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MArch Architecture (ARB/RIBA Part 2) Compiled from Bartlett Books 2004–2017


Our Design DNA At The Bartlett School of Architecture, we have been publishing annual exhibition catalogues for each of our design-based programmes for more than a decade. These catalogues, amounting to thousands of pages, illustrate the best of our students’ extraordinary work. Our new Design Anthology series brings together the annual catalogue pages for each of our renowned units, clusters, and labs, to give an overview of how their practice and research has evolved. Throughout this time some teaching partnerships have remained constant, others have changed. Students have also progressed from one programme to another. Nevertheless, the way in which design is taught and explored at The Bartlett School of Architecture is in our DNA. Now with almost 50 units, clusters and labs in the school across eight programmes, the Design Anthology series shows how we define, progress and reinvent our agendas and themes from year to year. Professor Frédéric Migayrou Chair of The Bartlett School of Architecture Professor Bob Sheil Director of The Bartlett School of Architecture


2017 Make-Believe Penelope Haralambidou, Michael Tite 2016 Against the Flow Penelope Haralambidou, Simon Kennedy, Michael Tite 2015 Forty Second Island Penelope Haralambidou, Simon Kennedy, Michael Tite 2014 Remember the Future Penelope Haralambidou, Simon Kennedy, Michael Tite 2013 Collisions Michael Chadwick, Simon Kennedy 2010 Possibilities of Exchange: Poetic Transference Uwe Schmidt-Hess, Michael Wihart 2009 Migrating Thresholds Uwe Schmidt-Hess, Michael Wihart 2006 Phenomenal Noumena: extreme PHENOuMENA Steve Hardy, Jonas Lundberg with Ken Faulkner 2005 Effectual Formalisms Steve Hardy, Jonas Lundberg 2004 [Bosphorus] Drifts [Caspian] Shifts Peter Hasdell, Patrick Weber


Make-Believe Penelope Haralambidou, Michael Tite


Unit 24

Make-Believe Penelope Haralambidou, Michael Tite

Year 4 John Cruwys, Tom James, Matei Mitrache, Masahiro Nakamura, Rose Shaw, Paula Strunden, Stefania Tsigkouni Year 5 Sabina Berariu, Thomas Brown, Clare Dallimore, Matthew Lucraft, Martyna Marciniak, Gergana Popova, Nick Shackleton, Jasper Stevens The Bartlett School of Architecture 2017

Special thanks for digital film, animation and interactive media teaching to Keiichi Matsuda Workshops: Angeliki Vasileiou, Kevin Pollard, Neutral Digital, Shed-Works, Studio Archetype Thank you to: Jack Holmes, Sergio Irigoyen, Rashed Khandker, Greg Kythreotis, Brook Lin, Sam McGill, Dan Scoulding, Ben Sheterline Thank you to our critics: Ollie Alsop, Anna Ulrikke Andersen, Nat Chard, Patrick Chen, Daniel Cotton, Nico Czyz, Max Dewdney, Stephen Gage, Tamsin Hanke, Colin Herperger, Ifigeneia Liangi, Chris Pierce, Merijn Royaards, Sayan Skandarajah, Henrietta Williams

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Unit 24 is a group of architectural storytellers employing film, animation, drawing, VR/AR and physical modelling in pursuit of spatial propositions that harness the potential of time-based media. We nurture freethinkers who investigate ideas and techniques in collaboration with other likeminded experts. We find inspiration in the dialogue between film and architecture and their intertwined histories; film has the power to construct the psyche of a city while architectural ideas are changing the way that film is generated and understood. This year we turned our attention to the growing frictions between urban bubbles of overabundance and post-urban pockets of debilitating scarcity. We asked whether a cinematic architecture of ‘make-believe’ can address this dichotomy with proposals that marry fact and fiction. In November, in the immediate aftermath of the US Presidential Election, we explored the contrasting territories of LA and Arizona, tracing a path across the underlying geographic, social and fictional fault lines that separate these neighbouring, yet deeply diverse regions. Since it first swelled out of the Californian desert in the late 1800s, the growth of LA has been inextricably linked to the business of making moving images and storytelling. Conversely, the cinematic landscapes of Arizona have provided the outward gaze for America to reflect upon its history. This sense of emptiness breeds the mythical and surreal, triggering sightings of unexpected objects and the birth of conspiracy theories. Within these febrile territories, we searched for new kinds of makebelieve that blur the boundaries between truth and reality. We explored the fictionalised urban landscapes of LA, the sun-baked world in and around the Salk Institute and discovered the desert-inspired utopias of Taliesin West, Arcosanti and Biosphere 2, where architecture playfully imagines an alternative make-believe future. Upon our return, we interpreted our findings into the local climate of the post-Brexit maelstrom. We conjured new visions for these towns with proud, yet long-lost pasts: from Great Yarmouth to Rugeley, from Stratford to Port Stanley. Our students propose speculative new narratives for half-forgotten towns like these, creating stories that might beggar belief, but which are so hair-brained that they might just work. Year 5 projects build on last year’s investigations, creating architectural ‘essay films’ that explore wild new frontiers and states of speculative magic. A series of workshops with games designers, visualisers, VR developers and sound technologists supported the work along with access to Oculus Rift and HTC Vive Developer Kits. Throughout the year, Unit 24 has evolved into a band of virtual storytellers, snaggletoothed mythmakers, digital hoaxers and political yarn-spinners, who aim to make believers out of anyone who might care to listen.


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24.2 Fig. 24.1 Nick Shackleton Y5, ‘Let’s Live’. ‘Let’s Live!’ is not a utopia, but a community of online gaming performers, where work has been substituted by a desire to play. Players/ performers lay bare their everyday lives to the millions of online spectators that consume content. The architecture derives directly from the game-space, where brick and mortar merge with the digital world of gaming. A highly choreographed sequence of rituals merge play with everyday life, and the settlement provides a backdrop for the broadcasting that blurs the physical with the digital. Fig. 24.2 Clare Dallimore Y5, ‘Drawing in Time: Desert Filmscape’. Set in Arizona’s interior upland, the project acts as a rebellion against Hollywood cinema. Exploring themes of frontier, utopian living and cinema, the project proposes a new environment for 296

independent filmmakers working and living outside of the urban sprawl of nearby Phoenix, which culminates in an annual Independent Film Festival. Two-dimensional drawings are transformed into the three-dimensional filmic space, grafting the crafted nature of the hand-drawn elements into a digital form, set in space and time. Fig. 24.3 Gergana Popova Y5, ‘City as Stage’. The project revisits a period in the history of London, where theatre and city were constructing each other. Sited in Smithfield Market, the New Museum of London opposes the contemporary desire for the object, explores the intangible part of our heritage and celebrates traces of forgotten history. Inspired by the site’s long history of co-existence between a market and a funfair, ‘City as Stage’ merges theatre, market and museum.


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24.5 Fig. 24.4 Sabina Berariu Y5, ‘LOG | Deconstructed domesticity’. We are witnessing a spilling of the home at urban scale, where old bonds break, spatial linkages dissolve and new types of domestic urban composition emerge. This project is grounded in the digital nomadic movement, paired with the shifting nature of domestic environments and the possibility of integrating technology into everyday objects which respond to the biochemical composition of the human body. On a micro-level, the project addresses the fundamental biochemical composition of the nomad, while on a macro-level, the design assumes that old paradigms of property ownership and social status are superseded. LOG, ‘Life on the Go’, a high-end branded line of home-mobile products, controlled through wearable technology, is proposed as an alternative to 298

current domestic architectures. Fig. 24.5 Thomas Brown Y5, ‘Resorting to Canvey’. Resorting To Canvey is a speculative framework for a new environmentally responsible holiday resort. The project addresses one of the most pressing challenges facing not only Canvey’s tourism industry, but much of the built environment situated along the Thames Estuary including London: vulnerability to severe flooding due to sea-level rise. The film presents a case of positive flooding of the future holiday resort through the narrative of an unassuming protagonist, Bert Vandewiele. Bert is the caretaker at Thorney Bay Village, and is faced with many challenges whilst keeping the environmental flooding station-cum-holiday resort running smoothly for the holidaymakers.


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24.6 Fig. 24.6 Martyna Marciniak Y5, ‘Paul E. Phylo’s Palace’. A revival of the Enlightenment idea of architecture that has the potential to inspire desire and love. The Palace is a character that leads its visitors on a courtship journey from the lounge of anticipation, through the hall of indifference, the dining-room of awakening, to the boudoir of ultimate excitement. Similar to a living organism, the building reacts to the visitor’s presence – it uncovers its secret passages, blushes, grows and decomposes. Fig. 24.7 Jasper Stevens Y5, ‘The London NOTEL’. Part cinema, part immersive theatre, part hotel, the London NOTEL is a hybrid that merges VR with physical architecture. The building is only there to be touched, existing as haptic infrastructure designed to guide visitors through immersive cinematic narratives. But, there are rumours that 300

some guests have never returned, lost inside the building’s multiple realities. A Private Investigator has been hired to investigate. Provided with only a map of the building, he arrives on a rainy Saturday night... Fig. 24.8 Matthew Lucraft Y5, ‘A Monument to Outlast Humanity’. Emerging from the abandoned suburbs of the Sonoran Desert, the North Surprise Community Settlement is an experiment in idealised future living without paid labour. A group of ageing RVers pioneer an earthen, handmade architecture, an embodiment of a community voice and a lasting relic of their existence. Over time, a network of radially planned micro-communities spreads across the desert; the ‘streets’ undulate above and below the ground, forming an evolving artificial landscape intimately connected with the site’s fascinating past.


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Against the Flow Penelope Haralambidou, Simon Kennedy, Michael Tite


Unit 24

Against the Flow Penelope Haralambidou, Simon Kennedy, Michael Tite

Year 4 Sabina Berariu, Thomas Brown, Clare Dallimore, Matthew Lucraft, Martyna Marciniak, Gergana Popova, Nick Shackleton, Jasper Stevens

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2016

Year 5 Haesung Choi, Nichola Czyz, Finbarr Fallon, Stefana Gradinariu, Azizul Hoque Mariya Krasteva, Stefanos Levidis, Ting-Jui (Brook) Lin, Ziyi (Bill) Liu, Antonio Zhivkov Workshops: Factory Fifteen, Tomas Millar, Kevin Pollard, ScanLAB Projects Special thanks to: Kairo Baden-Powell, Alastair Browning, Ben Sheterline, Emir Tigrel, Angeliki Vasileiou Critics: Ollie Alsop, Anna Ulrikke Andersen, Alessandro Ayuso, Paul Bavister, Matthew Butcher, Luke Chandresinghe, Peter Cook, James Craig, Hal Currey, Kate Davies, Elizabeth Dow, Max Dewdney, Marcela Araguez Escobar, Murray Fraser, Ruairi Glynn, Colin Herperger, Jonathan Hill, Alex Holloway, Kelvin Ip, Platon Issaias, Jan Kattein, Chee-Kit Lai, Ifi Liangi, Keiichi Matsuda, Sam Storr McGill, Tim Norman, James O’Leary, Manuel Toledo Otaegui, Luke Pearson, Dan Scoulding, Renée Searle, Catrina Stewart, Henri Williams

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Unit 24 employs film, video, animation, drawing and modelling techniques to generate architectural propositions, harnessing the potential of timebased media in the production of space. We nurture freethinkers who investigate ideas and techniques in collaboration with other like-minded experts. This year, after securing funding for workshops and new equipment, students benefitted from our expanded network of associated specialists, architects, animators, virtual reality tinkerers, filmmakers and musicians in a series of bespoke master classes. This year’s theme focused on shifting notions of the ‘local’ and the ‘global’, reading both not as spaces, but as flows. The world has imploded. Instantaneous information flow rules all – the new ‘digital local’ makes the Global Village into the Google Earth. Location is irrelevant... or is it? Local news. Local weather. The local pub. Local architects. What do we mean when we talk about the local? Is it a place? Is it part of the psyche? Can its value be measured? Who can be a local? Can technology ever be local? And what about architecture? Challenging the forces of universalising technological progress, we invited students to find a ‘critical regionalism’ for the information age, interrogating globally available open-source technologies in search of the particular and the local. We questioned the tendency to retreat into the home-grown, the tribal and the regional and asked whether the local simply inflects the global condition or whether it can be a driver for change. The Thames, then. Our local river. A shimmering causeway flowing to the centre of the universe, or the disgusting urinal of a washed-up, morally bankrupt city? Defining the Thames in the singular is facile. At once staggeringly ugly and magnificently sublime, its length spans innumerable conditions: cupping the sweetbreads of international corporate investment but also cultivating new ecosystems. It has witnessed the emergence and growth of London and will outlive it. In November, we travelled to and dispersed ourselves throughout Japan; walking the river route against the flow from Osaka to Kyoto; exploring backstreets in Tokyo; visiting Hiroshima; sailing to Naoshima, hoping to learn from what Arata Isozaki termed ‘Japan-ness’: a local architecture that can harness the forces of globalisation. Year 4 students proposed filmic architectures that utilised the estuarine zones in and around the Thames, searching for an alternative future of the local, while Year 5 students developed their own personal agendas locally and globally.


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24.2 Fig. 24.1 Finbarr Fallon Y5, ‘SG100’. Fin imagines a future subterranean expansion of Singapore, where inflatable structures breathe naturally cooled cave air, supported by modular super-frame structures. The film portrays the 2065 centennial of independence celebrations, when the traditional military parade is reconfigured to a choreographed march of robotic construction technology. This ‘Metropolis’-inspired vision is a Technicolor polemic that challenges the ethics of large-scale infrastructural projects and their dark consequences, such as the exploitation of foreign workers. Fig. 24.2 Haesung Choi Y5, ‘Holographic Theatre’. In science fiction cinema, the hologram has become ubiquitous shorthand for the futuristic and the intangible. Located on an old battery in Tokyo Bay, Hae explores the theatrical qualities of this 284

‘mythical hologram’ and overlays it onto a physical structure to propose a hybrid inhabitable and tectonic holographic experience. Seen as a fabric that can shroud and conceal, Hae’s hologram can also reveal a visceral ‘brighter real’. Fig. 24.3 Azizul Hoque Y5, ‘Whalemart’. Aziz’s re-imagining of Tokyo as a city of hyper-convenience plunges us headlong into the shemozzle of an artificially intelligent drone service industry that swarms above and around us, eager to cater to our every need. Acting like an urban reef, the city hosts an aquatic caste system of robotic crustaceans; from delivery shrimps to whale-like storage zeppelins, rubbish collecting crabs and mobile sushi kiosks. In this pumped-up animeinspired city, the rules of transaction have been re-written and the bass has permanently been turned up to ten.


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24.4 Fig. 24.4 Stefana Gradinariu Y5, ‘The Fourth Nature’. The project deploys a ‘critical realist’ reading of mutant landscapes resulting from long-term and large-scale mining activities in the Apuseni Western Mountains of Romania. Three host sites in the area are key locations: the Rosia Montana gold mining community; the Roșia Poieni copper quarry and the Sesei Valley sludge bed. Stefana’s Hydrological Institute aims to heal the damaged, contaminated land and protect it from future exploitation. A series of tower-like structures scatter the quarry bed, echoing the haunting imagery of the flooded dwellings of the valley and acting as a warning flare to future generations. The project seeks to atone for the natural, cultural and historical vandalism played out in the region, by giving voice to the traumatised landscape. 286

Fig. 24.5 Nichola Czyz Y5, ‘The Long Now Foundation’. Named after the institute established by Stewart Brand and Brian Eno, Nico’s project is guided by an interest in instilling long-term thinking. It is the result of a pilgrimage route along the River Thames from the sea to the source, during which a brick is made from the river’s clay. Once fired, and on the ninth day of walking, the brick is placed at the source as the seed of a temple projected to grow over the next 10,000 years. Rules derived from the structure of bismuth crystals guide the placement of the bricks and the labyrinthine architecture that emerges over time is the result of the pilgrims’ interpretation, forming a ‘ruin in reverse’. The project is situated between land art and essay film, questioning the role of time in architecture, as well as the role of the architect as author.


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24.7 Fig. 24.6 Antonio Zhivkov Y5, ‘Palace of Motion’. Acting as a futuristic reincarnation of the original Crystal Palace, this project explores the possibilities of interaction between the human body and new technologies. The building is designed as a constantly changing entity; a dancing partner to human movement. Through an iterative process of motion capture and modelling, bodies and the corresponding building elements become gradually abstracted until the boundaries between the different joints and limbs vanish, creating a spectacular architecture that feels alive. Fig. 24.7 Mariya Krasteva Y5, ‘Reading between the Shadows: Mukaejima Film Island’. An exploration of the themes of identity, architecture and light through a study of early Japanese cinema. This posits a new typology, an immersive film museum inspired by the legends of 288

the ‘Golden Age’: Tanizaki, Ozu and Mizoguchi. Through the manipulation of daylight and projected light, aspects of three key films become embedded within the architecture. The building carries material and intangible traces of Japanese history, perpetually played out in time. 24.8 Stefanos Levidis Y5, ‘Embassy of the Displaced’. Established between London, Athens and Lesvos in December 2015, this is a design-based collective that operates both in-the-field and remotely, providing spontaneous responses to the refugee crisis. The ‘Embassy’ serves as a design-for-survival laboratory, a visual archive of the refugees’ journey and an institution on the side of the displaced, aiming to symbolically frame the plight of displacement through scanning technology and architectural design; ultimately suggesting a land for the landless.


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24.9 Fig. 24.9 Ziyi (Bill) Liu Y5, ‘Osaka Expo 2020: Mikoshis of Surveillance and Spectacle’. Based on traditional Japanese concepts of public space, the project proposes a new typology for the world exposition through the reconstruction of the processional and temporary qualities of the Japanese Matsuri (festival). Conceived as an extension of Arata Isozaki’s rebellion against the government’s top-down control, this project serves as a commentary on the act of surveillance both as a covert strategy used during Expo’70 and as a novelty of increasing fascination within contemporary society. Fig. 24.10 Ting-Jui (Brook) Lin Y5, ‘An Anatomical Embassy’. This project is conceived as a refurbishment of the current home for the Embassy of Japan in Piccadilly, imagining its temporary relocation to the north edge of the adjacent Green 290

Park. The procedural, operational and diplomatic organs of the embassy become ceremonially eviscerated from the Victorian body and spill out into the park, like scattered ‘seeds’, which grow into small pavilion-like interventions. These vessels become re-inserted into the original building after a period of open use within the park: the two identities and two sets of vocabularies – architecture and garden design – eventually grafting and budding together. This ‘dual’ embassy (that of Green Park and that of 101-104 Piccadilly), embodies Venturi’s ideas of ‘duality’, ‘fragments’, ‘individuals’, and ‘the whole’ and becomes a carefully considered diplomatic architecture of formality, inflection and negotiation.


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Forty Second Island Penelope Haralambidou, Simon Kennedy, Michael Tite


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Forty Second Island Penelope Haralambidou, Simon Kennedy, Michael Tite

Year 4 Haeseung Choi, Nichola Czyz, Finbarr Fallon, Stefana Gradinariu, Azizul Hoque, Mariya Krasteva, Stefanos Levidis, Ting-Jui (Brook) Lin, Ziyi Liu, Antonio Zhivkov Year 5 Deng (Aiden) Ai, Joel Cullum, Jiang Dong, Ka Tsun Kelvin Ip, Emir Tigrel, Angeliki Vasileiou, Kai Yu, Caiwei (Amy) Zhao The Bartlett School of Architecture 2015

Special thanks to Paul Bavister, Douglas Fenton, Johnny Kelly, Kevin Pollard We would like to thank our critics: Nat Chard, Dan Cotton, Hal Currey, Liam Davis, Murray Fraser, Alexis Germanos, Christine Hawley, David Hemingway, Colin Herperger, Jack Holmes, Steven Howson, Platon Issaias, Kei Iwamoto, Chee-Kit Lai, Tim Norman, Caireen O’Hagan-Houx, Leonard O’Hagan-Houx, Ollie Palmer, Luke Pearson, Alan Penn, Kevin Pollard, Sophia Psarra, Merijn Royaards, Camila Sotomayor, Reza Schuster, Matthew Shaw, Matthias Suchert unittwentyfour.wordpress. com www.unittwentyfour.com

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Unit 24 employs film, video, animation, drawing and modelling techniques to generate architectural propositions, harnessing the potential of timebased media in the production of space. This year, we studied a city to which we have all been … at least, in our imagination. This city has created its own mythology through film, and an identity so distinctive, that it is simulated throughout the world. Deeply embedded in our collective subconscious, this place can be reconstructed remotely, travelled to in dreams, and experienced through purely fictional constructs. New York City is an archipelago of 42 islands; some are prominent and densely populated, others are deserted and effectively invisible. The island nature of the city has impacted on how it has grown and the way it sees itself. Its hydrogeographic position enabled it to harbour storytelling immigrants from all over the world, the pressure on land created the skyscraper, and the city’s topography has allowed it to gaze at its own mythical reflected skyline. The spirit of Manhattan, the most prominent island, is distilled in 42nd Street. Linking the iconic sites of Grand Central Station, Chrysler building, the UN Headquarters and Times Square, it was once known as ‘Dream Street’. It has a sordid history of harboring criminal activity – an old joke goes that ‘they call it 42nd Street because you’re not safe if you spend more than forty seconds on it’. By contrasting the urban density and energy of 42nd Street to the unexploited potential of the rest of the 42 islands we searched for new paradigms of urban occupation. We began by studying New York from afar, constructing filmic responses via research and editing techniques. We then proposed architectural interventions into these filmic sites. Our field trip to New York gave students the opportunity to compare their constructions to the throbbing reality of the city. Each student was invited to propose their own Forty Second Island through an architecture of narrative and film: a structure that established its own fictions and rules and allowed them to play out in time. Year 4 students resolved early speculations into a cinematic building proposition sited in New York. Year 5 students proposed a speculative thesis project, maintaining film as a key concern. Unit 24 is supported by a broad network of associated professionals working in sectors ranging from architecture to film, animation, sound design, motion graphics, urban design and contemporary art. Contributions from these professionals serve as a counterpoint to the theoretical discourse within the unit. This year students benefited from animation masterclasses with Johnny Kelly and Douglas Fenton, sound workshops with Paul Bavister, collaborations with film sound composer Kevin Pollard, and scanning workshops with ScanLAB.


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Fig. 24.1 Kelvin Ip Y5, ‘Hong Kong Last Resort’. Entombed within a citadel at the fringes of the container port, Hong Kong Last Resort houses the deposed rebels of the crushed city. Through the deployment of strategic urban planning, emboldened civic architecture and symbolic sculptural motifs the citadel acts as a fatalistic double critique against both the British colonial rule and the credibility of the ‘One Country, Two Systems’ policy introduced by China. A warning from the future, the project maps out an imaginary end-game and an audacious critique of the smothering of a proud culture. Figs. 24.2 – 24.3 Kai Yu Y5, ‘Submerged Silence’. In response to a growing interest in Taoist philosophy in China, a floating temple/diving centre provides a mirrored counter-body to the lost sacred site of the Jing Le palace. The palace embodies the

symbolic birth of the diety Xuanwu, but today lies at the bottom of a reservoir constructed by the Communist Party in 1967. Reaching the island by boat the visitor passes through a series of charged thresholds and physically completes the destroyed Xuanwu narrative, the lost faith, by accessing the submerged ruin undewater. Fig. 24.4 Deng (Aiden) Ai Y5, ‘New York Automobile Museum’. Acting as a monument to the car and its impact on the 20 th century American city, the New York Automobile Museum celebrates and mournfully reflects upon the doomed and intoxicating love affair between American culture and the image of the car. The automobile industry is at once glorified and also vilified through the symbolic destruction and explosion of components on a daily cycle. A blown-out hurricane.

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Fig. 24.5 Jiang Dong Y5, ‘The Autonomous Threshold’. Conceived as an experimental commuter island, the project explores new emerging domestic territories created by recent developments in self-driving vehicle technologies. Located within Parkland Walk in north London, a series of carousel-like house units provide the necessary hardware for daily life, while mobile vehicle units, or ‘autonomous thresholds’, can be programmed to receive parts of the house and travel away with them. Daily life becomes de-coupled from the drudgery of commuting, allowing the occupant/traveller to watch a film on the way home from work, to eat a bowl of cereal whilst on the school run or to take a long shower while on the M25. Fig. 24.6 Joel Cullum Y5, ‘Remember the Future’. Imagining an alternative reality for the Heygate Estate in Elephant and

Castle, the film gives life to the sketches of visionary post-war architects who fought – and failed – for its regeneration. Fig. 24.7 Caiwei (Amy) Zhao Y5, ‘The Institute of American Cuisine’. A moored aircraft carrier, harmoniously aligned to New York’s 42nd Street, is the unlikely site for an experimental and cultish molecular gastronomy institute, orchestrating a covert operation against obesity. Innovating and specialising in agar-agar heavy cuisine, foodstuffs are manipulated and sculpted into ‘plates’ that are sometimes small as a thimble and at other times as large as a room. Channeling Grimm, Ledoux and Lewis Carroll, this edible terrain is a playground, an enchanting dietary experiment and an outrageous culinary warship.

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24.9 Figs. 24.8 – 24.9 Angeliki Vasileiou Y5, ‘Weaving the Ineffable’. Located within the industrial hinterlands of Leicester, a library is embedded within the enigmatic micro-cosmos of Soar Island. Bridging the physical with the immaterial the library becomes a model of different individual paths to knowledge. This shifting, labyrinthine terrain guided by the writings of Jorge Luis Borges, Umberto Eco and Gilles Deleuze, is loosely traced out across the island’s body. Complex interconnecting networks of rooms lure the visitor to endlessly explore the depths of the apparently boundary-less interior. Weaving the Ineffable seeks to construct an architecture informed by literature, where non-linear structures of space can echo the mysterious structures of the mind. Fig. 24.10 Emir Tigrel Y5, ‘Vestigial Landscapes’.

Within the once-sooty, blue-collar industrial zones of the Brooklyn Naval Yard – and acting as a counterpoint to the burgeoning ’Silicon Alley’ of Manhattan – the project examines architecture’s ability to convey historic continuity into the present. Drawing on the rich symbolism of the industrial ruins that scatter the existing site and by using advanced imaging technologies, the new building seeks to ‘complete’ lost artefacts and spaces, giving a tectonic presence to the fading memories of this original US Industrial Powerhouse. In this instance, the design reinterprets the embodied experience of scale by animating a naval vessel’s rudder thus turning it into a dynamic piece of history, rather than a frozen relic.

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Remember the Future Penelope Haralambidou, Simon Kennedy, Michael Tite


Unit 24 Remember the Future Penelope Haralambidou, Simon Kennedy, Michael Tite

Year 4 Behnaz Berengi, Ka Tsun Kelvin Ip, Emir Tigrel, Angeliki Vasileiou, Kai Yu, Cai Wei (Amy) Zhao Year 5 Kairo Baden-Powell, Daniel Cotton, Liam Davis, Jonathan Holmes, Steven Howson, Keiichi Iwamoto, Edward Mascarenhas, Rintaro Yoshida The Bartlett School of Architecture 2014

Thanks to our partners: Factory Fifteen, Hal Currey of Arup Associates, Kevin Pollard, Andrew Gow of Raindog Films, Ali Carter of Max Fordham and Ben Sheterline of Price & Myers Thanks to our critics: Dimitris Argyros, Julia Backhaus, Greg Blee, Kyle Buchanan, Luke Chandresinghe, Nat Chard, Hal Currey, Jo Dejardin, Richard Difford, Daniel Dale, Tom Ebdon, Douglas Fenton, Andrew Gancikov, Christophe Gerard, Tilo Gunther, Christine Hawley, Timo Haedrich, Colin Heperger, Jonathan Hill, Chee-Kit Lai, Sean Macintosh, Tim Norman, James O’Leary, Pravin Muthiah, Luke Pearson, Sophia Psarra, Kim Quazi, Merjin Royards, Matt Shaw, Gabby Shawcross, Bob Sheil, Mark Smout

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Unit 24 employs film, video, animation, drawing and virtual/physical modelling techniques to generate architectural propositions. Acknowledging the continuing absence of a dominant socio-political design regime, and inspired by cinema, television, photography, literature and computer games, the Unit seeks to challenge the empty formalist pursuit currently prevalent in the production of built form in search of a critical and politically engaged role for the architect. Inspired by historical cinematic visions of the future (Fritz Lang’s Metropolis), contemporary urban fantasies (Wim Wenders’ Wings of Desire), and past versions of the present (Walter Ruttman’s Berlin: Die Sinfonie der Großstadt), this year the Unit’s studies were focused on Berlin. Beginning by studying Berlin from afar, the first phase of the year, ‘Berlin Dream’, saw students use a number of short, time-based projects to develop an informed visual and cultural attitude to Berlin. A site was identified, an intervention proposed, and new techniques of spatio-temporal design and representation were explored. The field trip to Berlin, ‘Berlin Travelogue’, took the form of an intense study of both the site chosen in the first phase of the year, and of Berlin as a whole. The students collaborated with ScanLAB to create highly detailed 3D scans of extraordinary spaces, and produced experimental film work to further refine their design ambitions and their approach to an individual spatial practice. For the main project of the year, which we called ‘Berlin Symphony’, Year 4 students designed a detailed, ‘filmic’ building which sought to draw on cultural, physical, economic and historical peculiarities, resolving an architecture that sought to challenge and subvert the fabric of Berlin. This design then became the protagonist in a final, time-based exploration. Year 5 students refined their explorations into speculative cinematic architectural projects, generating architectural films and filmic architectures, spatio-temporal graphics and cinematic architectural drawings, all supported and enriched by the written thesis document. The completion of Year 5 enables students to develop particular personal design methodologies with the moving image as a key parameter. Creative Practice Unit 24 benefits from a broad network of associated professionals working across the creative sectors. This year students benefited from frequent masterclasses from architectural filmmakers Factory Fifteen, from sound workshops with film composer Kevin Pollard, from scriptwriting and narrative direction from Andrew Gow of Raindog Films, from scanning workshops by Matt Shaw of ScanLAB, and from inspirational lectures from digital design agency Studio Output, dynamic young practices Patrick Lewis Architects and Haptic Architects, and architectural visionary and practitioner Felix Robbins.


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Fig. 24.1 Liam Davis Y5, ‘Agitprop (agitation propaganda)’. The film represents the dissemination of social and political conflict in public space through architectural and cinematic montage. It traces the design and production of a dialectic structure, constructed from culturally significant icons to incite emotional associations through a process of superimposition and superadjacency. Fig. 24.2 Steven Howson Y5, ‘Accelerated Serendipity’. The project proposes a speculative work space for the creative digital technology industry in East London’s Tech City. The film is an ironic take on corporate promotional shorts satirically proposing an architectural iconography inspired by electronic devices. Fig. 24.3 Aggeliki Vasileiou Y4, ‘Staging Weather’. Oscillating between reality and dream, the theatre sited on the bank of the river Spree in Berlin entraps the

indeterminacy of the weather by simulating different environmental conditions within the interior of three auditoria. Fig. 24.4 Emir Tigrel Y4, ‘New Bank and School of Economics’. The building is sited within a redundant ice factory, featuring a dynamic roof ‘vault’ system that stores digital and physical currency, harnessing socio-economic nuances to trigger an architectural response that encourages entrepreneurialism and change. Fig. 24.5 Jonathan Holmes Y5, ‘Tempelhofer Lu(f/s)twerk’. A wind and hydro-powered recreational wetland transforms Tempelhof Airport into a landscape of the sublime. The physical processes on site spawn programmatic opportunities and cause natural phenomena. The film uses the motion-picturesque architectural framework to cast the site in parallel cinematic universe.

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Fig. 24.6 Rintaro Yoshida Y5, ‘The Parasphere Architect’. The film proposes an archaeological museum/garden of cyberspace grafted on physical uncanny urban structures that resemble ‘Tomason’ which suddenly appear in the city. The design explores the early iconography of cyberspace before digital media became all-pervasive, in a series of brightly coloured toy-like digital follies, each representing a seminal cyberspace novel. Fig. 24.7 Cai Wei (Amy) Zhao Y4, ‘Cross-Media Centre: A Light Device’. Sited in the Media Spree Development Corridor in Berlin, the building features a dynamic glass façade that filters natural light as well as being self-illuminating at night. Using the music video genre and featuring Kraftwerk’s classic piece, Home Computer, the film recasts the building in a humorous alien invasion narrative.

Fig. 24.8 Kelvin Ip Y4, ‘Blossoming Bridge’. The project proposes an ornamental movable bridge housing a hybrid programme of a post office/shopping arcade. Soft ornaments grow and expand in response to both environmental and functional cycles mimicking the blossoming of flowers creating a decorative choreography. Fig. 24.9 Keiichi Iwamoto Y5, ‘Berlin Estrangement’. Exploring Berlin’s underground, a space that has strong associations with both fear (bunkers and wartime bombing) and freedom (tunnelling under the Berlin Wall to escape), the project imagines an allegorical ‘deep underground’ and constructs a utopian future that challenges, inverts and expands the current urban reality of the city.

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MArch Architecture Unit 24 The Bartlett School of Architecture 2014 24.10 Fig. 24.10 Edward Mascarenhas Y5, ‘Barbecana’. Inspired by Constant’s New Babylon and re-appropriating the spaces of The Barbican Estate, the project proposes a game that reflects on architecture’s relationship to play. This new pervasive game creates a space that mediates between real and simulated urban experience. Through immersive gameplay Barbecana destabilises and blurs the spatial temporal nature of the site. Fig. 24.11 Dan Cotton Y5, ‘Wates House’. A building narrates its own life story in a short film that explores the multifarious nature of our lived-in spaces and comments on the role of memory in our experience of space. Projection-mapped animations uncover hidden narratives – drawn from material collected through interviews with its inhabitants – and replayed on the walls of the soon to be demolished Wates House. 288

Fig. 24.12 Kairo Baden-Powell Y5, ‘Fictional Constructs’. Set in Kraftwerk, Berlin, the film constructs a fictional image of the site where hyper-real design interventions conceal various levels of deception of scale, time and place. The design proposes a new open film studio/public space that constantly evolves, grows and performs, acts and expands, merging the boundaries between the everyday and the iconic, the real city and its representation in film.


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Collisions Michael Chadwick, Simon Kennedy


Unit 24

Collisions Simon Kennedy, Michael Chadwick

‘Americans may have no identity, but they do have wonderful teeth.’ Jean Baudrillard Unit 24 employs film, video and animation techniques to generate architectural propositions, operating consciously and conscientiously within the globalised, decentralised, desensitised territories of media.

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2013

The Unit recognises the current absence of a dominant socio-political architectural and design regime. We aim to celebrate this freedom and draw from popular artforms: cinema, television, photography, literature and computer games can be analysed and utilised to form hybrid and synthetic spatial propositions. Collisions We inhabit unique times of tumultuous transition. Encroaching digital technologies collide with analogue and chemical technologies (nowhere more strikingly than in the construction industry). Cyberspace collides with and infiltrates built fabric. Iconic images collide with their own dissemination. Globalisation collides with everything. The Unit attempted to interpret the collision as a force of positive change, and sought to experiment with its potential use as an instrument of architectural investigation. Beginning the year with a series of short, moving-image-based projects, students outlined a conceptual position while refining the skills required to examine their own architectural collisions. Intensive workshops were held during this phase of the year in key techniques for digital animation, editing, production and compositing. We then travelled to the source of the spread of globalisation, armed with iconic images and film, with the intention of testing the power of such iconography against its origins. As part of a field trip to California, the Unit studied the Case Study Houses and works by Frank Gehry, Eric Owen Moss, 286

Morphosis and Coop Himmelb(l)au, the LACMA Stanley Kubrick exhibition, and Hollywood. Visiting the Sony Animation Studios, students were treated to a 3D and compositing workshop where they recreated a scene from The Amazing Spiderman. A visit to SCI-Arc also enabled students to experience SCI-Arc’s cutting edge Robotics & Simulation Lab. Fourth year students then resolved their early speculations into a cinematic building proposition informed by filmic-spatial investigations, translations and notions of genre. Fifth year students defined a personal spatial and artistic practice, while constructing a speculative architectural thesis proposition, also with the moving image as a key parameter. Creative Practice Unit 24 benefits from a broad network of associated professionals working in sectors ranging from architecture to film, animation, sound design, motion graphics, urban design and contemporary art. Contributions from these professionals serve as a critical pedagogic counterpoint to the conceptual and theoretical discourse within the Unit, as well as providing inspiration and practical guidance – students are encouraged to consider their potential as practitioners while still studying at the Bartlett. Unit 24 arranged a series of lectures covering all aspects of setting up a creative and commercial practice in today’s economy and, importantly, maintaining creativity and conceptual development throughout the process. The Unit welcomed speakers such as David Chambers and Kevin Haley of Aberrant Architecture, Zoe Chan and Joao Gameiro Neves from Atelier ChanChan, Alex Scott-Whitby at Studio AR, George Thompson of Visitor Studio, Pedro Gil of Studio Gil, Jenny Fleming and Alessio Cuozzo of JAA, Rob Small of Lotsmorehere and Ed Soden.


MArch Architecture Unit 24 The Bartlett School of Architecture 2013

Many thanks to our critics: Diana Cochrane, Hal Currey, Andrew Gancikov, Alexis Germanos, Christine Hawley, Ephraim Joris, Jerome Keam, Patrick Lewis, Kim Quazi, Reza Schuster, George Thompson. Unit 24 has benefited from its relationships with a network of practising architects and construction industry consultants, and so would like to thank practice tutors Kim Quazi and Hal Currey of Arup Associates, Structural Engineers Michael Thomson and Timothy Snelson, also of Arup Associates and Environmental Engineer Ali Shaw of Max Fordham. Year 4 Ai Deng, Daniel Cotton, Liam Davis, Khadija Durbar, Muhammad Zhlfiker Enayet, Jonathan Holmes, Steven Howson, Keiichi Iwamoto, Edward Mascarenhas Year 5 Ruben Alonso, Isaac Eluwole, Douglas Fenton, Sasha Smolin

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Fig. 24.1 Douglas Fenton, Y5, The Post-Human Experiment. Based on a theoretical view of the consciousness as a pattern of information which might be held within a digital substrate, the project explores the relationship between architectural environments and the duality of the mind/body that experiences them. The image describes a sequence within the film, The Post-Human Experiment, where the protagonist enters geometries and abstracted spaces generated by a digital version of consciousness. By representing this ‘mindscape’, the project speculates on the perception of 3D space and juxtaposes this against the abstracted spatiality held within the subconscious and in dreams, where time, space, place and event merge into one another, shifting and changing. 289


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Fig. 24.2 Jonathan Holmes, Y4, Super Supper, film still. Normative shop-based activities are gamified with hilarious results, subsequently enabling new commercial potentialities. Fig. 24.3 Ruben Alonso, Y5, Southbank, photo-collage: ‘The production of reality no longer depends on the direct relationship with reality, but with a represented reality.’ Fig. 24.4 Douglas Fenton, Y5, The Post-Human Experiment, spatio-temporal graphic depicting the procession through the Post-Human Experiment Tower. Fig. 24.5 Douglas Fenton, Y5, The Post-Human Experiment, spatio-temporal graphic showing the filmic journey from entering the Tower to emerging into mental geometric constructions.

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24.9 Fig. 24.6 Ai Deng, Y4, Bricolage, A Three-Dimensional Collision, film still. Fig. 24.7 Edward Mascarenhas, Y4, Colliding Chairs, graphic storyboard. Set in the City of London, the film speculates on an infestation of banal office-derived objects and examines the surreal results. Fig. 24.8 Sasha Smolin, Y5, Market Stall Typologies, film still. Beginning with a process of intensive data gathering, the project generates a series of opportunistic typological interventions derived from the multiple cultures inhabiting Caledonian Road, London. These are combined to form dynamic and sympathetic new urban spaces. Fig. 24.9 Sasha Smolin, Y5, Market Stall Typologies, Eritrean typology. The Nda Mariam temple is Asmara is transformed via projection, drawing and modelling. 291


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24.13 Fig. 24.10 Liam Davis, Y4, Collage: Film to Form, spatiotemporal graphic. The project seeks to generate architectural space via the analysis of filmic montage techniques. Here, Sergei Eisenstein’s Battleship Potemkin is analysed graphically, sonically and temporally, giving rise to a system of notation, which is then used to drive software-based parameters, allowing the construction of new spaces and filmic architectures. Fig. 24.11 Daniel Cotton, Y4, Transitions: The Marlowe House, Hollywood, California. The project seeks to derive architectural space from filmic transitions between virtual and cinematic space, and footage filmed with a custom-designed steadycam. Transitions are mapped into three-dimensional habitable spaces which form a residence for the fictional detective, Phillip Marlowe. Fig. 24.12 Steven

Howson, Y4, The Thirty Second City, film still. The project describes the near-instant formation of a hyper-dense fictional urban amalgamation. Fig. 24.13 Keichi Iwamoto, Y4, The Restoration of the London Baths – conceptual graphic. Following an investigation into London’s historic red-light districts, the project suggests a controlled collision between eastern and western cultural modes.

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24.16 Fig. 24.14 Isaac Eluwole, Y5, The Quotidian Utopia, Aaron’s Undercroft, film still. The project seeks to reappraise forgotten and maligned Modernist spaces, countering preconceptions then inverting them with counter-cultural augmentations and interventions. Beginning by photographing and modelling each site in meticulous detail, the spaces undergo softwarebased transformations, from which each intervention is generated. A study of the prejudices surrounding the site, actual and perceived uses, and historical occurences gives rise to the intervention’s programme. Fig. 24.15 Isaac Eluwole, Y5, The Quotidian Utopia, The Memorial spatial construct, film still. Fig. 24.16 Isaac Eluwole, Y5, The Quotidian Utopia, The Memorial in construction, film still. Fig. 24.17 Jonathan Holmes, Y5, The Stahl House, 294

a constructed image of a mythological artefact at the boundary between reality and fiction.


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Possibilities of Exchange: Poetic Transference Uwe Schmidt-Hess, Michael Wihart


Dip/MArch Unit 24 Yr 4: Sung-Hwa Cha, Mo Huen Chong, Christopher Cox, Michail Floros, Yi-Tung Su, Qidi Hu, Nobuhiko Maeda Yr 5: Ronald Cheape, Maya Cochrane, Thomas Ibbitson, Kevin Kelly, Asako Sengoku, Chun-Tai Tsai

Possibilities of Exchange: Poetic Transference Unit 24 studies space beyond the confines of operational thought where architecture can become a dynamic interface between the body and the landscape. Today’s innovations in technology, science and media are not only pushing the limits of what is feasible, but also the boundaries of our imagination. In this world thought is freed from pure rationales uniting opposites such as the natural and man-made, the biological and technological, the analytical and intuitive. Events emerge between users and their architectural surroundings; a hitherto unknown poetic transference unfolds new possibilities of exchange between man, architecture and landscape. This year’s projects have proposed hybrid interventions that migrate between the common strictures and nomenclatures of digital, mechanical, biological etc., becoming models of innovation as well as imaginative devices that investigate alternative spatial realities. Unit 24 would like to thank Geoff Whittaker from KPF Architects for his continued assistance with Design Realization as well as our critics: Tilo Amhoff, Christopher Bryant, Nic Clear, Marjan Colletti, Ines Dantas, Ranulph Glanville, Ruairi Glynn, Robert Greer, Christoph Hadrys, Jon Harvey, Chris Hildrey, Tobias Klein, Ben Luk, Geoff Morrow, Markus Seifermann, Bob Sheil, Ben Sweeting, Phil Watson, Mark West and Emmanuel Vercruysse.

Michael Wihart & Uwe Schmidt-Hess

Top: Michail Floros, Wet Elevator for Nautical Passenger. Middle: Chun-Tai Tsai, Tidal Architecture – Sea Food Market in Mousehole Harbour. Bottom: Maya Cochrane, Training Centre for Ice Road Truckers. Opposite page clockwise from top left: Maya Cochrane, Feather and Lung Model; Michail Floros, Wet Elevator Models; Asaco Sengoku, Muscle Wire Actuation Model; Michail Floros, Wet Elevator Models; Sung-Hwa Cha: Soft Envelope Study.


Top: Asaco Sengoku, Lace Space: a Workshop for Lacing. Bottom from left: Ronald Cheape, Terra-forming Intervention in Glenaladale; Christopher Cox, The Biological Rocking Chair; Mo Huen Chong, Elastic Space.


Kevin Kelly, Temples of Hermitic Virtues.


Tom Ibbitson, The Still Vessel: Timber Experts Stranded on an Island made of Stone are Forced to Rebuild Their Ship Using Stone, the Result is an Architecture of Inheritance and Inversion. Opposite page: Hull and Formwork Construction. Top: Sail detail. Bottom: The Becoming of the Window.


Migrating Thresholds Uwe Schmidt-Hess, Michael Wihart


Dip/MArch Unit 24 Y4: Maya Cochrane, Nicole Dixon, Thomas Ibbitson, Kevin Kelly, Tomonori Ogata, Asako Sengoku, Chun-Tai Tsai, Andrea Wong. Y5: Jonathan P Harvey, Christopher Hildrey, Milad Hossainzadeh, Gerald Huber, Bleddyn R Jones, Fei Meng, Thomas J Rigley

Migrating Thresholds Art protects us from the desert of reality, its one-dimensionality and the complete usefulness and banality of our existence. She achieves that by luring us into new and extraordinary emotional, experiential and intellectual states. In search of original pleasure, architectural designers often endeavour to challenge the unknown but feel restrained by the consequences of the known. We couldn’t care less. There are spaces where duration and memory are compressed. Thresholds can be spatial, chemical, social, etc. They always have potential and they are the sites of change. The term ‘threshold’ describes moments of transitions. How do we record it? How do we, as architectural designers, imbue thresholds with meaning? In its first year the unit has zoomed into transitional practices and observed rites of passage and their relevance to our coexistence and in turn invented new passage tactics and rites and responded with articulate architectural observations, experiments and propositions. We have explored thresholds between craftmanship and experimentation; between the excellence of the expectable and the failure of the experiment. We understand thresholds as sites of potential beginning, contact connection, immersion and their antagonists at the same time.

Michael Wihart and Uwe Schmidt-Hess

Top: Thomas Ibbitson, The beginning of architecture in the Garden of Eden Bottom: Asako Sengoku, Inflatable dress.


Clockwise from top left: Bleddyn R Jones, Geo-mechanical bridge at the Dripping Well in Knaresborough, North Yorkshire; Andrea Wong, Transfigured anatomies of a shopping bag; Fei Meng, Archaeological prosthetics for the Schliemann excavations of Troy, Turkey; Kevin Kelly, Lunatic Window; Chun-Tai Tsai, Moments of transformation; Tomonori Ogata, The visio-computational space of Anatoli Karpov; Thomas J Rigley, Aqueous transmission.


Milad Hossainzadeh, The Library of Bioinformatics Exchange, Sarajevo.


Maya Cochrane, Pores for a Hamam hydraulique.


Christopher Hildrey, Hybrid Gardens of the Circle Line, London.


Jonathan P Harvey, Mistral Festival in Orange, France.


Phenomenal Noumena: extreme PHENOuMENA Steve Hardy, Jonas Lundberg with Ken Faulkner


Dip Unit 24 Yr 4: Alan Pottinger, Charlie Coates, Dominque Laurence, Gayle Chan, Hannes Mayer, Huali Zhang, Ian Law, Justin Goodyear, Richard Roberts, Kwan Pik (Sonia) Chiu. Yr 5: Chris Jones, Poyuan Huang, Takehiko Iseki, Tuomas Pirinen, ViJay Patel, Wei-Haw Wang. .Phenomenal Noumena:

extreme

PHENOuMENA Noumena exist in themselves as independent from experience in contrast to phenomena which exist within the experienced world, as 'objects' perceived by the senses. Many contemporary design techniques continually decontextualise the experience of architecture and replace the experiencing subject with the notation of the statistical, the representational or the programmatic subject. In parallel, the semi-autonomous emergence of architecture from systemic and algorithmic methods places the practice of architecture closer to that of the pseudo-noumenal. The unit aims to reintroduce qualitative experience to the otherwise typically quantitative practice of architecture. Rather than work towards the understanding of a neo-cognitive experience, the charge is to work by interlacing the qualitative with the quantitative. Working within instrumental simulations it is possible to provide qualitative feedback of phenomenal effects for the quantitative manipulation of systemic or material conditions which create the effects. In altering the porosity of a wall through which light passes, for example, one increases the potential sensation of a brightening/darkening space. The design research is situated between the noumenal and the phenomenal, between the systemic algorithm and the sensed, in what we will call the phenoumenal. Focusing on the phenbionics of the sensed, natural and mechanical phenomenon, students avoid complacent effects and instead seek out extremes. The unit continues to design effectual and experiential phenomena within pseudonoumenal structures.

Steve Hardy, Jonas Lundberg with Ken Faulkner

Top to bottom: Tuomas Pirinen, Chainsaw Animation; Huali Zhang, Shark Research Centre, Florida; Vijay Patel, Mangrove Growth Mesh, Cuba; Wei-Haw Wang, Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Greece.


This page: Takehiko Iseki, Salt Farms, Jordan.


This page: Justin Goodyer, Fluid Dynamics, New York. Facing page: Tuomas Pirinenm, Xylitol/Birch Milling, Finland.


This page: Poyuan Huang, Condensation Chambers, Morocco. Facing page: Chris Jones, Sequestration Coal Mining, Pennsylvania.


Effectual Formalisms Steve Hardy, Jonas Lundberg


Dip Unit 24 Yr 4: Julian Busch, Stephen Clarke, Poyuan Huang, Takehiko Iseki, Christopher Jones, Sun Eoi Lee, Vijay Patel, Tuomas Pirinen, Wei-Haw Wang. Yr 5: Mark Andrews, Raymond Chan, James Ewen, Peter Moerland, Ka Chun Pun, Benjamin Guy Thomas, Charis Tsang, Vincent Young.

Effectual Formalisms The unit works within a ‘blind’ formalism; challenging the ocular preference for form with the performative aspects of the form in relation to the other senses. For example, forms that are seen as different will usually ‘sound’ different as well. If sound (or other sensual effects) becomes a determining factor, then designers can work on the form of a project to produce the desired effect. If the effect is carefully constructed, one may even achieve certain emotive qualities. Working with spatial effects has become increasingly possible with our ability to simulate phenomena of space, material, light and sound. A ray-traced image demonstrating the actual radiosity and colour bleed of light in fact becomes more of a simulation than a representation. It is now also possible to ray-trace the actual sound of a space and create an exact, predictive simulation of the effect within the space. The unit works on locating, customising, mastering and creating simulation techniques, and experiments with these simulations to design emotive phenomena within a formal structure. The intention is for the student to unleash the simulation as a powerful design tool for understanding complex relationships.

Steve Hardy and Jonas Lundberg

Top: Benjamin Guy Thomas, middle: Charis Tsang, bottom: Wei-Haw Wang.


Clockwise from top left: Poyuan Huang, Takehiko Iseki, James Ewen, Julian Busch, Ka Chun Pun, Raymond Chan, Vijay Patel, Tuomas Pirinen, Christopher Jones, Mark Andrews. Overleaf, left: Vincent Young, right: Stephen Clarke.


[Bosphorus] Drifts [Caspian] Shifts Peter Hasdell, Patrick Weber


Dip Unit 24 Yr 4: Johan Berglund, Eleanor Brough, Katherine Davies, James Ewen, Kirsten Holland, David Roy, Kristina Schinegger, Jason Spiliotakos, Niek Turner, Emmanuel Vercruysse. Yr 5: Joveria Baig, Sarah Burton, Rhys Cannon, Ka Man Cheung, Dimitris Karampatakis, Jonas Love Norlin, Chryssanthi Perpatidou, Ylva Reddy. MArch Architecture: Timo Haedrich.

[Bosphorus] Drifts [Caspian] Shifts Unit 24 investigated conditions of flux, places of exchange, transformation and information. Focusing our investigations on a part of the Silk Road between Istanbul and Baku, an area defined by flows between the east and west, we consider a range of shifting conditions and continually changing environments. The unit explores an architecture that is part caravan (moving object) and part building or caravanserei (fixed place). We propose architectures of interferences, interruptions and obstacles to the flow of things in motion. Projects are sited in Istanbul or Baku. The year’s programme comprises three interrelated parts. Rift: a project defining two points of reference and the space in between. Drift: an assemblage/construct of moments of drifting, derive, currents, turbulence, vortices and eddies. Shift: proposals developed from individuals concerns ranged from markets of various types, hotels, taxi stations, bird sanctuary, apiary radio stations, weather register, sanatoriums and dog racing tracks.

Peter Hasdell and Patrick Weber


Opposite, top: Dimitris Karampatakis, middle: Emmanuel Vercruysse, lower: Jason Spiliotakos. This page, top: Rhys Cannon. Bottom row: Kirsten Holland, Sarah Burton, Niek Turner, Johan Berglund, Joveria Baig, Chryssanthi Perpatidou, Niek Turner, Rhys Cannon, David Roy, Ylva Reddy.


ucl.ac.uk/architecture

Bartlett Design Anthology | Unit 24  

Architectural design teaching on The Bartlett School of Architecture's BSc and MArch Architecture programmes is organised around ‘units’: co...

Bartlett Design Anthology | Unit 24  

Architectural design teaching on The Bartlett School of Architecture's BSc and MArch Architecture programmes is organised around ‘units’: co...