ca/ trucking. Spring road bans will be posted as necessary under the “New Spring Order” link. To view the interactive map showing winter weight restrictions and spring road bans, visit www.saskatchewa n.ca / highwayhotline and scroll down to restrictions. Information is also available by contacting the Highway Hotline at 511.

Spring runoff potential below average for most The Water Security Agency has released the March spring runoff outlook. Most of the province is facing a below normal spring runoff for 2020 as low winter snowfall levels are impacting conditions across Saskatchewan. A band in southwestern Saskatchewan stretching

from Moose Jaw through to Lucky Lake and Leader is facing the driest conditions with a well below normal runoff projected. Some agricultural water supply issues could develop within drier areas during 2020 if lack of moisture persists through spring. March and April can be the some of the wettest

months, so the outlook may improve. Only the far northwest and extreme southeast and southwest corners of the province are projected to have near or above normal runoffs, with small portions of the province expected to have a higher than normal runoff. However, in these

areas where above normal runoff is expected, flood flows are unlikely based on current conditions and normal conditions going forward. Snowmelt runoff is influenced by fall soil moisture, storage conditions, winter precipitation accumulations and weather during the spring

melt. While much of the southern half of province entered the winter with good to excess moisture conditions, below average snowfall has decreased the runoff potential. Water supplies from the province’s major reservoirs are expected to be adequate in 2020. Desirable summer operating levels

are also expected at most recreational lakes within the province in 2020. The Qu’Appelle Valley is the exception with Last Mountain, Pasqua, Echo, and Crooked lakes likely to be lower than desirable. The WSA will issue another forecast in early April if runoff is not yet underway.


Page 10 - The Battlefords, Thursday, March 12, 2020

Regional News-Optimist

w w w. n ew s o p t i m i s t . c a

Kindersley farm to work with Supercluster group

Project will help farmers become more efficient and achieve higher returns while improving traceability along the value chain Submitted Protein Industries Canada in partnership with an industry consortium, recently nnounced an investment of $ 9.25 million into a project that will help improve on-farm logistics and food traceability through an integrated data platform. This innovative project will utilize data from the farm gate,

through the entire supply chain, to make on-farm practices more efficient, increasing consumer traceability while reducing input costs and the overall environmental impact of the sector. “The Protein Industries Supercluster project is showing the way for increased collaboration between SMEs by bringing together partners from

R.K. (Ray) WandleR 2 Way Radio Communications specialist

across the agriculture value chain. Both Canadian consumers and farmers will benefit from reliable farm-level data that can support Canada’s reputation as a supplier of traceable food ingredients, and a champion of sustainable farming practices,” The Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry said.

#4 Summerfield Beach Drive PO Box 502 Cochin, Sask. S0M 0L0

GEOTECH WIRELESS Communications Services

Two Way Radio, Sales, Service and Programming Cell Phone Signal Boosters Phone: 306-441-2222 Fax: 306-386-3029 30 km North of North Battleford & 1 km East Email: gtk@sasktel.net

The consortium, consisting of Provision Analytics from Calgary, Alta.; Verge Technologies from Calgary; Skymatics from Calgary; and Coutts Agro from Kindersley, Sask., will invest, $4.6 million or half of the total project budget, with Protein Industries Canada’s co-investment making up the other half. This project brings together the expertise of Coutts Agro, a large-scale farming operation, with technologies from Verge Technologies and Skymatics, which uses digital mapping and optimization technologies to help farmers improve in-field operations by capturing information around input application, fuel use and more. Verge Technologies software results in fewer passes required to maintain a field, leading to reduced fuel costs and mitigating a producer’s environmental impact. This dataset will be used by Provision Analytics to create linkages to support food traceability, transparency and key metrics associated with energy efficiency. “This project is tru-

ly ground-breaking for the Canadian agriculture and food sector,” CEO of Protein Industries Canada Bill Greuel said. “The collaboration and scope of this project, from onfarm through to processing captures the spirit of the Supercluster. By bringing together partners from across the value chain, the project will improve the traceability of our agrifood products across the chain of custody and provide metrics for sustainability initiatives, ensuring that Canada’s reputation as a safe and reliable supplier of healthy, sustainably produced food is protected.” This will be the first project to attempt to correlate farm level practices through the value chain from production to processing. Historically, all notions of sustainability and traceability have been constrained to individual steps of the value chain. This project brings together the different touchpoints to support traceability and sustainability initiatives and advance Canada’s agriculture and food sector. “Thank you to everyone at Protein Industries Can-

ada, Provision Analytics, Verge, and Skymatics for making our group’s application a success. Never has the pace of changing demands around food been so great,” Vice President of Coutts Agro Matt Coutts said. “As farmers we take great care to sustainably produce safe food while improving outcomes for all stakeholders, including the environment. With this project, our group is able to create a future where the Canadian agriculture sector is on the right side of history and Canadian Farmers are participating in the associated value creation.” Coutts Agro Ltd. is a family farm located near Kindersley. They operate and produce grain and oilseeds on roughly 100,000 acres. A leader in adopting new technology, they were the winner of the 2018 Land O’ Lakes Innovation in Sustainability Award. This is Protein Industries Canada’s fourth approved project and the first that falls under the data category. This project will have demonstrated benefits beyond plant protein to the entire agriculture and food sector.

10% OFF

All oil filters Discounts And selected oils

April 6-17

10% OFF

MORE THAN JUST TIRES

All Morris parts stocked. April 20 - May 1

10% OFF

All Sprayer stocked parts Sprayer hose

15% OFF

April 6-17 Morris 2½ Red Hose

Sale $9.99/ft Reg. $12.46/ft Morris 15/16 White Hose

Sale $1.65/ft Reg.$2.03/ft

HWY 4 North | North Battleford

CALL US TODAY! 306-445-2427

• Alignment • Steering & Suspension • Climate Control: Air Conditioning & Heating • Battery & Electrical Services • Brakes • Cooling System & Radiator • Fuel System Services • Exhaust System • Driveline System • Oil & Lubrication Services Store Hours: Monday to Friday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. | Sunday Closed

306-752-2260

1120 Saskatchewan Drive South/East Service Road Melfort, SK

Fountaintire.com


Regional News-Optimist

The Battlefords, Thursday, March 12, 2020 - Page 11

w w w. n ew s o p t i m i s t . c a

Agronomy

Is it time to review your “right rate” for nitrogen? By Warren Ward

We know canola has the genetic potential to yield 80 bu./ac. or more because we see these yields from time to time in fields in Western Canada. Achieving high yields depends on some help from nature (not too dry, not too wet, not too cold, not too hot), but having the nutrients available to feed a big crop is also essential.

The question is, could farmers increase their nitrogen rates for canola and

improve their profitability? In some cases they definitely can.

Maine-Anjou

SINCE 1970

MANITOU

We raise the “REAL” Maine-Anjou cattle! Seriously the Real Maine-Anjou cattle are the ultimate breed in crossbreeding. BULLS FOR SALE AT THE FARM

According to well-used data from the Canadian Fertilizer Institute, canola needs around three pounds of available nitrogen per bushel of seed yield. This nitrogen comes from soil reserves, mineralization of residue and from fertilizer. As yields get higher, the ratio of three pounds of nitrogen per bushel of canola yield could be a little lower. Rigas Karamanos, a soil scientist with decades of experience in Western Canada, says that with yields of 50 bu./ac. or more, nitrogen uptake for modern hybrids could be as low as two pounds per bushel. A good range for targeting high yields, therefore, would be two to three pounds per bushel. (If ratios of nitrogen rate to yield are over three pounds per bushel, farmers will want to examine what other inputs may be limiting yields.) “Right rate” is one of the 4R principles of good fertilizer stewardship. The others are “right source”, “right time” and “right place”. For more on the 4Rs, see the Nutrient Stewardship section at fertilizercanada.ca and the Fertilizer Management section at canolaencyclopedia.ca.

How do you know what nitrogen rate is the right one?

www.manitoumaineanjou.ca Gary & Sandy Graham 306•830•0883

marSdEn, SK

grahamgs@sasktel.net

Soil tests can certainly help. This provides a picture of actual nitrogen reserves in the soil and organic matter levels can hint at mineralization potential. Labs also provide a recommended rate that could be used as a baseline. For a test to see if their current rates are still the right rates, farmers could try a few strips in 2020 with rates higher than their usual rate. An Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) inputs study completed in 2010 found that with extra dollars to spend on inputs, the best return on investment came from

Warren Ward

an increased rate of nitrogen fertilizer. CCC Ultimate Canola Challenge on-farm trials in 2016 and 2017 found that seven of 17 trial sites across the Prairies had a statistically significant yield increase when nitrogen rates were increased by 25 per cent compared to the standard rate for the field. The average base rate for farms that participated in the UCC trials was 127 lb./ac. of nitrogen, and the average yield increase across all 17 sites was 2.2 bu./ac. for the higher nitrogen rate. It is reasonable to expect a greater yield increase and therefore a larger ROI when the base nitrogen rate is lower to start with. Going from 100 to 125 lb./ ac. of nitrogen will cost $12.50 (based on 50 cents per pound of nitrogen) and should, on average, increase yields by at least the 2.2 bu./ac. shown in the UCC trials. Of course the actual on-farm results will depend on weather and yield potential for the area. In general, while the return on investment for extra nitrogen is not near as high as the first 50 pounds, the

return can still be positive. This limits the risk of experimenting with higher nitrogen rates, and might provide farmers with some motivation to test higher rates for broad strips within a few fields. Farmers willing to try this in 2020 should make sure to try incremental increases in nitrogen without varying anything else – so they get a true test of the nitrogen effect. Obviously the farm has to make decisions that will increase profits – if not on every field every year, then at least overall. A review of nitrogen rates in light of canola genetic yield potential could provide a positive economic boost for the farm. Another good reason to look at higher nitrogen rates is that higher productivity per acre makes better use of the farmland we have, and reduces emissions per tonne of canola produced. These will be important considerations for Canada’s canola industry going forward. Nitrogen is a large input cost for canola, and farmers operating on thin margins have to pay attention to their return on investment for all inputs. With the proven benefits of an input like nitrogen, farmers looking at costs and profit potential have good reasons to consider increasing their nitrogen investment per acre. –Warren Ward is an agronomy specialist with the Canola Council of Canada. Email wardw@ canolacouncil.org. These canola management tips are brought to you by the Canola Council and SaskCanola.

USED EQUIPMENT ON HAND MORRIS 8370 XL AIR TANK...........................................$37,500 60’ MORRIS CONTOUR DRILL ......................................$79,000 MORRIS 47’ CONTOUR DRILL WITH 8370 XL AIR TANK ................................................$85,000 50’ MORRIS MAXIM AIR DRILL .....................................$12,000 7300 MORRIS 300 BO AIR TANK ...................................$15,000 12X72 MERIDIAN SWING AUGER .................................$17,500

SELECT SEED GROWERS *CWRSWheat: Wheat: AAC Brandon, *CWRS AAC Brandon, AAC Elie, AAC Redberry *Peas: CDC Forest

North Battleford, SK Email: gregfarms@sasktel.net PH (306) 445-5516 Denis (Cell): (306) 441-7851 Rory (Cell): (306) 441-7005 Brandon (Cell): (306) 441-3781 Emile (Cell): (306) 441-6305

*Malt Barley: Lowe AAC Synergy *Flax: CDC Glas

Canadian Seed Institute ACCREDITED

NEW

NEW NEW

See Us For All Your Farming Needs Hyd Hose, Belts, Bearings, Batteries, Etc. We Have A Wide Array of Meridian Augers! Your AGCO - Morris Dealer After Hours: Jim: Cell 306-768-7756 House 306-768-2740 Kevin: Cell 306-768-7065 House 306-768-2455

CARROT RIVER IMPLEMENTS INC. Carrot River, SK. Ph: 306-768-2715 Fax: 306-768-2255 Email: crimp@sasktel.net


Page 12 - The Battlefords, Thursday, March 12, 2020

Regional News-Optimist

w w w. n ew s o p t i m i s t . c a

Flooring BATTLEFORDS

SPRING

CENTRE

Y R O T N E V E N L I A S

Kanga Bac

• Underlay attached • Do It Yourself & SAVE • Available in plush • Lots of colors to choose from Starting at

2

$

SPC Click Vinyl Plank

29

/sq.ft.

AC5-German Drop-Lock Laminate • Extremely durable • 30 year warranty • 36 hour water block

2

$

Starting at

99

/sq.ft.

• Drop & Go • Easy application • 20ml wear layer Starting at

2

$

• 25 year warranty • 5 colors to choose from • Drop installation • The look of Hardwood…. The durability of laminate Starting at

99

/sq.ft.

Armstrong Linoleum

• Hand scraped • Lots of colors & textures to choose from Starting at

99

Laminate German-made Flooring

1

$ 79

¢

/sq.ft.

/sq.ft.

WE ARE YOUR INSURANCE SPECIALISTS DON’T PAY FOR UP TO 6 MONTHS or 0% INTEREST FOR UP TO 24 MONTHS Sale ends 5:00 P.M. April 5th, 2020

Flooring BATTLEFORDS

CENTRE

306-445-4690 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

• Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Thursday 9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. • Friday 9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.

SUNDAY & HOLIDAYS 12:00 - 5:00 P.M. info@battlefordsflooringcentre.ca


Page 2 - The Battlefords, Thursday, March 12, 2020

Regional News-Optimist

w w w. n ew s o p t i m i s t . c a

Seed Royalties Update

Farmers speak up on seed royalties Producers send a clear message through western farm organizations’ Seed Royalty Survey

Recent proposals on seed royalties have generated a great deal of interest among Canadian farmers. In late 2018, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency launched consultations on the future of crop breeding in Canada. A series of public meetings were held across the country where federal officials sought feedback on new models to collect royalties on saved seed. The proposed models included a “trailing contract royalty” that would see producers sign a contract stipulating that a

WB

royalty is paid when farmsaved seed is used, and an “end point royalty” in which a royalty is paid when delivering harvest-

ed grain from farm-saved seed. The consultations were put on hold in the spring of 2019 but are expected to resume in 2020. The Alberta Federation of Agriculture (AFA), the Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan (APAS), and the Keystone Agricultural Producers of Manitoba (KAP) have been working together to ensure the viewpoints of producers are heard in these discussions.

Wapaw Bay Humates

Maximize yields & profits & improve your soil

with Wapaw Bay Humic Acids for less than $10 per acre!

Seed treatment – enhanced germination Soil and foliar applications. Irrigation. CFIA registered - Allowed for Certified Organic farms

Reprinted with permission from the Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan (Saskatchewan Farmers’ Voice magazine, Winter 2020) breeding is funded.

• Seek input on the principles that should guide changes to how plant

• Measure satisfaction

Larry Doke, MLA CUT KNIFE - TURTLEFORD CONSTITUENCY

604-329-0439 ap0548ap@gmail.com

P.O. Box 850 Maidstone, SK S0M 1M0 Ph: (306) 893-2619 Fax: (306) 893-2660 Email: larrydoke@sasktel.net

Contact us for your Product Guide – Dealer enquiries welcome

Healthy Soil, Healthy Plants, Healthy Profits

Saskatchewan’s Growth Plan envisions crushing more canola and processing more meat and pulse crops at home, increasing crop production as we grow Saskatchewan’s agri-food exports to $20 billion by 2030.

• Gather opinions on the two options presented and determine if there is support for investigating other options;

• Gauge awareness of the consultations and the two models that have been presented;

1 Yellowhead Road, Saskatoon, SK Tel: 306-767-2296 Emails: raypotie@gmail.com

with how crop varieties are currently developed and funded;

In July 2019, the three farm organizations launched the Producer Survey on Seed Royalties. The purpose of the online survey was to:

The survey was open from July to October 2019 and received 1,136 responses. Fifty-three percent of respondents were from Saskatchewan, with 25 percent from Alberta, 20 percent from Manitoba, and 2 percent from other provinces. The results were clear: Canadian farmers do not support the two seed royalty models under consideration.

Growing awareness amongst farmers Result #1: There was broad awareness of the consultations and the two specific options that have been presented. Eighty percent of respondents said they were aware of the consultations on seed royalties/value creation. When asked to Continued on Page 3

Hugh Nerlien

MLA- Kelvington-Wadena (306) 278-2200 nerlien.mla@sasktel.net

Todd Goudy

MLA - Melfort Constituency (306) 752-9500 goudymla@gmail.com

Learn more at saskgrowthplan.ca.

Fred Bradshaw

MLA - Carrot River Valley (306) 768-3977 fbradshaw.mla@sasktel.net

Delbert Kirsch MLA – Batoche

(306) 256-3930 batochemla@sasktel.net

FARMER

Serving the producers of the Northwest

RancheR

A community newspaper published Monthly . Owned & Operated by Prairie Newspaper Group LP a division of GVIC Communications Corp. 892 - 104th Street, North Battleford, Saskatchewan S9A 1M9 Telephone: 306-445-7261 • Fax: 306-445-3223 E-mail: newsoptimist.news@sasktel.net We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada. Nous reconnaissons l’appui financier du gouvernement du Canada.

Gordon Brewerton Senior Group Publisher

Administration

Joyce Wappel Office Manager, Noah Cooke, Aliya Cooke DTI/Receptionist

Editorial

Jayne Foster Editor John Cairns Reporters

Advertising Sales

Candace Mack-Horton - Sales Manager, Maureen Charpentier, Katasha Clarke

Composition

Claude Paradis Prepress Manager,

Circulation

Karen Boser Bindery Manager, Grace Merritt - Melissa Pitkeathley, Inserters


Regional News-Optimist

The Battlefords, Thursday, March 12, 2020 - Page 3

w w w. n ew s o p t i m i s t . c a

Seed Royalties Update Continued from Page 2 rate their familiarity with the proposed models, only 13 percent reported being unfamiliar with the end point royalty proposal, while 17 percent were unfamiliar with the trailing contract royalty option.

Overall satisfaction with current approach Result #2: Respondents reported an overall level of satisfaction with how new crop varieties are developed and funded in Canada. The survey listed eight crop types and noted that these crops have different models for funding and commercializing new varieties. Respondents were asked to rate how satisfied they were that these models would meet their future needs (both economic and agronomic). The majority of respondents expressed satisfaction with the funding models for all crop types. At the high end, 75 percent of producers responded that they were satisfied or very satisfied with the existing approach to varietal development for wheat/durum. On the lower end, 57 percent indicated satisfaction with the approach to canola development.

Lack of support points to need for additional options Result #3: A large majority of respondents disagreed that the trailing contract royalty and end point royalty models should be pursued further. There was strong support for the need to investigate additional options. The survey used descriptions from government consultation material to briefly describe the trailing contract royalty and end point royalty proposals. Respondents were then asked if these models were worth further consideration or whether additional options were required. Responses to both proposals were consistent: 65-66 percent of respondents disagreed or strongly disagreed they should be pursued further, with 51 percent of respondents agreeing that additional options were required.

The future of plant breeding Result #4: Responses were more varied when it came to the future direction of plant breeding. Respondents were

“The results were clear: Canadian farmers do not support the two seed royalty models under consideration.” asked to agree or disagree with various statements about the future of crop breeding in Canada. At the high end of support, 68 percent of respondents expressing an opinion agreed that increased investment in crop development is required provided it ensures long-term stable funding for public and university breeding programs. Sixty-four percent supported increased investment provided that producers have oversight into how much is collected and what the funds are used for. Fifty-two percent supported increased investment that ensures Canadian producers have access to improved varieties in order

to remain competitive in international markets. On the low end, 47 percent of respondents agreed that increased investment in crop development is required provided it encourages competition and higher levels of private sector investment in plant breeding.

Farmers want to be consulted Result #5: Respondents expressed a strong interest and desire for further producer engagement in the seed royalty consultations. The survey results reflected strong opinions

about seed royalties and a general awareness that the changes under consideration will affect farmers and the agricultural industry for decades.

Nearly half of respondents supplied their contact information and asked to be kept informed as the consultation process moves forward.

What next?

APAS, in cooperation with its provincial counterparts in Alberta and Manitoba, has presented the survey results to the new federal agriculture minister and will continue to use them to advocate for more and better producer consultation going forward. “What we heard from producers is that they are not in a position to absorb extra costs,” said Todd Lewis, president of APAS. “As price-takers, farmers have little room in their margins for added expenditures. There is little support for yet another expense to add our bottom lines.” Additionally, in December 2019 APAS members adopted a resolution calling on the federal government to withdraw consideration of the two proposed models and consult with producers on funding models that align with six principles.. For a more detailed analysis of the survey results, visit seedroyaltysurvey.com.

Water Cannons Single Nozzle Cannon will pump 1000 US gallons per minute, irrigate approx. 4 acres. The Dual Nozzle will pump double - 2000 gallons per minute!

We're Everything you Tow!

Cold winters, muddy spring, heavy loads • Built to handle rugged Canadian Climate • Soldered connections with - 60° wiring • Build up to 45,000 GVW for light trailer/100,000 GVW for Semi Trailers Many options available to customize units

11827 24 St. NE, Edmonton I 780-371-1002 | www.doubleatrailers.ca


Page 4 - The Battlefords, Thursday, March 12, 2020

Regional News-Optimist

w w w. n ew s o p t i m i s t . c a

Next-gen consumers and farmers share concerns and hopes for the food system

Corteva Agriscience finds GenZ/Millennial consumers and farmers want to become a strong collective voice and major driver in reshaping the next generation of agriculture Submitted Corteva Agriscience recently announced the results of a global study

of Gen Z/millennial farmers and consumers. This first-of-its-kind research, commissioned by Corteva Agriscience, examined

views on the future of food and farming by next-gen farmers and consumers in the United States, Brazil, China, France and Russia.

Stop by our Lumber Department and get all YOUR ESTIMATES for construction of homes, cabins or other buildings.

CHECK OUT THE NEW PLANS!

Turtleford & District

(306) 845-2222 Turtleford, SK

Notably, the study reveals surveyed participants in different global markets are highly aligned in their concern about the future of food and farming. The study, conducted by Kantar, one of the world’s leading data, insight and consultancy companies, also revealed that next-gen farmers and consumers want to have more influence over decisions about how food is grown, sold and consumed; and share a deep desire to be involved in securing the financial and environmental sustainability of farms. Key insights from the research are profiled in an accompanying white paper that includes data from each of the countries involved in the study. “Two of the most important voices in the food system today are those of young farmers and consumers,” said James C. Collins, Jr., Chief Exec-

utive Officer of Corteva Agriscience. “They see that the future and ability to thrive are interconnected. Now is the time to empower both farmers and consumers to face the challenges of the future with mutual understanding, appreciation and a willingness to work to-

gether to ensure long-term security to both farming and food.” Key Study Findings include: Protecting the Future of Food • 89 per cent of surveyed consumers and 73 per cent of surveyed farmers are Continued on Page 5

TICKETS

zed Authori r Deale

110.00/YEAR

$

Every ticket eligible for EVERY DRAW

(With the exception of Previous Purchaser Draw) Tickets can be purchased at the BUHF Gratefully Yours Gift & Food Shop, the BUH Foundation Office, by phone, fax (446-6631), or online.

306-446-6652

2020-2021

www.buhfoundation.com

LR19-0103

ENRICH LOCAL HEALTHCARE, EMBRACE COMMUNITY WELLNESS, SUPPORT YOUR FOUNDATION!

1000.00

1000.00

$

Parts, Service & Repairs.

$

Early Bird

Previous Purchaser

THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 2020

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2020

DRAW

DRAW

Tickets MUST be purchased by 5:00 pm Friday, April 3, 2020 to be eligible.

• Cylinder Contracts • All Sizes • Welding Supplies

– 13 DRAWS EACH MONTH –

Regulator + Torch Repair • Industrial Gases • Specialty Gases

• Hospitality Gases • Welding & Cutting Gases

1 DRAW FOR $ .00

1 DRAW FOR $ .00

1 DRAW FOR $ .00

10 DRAWS FOR $ .00

1000 600

400 200

* All draws will be drawn randomly out of the raffle drum. *All draws will be made at Battlefords Union Hospital at 8:30 am. **All draws will be made on the final Friday of the month with the exception of June, July and December.

Oils & Lubricants

Tickets MUST be purchased by 5:00 pm Thursday, April 9, 2020 to be eligible. Must have purchased a ticket in one or more of the last three years to be eligible for the Previous Purchaser Draw.

zed Authori r Deale

• Agriculture • Forestry • Automotive • Industrial • Construction • Marine • Exploration • Mining • On-Road Heavy Duty

MONTHLY DRAW DATES FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2020 FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2020 FRIDAY, JUNE 19, 2020** FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2020** FRIDAY, AUGUST 28, 2020 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2020 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2020 FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2020 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2020** FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2021 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2021 FRIDAY, MARCH 26, 2021

Final day of the 50/50 Enhancement sales will be Friday, April 17, 2020 at 5:00 pm if not sold out earlier. Maximum of 10,000 50/50 Enhancements sold. There will be one draw for the 50/50 Enhancement. The draw will occur Friday, April 24, 2020 at 10:30 am.

Proceeds raised from the 20/21 Monthly Lottery will purchase a new patient monitor for BUH’s OR (Operating Room). Every year more than 3500 surgeries are performed in the OR. In order to maintain the patient’s health and well-being during their surgical procedures, the patient’s vital signs must be monitored continuously by the surgical team. The new monitor will have enhanced technology to keep patients safe and secure during these critical procedures.

TICKETS GO ON SALE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2020

There will be.. WINNERS 158 Why not you?

83 Railway Ave. North Battleford, Sk.

Phone: 306-445-3534

2020/2021 MONTHLY CASH LOTTERY RULES OF PLAY: ALL DRAWS WILL BE MADE AT BATTLEFORDS UNION HOSPITAL, 1092 – 107TH STREET, NORTH BATTLEFORD, SK AT 8:30 AM IN THE MAIN LOBBY. MAXIMUM OF 1300 TICKETS SOLD. EVERY TICKET ELIGIBLE FOR EVERY DRAW (MUST HAVE PURCHASED A TICKET IN ONE OR MORE OF THE LAST THREE YEARS TO BE ELIGIBLE FOR THE PREVIOUS PURCHASER DRAW). EARLY BIRD DRAW - $1000 - THURDAY, APRIL 9, 2020 (APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2020 5:00 PM). PREVIOUS PURCHASER DRAW - $1000 – FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2020 (APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 2020 5:00 PM). 13 DRAWS A MONTH: 1ST PRIZE - $1000.00, 2ND PRIZE - $600.00, 3RD PRIZE - $400.00, 10 DRAWS FOR $200.00 EACH. DRAW DATES: APRIL 24, 2020; MAY 29, 2020; JUNE 19, 2020; JULY 24, 2020; AUGUST 28, 2020; SEPTEMBER 25, 2020; OCTOBER 30, 2020; NOVEMBER 27, 2020; DECEMBER 11, 2020; JANUARY 29, 2021; FEBRUARY 26, 2021; MARCH 26, 2021. WINNERS WILL BE CONTACTED BY PHONE AND NAMES POSTED ON WWW.BUHFOUNDATION.COM AND INCLUDED IN THE BATTLEFORDS REGIONAL OPTIMIST. IF ANY DISCREPANCIES OCCUR WITH LOTTERY TICKET(S) WINNING TICKET NUMBERS AND VALUES, THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF THE LOTTERY AUDITOR SHALL BE DEEMED CORRECT AND FINAL. ANY NSF CHEQUE OR DECLINED PAYMENT WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE FOR DRAW. CALL BUH FOUNDATION AT 306-446-6652 FOR FURTHER INQUIRIES.


Regional News-Optimist

w w w. n ew s o p t i m i s t . c a

The future of farming Continued from Page 4 concerned the world will not have enough food for its nutritional needs by 2040. • 90 per cent or more of next-gen farmers and consumers agree everyone needs to compromise to secure the future of food • More than 80 per cent of young farmers and consumers are willing to take personal responsibility for helping address the challenges of food and farming. Securing the Future of the Farm • 80 per cent of surveyed consumers and 81 per cent of surveyed farmers agree that it will be difficult for farmers to make a living in the future. • 90 per cent agree that farmers will have to adopt innovative new technologies and methods to address the food and farming issues we face. Ensuring the Voices of Consumers and Farmers are Heard • 93 per cent of both next-gen consumers and farmers feel they need a bigger voice when it comes to securing the future of food and farming. • Next-gen consumers (94 per cent) and farmers (80 per cent) have opinions about what food should be produced and they also believe that big players in the food chain — including

food wholesalers, food input suppliers and food manufacturing companies — have more influence than they do over how food is grown, sold and consumed. Confronting Climate Volatility • 95 per cent of farmers and 97 per cent of consumers believe the climate is changing, and they also believe that it will have a negative impact on the global food supply in the next 20 years with the exception of young farmers and consumers in the U.S., where less than half feel this way. • More than 90 per cent of both next-gen farmers and consumers want to live in a world where no one must choose between the environment and having enough to eat, and both groups want to join forces to find ways in which both farming and consumption can change to have a lower impact on climate. “Farmers and consumers often are portrayed as two different parties at opposite ends of the global food system. The findings in this study reveal a different picture of young farmers and consumers wanting to meet in the middle and define ways to solve some of biggest issues in the future of farming and food,” said Dana Bolden, Senior

Vice President of External Affairs and Sustainability for Corteva Agriscience. “Finding common ground is essential and we are committed to exploring ways where Corteva can help cultivate the kinds of conversations between the next generation of farmers and consumers that are needed to bring about timely solutions.” For the purposes of this study, next-generation farmers were defined as 16 to 38-year-old decisionmakers on farms, and next-generation consumers were defined as 16 to 38-year-old non-farmers. The survey was conducted among a minimum of 100 farmers and 500 consumers per country for a total of more than 3,000 survey respondents. Corteva Agriscience is a publicly traded, global pure-play agriculture company that provides farmers around the world with the most complete portfolio in the industry - including a balanced and diverse mix of seed, crop protection and digital solutions focused on maximizing productivity to enhance yield and profitability. Corteva Agriscience became an independent public company on June 1, 2019 and was previously the Agriculture Division of DowDuPont. More information can be found at www.corteva.com.

EQUIPMENT 2020 DEGELMAN PRO-TILL

$

The Battlefords, Thursday, March 12, 2020 - Page 5

480 ACRES PRIME AGRICULTURAL LAND FOR SALE RM 470 OF PAYNTON, SASKATCHEWAN

ACCEPTING OFFERS until April 15, 2020

NE. Sec 07 Tp 46 Rg 20 W 3 Sama 2017 Assessed Value $255,000 * 2.82 ($719,100) (151 acres) Soil classification G. SE. Sec 07 Tp 46 Rg 20 W 3 Sama 2017 Assessed Value $268,900 * 2.82 ($758,298) (160 acres) Soil Classification H Includes Large Steel Quonset Building on concrete slab (The above parcels must be sold together). NE. Sec 24 Tp 46 Rg 21 W 3 Sama 2017 Assessed Value $263,900 * 2.82 ($744,198) (160 acres) Soil classification H (All land available for immediate possession). Highest offer or any offer not necessarily accepted. It is not necessary for bidder to bid on all three of the properties; All offers must identify separate prices for each individual title being bid on. All offers must be in writing and must identify each bidder(s) name, mail address, telephone number and email address. All bids must be delivered either by email to dantheman@sasktel. net or by mail to JB Michaud Farm, Box.1192 North Battleford, Saskatchewan S9A 3K2 by April 15 / 2020. The successful bidder will be notified and will have 7 days from notification to deliver the 10% deposit (certified cheque, or bank draft) to the law firm of our choice. Details will be revealed at time of notification. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid to the designated law firm within 30 days of acceptance of offer or the deposit will be forfeited. The successful bidder is responsible to pay their own legal fees and any land titles fees to transfer the land. Inquiries can be made at: dantheman@sasktel.net.

SALE 2014 STEIGER 450HD

CALL

$

269,500

2011 CNH PH800/3430

$

55,750

26’

Duals, 1500 hrs, lux cab, PTO

60’, dual shoot, Var Rate

1997 JOHN DEERE 9300

2012 BOURG 7200-60’

2014 MORRIS 9650

SPRING EARLY DELIVERY NOW AVAILABLE!

Order and receive SUMMER DYED DIESEL at today’s price and DO NOT PAY until June 30, 2020* (weather permitting)

$

79,500

$

33,500

$

107,500

7100 hrs, triples, 4 hyd remotes

60’, hyd adj, 9/16” tines

TBH, Var Rate

2007 XL 70 RGN

2014 BOBCAT E35

2012 PUMA 155

Early Delivery Promotion ends on April 30, 2020

DISCOVERY $

48,500

Double drop, lowboy

$

57,500

185 hrs

$

115,000

6350 hrs, MFD, L765

MARTODAM MOTORS 1983 LTD. 306.883.2045 www.martodammotors.com

AGRO CENTRE & CARDLOCK

400 Railway Avenue, Spiritwood, SK

“Your One Stop Dealer”

*On approved credit. Call for details.

906 Battleford Road, North Battleford 306-446-7288


Page 6 - The Battlefords, Thursday, March 12, 2020

Regional News-Optimist

w w w. n ew s o p t i m i s t . c a

Strait Line Auto Sales Inc. Bringing country value into the city

If we don’t have it. We can get it!!

Viruses: An eye on the big picture Submitted by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

2006 Dually Dodge Ram Pickup 4x4, 5.9 Cummins Auto, 3500 SLT

Was 17,900

Now

$

2008 Ford F-350 4x4

15,900

$

2004 Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD, 6.6 Duramax Leather loaded

10,900

$

2015 Chevrolet Silverado 1500, 4x4, 5.3 Auto A/T/C/CD/PW/PL

$17,900

8,900

$

2001 Dually Lariat 4x4 Ford F-350 Super Duty 7.3 Diesel Low Km.

Was 21,900

$

Now

18,900

$

2013 Chevrolet Silverado 5.3 Auto, 4x4, A/T/C/CD/PW/PL Was 15,900

$

Now

14,900

$

2671 - 99th Street, North Battleford, SK, S9A 0R9 Hwy. 4 North

306-445-5885 • www.straitlineauto.com Give us an opportunity to earn your business.

Elliott Insurance Services Ltd • Commercial • Farm • Home • Auto • Recreational • Hail • Travel Covering Saskatchewan & Alberta We specialize in

Agro and

Oilfield Coverage

Dr. Julie Brassard has a passion for viruses. Viruses are tiny organisms that can make you sick in a matter of hours. She is part of a team of researchers that helps us better understand viruses. “Our immune systems are very complex, yet some viruses can effectively bypass them and make us sick so quickly,” says Dr. Brassard, a food and environmental virologist based at Agriculture and Agri Food Canada’s Saint Hyacinthe Research and Development Centreion Quebec. “The more I learn about them, the more fascinating I find them.” Dr. Brassard and her team use a “one health” approach that looks at the big picture of diseases and how viruses travel between humans, animals and the environment. That is because many viruses naturally circulate among animals, humans and the environment, including water. For example, hepatitis

E virus (HEV) is found in pigs worldwide. The pigs are not affected b y

Dr. Julie Brassard

the vi r us, but act as a host. The virus can be transmitted to humans who eat contaminated undercooked meat. While the risk of contracting the disease is low in Canada, its potential for harm means that finding the best measures to reduce the spread of the virus continues to be important. Dr. Brassard’s team is working hard to discover the sources of HEV, how it spreads, and how it sur-

vives. Their resea rch will help teach people how to control HEV — in barns, abattoirs or barbecues. “Farmers and others in the agri food industry face many challenges as they work hard to keep our food safe,” says Dr. Brassard. “I feel privileged to be able to support them by providing new knowledge, scientific advances and innovations to protect people, animals, our food industry and our economy.”

AUCTION CONSIGN NOW!

TO THE ANNUAL SPRING EQUIPMENT AUCTION

Tuesday, April 21st • 8AM HWY #3 EAST, TISDALE, SK

FULL & PARTIAL FARM DISPERSALS FARM & CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT HEAVY TRUCK, CARS, TRUCKS, RV's & MORE

NOW BOOKING

SPRING & SUMMER 2020 FARM AUCTIONS (Prime dates still available) Call us for your Free on Farm Consultation “You will be glad you did!”

Contact one of our brokers

Kelly, Katelyn or Pauline

PO Box 300, 112 Main Street Maidstone SK S0M 1M0 306-893-2461 Fax: 306-893-4222 eis@elliottinsurance.ca

Ph: 306-873-5488

OTHER SERVICES

• SGI MVD Issuer • Marriage Licenses • Notory Public • Commissioner

Box 2199, Tisdale, SK S0E 1T0 Email: bruce@sasktel.net Incorporated PL #314037

www.schapansky.com


Regional News-Optimist

w w w. n ew s o p t i m i s t . c a

SARM unhappy with PMRA decision to pull strychnine

The Battlefords, Thursday, March 12, 2020 - Page 7

Submitted The Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities says it is appalled to learn that the Pesticide Management Regulatory Agency has made final decision to cancel the approved use of strychnine to control Richardson Ground Squirrels. The PMRA’s decision is based on anecdotal assumptions, not recent research. In 2019, the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture completed a study on the use of strychnine. This study indicated that despite a large number of non-target species present, death from strychnine was limited to only four deer mice. “With such a small proven environmental impact PMRA should be using SMA’s research to support the continued use of strychnine, not to discontinue it,” said President Ray Orb. “We plan to meet with Minister Marit

and decision makers in Ottawa” said Orb “SARM will take all steps needed to have the decision overturned or at minimum have our producers compensated for any crop damage due to gophers.” PMRA’s plan is to phase out the product over the next three years, making the product unavailable after March 4, 2021 and fully banned for use March 4, 2023. There is currently no alternative to control RGS. In 1992 to 2001, 2 per

cent liquid strychnine wasn’t available causing RGS populations to explode resulting in millions of dollars in losses to producers. In the years it has been made available populations have declined. Dry years with no effective method of control will result in devastating losses. “I hope the province can appeal or at least delay the decision” said Orb, “Our producers don’t need to be enduring anymore hardships.”

A PROVEN FIT

761 TM

Our new canola hybrids bring TruFlex™ performance in a Proven package, giving you a choice in Roundup Ready® technology. Proven® Seed TruFlex hybrids feature disease management, wider spray windows and application rate flexibility, plus the ability to grow in all maturity zones. Choose PV 761 TM if you need the option to straight cut your canola. Find the perfect fit for your farm with a Proven Seed TruFlex canola hybrid. Available at Nutrien Ag Solutions™. Learn more at ProvenSeed.ca

with Roundup Ready ® Technology

Always follow grain marketing and all other stewardship practices and pesticide label directions. Details of these requirements can be found in the Trait Stewardship Responsibilities Notice to Farmers printed in this publication. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW PESTICIDE LABEL DIRECTIONS. Roundup Ready® Technology contains genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate. Glyphosate will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Roundup Ready® and TruFlex™ are trademarks of Bayer Group, Monsanto Canada ULC licensee. PROVEN® SEED is a registered trademark of Nutrien Ag Solutions (Canada) Inc. Nutrien Ag Solutions and Design is a trademark of Nutrien Ag Solutions, Inc.

TruFlex Canola - a step up in weed control

IAN MAYERLE While it may be premature to think about your canola spray application, it’s not too early to consider what type and variety of canola to include in your crop rotation. Quite often we reflect on last year to make our decisions for this year. Rarely do exact environmental conditions repeat from year to year, but the TruFlex™ canola trait has many advantages that I believe would be beneficial in any given year.

Aborted canola pods due to late herbicide application in Watrous.

TruFlex canola introduces flexibility that will help farmers manage their crop more effectively. One of my favourite attributes of TruFlex canola is the broad spray window. You can now safely make your spray application beyond the six-leaf stage, up to first flower. Too often I’ve seen canola sprayed at very late stages. In these late • Extended window of application – with applications the anthers are exposed and TruFlex canola you can safely spray until when sprayed with a coinciding herbicide the first flowers open. Like in 2019, we often have uneven emergence that leads system, yield can be reduced significantly. Proven® Seed now offers three TruFlex to difficult spray timing. • Better control of hard to kill weeds with TruFlex canola you can apply up to 360 grams of glyphosate twice per growing season, which is twice the rate of other varieties. This will help control wild buckwheat and tough perennial weeds like foxtail barley and dandelions.

Lyle Cowell, Nutrien Ag Solutions

hybrids with Roundup Ready® technology PV 760 TM (early maturity and good pod strength); PV 761 TM (exceptional yield potential and lodging resistance and good pod strength); and PV 780 TC (clubroot resistance and very early maturity). Visit ProvenSeed.ca to learn more. Ian Mayerle is a Crop Production Advisor for Nutrien Ag Solutions in Valparaiso, Sask. He can be reached at 306-873-3180.


Page 8 - The Battlefords, Thursday, March 12, 2020

Regional News-Optimist

w w w. n ew s o p t i m i s t . c a

New USask research chair to provide integrated approach to agronomy research Submitted by USask To help expand agronomy research in Western Canada, crop scientist Dr. Maryse Bourgault (PhD) has been recruited from the United States as the first Western Grains Research Foundation Inte-

grated Agronomy Chair at the University of Saskatchewan. With $2 million in funding over seven years from WGRF, Bourgault – a crop physiologist with a background in environmental sciences – plans to work with farmers and re-

searchers from across multiple disciplines to bring a collaborative and integrated approach to research aimed at improving soil management and increasing crop production potential and sustainability. “There are a lot of questions that would surely

Turtleford and District Co-op

For all your Bulk Oil and Storage Needs Contact Tyler at 306-845-2222 for more information.

benefit from having several different specialists looking into it together,” said Bourgault. “But I’m planning on taking the time to talk to farmers to understand what they feel might be the most pressing issues and the solutions that might have the greatest impact.” She said current cropping systems will be reviewed to identify improvements such as new technologies and practices that are environmentally and economically sustainable. “I’m hoping that we will be able to contribute to industry knowledge by taking a step back and looking at the various components of the production system to see how we can understand how different practices might work together or against each other,” said Bourgault. “Then, we might be able to propose the best ways to foster the synergies that arise and minimize the negatives.” Coming to USask from the Northern Agricultural Research Centre (Havre

Dr. Maryse Bourgault

site) at Montana State University, Bourgault will hold a joint appointment in the plant sciences and soil science departments in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources. “All of us in agriculture are increasingly aware of how any one thing we do can have vastly different outcomes depending on a myriad of other things,” said Dr. Mary Buhr (PhD), dean of the college. “Having a bright young mind dedicated to helping integrate those myriad of things is a huge benefit to prairie agriculture and ecosystems, and we are deeply grateful to WGRF for their help in bringing Maryse into our USask Agro family.” WGRF Board Chair Terry Young said the foundation is excited about the

impact Bourgault can have on agronomy research. “Farmers face challenges that cut across multiple crops and multiple agronomic disciplines,” Young said. “Having a dedicated Research Chair for Integrated Agronomy at USask will help strengthen and build agronomic research capacity in Western Canada.” The WGRF is a farmerfunded and farmerdirected non-profit organization investing in agricultural research that benefits Western Canadian farmers. WGRF is the largest producer funder of field crop research in Canada. Since 1981, the foundation has funded over $196 million of research in field crops of interest to Western Canadian farmers.

Outback open house date of April 3, 2020 Some of our Seed Varieties Available HRS Wheat- CDC Landmark VB, AAC Viewfield, AAC Brandon, Goodeve. Barley- CDC Bow

Check out the Outback Representative in your neighborhood.

Take this opportunity to check out the latest in precision GPS products that take your profitability of your farming operation to the next level. Your Area Outback Representative

Charabin Seed Farm Ltd. 3 Miles East Hwy 40 North Battleford, SK S9A 2Y1 306-445-2939 charabinseedfarm.ca ch outbackcsf@gmail.com

www.OutbackGuidance.com


Regional News-Optimist

The Battlefords, Thursday, March 12, 2020 - Page 9

w w w. n ew s o p t i m i s t . c a

Province Twin City “Specializing in Automatic Transmissions” proclaims Agriculture Literacy Month

TRANSMISSION Glaslyn, SK

9901 Thatcher Ave. Parsons Industrial Park North Battleford

The Government of Saskatchewan has proclaimed March 1-31, 2020, as Agriculture Literacy Month in Saskatchewan. Agriculture Literacy Month brings producers and industry professionals to the classroom to give students the opportunity to learn where the food on their plate comes from. “Our food has a story and Agriculture Literacy Month allows students to hear that story first hand from producers,” Agriculture Minister David Marit said. “It is important that our children and grandchildren receive accurate information about the work done by our agriculture industry straight from the experts.” This year’s theme is technology, which will teach students about development, uses and the im-

portance of innovation on modern farms and ranches. “Agriculture has always been, and continues to be, a significant part of the province,” Deputy Premier and Education Minister Gordon Wyant said. “Our government supports classroom opportunities for Saskatchewan students to learn about agriculture and its contribution to our province.” “There are so many myths and misconceptions about food and agriculture today, it is difficult for people to know what to believe,” Agriculture in the Classroom Executive Director Sara Shymko said. “The classroom visits with real people working in the industry are so important because they give students a chance to ask questions and have them answered honestly and openly.”

WE ALSO HANDLE • Standards • Clutches • Transfer Cases • Differentials • Coolers

For a Transmission Check Up Call

306-445-3445

MasterCard

“Know your vehicle’s scheduled maintenance recommendations.”

Black and Red Angus Yearling and 2 yr. old Bulls on moderate growing Ration. Performance Info available. Adrian Edwards 306-441-0946 or Brian & Elaine Edwards 306-342-4407

You treat them like family.

Helping Sask. farmers cope with stress Innovation Saskatchewan, in partnership with the Ministry of Agriculture, is asking technology entrepreneurs to develop a way for farmers, ranchers and agricultural workers to monitor their mental health. This latest Innovation Challenge aims to address a growing concern within Saskatchewan where calls to the farm stress line in 2018-2019 doubled from the previous year. “Mental health is a concern within every industry but particularly acute in agriculture,” Minister Responsible for Innovation Saskatchewan Tina Beaudry-Mellor said. The Innovation Challenge, launched on March 5, asks for expressions of interest from Saskatchewan-based companies and entrepreneurs to answer the following: What technological solutions can assist Saskatchewan farmers in actively monitoring their mental health? A survey of Canadian farmers released in 2016 found over half the respondents met the classifications for anxiety and one third met the classifications for depression, which is significantly higher than most Canadians. “There’s a lot you can’t control on a farming operation and you’re usually working in an isolated environment – both can take a toll on the mental health

of farmers and ranchers,” Agriculture Minister David Marit said. “Mental health in the agriculture industry is incredibly important, and I’m looking forward to seeing the innovative ideas that come from this process,” he added. Solutions could take many forms including, but not limited to, a mobile phone app, website program, artificial intelligence interface or offline sensor linking to the internet. Selected submissions will be short-listed, and a pitch competition will determine a winner. Winners will receive $10,000 in funding and a 16-week collaboration with government to develop their concept. The deadline for submissions is April 30. Public information sessions will be held in Saskatoon and Regina, on March 17 and 19 respectively, as well as online on March 24. Further information on times and locations will be posted on Innovation Saskatchewan’s website. “Innovation Challenges find inventive answers to public issues,” Beaudry-Mellor said.  “We have successfully collaborated with our province’s tech sector to combat rural crime, grant permissions for hunting and fishing on private land and track the waste that ends up in our province’s landfills.”

Feed them like family. Whether it’s in the field or around the table, you feed your family the very best. With BrettYoung forage, quality is key. We stand by our products with an industry-leading, 100% establishment guarantee. Choose from one of our carefully crafted stock blends or custom build your own mix for a happy, healthy herd. To determine the right blend for your farm, visit brettyoung.ca/stock-blend-selector

Visit any Richardson Pioneer, P&H, Co-op Crop Input Retail or Independent Ag Retail location in March for best selection and early season discounts on BrettYoung forage seed.

BrettYoung™ is a trademark of Brett-Young Seeds Limited.

Profile for Battlefords News Optimist

Farmer Rancher March 12, 2020  

Farmer Rancher March 12, 2020  

Advertisement