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Design Anthology UG9 BSc Architecture (ARB/RIBA Part 1) Compiled from Bartlett Books 2008–2018


Our Design DNA At The Bartlett School of Architecture, we have been publishing annual exhibition catalogues for each of our design-based programmes for more than a decade. These catalogues, amounting to thousands of pages, illustrate the best of our students’ extraordinary work. Our Design Anthology series brings together the annual catalogue pages for each of our renowned units, clusters, and labs, to give an overview of how their practice and research has evolved. Throughout this time some teaching partnerships have remained constant, others have changed. Students have also progressed from one programme to another. Nevertheless, the way in which design is taught and explored at The Bartlett School of Architecture is in our DNA. Now with almost 50 units, clusters and labs in the school across our programmes, the Design Anthology series shows how we define, progress and reinvent our agendas and themes from year to year. Professor Frédéric Migayrou Chair of The Bartlett School of Architecture Professor Bob Sheil Director of The Bartlett School of Architecture


2018 Met[a]ropolia 2046 Jessica In, Chee-Kit Lai 2017 The Ephemeral City Jessica In, Chee-Kit Lai 2016 Lux::Umbra Jessica In, Chee-Kit Lai 2015 Skilled Contrivance in the Age of Technological Abundance Jessica In, Chee-Kit Lai 2014 Performance Max Dewdney, Chee-Kit Lai 2013 Brief City São Paulo – London Max Dewdney, Chee-Kit Lai 2012 Blinding Light, Spectacle at the Edge of London/Beijing Max Dewdney, Chee-Kit Lai 2011 Adhocracy Max Dewdney, Chee-Kit Lai 2010 In from the Cold Max Dewdney, Chee-Kit Lai 2009 Alter Ego Max Dewdney, Chee-Kit Lai 2008 Interface Jason King, Gabby Shawcross


2018 Met[a]ropolia 2046 Jessica In, Chee-Kit Lai


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Met[a]ropolia 2046 Jessica In, Chee-Kit Lai

Year 2 Daeyong Bae, Alexander Balgarnie, Miles Elliott, Yuen (Peter) Kei, Alessandro Rognoni, Malgorzata Rutkowska, Yaqi Su Year 3 Daniel Boran, Wei (Vanessa) Chung, Xavier De La Roche, Aleksy Dojnow, Grey Grierson, Anna O'Leary, Edward Taft, Rupert Woods The Bartlett School of Architecture 2018

Thank you to our consultants: Matt Lucraft, Sean Malikides, Andre Sampaio Kong, Donald Shillingburg, Denis Vlieghe UG9 Photography Workshop: Brotherton Lock Special thanks to our critics: Alessandro Ayuso, Paul Bavister, Amy Begg, Jason Chan, Nat Chard, Marcus Cole, Alessandro Conning-Rowland, Richard Difford, Florian Dussopt, Winston Hampel, Penelope Haralambidou, Jonathan Hill, Alex Holloway, Vasilis Marcou Ilchuk, Carlos Jiménez Cenamor, Asif Khan, Andre Sampaio Kong, Elie Lakin, Matt Lucraft, Patrick Lam, Caireen O’Hagan, Mads Peterson, Arturo Revilla, David Roy, Donald Shillingburg, Giles Smith, Andrew Tam, Ivo Tedbury, Nicole Yu Xuan Teh, Mike Tite, Tim Yue Special thanks our sponsors: Panopus Printing PRS Ltd

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‘In Wong Kar-Wai’s films, there is not a single shot of Hong Kong skyline, that picture-postcard metaphor of Hong Kong, conjuring up images of power and desire. Wong’s Hong Kong is a city of a different kind, and the secret of that city is not power, but impotence…The city is not only a physical scape, but also a psychic one. This is one reason why the city is never shown whole, but only in fragments, in metonymies and displacements.’ Ackbar Abbas, ‘The Erotics of Disappointment’ This year, Unit 9 considered identity not as a singular construct but as multiple entities. Spaces, like identities, are multiple in their definitions and are constructed – by ourselves and by others. The unit considered the spaces and identities of a city as a series of dynamic and layered abstractions, a Met[a]ropolia (Meta + Metropolis). These layers refer to each other to continually change meaning, and in doing so complete or add to the original. We are interested in using self-reflexive techniques to construct identity and space. Met[a]ropolia explores frames within frames, plays within plays, and cities within cities to ask: How can a meditation on space illuminate our understanding of identity? Our field trip led us to Hong Kong, a city in which Ghost in the Shell director Mamoru Oshii recognised the ability of the city to take on new identities – the city for him was the perfect starting persona from which he could create his futuristic urbanism. Our main projects for the year are propositions for the year 2046 – the year when Hong Kong marks the end of the ‘one country, two systems’ constitutional principle formulated by China. In Wong Kar-Wai’s film of the same name, 2046 is never explicitly defined – it is a place, a room, a year, and a state of mind. Our projects this year draw influence from Wong’s multiple non-chronological narratives, saturated visual style and complex composition, to create reflective architectures that address questions about reality and illusion, identity and self-discovery, to continually question relationships between viewer and occupant. The mediation between matter and form, the relationship between design and occupation, the spatial implications of new technologies and the restructuring of social relationships that follows are themes that continue to interest UG9.


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Figs. 9.1 & 9.5 Aleksy Dojnow Y3, ‘Destructive Détente’. The building is a collaborative gift granted to Hong Kong – and therefore to China – by the UK, USA and Germany. Overtly it functions as a centre for dialogue and a mouthpiece for Demosisto, a pro-democracy political party run by students who co-organised and co-led the massive protests. Covertly however, it performs the role of an inerasable critique of the Chinese political system and ultimately the inevitable fate of the Hong Kong self-determination movement after 2047. The building gives Demosisto an illusion of dialogue and simultaneously distorts, disrupts and censors the student opposition campaign. Fig. 9.2 Alexander Balgarnie Y2, ‘Public Carpet’. Malls, subways, and walkways turn central Hong Kong into an urban-scaled interior. 380,000 migrant domestic

workers stake out rugs and mats in the public fragments of this domain every Sunday in a ritual of sociability, identity, and community. With these values in mind, a coded motiontracker projects back similar data to that silently harvested by intelligent surveillance systems, both political and commercial. Believing that the public domain is vital to the culture of any city, coded into the carpet are incentives for those who linger and socialise underneath, who through their being together turn striated metric spaces into ‘a space of becoming’. Fig. 9.3 Wei (Vanessa) Chung Y3, ‘Calligraphy Drawing Device’. Traditional Chinese hand writing and the quality of calligraphy are explored and reinterpreted through tactile technological representations. Using a variety of engraved wooden plates, consisting of the eight basic Chinese character strokes, users

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can recreate any Chinese character. The ultimate goal of the device is to personalise handwriting through the teaching of written Chinese characters. Fig. 9.4 Grey Grierson Y3, ‘Lui Xiabao Device’. Traditionally many people burn paper offerings at the gravesites during the Qingming festival for their ancestors to use in the afterlife. From the noughties onwards these offerings have included paper replicas of housing, clothes and iPhones. Assuming the future of this tradition would be entirely based in the digital world, the device enables people in the UK to honour their family shrine in Hong Kong. Through the study of Lui Xaiobo the final device is able to channel a new narrative of secrecy and subversion within the act of offering. The device utilises emerging photogrammetry technology, Arduino controlled sensors and Instagram to

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create a new iteration of the Qingming ritual. Figs. 9.6 – 9.9 Grey Grierson Y3, ‘Negotiations of States’. A crematorium and columbarium for Hong Kong that speculates on the division between analogue death and digital life. Through the creation of a new funerary system, existing rituals that have been slow to evolve and inhabit existing digital realities are critiqued. The crematorium is designed to act as the spatial interface between virtual and tangible life. Each death leads to a physical addition within the columbarium’s landscape and a virtual addition to the data bank. The physical addition is soon lost under layers of erosion, addition and activity within the landscape whereas the virtual addition becomes perpetual. This curation of ancestural departure provides a spatial setting for contemplation, reflection and remembrance.


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Fig. 9.10 Daeyong Bae Y2, ‘Kwun Tong Love Hotel’. The density and cramped domestic environments of Hong Kong often leave young couples without space for intimacy. Seedy hotels letting rooms by the hour are often their answer. By manipulating fog, and using sculptural forms that echo qualities of tenderness, the proposed hotel aims to break down the taboos and difficult thresholds of the typology. Fig. 9.11 Xavier De La Roche Y3, ‘Choreography of Decay’. Sheung Wan Sculpture Centre serves as a hub for creatives and non-creatives alike to make sculpture. Unlike painting, sculpture has the ability to physically manipulate the viewer, arguably making it more tangible than other art forms. The building is allowed to decay over time in a controlled manner, causing yellow rust to bleed into the urban landscape as a silent reminder of the recent

Umbrella Movement. Fig. 9.12 Alessandro Rognoni Y2, ‘Architecture for Visual Economies’. The project attempts to mediate between Hong Kong’s small independent traders and the government’s desire for recognisable (and controllable) commercial agglomeration. It preserves the intensity and diversity of independent traditional pharmacists within a department store framework by substituting traditional architectural elements like windows with the wares of the traders. Fig. 9.13 Yuen (Peter) Kei Y2, ‘Dai Pai Dong Hub’. The traditional streetfood stalls of Hong Kong, Dai Pai Dong, are highly endangered. This proposal considers Dai Pai Dong as much a part of Hong Kong’s cultural identity as its economy. The proposal increases the connectivity of the area with vehicle and pedestrian routes bridging over a large public

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perception of pollution. Using found data on the predictions of worsening pollution in Hong Kong, the artificial acid rain can erode materials to match the data and form a 1:1 collage of materials for visitors to experience and be informed on how the material world will look if pollution isn’t improved.

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space, with ample room and some specific infrastructure for independent, rather than corporate, food stalls. Fig. 9.14 Rupert Woods Y3, ‘Re-Branding Hong Kong Pollution’. In 1997 Hong Kong was returned to China and the Hong Kong government feared that it would become ‘just another Chinese city’. To avoid this, the scheme Brand Hong Kong was launched to promote Hong Kong as ‘Asia’s World City’, advertising the city’s heritage and natural beauty as a key focus. However the scheme failed for many reasons, two of which were declining natural beauty and the erosion of heritage buildings due to acid rain from worsening pollution and air quality. Buildings have become indicators of pollution, due to acid rain staining and eroding buildings. This is considered a dirty and negative image for Hong Kong, however this project proposes to reposition the

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Fig. 9.15, 9.16, 9.18 Edward Taft Y3, ‘Museum of Hong Kong’s Lost Urban Fabric’. Within the next 30 years Hong Kong is destined to face an all-too-familiar situation of uncertain identity and a new nostalgia for the recent past, a time when there were still faint remnants of pre-handover culture. The memory of this culture was ingrained within the urban fabric, which has since been lost at the helm of redevelopment. This is ultimately the goal of the Museum of Hong Kong’s Lost Urban Fabric. The architectural proposal uses cinematic footage from the city’s Nostalgic Cinema archive to construct lost urban spaces into three-dimensional photogrammetry models. In an experience that relies heavily on the continuing development of augmented reality technology, the visitor will be able to wander through various reconstructions of sites

within Hong Kong that have since been lost. The resulting role of the architecture is to act as a backdrop for potentially infinite AR scenarios, whilst enhancing the scope for scale deception in order to fit as much of the lost city within the walls as possible. Fig. 9.17 Edward Taft Y3, ‘Dreams of Kowloon Walled City’. The project concerns Kowloon Walled City, Hong Kong, known as the biggest slum on earth. With the handover approaching, the snap decision was made to demolish Kowloon Walled City. By 1995 there was no evidence that the Walled City had ever existed. The suddenness of the decision to demolish the Walled City meant that there was very little documentation of the site prior to its demolition. A book called City of Darkness created by architect Greg Girard and photographer Ian Lambot is the only true documentation of life inside Kowloon. This

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project attempts to recreate resident Albert Ng Kam-ko’s dream, tracing his journey through the stairs and alleyways to retrieve his family’s water, using photographs and accounts from City of Darkness. The project explores various methods of reconstruction, with the ultimate outcome being a digital recreation of the Walled City in Albert Ng Kam-ko’s dream. This reconstruction is then occupied through Virtual Reality to bring the user as close as possible to the dreamlike experience.

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2017 The Ephemeral City Jessica In, Chee-Kit Lai


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The Ephemeral City Jessica In, Chee-Kit Lai

Year 2 Assankhan Amirov, Theo Brader-Tan, Eleanor Evason, Gabriele Grassi, Thomas Leggatt, Patrycja Panek, James Robinson Year 3 Krina Christopoulou, Morgan Hamel de Monchenault, Arthur Harmsworth, Janis Ho, Jaejun Kim, Minghan (Tom) Lin, Xiao Ma, Samuel Price, Niraj Shah The Bartlett School of Architecture 2017

Unit 9 also continues an ongoing collaboration with Denis Vlieghe, who runs a Physical Computing Workshop as part of Project 1 (Interactive Device) Thank you to our critics: Sam Aitkenhead, Edwina Attlee, Paul Bavister, Alastair Browning, Nat Chard, Kacper Chmielewski, Richard Difford, Elizabeth Dow, Murray Fraser, Ruairi Glynn, Penelope Haralambidou, Jonathan Hill, Lilly Kudic, Constance Lau, Jamie Lilley, CJ Lim, Emma-Kate Matthews, James O'Leary, Jonathan Pile, Sophia Psarra, Arturo Revilla, Farlie Reynolds, Don Shillingburg, Andrew Slack, Giles Smith, Eva Sopeoglou, Ivo Tedbury, Manijeh Verghese, Denis Vlieghe, Patrick Weber, Nick Westby, Dan Wilkinson, Simon Withers, Fiona Zisch Special thanks for photography workshop by Soma Sato Special thanks for computing workshops by Steven Howson and Denis Vlieghe

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"The difference between a piece of architecture and an image is that people can move through architecture, meaning that the element of time is the crucial difference. Architecture is the opposite of an image. Architecture is not about space, but about time," Vito Acconci This year, our investigations began by considering the concept of dimension beyond physical objects, negotiating between different planes of time to create the architecture of the Ephemeral City. Our early studies explored Mexican culture from afar, to design and create a time-based, spatially embedded device. Speculative in nature, these design explorations are nonetheless bound by determined roles and relationships and form the basis of an architectural analysis – measuring geographically defined qualities of space such as rhythm, tempo and speed, creating kinematic representations of place closely related to the performance of its inhabitants. Our field trip led us to Mexico City, where we considered Mexican culture across multiple planes of time – the modern-day capital, the Spanish-colonial influence, and the ancient sites of the Aztecs – the combination of which creates the vibrant, complex and overflowing metropolis that is Mexico City today. Our main project is a complex building for a public programme that speculates on and suggests new forms of the Ephemeral City. The projects propose a new urban typology for an architecture that could act as a generator for future change, or as a resource for forgotten communities. The proposals are led by students’ initial curiosities, then are developed and driven by considering inhabitants not as passive receptors, but instead as active elements in the definition of our architecture. Unit 9 is interested in an architecture that mediates between matter and form, and the relation between design and occupation. We are interested in the celebratory, the continually reconfiguring and reinvented. We see performance as intrinsically linked to the development of technology beyond the discipline of architecture. We are critical of the passive consumption of technology and instead support rigorous investigations into its application to design processes. We continually question the conventions of the production of architecture, pushing the boundaries of drawing, making and interactivity to actively promote both analogue and digital craftsmanship.


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Fig. 9.1 James Robinson Y2, ‘One Drop at a Time’. The device is a micro-archive of different water samples found in Mexico City. It reveals apparently unnoticeable changes within the water system (of waste and pollutants, etc), allowing viewers a glimpse into Mexico City’s complex relationship with water and the environment over time. Fig. 9.2 Jaejun Kim Y3, ‘Flight Club’, interactive model with remote control and laser lights. The building is a proposal for a nighttime hand-gliding club. Located on an archaeological landscape northeast of Mexico City, the club offers visitors a different experience of viewing the Pre-Hispanic city of Teotihuacan (a UNESCO World Heritage site). The proposal consists of an indoor training section which allows beginners to practice, as well as multiple runways for more advanced users and viewing platforms for visitors. Whilst

gliders can also visit during the day, night-gliding is the main attraction and the architecture sets the backdrop for the ephemeral performance of light and flight after sunset. Fig. 9.3 Minghan (Tom) Lin Y3, ‘Drug Rehabilitation Centre’. This proposal is for a drug rehabilitation centre in Mexico City. The architecture of the building consists of a series of carefully choreographed waterscapes that create soft barriers. This is juxtaposed against the rigid daily routine of the programme. Using only natural light, users are directed around the building throughout the day. Sunlight falling onto the different surfaces of the building, together with the presence of flowing water, creates moments in which matte concrete walls become mirrors of their context, and shallow ponds not only reflect the sky, but also create moving rainbows. Fig. 9.4 Janis Ho Y3,

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of the direction of feathers, all in one smooth movement. The performance of the device allows viewers a sense of flight. Essential elements to the ‘Hopi’ tribe, such as rainwater, cloud and lightning, are represented with lasers, mirrors and fog.

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‘Cinematic Courthouse’. The proposal is for a cinematic courthouse in Mexico City. The building openly engages in filming courtroom proceedings in an attempt to open up the country’s judicial system to a public which has arguably lost faith in it. The architecture intentionally dramatises key figures moving through spaces, by using cinematic lighting and moving cameras. Viewers attending court proceedings or viewing remotely via smart devices are fed live footage of the events, with all key figures portrayed as equals. It is hoped that justice can be served without prejudice. Fig. 9.5 Jaejun Kim Y3, ‘Flight’. Throughout history, people have had the desire to fly. The interactive device captures the essence of the ritualistic Mexican ‘Hopi’ run. Using Arduino, the device shows the basic gestures of the eagle’s wings, including the intricate change

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Figs. 9.6 – 9.7 James Robinson Y2, ‘Hydrodynamic Landscape and Water Archive’. The building captures the lost lakes of Mexico City. The proposal includes private laboratories, a water archive, a public park, and nutrient-emitting cranes hovering above open lakes. Different parts of the building are allowed to be flooded as the landscape fluctuates with the seasons. The architecture is a cross between a building and a scenographic landscape. Fig. 9.8 Thomas Leggatt Y2, ‘Equilibrium Weather Device’. The device looks to engage an audience to question the balance between man-made environmental issues and the human intervention required to reduce their impact. It requires constant human interaction to create equilibrium, by way of interventions that allude to man’s misuse of water and nature’s way of replenishing such natural resources. The design

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questions how man balances out these forces. Fig. 9.9 Thomas Leggatt Y2, ‘The Sound Archive’. Sited in Centro Historico, The Sound Archive uses an architectural language to act as instruments for rainwater during the wet season. The sounds created are recorded as an archive for future reference. During the dry season, the archive sounds are replayed to create a folly-esque representation of water flowing through the design. The experience of the architecture juxtaposes live and mediated soundscapes.


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Fig. 9.10 Assankhan Amirov Y2, ‘Mercado de Niño Jesús’. The building is for a vertical market to accommodate the production of the much-loved baby Jesus dolls. Sited in Centro Historico, the programme also includes bars, restaurants, museums and platforms, which offer stunning views across the city centre. Much of the building is made up of large exposed ramps and stairs, which encourage informal trading and community life, all of which are visible to the public at street level. There are also plug-in pods for more permanent activities and back-of-house spaces. The façade is made of recycled tarpaulin salvaged from old market stalls and street vendors. Fig. 9.11 Gabriele Grassi Y2, ‘Ghost Recon Gaming Centre’. Situated in Roma Norte in Mexico City, the building is a labyrinth for gamers, developers and viewers. The proposal

offers a series of pixellated spaces that weave public and private, indoor and outdoor. To gamers on VR headsets, the spaces they occupy have the ability to appear bigger than their physical presence, thereby creating infinite possibilities within the game. To viewers, they are simply running around the same reconfigured spaces using sliding and rotating elements within the architecture. There is a park in front of the building, and the building sits on an island site with a front-facing public park. The blank façade act as a screen for the projection of gaming activities. Fig. 9.12 Eleanor Evason Y2, ‘Language Centre for the Indigenous People of Mexico City’. Here, the digital language of code is an allegory for verbal language. This project is an experiment in generative design which uses the cellular structure of the Voronoi mesh for the subdivision

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By day, the building deploys vendor carts across the local neighbourhood to sell street food popular with local residents and tourists. By night, the carts dock at the main building to create a large kitchen, turning the building into a series of restaurants and bars, housed in inflatable structures. The architecture is visually open in order to preserve the tradition of street food and aims to provide a more sustainable approach for the future.

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of space as a result of pointcloud glitches. The building uses light, both natural and artificial, to choreograph the user experience of the spaces. Planar surfaces are used to reflect light and create moments of clarity throughout the building, echoing the visitor’s progression through a language. Fig. 9.13 Niraj Shah Y3, ‘Complejo Deportivo’. The building is a combination of sports complex, public park and bus stop. Made from concrete panels of different bounce tolerance, occupiers are free to use its surfaces for impromptu sporting activities – thereby encouraging visitors from afar who have travelled there by bus, and local residents, to interact with it in a playful way. There is also a dedicated sports complex for more formal activities such as basketball, mini-football, squash and swimming. Fig. 9.14 Theo Brader-Tan Y2, ‘Street Vendor Hub’.

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Figs. 9.15 – 9.18 Krina Christopoulou Y3, ‘Digital Wonderland’. Located on the island of the Lago Mayor in Mexico City, the Cartographic Library houses maps of places that never existed. The proposed library archive is built underground, and upon retrieving a map with an augmented reality interface, the laser infrastructure on the roof recreates the phantom place through a triangulated laser-scape of the map’s topographic character. Upon arriving at the library, visitors may enter the underground archives of the physical maps. Scanning the maps with a smartphone reveals an augmented reality interface with which visitors can select the maps they wish to view on the roof’s laser-scape. The underground spaces are designed following principles of landscaping, and assuming arrangements that combine central nodes of activity

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with smaller, more intricate connecting routes. Conceptually, the architectural experience of the building is structured around the concept of deja-vu, created by the duplication of experiences. This creates an stereoscopy of similar experiences, whose similarity questions the memory of the past, the integrity of the present and the assumption of the future. The library is built underground, assimilating the island’s topography, resurfacing on the site with its extensive roof.


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2016 Lux::Umbra Jessica In, Chee-Kit Lai


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Lux::Umbra Jessica In, Chee-Kit Lai

Year 2 Aya Ataya, Natasha Blows, Wai (Thomas) Chu, Christopher Grennan, Zeng (Glen) Heng, Karina Tang, Connie Tang Koon Cheong, Tze-Chuan (Roger) Tung, Claudia Walton

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Year 3 Carrie Coningsby, Alessandro Conning-Rowland, Judy El-Hajjar, Maria Junco, Jaemin Kim, George Proud, Ken Sheppard, Issui Shioura UG9 continues to work with ongoing collaborator Arup Associates for Year 3 Technical Dissertations. Special thanks to Mick Brundle and James Ward UG9 also continues an ongoing collaboration with Denis Vlieghe who runs a Physical Computing Workshop as part of Project 1 (Interactive Device) Special thanks to our critics: Alessandro Ayuso, Scott Batty, Rhys Cannon, Luke Chandresinghe, Nat Chard, Tom Coward, Florian Dussopt, Stephen Gage, Penelope Haralambidou, Jonathan Hill, Carlos Jimenez, Manuel Jimenez, Kyriakos Katsaros, Andre Sampaio Kong, Dionysia Kypraiou, Constance Lau, Tim Lucas, Duncan McLeod, Mads Hulroy Peterson, Donald Shillingburg, Tom Slivans, Giles Smith, Michiko Sumi, Tomas Tvarijonas, Manijeh Verghese, George Wade, Nick Westby Special thanks for photography workshops by Finbarr Fallon and Jim Stephenson Please also visit: Facebook.com/Design.Unit9 Vimeo.com/DesignUnit9

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I decided to record "the life of a candle." Late one midsummer night, I threw open the windows, and invited in the night breeze. Lighting a candle, I also stopped open my camera lens. After several hours of wavering in the breeze, the candle burned out. Savouring the dark, I slowly closed the shutter. The candle's life varied on any given night – short intensely burning nights, long constantly glowing nights – each different, yet equally lovely in its afterglow. Hiroshi Sugimoto, 1995 Our investigations this year began with concepts of light and shadow explored via historical, contemporary and speculative technological interpretations. We are curious about the difference in meaning between Western and Eastern interpretations of light and shadow. We continue the threads from last year to explore the following question: in a perpetual overexposed day created by modernity, the Internet and contemporary globalisation, what can these themes of light and shadow offer our architecture in our constantly – allegorically and literally – overlit world? Lux The introduction of gas lamps was one of the most important social and political contributions to the Victorian city, creating not just new urban typologies but also new behaviours and a new experience of the city. This transformative nature of light sets the ambition for our preliminary studies into Japan from afar, exploring concepts of light, shadow, materiality, time and technology. Umbra • Penumbra • Antumbra The three distinct parts of a shadow set the theme of the main building project of the year. Often used to describe the shadows cast by celestial bodies, they are also used to describe the levels of darkness. Sited in Kyoto, we are interested in how design can influence the lives of many people (real and imagined), how they move and how they live in their environment, the relationships between them and the interaction and inhabitation of these spaces and moments. The role of light and shadow to design the immaterial, the ephemeral-permanent, and an architecture that is beyond the control of the architect are themes central to this year’s main project. UG9 sees performance as intrinsically linked to the development of technology beyond the discipline of architecture. We are critical of the passive consumption of technology and the lack of criticality in its application to design processes. We continually question the conventions of the production of architecture, pushing the boundaries of making, interactivity and drawing to become an integral part of the design process. We actively promote analogue and digital craftsmanship and time-based media to rigorously test ideas from inception through to final representation.


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Fig. 9.1 Wai (Thomas) Chu Y2, ‘Hidden Beauty’, interactive dressing device. Inspired by the hidden boundaries of Yakuza tattoo culture and the Samurai dressing ritual, the device scans the user’s arm via a 3D scanner positioned on the outer orbit. The digital contour of the arm is fed into a computer and once processed, a 3D printer pen on a robot arm draws a live 3D tattoo around the user’s arm guided by the digital scan. Fig. 9.2 Tze-Chuan (Roger) Tung Y2, ‘Interactive Time Fountain’, interactive device. This device is a futuristic time fountain based on the traditional Japanese cistern that tips to measure time through volumes of water. Stroboscopic light and shadow are linked with the viewer’s interactions with the fountain, causing the water to seemingly drip at different speeds, both forwards and backwards in time.

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Fig. 9.3 Aya Ataya Y2, ‘Digital Purification’, interactive device. Gestures found in traditional Shinto purification rituals Onusa and Temizuya are reinterpreted into a digital light painting device to create mementos of the experience. Head and hand movements are tracked to recreate active voids in the light surfaces for an exposure of Sugimoto’s ‘life of the light’ that is unique to each personal expression of the ritual. Figs. 9.4 – 9.7 Issui Shioura Y3, ‘Chano-yu Tea Ceremony Lighthouse’, interactive drawing, acrylic and acetate layered section with light. The concept of ichi-go ichi-e (a once-in-a-lifetime encounter), a tea ceremony (chanoyu) – is reinterpreted through Gibson’s theories of visual perception, affordance and occluding edges of perceived space. The traditional illusional qualities of Roji tea gardens


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throughout the seasons is manifested through different journey pathways within the building that are perceptually altered – but not physically elongated – through the precise use of light tube columns and sliding walls. The creation of unique, memorable spatial moments with light induces a separation from reality, to allow for the deep conversations over tea to achieve the core quality and enhanced experience of chano-yu without the strict traditional appearance.

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Fig. 9.8 Zeng (Glen) Heng Y2, ‘Kimono Fabric Dye Factory’, folded Kimono laser-etched final drawings. The proposal is for a fabric dye factory using natural colouring from recycled food waste collected from the restaurants across Kyoto. The final drawings on calico fabric plays with the conventions of pattern cutting and architectural notations. Through the unfolding, the Kimono orthographic drawings are slowly revealed. Fig. 9.9 Ken Sheppard Y3, ‘Kyoto 4’33’, film still of physical model and audio recording with water. Kyoto 4’33 is a storm surge cistern that acts as an auditorium complex. The infrastructure for storm surge reduces the risk from the monsoon flooding of the neighbouring Kamogawa river, while utilsing the captured water to create a transformative event space for the asynchronous performance of Gagaku music

performed during the Jidai Matsuri festival in October. The filling of the structure triggers a transformation from three separate auditoria into one combined auditorium, through a series of floating mechanisms. During the asynchronous performance, sound produced by the three orchestras are reflected into the central cistern to mix and reverberate, depending on the water levels dictated by the region’s natural hydrological cycle. Fig. 9.10 Ken Sheppard Y3, ‘Ceremony’, final drawing of installation performance staging. Ceremony explores the concept of Ma – a moment of reflective pause – through a spatial sound and light performance. Three players interpret a Laban-type score on their motion instruments, which is translated into a light and laser projection to visualize the light boundaries created by their performance. As Kiri

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(or haze) is used as a compositional technique to create visual Ma in traditional Japanese paintings, Ceremony continually redraws Ma through the immaterial medium of projected light volumes, momentarily capturing the ephemeral qualities of the ceremony space. Fig. 9.11 Issui Shioura Y3, ‘Chano-yu Tea Ceremony Lighthouse’, 1:50 model.

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Fig. 9.12 Alessandro Conning-Rowland Y3, ‘Kyoto Motorcycle City’, detail model. The main building sited in central Kyoto and associated infrastructure around the city provides the framework for an annual motorcycle race for the thriving, but locally underappreciated, custom vehicle culture in Japan. The proposal is a symbiotic overlay of architectural artifice against the context of Kyoto’s key landmarks. Fig. 9.13 George Proud Y3, ‘The Yotsuya Sanchome Bitcoin Bank’, augmented sectional drawing. Sited in a residential area within Tokyo, the proposal is for a self-sustaining high-tech community. The bank houses a mine (for bitcoin), which is the primary source of income for the maximum capacity of 70 residents. Figs. 9.14 – 15 Alessandro Conning-Rowland Y3, ‘Journey through Shokintei’, light-drawing device. The viewer is taken on an immersive

collage journey through Shokintei using stylised images (by Walter Gropius, during his visit to the famous teahouse). The device is a series of interconnected Japanese timber screens lined with seemingly black double-printed shoji paper. Fig. 9.16 Claudia Walton Y2, ‘Kyoto Hiking Trail’, folded trail map drawing. Sited in Arashiyama, the Trail promotes slow tourism, encouraging visitors to reinterpret the landscape in a more personal way, instead of consuming views for their Instagram feeds. Pavilion structures and constructed viewpoints along the trail interact with hikers and with each other. Fig. 9.17 Alessandro Conning-Rowland Y3, ‘Kyoto Motorcycle City’, unfolded section drawing.

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2015 Skilled Contrivance in the Age of Technological Abundance Jessica In, Chee-Kit Lai


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Skilled Contrivance in the Age of Technological Abundance Jessica In, Chee-Kit Lai

Year 2 Yan Ho (Brian) Cheung, Jooyoung Cho, Lucca Ferrarese, Andrew Jack Leather, Adam Moqrane, Achilleas Papakyriakou, Sophie Percival, Soma Sato, Isaac Simpson, Nihal Tamang, Matthew Taylor, Tze-Chuan (Roger) Tung Year 3 Douglas Croll, Jaemin Kim, George Proud The Bartlett School of Architecture 2015

UG9 continues to work with ongoing collaborator Arup Associates for Year 3 Technical Dissertations. Special thanks to Mick Brundle and James Ward. Unit 9 also continues an ongoing collaboration with Denis Vlieghe who runs a Physical Computing Workshop as part of Project 1 Special thanks to: Abi Abdolwahabi, Alessandro Ayuso, Scott Batty, Matthew Butcher, Mollie Claypool, Nat Chard, Marjan Colletti, Kate Davies, Murray Fraser, Stephen Gage, Manuel Jimenez Garcia, Evan Greenberg, Penelope Haralambidou, Jonathan Hill, Bill Hodgson, Carlos Jiménez Cenamor, Jan Kattein, Julia King, Justin C. K. Lau, Guan Lee, Lawrence Lek, CJ Lim, Yeoryia Manolopoulou, Claudia Orsetti, Sophia Psarra, Alisdair Russell, Sara Shafiei, Bob Sheil, Donald Shillingburg, Giles Smith, Michael Tite, Manijeh Verghese, Victoria Watson, Peter Webb

Images, in the very act of showing, always hide the reality which they are supposed to show. 1 Vilém Flusser’s philosophy on the technology of photography understood it to be not a faithful representation of reality, but rather, a cultural technique through which reality is constituted and understood. While his ideas are written in the context of photography and the news media of the 1970s and 80s, his vocabulary has proven influential for thinking about contemporary digital media technologies and their online uses. His essays highlight a critical and philosophical need to understand the media culture and its emergent possibilities and threats in an increasingly technical and automated world. As architects operating in the age of technological abundance, we are curious about how imagination, technology and human desire are understood in the ‘digital age’ beyond the insistence of continuous reality being reduced into discrete binary units. The contrasting title – of binary technological and infinite abundance, and the skill required to wrestle them creatively – acknowledges that as technological development binds us to a set of infinitely evolving rules, the question of how we come to understand what is valuable in our environment is key to the development of the nature of our apparatus; how we view the world through our devices and architecture. In acknowledging that technology has always informed the way in which architects work, we are interested in the how computation, fabrication and physical computing tools inform our spatial and interactive narrative of architecture. Tokyo is famed for its unique urban mix of creativity, consumption, technology and tradition. What better place to explore a grand-scale technological spectacle, which seamlessly spans virtual and physical domains? This year the building proposals aim to identify and address culturally specific relationships that affect our infinitely connected, technologically abundant world, sited in a dimension of Tokyo between permanence and temporal, reality and hyper-real, virtual and physical. This year we visited University of Tokyo DFL, Atelier Bow-Wow and SANAA in Tokyo, Japan.

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1 Vilém Flusser Lectures: We Shall Survive in the Memory of Others (2010) Buchhandlung Walther Konig GmbH + Co 130


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Fig. 9.1 Achilleas Papakyriakou Y2, ‘Turn Me On’. Interactive prosthesis. The wearable device is inspired by Tokyo’s sex and fashion subcultures. The device consists of interactive touch pads for the voyeur, which in turn activates valves located at sensitive points across the wearer’s body. Certain valves are programmed to release soft puffs of air whilst others release frosts, thereby giving the wearer fluctuating sensations of pain and pleasure. Fig. 9.2 Matthew Taylor Y2, ‘Interactive Dating’. Interactive device. There are currently around 5.5 million vending machines in Japan, the majority of these are situated within Tokyo with a ratio of 1 to every 23 people. This project explores the vending machine – a machine that traditionally requires no social interaction – as a device for dating interaction. Taking inspiration from the stages of

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Japanese tea ceremony, the table takes daters through seven stages, celebrating the completion of each. Stages 1 and 2, sitting and acceptance, release the metronome and the date begins. Stages 3-5, meeting for a drink: a teapot is placed on a pressure mat, when lifted a chime will begin to ring. Stages 6 and 7: if the dates touch, skin contact through the table and hands completes the current, which converts to a buildup of sound, an aural mark of the daters’ compatibility. Fig. 9.3 Yan Ho Cheung Y2, ‘Bowing Door’. Interactive prototype. This project explores the cultural differences in the Japanese understanding of gates and thresholds, prompted by an observation that the ticket gates on the Tokyo subway are by default open, closing shut only when an invalid ticket is presented. The idea is to implement the bow, a Japanese


ephemeral quality within architecture to be captured. The device provides a spectacle of water that is driven by live human data captured by the Kinect/Arduino. Fig. 9.5 Andrew Jack Leather Y2, ‘Natural Disaster Landscapes’. Simulation device. Taking inspiration from the phrase ‘storm in a teacup’, Jack looks at capturing the essence of Japan’s natural disasters within a series of ‘picture frames’, much like snow-globes. Frame 1 recreates a miniature flood; frame 2 recreates tidal waves through reverse liquefaction; frame 3 recreates mini storm surges and earthquakes.

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gesture of social opening, to the character of the device. To open the door, one must bow first before the door bows back, indicating a sense of mutual respect. As the bowing door moves aside, another set of double doors open as if to invite approach, only to playfully close. Fig. 9.4 Adam Moqrane Y2, ‘The Fountain of Human Solidity’. Fluid dynamics installation. This project explores the socioeconomic theme of population density in an interactive and hyper-real spectacle which uses live human data to reflect a continually changing condition of the urban fabric. Initial research revolved primarily around population density in Tokyo and its resulting architectural outcomes of control. Mounting the device onto a façade with manipulated suction cups allowed the device to be transported to different sites, where each setting allows a hyper-real and

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Figs. 9.6 – 9.7 George Proud Y3, ‘Secret 3D Tinder Vending Machine’. Virtual reality 3D model for Oculus rift and stereoscopic device. George’s latest edition of Tinder for Tokyo allows potential daters to upload 3D profiles at home via a webcam and a special app. The secret vending machines are located across Tokyo’s tight forgotten spaces marked on the pavement with interactive symbols. Users bow at this point to reveal a digital Torii (traditional gates to Shinto shrines) to enter the machine, which allows them to ‘check out’ potential dating profiles three dimensionally. Fig. 9.8 Yan Ho Cheung Y2, ‘Robots’. Exploded isometric drawing. Situated in Akihabara ‘electric town’ in the near future when robotic technology has matured and consumer robots within the household have become the norm. Reviving the electronic conglomerates of

Japan through its celebration of consumer robotics, the showroom houses a repair, research and development centre, providing the ageing population and their robots with aid and comfort. Fig. 9.9 Sophie Percival Y2, ‘Odaiba Digital Landscape’. Model with light/digital choreography. Sophie imagines a near distant future in which global warming has caused the famous Japanese cherry blossom trees to skip spring season altogether. The park is a nursery as well as a memorial to digitise the spring season, which is deep in tradition and attracts a vast number of tourists annually to catch a rare glimpse of the ephemeral spectacle. Other activities include glow-in-the-dark sprinklers, hologram cherry blossom, growing fog trees, cooling joggers’ track, laser fences and security drones.

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Figs. 9.10 – 9.12 Isaac Simpson, Y2, ‘Engawa Transition’. Laser-cut concrete block drawings, orthogonal plan drawing, section-iso drawings. The project proposes to plant a seed of Japan’s fading traditional culture into the fast, ever-changing robot-like system that Tokyo possesses today. The architecture houses three main elements: the skin – an architecture that provides protection from detractors, wars and other outside influences proved to be a great destroyer to Japanese traditional culture; the memory – an archive for Japan’s arts, both new and old, also functioning as a public museum and library; and the heart - the practice and teaching of calligraphy (shodo). Offering a place for people to learn calligraphy and perform in, it gives the local people access to master calligraphers teaching and showcasing their shodo.

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Fig. 9.13 Douglas Croll Y3, ‘Tailored Odds: A Future Proposition for the Gambling Culture of Japan’. Interactive gaming device. Investigating the idea of spatial negotiation through gambling, this conceptual model is designed to be operated by four players and a dealer. Drawing inspiration from Japanese pachinko, the game incorporates the concepts of control, negotiation, skill, chance, tension, secrecy, and competition. The dealer at the head of the table feeds the balls from above, whilst kneeling players turn their handles to control the tensile skin overhead, attempting to win as many balls as possible. The trick lies in that each player’s handle controls the mechanisms of a different player, and so the assumed control each player believes to have is false and compromised. Figs. 9.14 – 9.16 Douglas Croll Y3, ‘Keeping Afloat: Casino for Odaiba Island’.

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Perspective drawings printed onto polyester film for lightbox effect. Situated in a waterfront park to the north-western corner of Odaiba, this casino challenges traditional methods in its manipulation and influence of its occupants through continual spatial disorientation. Traditionally achieved though labyrinthine floorplans and limiting the depth of vision, here the casino renders oblivious disorientation through moving elements of the building in a controlled and deliberate manner. The surrounding context of the gamers is in a constant state of change through the use of water to elevate and float the outdoor gambling spaces, minimising mass, friction, and energy required for subtlety spatial manipulation. The movement of certain spaces also creates temporary access to areas of the building only at precise points throughout the day,


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further enhancing this concept of disorientation. One may find themselves in a space from which they cannot take the same route back.

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2014 Performance Max Dewdney, Chee-Kit Lai


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Performance Max Dewdney, Chee-Kit Lai

Year 2 Tae Woo Hong, Angus Iles, Yangyang Liu, Rosa Prichard, Soma Sato, Anastasia-Christina Stan, Yu Xuan The, Ernest Zhi Heng Wang

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Year 3 Yin Fung (Jacky) Chan, Duncan (Harry) Clover, Marcus Cole, Ruochong (Robin) Fu, Xiang (Robin) Gu, Claire Haugh, Abigail Portus, Ivo Tedbury Unit 9 continues to work with ongoing collaborator Arup Associates for Year 3 Technical Dissertations. Special thanks to James Ward and Mick Brundle Unit 9 also continues an on-going collaboration with Denis Vlieghe who runs a Physical Computing Workshop as part of Project 1 Special thanks to: Abi Abdolwahabi, Julia Backhaus, Alexander Barretta, Peter Bishop, Greg Blee, Iain Borden, Alastair Browning, Mick Brundle, Ming Chung, Gary Edwards, Pedro Font-Alba, Murray Fraser, Maria Fulford, Stephen Gage, Joshua Green, Penelope Haralambidou, Catherine Harrington, Carlos Jimenez Cenamor, Constance Lau, Holly Lewis, Jamie Lilley, Ian Ng, Sophia Psarra, Jane Rendell, Peg Rawes, Sabine Storp, Ned Scott, Gabby Shawcross, Camila Sotomayor, Nick Tyson, Manijeh Verghese, Denis Vlieghe, Victoria Watson, James Ward, Nick Westby, Danielle Wilkins, Simon Withers

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We see space as scripted, not a tabula rasa. Space is inherited and is always attached to geographies, histories, and policies. 1 We are interested in the Performance of Architecture, both as a set of scripted, artistic and cultural acts and actions as well as investigations into the ‘Performance Specification’ (particular properties) of buildings, assessed through their material and environmental properties. Vital to the ‘Performance of Architecture’ is the performance of cities, through their ecology, technology and infrastructure. The performances of cities are marked through events and actions such as protests (as seen in Rio 2013 and London Riots/Occupy 2011/2) and celebrations (World Cup 2014 and Olympics 2012/16). It is through the mediation of technology that performances between buildings and cities’ are linked. The use of digital social communication networks and the high-tech industrial revolution of digital technologies are changing the way in which we fund, occupy, produce and design architecture. An understanding of both the social and the technological are vital for architects to help shape the environmental and social performance of our future cities. Architecture is in a constant state of construction and reconstruction, co-production of the social and technical. 2 For the last two years we have visited Brazil. This year the building proposals aim to act as new urban networks and as responsive generators for future exchange and adaptation for users’ changing needs sited in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. The specific focus of research was on the materiality of Brazilian Architecture, looking at its performance specific to both the environmental as well as social conditions. We have studied the links between a series of case study buildings, understanding their construction techniques, material expressions and social contexts as a means to inform a critical position in relation to each student’s choice of building programme. This is why I’m interested, although it’s a dangerous phrase to use, in responsive architecture, that responds to appetites rather than problems. But I don’t want to have to define the appetites. The architecture has to be very responsive, but rather loose… 3 This year Unit 9 worked in collaboration with University of Columbia’s Studio X in Rio De Janeiro. 1. Rachel Hann, ‘Blurred Architecture: Duration and performance in the work of Diller Scofidio + Renfro’, Performance Research: A Journal of the Performing Arts, 17:5, 2012, p.15 2. Bruno Latour, Reassembling the Social: An Introduction to Actor Network Theory, (Oxford: OUP, 2007) 3. Cedric Price in conversation with Richard Goodwin, Public Life – Public Place, Issue 1 (London: Architectural Society, 1979)


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Fig. 9.1 Ivo Tedbury Y3, ‘Ghost Landscapes of Rio’. These devices seek to communicate images of a demolished urban fabric which previously occupied the site, specifically, in what is now the 2016 Rio Olympic park. Responding to the strict public space advertising laws introduced in Brazilian cities, all that is visible to the naked eye are strips of shimmering LEDs – instead the experience is mediated by technology: when a camera is swiped over LEDs, the strip delivers the image in individual columns of pixels. Fig. 9.2 – 9.4 Ivo Tedbury Y3, ‘Circuit Atlantica, Formula 1 Track and Pit Building’, Copacabana Beach. A permanent structural intervention on the iconic site, which supports the temporary spaces that accommodate the race over the specific timeframe, but which can be stored underground during the rest of the year.

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A ‘canopy’ of LED strips is hung over the track, allowing the viewing experience to be augmented by a motion-sensitive light display, but also generating advertising revenue through the ‘panning photography’ technique, specific to motor racing. This revenue in turn subsidises business start-up and community spaces which occupy spatial units along the strip for the rest of the year, forming a raised promenade which looks over the beach, linked to existing pedestrian routes using ramps across the road.


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Fig. 9.5 Duncan (Harry) Clover Y3, ‘National Music Conference Centre and Lido’. Sited on the iconic Arpourador Rock between Ipanema and Copacabana beches in Rio De Janeiro the building acts as a wave energy hydro electric power station, seasonal music performance and conference centre while providing all round lidos. The sea wall is made up of oscillating water columns which shelters the lido bathing area all year round, these pools are tiered and once drained create a festival auditorium for the Rio music conference and other national celebrations. The building has three stages and each roof articulates and opens in festival period using hydraulic wave power.

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Fig. 9.6 Ruochong Fu Y3, ‘iSportsPark’, Centro, Rio de Janeiro. The sports park is for office workers and local residents located in the Centro area of Rio de Janeiro. The building’s interactive façade pulsates according to athletes’ heart rates, allowing spectators and pedestrians to tell the intensity of the on going events. Together with other interactive and digital technologies it creates an immersive social and sporting environment. Activities includes gaming, training, relaxing, shopping and dinning. The building is visioned as a living architecture operating 24/7 and aims to use innovative sporting experiences to attract people and bring life back to the area, while also serving as an urban intervention and bridge within otherwise uninhabited business district. Fig. 9.7 Tae Woo Hong Y2, ‘Capoeira Performing Device’. The project looks at the key

characteristics and movements of Capoeira, a popular game and Brazilian maritial art. The key qualities of Capoeira are constant motion, balance and speed. Through a series of interactive prototypes the final device replicates the fundamental movement of Capoeira known as ‘Ginga’, activated through players interaction with light sensors. Fig. 9.8 Yin Fung Chan Y3, ‘Desalination Plant in Rio de Janeiro’. The building acts as an environmental model responding to two major conditions of the site: water and waste pollution in Botafogo Bay. Rubbish floating on the water surface is collected by boats for recycling and generating electricity with a Biomass boiler. The energy produced from the waste collected is then used to desalinate water from the bay providing fresh water for visitors. The systems and

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processes of recycling and purification form part of the building’s fabric and are displayed to the public. Fig. 9.9 Ruochong Fu Y3, ‘iSportsPark‘, Centro, Rio de Janeiro, model.

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natural landscape. The building also provides a public tourist jetty with cafe and viewing platforms allowing visitors to experience the landscape beyond. Fig. 9.13 Ernest Zhi Heng Wang Y2, ‘The Samba Rhythm Machine’. The machine’s performance incorporates various elements of Samba dance and music. Like a Samba drum bateria, the Samba Rhythm Machine is controlled by a Mestre (band conductor). A Kinect reads hand movements and translates these readings into motor movements, moving the device’s components and creating multiple performances akin to the carnival in Rio.

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Fig. 9.10 Xiang Gu Y3, ‘Interactive Sunflower Device’. Programmed with Arduino, the interactive device responds to the movement of light within Rio De Janeiro. The components rise and fall, tilting and turning to capture the movement of the sunlight throughout the day, creating a reflective field condition and solar collection above and shadow play below. Fig. 9.11 Claire Haugh Y3, ‘Orchidarium’. (See also Fig 9.18) Fig. 9.12 Yu Xuan Teh Y2, ‘Institute of Rio De Janeiro Landscape and Tourist Jetty’. Rio de Janeiro’s natural landscapes have been declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. The project is sited in one of the city’s most picturesque locations. The project provides private spaces for land­scape architects and UNESCO committees and researcher as a forum to discuss the preservation of Rio’s

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observers. The synthesis of these groups is achieved through shared human experience – such as music, dancing and feasting – which are irrespective of class. Fig. 9.17 Marcus Cole Y3, ‘Reification of Data’. Taking precedence from Brazil’s ambitious plans to form its own internet, the project looks into the potential of depicting the digital within the analogue through the production of shadow QR codes. The device explores the potential for individual pixel blocks to form the basis of a façade system that responds to the sun. When positioned correctly, the cast shadows align to form QR codes. The physical model also explores the realms of sciography, acting as a prototype for a moving façade system that creates a link between the digital and physical realms.

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Fig. 9.14 Abigail Portus Y3, ‘Performance Centre’. The building is a performance centre and social hub, nestled alongside the Lapa aquaduct which accommodates a tram stop, between the Santa Teresa favela hillside and the main city. It provides an open community space with a central paraboloid theatre that projects an optical illusion of activity in the centre up to the floor above. This provides a virtual viewing plane, so visitors can benefit from a ‘secondary’ performance. Fig. 9.15 Ivo Tedbury Y3, ‘Circuit Atlantica’, Formula 1 Track and Pit Building, Copacabana Beach. (See Fig 9.2) Fig. 9.16 Rosa Prichard Y2, ‘Camdomble Church’. The Candomble ritual steps are translated into experiential spaces within the building. The two façades address contrasting neighbourhoods – one poorer and largely Candomble believers, and one wealthier and largely

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Fig. 9.18 Claire Haugh Y3, ‘Orchidarium’. Woven into the grid of an old derelict hotel in the mountains outside of Rio de Janeiro’s city centre is the Orchidarium. A botanical gardens for Brazil’s native orchids, seed store and research facility, the project not only provides new jobs for residents within the local Canoas favela but also becomes the new outpost for the Darwin Initiative based in Kew, England. At night the building’s façade is visible across the city as three dimensional images are projected onto its wires. Fig. 9.19 Marcus Cole Y3, ‘Reification of Data’. Fig. 9.20 Marcus Cole Y3, ‘The National Institute of Data: Analogue & Digital Archive’. The National Institute of Data forms part of a speculative government scheme providing the first steps towards a technologically independent Brazil. Its purpose is to provide a platform for

the public to involve themselves in the undertakings of its government but also for the production of a data centre capable of fuelling Brazil’s ‘datapendency’. Thus as well as a modular data centre design, the building contains a public archive storing patents linked closely to Brazil’s technological past, present and future. Fig. 9.21 Duncan (Harry) Clover Y3, segment of a temporary floating pontoon venue for Rio’s carnival. Using the pressure exerted on the floor and waves passing underneath the fabric ceiling oscillates the jewels of mirror attached casting fragmented beams of light across the floor. Water is simultaneously pumped up to a Japanese cistern in the ceiling, which fills and tips at intervals then flowing down through tubes while vibrations from the venue’s sound system reflect the conditions of the waves.

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2013 Brief City São Paulo – London Max Dewdney, Chee-Kit Lai


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Brief City São Paulo – London Max Dewdney, Chee-Kit Lai

‘…yes it was over, it was part of London’s past, it had joined all the other exhibitions, all the crashing military parades, the glittering state occasions, all the ceremony and display that come and go and help to make the public life of this city. Most of it had been pulled down now...’ Extract from Brief City, BBC documentary, 1951

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Events such as the Olympics are a form of brief city and create opportunities for cities to reinvent themselves for the world but they also bring with them questions about legacy, sustainability, economic and environmental cost. This year Unit 9 investigated the architecture of the brief city, from the 1951 Festival of Britain via ‘pop-up’ and the Olympics to the World Cup 2014. The architecture of the brief city explores the celebratory and ad-hoc, involving energy and innovation, but, also considers the consequences of the transitory nature of the brief city for the environmental, organisational, spatial and social aspects of urban life. The brief city encourages short-term inventiveness as a testing ground for the permanency of future projects, both social and architectural. The brief city inhabits places that are disused and overlooked and builds into unpopular or negative spaces, bringing with it the vital energy of a society expanding into the unknown, discovering itself and redefining the individual and their relationship to the collective. This year we focused our research between two cities in the process of redefining themselves to the world, albeit in very contrasting ways; London in the midst of defining its own post-Olympic legacy, in contrast to pre-World Cup São Paulo, once a infamous city for poverty and crime, now a global economic and cultural powerhouse. Unit 9 was interested in the lifecycle, performance and digital mediation of the brief city through hybrid forms of architecture that combine low and high technologies. The brief city needs to be adaptable 132

to users’ needs, through function and performance, viewpoints and constructions. In pursuing their architecture, students were encouraged to make proposals that revealed interdependent relationships between permanence and temporality, reality and the hyper-real, material and immaterial, the analogue and the digital, ownership and occupation, questioning the symbiosis required for such distinct opposites. The spectacles of the Olympics and World Cup transform cities during the celebratory and temporary events. The architecture of a brief city requires the design of spatial and temporal structures peripheral to the main events and asks how can these be reclaimed or reprogrammed for the afterlife of events. Four Dimensional City ‘If temporary use is seen merely as the prototype for a long-term utilisation, then the plea for the temporary runs the risk of inadvertently demanding a right of asylum from the temporary.’ ‘The Temporary City’ in Four Dimensional City by Peter Bishop and Lesley Williams The Royal Docks is situated between City Airport and the Excel Centre, adjacent to the London Thames Barrier. It forms an axis as a portal to the newly formed city of the east and Olympic sites, and a gateway into the heart of London. Opened in 1855, it was historically built on the Plaistow Marshes and designed specifically to accommodate large steam ships, innovative in its use of hydraulic power and strategically connected to the national railway network, the remnants of which are still visible. It was the shipping centre of London until its decline and eventual closure as a working dock in the 1980s, due to wartime damage and competing technological advancements in shipping. Post-Olympics, the area was topical as the site was earmarked for change into a new ‘urban quarter’ with a focus on the knowledge and green technology industries, aiming to increase cross-river and local connectivity to become a logistics hub to


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link into the newly forming east and to the centre of London beyond. Infrastructure of Civility ‘São Paulo is vibrant, it has a very strong physical presence… Though the private sphere remains inaccessible, everything you think and do is perceivable in the streets. In other cities, the public spaces tend to separate very clearly from daily life.’ Olafur Eliasson The Bartlett School of Architecture 2013

São Paulo, the third largest city in the world, is a giant metropolis with a rich confluence of cultures from around the world. Like London, it is ad-hoc in nature, a dense city with a layered and complex history that incorporates Brazil’s traditional and vernacular, colonial, pre-modern and modern history and is now at the heart of the country’s creative drive and outward expression to the world. São Paulo contains a potent mixture of the temporary and the permanent. The temporary encompasses the favelas and carnivals, markets, short-term housing, spectacles and events from the Grand Prix, film festivals, experimental theatre and dance, to the International Contemporary São Paulo Art Biennale. São Paulo is also home to more permanent architectural masterpieces by Oscar Niemeyer, Lina Bo Bardi and Paulo Mendes da Rocha amongst many others. Unit 9 collaborated with Escola da Cidade in locating sites for the main architectural project of the year, sited in São Paulo. Year 2 Arti Braude, Max Friedlander, Georgina Halabi, Hao Han, Carina Tran, Chenqui (John) Wan, Nicholas Warner, Camilla Wright, Yoana Yordanova Year 3 Alexandria Anderson, Daryl Brown, Lichao Liu, Ian Ng, Rosemary Shaw, Carolyn Tam, Panagiotis Tzannetakis

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Fig. 9.1 Max Friedlander, Y2, Social Service of Commerce (SESC). SESC is a private Brazilian institution, which operates not for profit. Run by trade, goods, services and tourism business the schemes is dedicated primarily to the social welfare of employees and their families, but open to the general community. The proposal provides a SESC for central SĂŁo Paulo including a theatre, cafe and social space internally and an interactive public landscape externally that adapts according to the weather and public input. The facade system is performative and changes depending on internal occupation and the external weather conditions. (Internal perspective view). Fig. 9.2 Yoana Yordanova, Y2, SEPASB Water Managment Plant and Culture Centre. The proposal aims to promote water recycling, integrate communities and revitalise the riverside,

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through the filtration of the river water and introduction of an artificial ecosystem, which creates an urban oasis landscape along the riverside.The site is on the edge of the main river, where three underground sub-rivers meet. The built-over rivers in SĂŁo Paulo cause many problems due to the lack of soil exposure and high rainfall, which results in many areas being flooded. Fig. 9.3 Hao Han, Y2, Mal Deldoro Bus Terminal and Market Exchange. The scheme is for a public bus terminal and exchange market. The programme is a response to the social fragmentation and poor transport system in the northwestern part of SĂŁo Paulo. It is designed around local bus destinations, demographics and time cycles throughout the day.


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Fig. 9.4 Max Friedlander, Y2, Social Service of Commerce (SESC).1:50 Arduino working model of the intelligent facade and roof system.

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Fig. 9.5 Daryl Brown, Y3, Capoeira Social Hub. Located on a fringe condition between residential and an emerging business district the building faces an existing highway and artificial river culvert. The building design augments the public space into a series of interior and exterior public and semi public spaces though interconnected circulation. Facilities include rehearsal, performance and educational spaces. Fig. 9.6 Ian Ng, Y3, Sand Harvesting Device. The project is for the design of a mechanism that filters sand to create a prototype modular defence system for the shorelines of the River Thames, London. Fig 9.7 Camillia Wright, Y2, Cooperative HQ. The project is sited in Newham, East London. The programme adopts the six key principles of the co-operative movement and provides a central hub for displaced communities effected

by the 2012 Olympic developments. Fig.9.8 Alexandria Anderson, Y3, Plastic Surgery Clinic, São Paulo. The project addresses the increasing demand for plastic surgery and the strive for body perfection in Brazil. The proposal contains short, medium and long stay facilities and revolves around the concept of ‘beauty and the beast’. The clinical interiors are augmented with a series of devices that control users’ perception of space from light to dark, with apertures and mirrors which contrast with the surrounding road, rail and artificial river that makes up the urban infrastructure.

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Simultaneously, the building functions as a physical commentary on the efficient use of native timber in construction. Fig. 9.12 Yoana Yordanova, Y2, Recycled Public Square and Bike Station. The project creates a new public square for local residents and visitors for the collection and exchange of plastic bottles. As well as a series of follies the design adapts used water bottles from nearby offices to create a floating cycle scheme. The contraption has been designed to clip onto a Barclays (Boris) bike to be used within the dock.

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Fig. 9.9 – 9.10 Chengqi (John) Wan, Y4, Palimpsest Landscape and Printing Forum. The project addresses the site’s history of failed urban landscape projects within the site in central São Paulo. The programme includes the headquarters of OCAS, the Civil Organisation for Social Action, São Paulo’s ‘Big Issue’. Included within OCAS is a printing press, training centre, recreational centre, and homeless accommodation set within a richly planted, programmed public landscape that is formally defined by the vertical layering of the site’s rich history. Fig. 9.11 Arti Braude, Y3, Silvicultural Centre, São Paulo. The project proposes the establishment of a Silvicultural Centre for the Brazilian Pine. It aims to encourage the proliferation of silvicultural stands on a larger scale through education, while acting also as a nursery to repopulate the city’s parks.

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Fig. 9.13 Max Freidlander, Y2, Flag Machine. Designed for the Royal Victoria Docks, East London, the project works as a 1:1 device that uses Arduino technology to control and mix an array of colour inks which ossilate between the colours of the UK and Brazilian flags. Light is projected out to create an area for performance and celebration. Fig. 9.14 – 9.15 Yoana Yordanova, Y2, SEPASB Water Managment Plant and Culture Centre. Fig. 9.16 Ian Ng, Y3, Institute of Materials. Utilising surplus waste materials the building acts as a prototype for the use of recycled and hybrid materials in construction, specifically paper. The building includes facilities for recycling waste paper, workshop spaces, social spaces and a library. Fig. 9.17 Chengqi (John) Wan, Y2, Palimpsest Landscape and Printing Forum.

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2012 Blinding Light, Spectacle at the Edge of London/Beijing Max Dewdney, Chee-Kit Lai


Unit 9

BLINDING LIGHT, SPECTACLE AT THE EDGE OF LONDON/BEIJING Max Dewdney, Chee-Kit Lai

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“The thoughtful eye must turn to the edge of the blinding light of contemporary spectacles to catch a distorted glimpse of the barely visible media that allow the intense architectural broadcasts to take place. Eventually a rich catalogue of different forms of almost nothing will come into focus. Each of these overlooked, seemingly ephemeral conditions could act as the basis for the most substantial rethinking of our field. Almost nothing will again be the substance of almost everything.” Mark Wigley, ‘Toward a History of Quantity’ in Anthony Vidler (ed), Architecture Between Spectacle and Use (2008)

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Spectacle has particular resonance in understanding the image of London in 2012: an incongruous mix of Olympic excitement and fears of civic disorder in the wake of fierce summer rioting. Both events are spectacular albeit in very different and extreme ways. The Olympics produce highly controlled media images whilst the riots presented a spontaneous scene of urban violence and disorder. This year we looked at the ‘Architecture of Spectacle’ by studying London and Beijing, both cities famous for their pomp and pageantry in epic proportions. Project 1 looked at the juxtaposition of pre-Olympic London, and its imagined legacy through the design of temporary interventions, while Project 2 proposed public buildings within the reality of Beijing post-Olympics. Spectacle produces different kinds of representation, both live and mediated, requiring the spaces and fabric of the city to tell a story. The infrastructure required to construct a series of controlled images is often temporary and ad-hoc in nature. In society increasingly obsessed with images, rendered views of buildings circulate in the press with as much force as ‘actual’ architecture, therefore virtual space and physical architecture must be understood in relation to each other. The examination of architecture’s relationship to spectacle raises interesting questions of performance, time, functionality, materiality, technology, adaptability, users, viewpoints and constructions. Unit 9 is interested in architecture that has permanence and temporality, memory and loss, reality and the hyper real, fact and fiction, and in problematizing the notion that they are distinct opposites. “Within industrial and post-industrial cultural and state formations, Spectacle implies an organization of appearances that are


simultaneously enticing, deceptive, distracting and superficial.” ‘New Keywords: A Revised Vocabulary of Culture and Society’, by T.Bennett, L.Grossberg, M.Morris, R.Williams, p335.

Year 2: Caitlin Mary Abbott, Tahora Azizy, Benjamin Beach, Finbarr Anton Fallon, Qiuling Guan, Pavel Kosyrev, Vasilis Marcou Ilchuk, Panagiotis Tzannetakis Year 3: Gary Edwards, Sarah Edwards, Ivie Egonmwan, Yin Sandy Lee, Jamie Lilley, Rachel Pickford, Sophie Madeleine Richards

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Special thanks: Architecture Department at The Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing; Arrow Factory, Beijing; Arup Associates, Adam Smith and James Ward (Technical Consultants); Carol Lu Yinghua (Jury member Golden Lion Award at the Venice Biennale ‘11; British Council (Architecture, Fashion, Design); Caochangdi Workstation, Beijing; Dr Hilary Powell (AHRC Fellow in the Creative and Performing Arts); Studio X Beijing (University of Columbia); Prof Yunsheng Su (Shanghai Tongji Urban Planning & Design Institute)

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This year we visited Beijing; a city of Spectacle; a vast and symmetrical metropolis whose architecture has adapted to reflect the outward image its political leaders wish to project; from Kublai Khan’s rebuilding of the city in the 13th century, to the modern high-tech metropolis of today. Unit 9’s fieldwork investigations established connections with a number of leading professionals within the field of architecture, urbanism and curation, in our search for sites and issues of contemporary relevance to Beijing that the student projects are set within.


Fig. 9.1 Benjamin Beach, Situationist Social Centre. The centre draws on the urban strategy of the Situationists to provide a community refuge with the aim to protect and preserve the urban fabric of the surrounding Hutongs through a photographic documentary process. The building provides darkrooms, cinema, exhibition space and artist residencies. Image shows site-strategy model based on Guy Debord’s ‘A Game of War’. Fig. 9.2 Qiuling Guan, Peking Duck Emporium. The project explores the lost tradition of local production of livestock within the city courtyard, reinventing the typology into a contemporary urban duck farm and restaurant within downtown Beijing. Image shows perspective view at night looking north towards Tiananmen Square. Fig. 9.3 Tahora Azizy, Urban Oasis.

The hybrid programme combines water, washing and play within the city’s emerging contemporary culture. It is a multilevel swimming pool, bath-house, café and restaurant sited within ‘798’ Art and Media district in the north-east suburb of Beijing. Image shows view from entrance lobby across swimming pool to waterfall beyond. Fig. 9.4 Rachel Pickford, Alternative Respiratory Clinic. The project addresses the city air pollution. The scheme explores the architecture of biomimicry to provide immersive environments for salt, mustard and chrysanthemum pools as a way to tackle breathing problems created by Beijing’s air pollution. Image shows concept model.

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Fig. 9.5 Vasilis Marcou Ilchuk, Public Calligraphy School. See Fig. 4.9, Fig. 19 and Fig. 20 for more details. Image shows physical model. Fig. 9.6 Sophie Richards, Inverted Tofu Temple. See Fig. 11 for more details. Image shows cutaway axonometric view. Fig. 9.7 Sarah Edwards, Xi An Lake Institute of the Environment. See Fig.18 for more details. Image shows 1:500 masterplan model.

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Fig. 9.8 Jamie Lilley, Sports and Social Centre for the United Kingdom Trade & Investment (UKTI) Outpost in Beijing. See Fig. 9.10 for more details. Exploded axonometric. Fig. 9.9 Vasilis Marcou Ilchuk, Public Calligraphy School. See Fig. 19 and Fig. 20 for more details. Model basement showing circulation. Fig. 9.10 Jamie Lilley, Sports and Social Centre for the United Kingdom Trade & Investment (UKTI) Outpost in Beijing. The building is an outpost in Beijing to act as a trade, leisure and business centre. The scheme addresses Anglo-Sino stereotypes, rituals and customs through an architecture of illusion and power. Image shows detail of 1:200 model which also functions as a 1:1 viewing device. Fig. 9.11 Sophie Richards, Inverted Tofu Temple. The project addresses the growing return to Buddhism

and vegetarianism within contemporary Chinese culture. The building provides an artificial urban well with soya allotments, tofu production and cookery school sited within ‘798’ Art and Media district in the north-east suburb of Beijing. Image shows sectional model with light study.

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Fig. 9.12 Pavel Kosyrev, Celebration & Remembrance Centre. The project addresses the differences and similarities in the complex cultural customs and rituals of birth, death and marriage. The building provides a centre for celebration and remembrance for Weddings, Wakes and Birth Ceremonies. Sited within central Beijing the scheme provides space for families to celebrate and remember outside of the confines of their otherwise close living quarters. Fig. 9.13 Sandy Yin Lee, Jasmine Tea House and Gardens. The building acts as self-sufficient workers’ collective providing a local economy and gateway to the surrounding Hutongs. The design caters for the production of Jasmine Tea, from the growth of the Jamine flowers, to the sorting, drying and consumption of tea through collected and filtered rainwater. Image shows long section.

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Fig. 9.14 Finbarr Fallon, Recycling Centre & Trading Cooperative. See Fig. 15 for more details. Aerial view of site and proposal. Fig. 9.15 Finbarr Fallon, Recycling Centre & Trading Cooperative. The building addresses the valuable assets of recyclable waste (that typically occurs on the city outskirts) within downtown Beijing. The Centre provides surrounding local Hutong residents a place to recycle plastic and turn organic waste into power, serving as a model for a cooperative micro economy. Sectional view across site and proposal.

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Fig. 9.16 Gary Edwards, CAFA Union. See Fig. 17 for more details. Perspective plan view. Fig. 9.17 Gary Edwards, CAFA Union. The project proposes a student union in addressing issues of communication and democracy. Sited in the China Central Academy of Fine Arts, the building adjusts and adapts to signify and cater for a range of sporting and social events. The project addresses contemporary issues of the virtual and the real through an interactive architecture that utilises programming technology to adapt to the users’ needs. Sectional perspective view.

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Fig. 9.18 Sarah Edwards, Xi An Lake Institute of the Environment. The project addresses Beijing’s issues of water pollution and congestions by providing an urban inner city retreat. The scheme is an infrastructural landscape for the monitoring and purification of the Xi An lake, located at the outer north east boundary of Beijing’s second ring road. Image shows final model looking south. Fig. 9.19 Vasilis Marcou Ilchuk, Public Calligraphy School. See Fig. 20 for more details. Exploded axonometric model. Fig. 9.20 Vasilis Marcou Ilchuk, Public Calligraphy School. The project celebrates the Chinese tradition of using public spaces within the city through spontaneous performance, fitness, play and learning. The building provides an open calligraphy school and student accommodation, archives, and exhibition hall,

whilst the architectonics provide open platforms for more spontaneous events. Image shows detail of exploded CAD model in relation to the building’s grid as a system to divide the use of individual spaces.

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2011 Adhocracy Max Dewdney, Chee-Kit Lai


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ADHOCRACY ‘The word is a portmanteau of the Latin ad hoc, meaning "for the purpose", and the suffix -cracy, from the ancient Greek kratein, meaning “to govern”’ Bob Travica

Max Dewdney & Chee-Kit Lai

The idea of Adhocracy is interesting because it sheds new light upon the contemporary political and cultural context of architecture. The historic strength of nation states as brands is increasingly challenged by forces that operate outside and beyond them, from terrorists to oligarchs, NGOs to international financiers. This puts pressure upon the familiar iconography of nationhood, calling it into doubt. Traditionally the identity of the state is built upon military, religious and political/legal structures and manifested through a familiar iconography — from crowns, passports, myths, monuments, skylines, cultural artefacts, and of course architecture. Adhocracy is in many ways an opposite form of expression which is why it can be deployed as a critical tool to explore the current cultural context of architecture. One example of an emerging Adhocracy is perhaps to be seen in unrecognised microstates, such as the Principality of Sealand, a former defence platform in the North Sea turned into an independent sovereign interest by an eccentric British family, or Transdniestra, a breakaway region in the state of Moldova. Micronations such as these can vary in scale from a 1:1 portal to an entire city territory. p. 72

Project 1 entitled ‘Microstate’ was sited in London. The project focused on the physical and metaphysical boundaries of The Corporation of London. Project 2 entitled ‘Archetype’ was sited in Shanghai, which the unit visited in December 2010. Shanghai is the world’s largest trading port and China’s most contemporary face. The city has free trade and comparative independence from central government dictate. It is a city of adhocracy, with varying political controls between districts such as the French Concession and Shanghai International Settlement. Unit 9 would like to thank Tongji University College of Architecture and Urban Planning for their generous help and support during the field trip. Whilst in Shanghai the unit participated with Tongji in a symposium about historic and contemporary urban fabric. This formed the basis of a number of site investigations and led to the identification of key strategic areas of current governmental development in Shanghai, which was fundamental to the programme of a number of the students’ proposals. Year 2: Amy Begg, Samuel Dodsworth, Geethica Gunarajah, David Hawkins, Jiatong Hu, Elzbieta Kaleta, Wei Ler, Hui Ng, Shiue Pang, Lok Siu Year 3: Georgina Goldman, Grace Mark, Ami Matsumoto, Louis Sullivan, Emma Swarbrick, Nada Tayeb, Rebecca Thompson


Shanghai government’s efforts to revive the traditional sport. The building creates an urban water landscape linking the traditional and the contemporary, aiming to provide a model for reviving the life of Shikumen houses and a community now under threat.

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Fig. 9.1 Sam Dodsworth, ‘Shanghai Cycle Complex’ is an urban transport hub. It connects raised train platforms, motorway and pedestrian thoroughfares. The building acts as a centre for maintenance, innovation and spectatorship. It creates a layered environment that invites examination of the bike in its many uses and enduring cultural significance. Fig. 9.2 Nada Tayeb, ‘Bonfire Night Garden Party’, see Fig. 9.10 for more details. Fig. 9.3 Amy Begg , ‘Cinema and Ad-Agency for Chinese Films’ promotes the enigmatic yet distinctive Chinese Film Industry. The scheme curates space to strategically evince advertising concepts of speed; the creation of desire and need evolved into rich immaterial architecture. Through controlled movement the building is ethereal — sometimes near invisible and at others aglow along key sightlines. Fig. 9.4 Shiue Nee Pang, ‘Dragon Boat Centre + Urban Waterscape Landscape’ provides a training facility for dragon boat racing in response to

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Fig. 9.5 Emma Swarbrick, ‘Baoshan Rehabilitation Community’ is a bespoke facility for the treatment of incarcerated drug offenders, which runs the filtration of industrial canal water and rainwater. The scheme is about refinement and purification, physical and physiological, of water and bodies. It represents a desire to challenge stigma and encourages a more enlightened approach amongst the public and welfare agents towards rehabilitation of substance abusers in China. Fig. 9.6 Hui Zhen Ng, ‘Dumpling Emporium’ is a multilevelled steam dumpling restaurant in Shanghai. The building is an architectural translation of the actions of chopping, wrapping and steaming. The dining experience ranges from ground level street food, to private banqueting suites. The design aims to react to the often dramatic seasonal changes of the Yangtze delta. Fig. 9.7 Amy Begg, ‘Courtship and Seduction’ is a mechanised building component that

toys with and evaluates the movements associated with pausing, shyness and blushing. Inspired by the perambulations and dance of courtship displayed by Shanghai Mitten crabs (now inhabiting the Thames) the proposal also mimics the Chinese concubine performance of fan dancing in its exploration of seduction and spatial allure. Fig. 9.8 David Hawkins, ‘Laoximen Carpenters Guild’ forms part of a government initiative to preserve the vernacular architecture of Shanghai. Located between the old and the developing city, it acts as a vessel between the two by using traditional craftsman’s techniques and materials in order to produce a complex contemporary architectural language, which forms the urban marketscape. Fig. 9.9 Louis Sullivan, ‘Shanghai World Trade Organisation Affairs Consultation Centre’ is a walled free trade market complex in Laoximen, central Shanghai. Contained within its boundaries is a rich architectural

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landscape that utilises stereoscopic optical illusion. It provides users with a dramatic encounter with a renowned depiction of 11th century Chinese trade: ‘Along the River during the Qingming Festival’ scroll in three-dimensional form. Overleaf: Fig. 9.10 Nada Tayeb, ‘Bonfire Night Garden Party’ is a subversive event architecture, which aims to deconstruct the codes of conduct of the Inns of Court on Middle Temple lawn. This explicitly and implicitly orchestrates a politically poised garden party, which tests the metaphysical boundaries of space and conduct. The architecture is a complex negotiation between events and programmes, actions and transcripts.

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2010 In from the Cold Max Dewdney, Chee-Kit Lai


BSc Unit 9 Yr 2: Charlotte Baker, Alastair Browning, Connor Cunnigham, Emily Doll, Natalia Eddy, Maryna Kuchak, Nabi Masutomi, Joanne Preston, Arub Saqib, Hongmiao Shi, William Harry Tweddell Yr 3: Joseph Dejardin, Joshua Green, Vinicius Machado Cipriano, Rebecca Thompson

In From The Cold In from the cold is an idiom: ‘Out of a position or condition of exile, concealment, isolation, or alienation: Since the new government promised amnesty, fugitive rebels are coming in from the cold’. It has been predicted that within nine years the world’s supply of oil will have peaked and as we enter a new unknown energy economy, the UK must acquire new energy sources – potentially a threatening state of affairs. The threat of a diminishing fuel supply is coupled with that of climate change, and as Britain adjusts to longterm weather changes, its notions of architecture will also undergo change. A new set of preoccupations for architecture is evolving, which aims to define and construct buildings that offer their users not only an enclosure and protection but systems to negotiate an uncertain future. It is the contention of Unit 9 that the newly emergent energy economy brings with it a new ideological atmosphere, which has something in common with the one that developed during and immediately after the Cold War. The Cold War generated an atmosphere of high ideological tension, which, curiously, was very productive for architecture. Seminal proposals from Eastern and Western architects and designers alike stand today as proof of the Cold War’s creative charge, the implicit threat of total annihilation seemed to encourage countless visions of technology’s transcendence over humanity. We studied Cold War propaganda strategies, adapting, revising and reinventing them as a means to address contemporary concerns and to redefine the agency of architecture in the making of proposals for buildings.

Max Dewdney & Chee-Kit Lai

Top and bottom left: William Harry Tweddell, Instrument for Activisim in Ballet. Bottom right: Alastair Browning, Platform 10 Kursky Railway Station.


Top and bottom: Alastair Browning, Platform 10 Kursky Railway Station. Middle: Charlotte Baker, Factory for Moscow Architecture Preservation Society.


Clockwise from top left: Natalia Eddy, Bandy Stadium; William Harry Tweddell, Theatre for Contemporary Ballet; Emily Doll, Viewing Device for St Paul’s Cathedral; Nabi Masutomi, Consulate for UNPO; Arub Saqib, Hotel + Transport Interchange; Vinicius Machado Cipriano, Winter Olympic Training Centre; Joanne Preston, Soviet Avant Garde Winter Cinema + Archive; Connor Cunningham, Moscow Mental Health Institute; Maryna Kuchak, Public Relations Factory. Opposite: Charlotte Baker, Factory for Moscow Architecture Preservation Society.


Above and opposite: Joshua Green, The Doronin Winery, East Moscow.


2009 Alter Ego Max Dewdney, Chee-Kit Lai


BSc Unit 9 Yr2: Khalid Al Sugair; Nichola BarringtonLeach; Laura Brayne; Alexander Holloway; Yee Y Lau; Christopher Leung; Rhianon Morgan-Hatch; Linlin Wang; Clarissa Yee Yr3: Paul Leader-Williams; Keong L Lim; Louise Robson; Jack Spencer Ashworth; Richard A Sprogis; Tim Yue.

Alter Ego The term alter ego; (Latin for “the other I”) coined by psychologists in the 19th century and popularised by the psychoanalytic movement, is said to refer to a second self or double psychological life. The alter ego is often used to describe identical characters within literature and film and is also used as a tool to analyse the relationship between a character and it’s author. Alter ego is the creation of an imagined other self, making a parallel or imagined universe, or second life, both absent and present. The architecture of alter ego explores multiple identities and layered memories of place. We investigate the spaces of heterotopia, that are neither here nor there, spaces that are simultaneously physical and metaphysical. In exploring the multifaceted psychological, literary, artistic and cultural dimensions of alter ego, Unit 9 aims to delineate a non linear architecture of duality. We investigate duplicated and mirrored spaces as a means of posing questions of scale and authenticity. The concept of alter ego also encompasses ideas about the relationship between an original and its copy and of parallel spaces thus creating two figures within a figure, two references within a reference, or two cities within a city. We focus our spatial explorations of alter ego on Istanbul or Constantinople, which has historically been a city of otherness to Northern European Capitals and which marked an edge of Europe a point of confluence for Europe and Asia. Istanbul forms the site for the main building project this year.

Top and bottom right: Tim Yue. Bottom left: Alexander Holloway.

Max Dewdney and Chee-Kit Lai


Clockwise from top left: Alexander Holloway, Khalid Al Sugair, Paul Leader-Williams, Keong L Lim, Jack Spencer Ashworth, Yee Y Lau.


Top left to right: Rhianon Morgan-Hatch, Christopher Leung. Middle left to right: Jack Spencer Ashworth, Linlin Wang, Nichola Barrington-Leach. Bottom left to right: Linlin Wang, Nichola Barrington-Leach.


Clockwise from top left: Alexander Holloway, Yee Y Lau, Clarissa Yee, Laura Brayne, Louise Robson, Jack Spencer Ashworth, Clarissa Yee, Richard A Sprogis.


This page and opposite: Tim Yue.


2008 Interface Jason King, Gabby Shawcross


BSc Unit 9 Yr2: Emma Bass, Diego Cano-Lasso, Theo Jones, Sonila Kadillari, Meng Liu, Harriet Redman, Claire Taggart, Yan Yan. Yr3: Min Gu, Alexander (Antony) Joury, Marina Karamali, Gordon O’Connor Reid, Paniz Peivandi, Marcos Polydorou, Ayeza Qureshi, Saman Ziaie.

Interface Unit 9’s topic of exploration this year was interface. We were interested in exploring how human practices combined with interactive technology create ‘events’ that make the users’ experience of their world more significant. In contemporary culture, the condition of interface has grown in importance with our increasing reliance on, and interaction with, new information technologies and media. Not limited only to the world of new technologies, interface explores the potential for exchange between a diversity of phenomena: people, time, space, material, logics and program. We explored this condition of interface and its potential at a number of different scales and in various contexts, acknowledging a preoccupation with time and experience as critical design elements.

Jason King and Gabby Shawcross

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Top: Harriet Redman, Storyboard for an Introvert, Bottom: Emma Bass, Dream Mnemonic Device.

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Top:Diego Canno-Lasso, Dune School H20 Pod and Site Model. Bottom: Saman Ziaie, Storyboard for a Remote Experience.

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Sonila Kadillari, Carpet and Gossip Factory.

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Gordon O’Connor-Read, Jack Kerouac Device.

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Top (both pages): Saman Ziaie, Cyclorama, Rooftop Remote Experience. Bottom: Min Gu, Boat Building Yard and Museum.

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ucl.ac.uk/architecture

Bartlett Design Anthology | UG9  

Architectural design teaching on The Bartlett School of Architecture's BSc and MArch Architecture programmes is organised around ‘units’: co...

Bartlett Design Anthology | UG9  

Architectural design teaching on The Bartlett School of Architecture's BSc and MArch Architecture programmes is organised around ‘units’: co...