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Heart of the Home.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among women in Arkansas, but they’re not the only ones impacted. Wives, mothers, daughters and sisters often serve as the health care decision maker for their home and family. As a woman, you are the heart of your home - and your family’s health often starts with you. Take care of your heart so that you can take care of theirs. Take the CHI St. Vincent Heart of the Home pledge today: chistvincent.com/moreheart

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Best Hospital in Arkansas for Cardiology & Heart Surgery U.S. News & World Report Named CHI St. Vincent Infirmary Best Hospital in Arkansas for Cardiology & Heart Surgery CHI St. Vincent Infirmary ranks first in cardiology and heart surgery among Arkansas hospitals according to U.S. News & World Report’s latest Best Regional Hospital rankings. In the 2020–21 Best Hospitals rankings, the Infirmary ranked as “High Performing” in care for heart failure, the highest rating awarded for that type of care. “Our cardiologists and heart surgeons are constantly working to bring the highest standard of care to our patients here in Arkansas and that care reaches far beyond the Infirmary itself,” said Marcia Atkinson, president of the CHI St. Vincent Heart Institute. “I’m proud to say that the Heart Institute offers Arkansas’ largest and most diverse network of heart specialists across CHI St. Vincent’s four hospitals and more than 25

community locations.” The CHI St. Vincent Heart Institute also continues to push the field of heart care forward in Arkansas by integrating advanced technologies like HeartFlow Analysis into their continuum of care, earning the gold standard in heart attack care from the American Heart Association and partnering with Pennsylvaniabased Penn Medicine to accelerate heart surgery research into innovative new approaches. U.S. News & World Report was based on independent analysis of multiple data categories, including patient outcomes, volume of high-risk patients, patient experience, nurse staffing and advanced clinical technologies.

For more information about the CHI St. Vincent Heart Institute, visit: www.chistvincent.com/heart


Outlook on Women’s Heart Health

Dr. Tata

Discussing heart disease prevention with our team of female cardiologists

H

eart disease is one of the most common causes of death for people in the United States, and no one knows that better than the cardiologists at CHI St. Vincent Heart Institute, who deal with heart disease patients every day. We talked with Katherine Durham, MD; Oyidie Igbokidi, MD; Rimsha Hasan, MD; Tena Murphy, MD; and Nanzeen Tata, MD—all female cardiologists from CHI St. Vincent Heart Institute—to find out why cardiology is their passion, how people can make an impact on their own heart health and how heart disease differs for women. What made you interested in cardiology?

What should every woman know about cardiovascular disease? DR. DURHAM: We are just as much at risk as men. Cardiovascular disease is prevalent among women as well as men, and we need to take our symptoms and health just as seriously. Women’s symptoms aren’t always the same as men’s symptoms. Women may have symptoms such as shortness of breath without chest pain or feeling more tired than usual. Some women experience atypical chest pain, such as heartburn or a burning sensation in their chest. These can be early signs of heart disease, and they shouldn’t be ignored.

DR. TATA: Heart disease is unfortunately part of my family. Early on in my medical training, the field of cardiovascular medicine grabbed my attention. The huge impact it has on the general population, the rapid growth in medications and procedures, and being able to assist so many dealing with heart conditions confirmed my goal to train as a cardiologist.

How does heart disease risk change as people age?

What are the most important heart disease risk factors for people to recognize?

DR. DURHAM: Menopause can also be a factor for women. Excess abdominal weight, compared to weight around the hips, is a risk factor for heart disease. After menopause, because of the way hormones change, some women can put on more abdominal weight, particularly if they live a sedentary lifestyle.

DR. HASAN: General health is very important. We should all know that basic risks include smoking, diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure and family history. But life stresses and lack of physical activity also have a strong effect. And if people have one set of vascular problems, they are likely to have another. What preventive steps would you recommend for people who want to improve their heart health? DR. IGBOKIDI: The first thing I would recommend is to know your risk factors. Talk to your primary care physician about modifying your risk factors in a positive way. This might include lifestyle changes such as eating foods low in fat calories, exercising four or five days a week for 30–45 minutes, not smoking and avoiding second-hand smoke.

DR. TATA: As we age, our risk increases. We are more prone to health conditions, and heart disease is one of them. As we get older, sometimes something as simple as increasing fatigue and inability to do physical things are important signs of potential heart issues.

How often should people visit their primary care provider for a checkup? What signs should they look for to gauge their heart health? DR. MURPHY: The answer is different depending on each individual. The minimum I would say is once a year. However, some people may need more regular follow-up. Exercise and physical activity tolerance can be a good indicator of heart health. Symptoms like shortness of breath or chest pain suggest you may have an issue. For any symptoms you are concerned about, consider seeking immediate healthcare attention

Dr. Hasan

Dr. Igbokidi

Dr. Durham

Dr. Murphy

Warning signs of a heart attack often present differently in women. Learn how to put your heart health first: chistvincent. com/moreheart


Small Actions, Big Results Minimally invasive heart surgery offers many advantages

Around the OR Heart surgeons at CHI St. Vincent Heart Institute are a dedicated bunch. When asked to reflect on their work, here are some of the thoughts they had: “If we agree together, the patient and I and their family, to do an operation, then it’s a team. It’s a covenant. My pledge is to do the very best operation I can.” — Michael Bauer, MD

Left to Right: Thomas Rayburn III, MD; Thurston Bauer, MD; Frederick Meadors, MD; Michael Bauer, MD; Kenneth Howell, MD

Minimally invasive” is a term used to describe surgeries that provide an alternative to traditional surgery. When it comes to heart surgery, this means smaller incisions that avoid more complex operations such as open-heart surgery. Heart surgeons at CHI St. Vincent Heart Institute perform many minimally invasive procedures, including mitral or aortic valve repair and replacement, coronary artery bypass grafting, and ventricular assist device implantation, among others. Some of these procedures are even performed with robotic surgical instruments. If you’re wondering what minimally invasive surgery means for patients, here are some of the biggest benefits of these procedures:

“When patients come to see me they have lots of questions. I am a firm believer in spending all the time that’s necessary for patients to understand what’s going on and what their options are so they can make the best decision.” — Thurston Bauer, MD

“One of our visions at CHI St. Vincent in Little Rock, Arkansas, is to provide state-of-the-art care for the people in our community and in our state.” — Frederick Meadors, MD

Less pain Less scarring Shorter hospital stay Lower risk of infection Lower risk of bleeding Shorter recovery time Take the Heart of the Home pledge today at: chistvincent.com/moreheart

“A lot of what I do is minimally invasive surgery. We do a lot of complex heart surgeries at CHI St. Vincent that a lot of places don’t or won’t do. When it’s done right, it’s a work of art.” — Thomas Rayburn, MD


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Expanding Minimally Invasive Alternatives to Open Heart Surgery

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The CHI St. Vincent Institute recently became positive Heart way. This might include lifestyle changesthe such first in Arkansas to successfully perform the Transcaval as eating foods low in fat calories, exercising 4–5 days TAVR heart procedure. Newminutes, TAVR, or Aortic a week for 30–45 notTranscather smoking and avoiding Valve Replacement, second-hand proceduressmoke. offer patients with aortic valve stenosis an alternative to open heart surgery, but some patients Whatroutes shouldwere every woman know about with suboptimal access previously deemed cardiovascular disease? ineligible. DR. DURHAM: We are just as much at risk as men.

This new Transcaval TAVR heart procedure, performed Cardiovascular disease is prevalent among first women as by CHI St. Vincent Interventional Cardiologist Dr. Aravind Rao well as men, and we need to take our symptoms and and Cardiovascular Surgeon Thomas Rayburn, allows heart health justDr. as seriously. surgeons to safely bypass problematic regions andasmake Women’s symptomsarterial aren’t always the same men’s this minimally invasive alternative available more patients. symptoms. Women may haveto symptoms such as shortness of breath without chest pain or feeling more “In this patient, the femoral access route used for a normal TAVR tired than usual. Some women experience atypical procedure was heavily calcified and she had no other option for chest pain, such as heartburn or a burning sensation in a valve replacement,” said Dr. Rao. “She worked with our team their chest. These can be early signs of heart disease, for six-months, had full faith in the Heart Institute and didn’t and they shouldn’t be ignored. want to go anywhere else. It’s now been months since the surgery and she’s doing ” Howgreat. does heart disease risk change as

people age? Typical TAVR procedures take one-to-two hours to complete DR. TATA: As we age, our riskinincreases. We are more and require an average of a one night stay the hospital.

In contrast, open-heart surgery requires between two-tofour hours in surgery, an average of five-to-seven days in the hospital and six-to-eight weeks of recovery. The CHI St. Vincent Heart Institute is one of three institutions across the 142 hospital and 21 state CommonSpirit Health system recognized you knowofwomen may have none procedures. or just a few of the typical heart attack asDid a center excellence forall,TAVR

SIGNS OF HEART ATTACK: MEN VS. WOMEN

symptoms? While some pain, pressure or discomfort in the chest is still a common

“This marks an incredible step forward for Arkansans seeking symptom in women, many have heart attack symptoms without chest pain. Here the very heart care, ” said CHI St. Vincent Heart Institute are some best of the in symptoms by gender: President Marcia Atkinson. “Procedures like the Transcaval TAVR MEN are less invasive than open heart surgery and offer dramatically reduced recovery times for patients. At this point, our team of > Lightheadedness expert heart specialists can offer about any advanced heart > Pain in the neck, back surgery technique being offered anywhere in the country.” shoulders or jaw

Symptoms of aortic valve disease may include shortness of > Abdominal pain or breath, difficulty when exercising, swollen ankles or feet, rapid “heartburn” or irregular heartbeat and palpitations, an uncomfortable > Chest discomfort or angina pain, awareness of one’s heart beating rapidly or irregularly, which may come and go or fatigue. The CHI St. Vincent Heart Institute advises anyone experiencing one or more of these symptoms to speak with > Nausea or vomiting their primary care physician or heart specialist.

> Heart palpitations prone to health conditions, and heart disease is one of them. As we get older, sometimes something as simple > Sweating with cold, as increasing fatigue and inability to do physical things clammy skin SIGNS OF HEART MEN VS. WOMEN are important signs ofATTACK: potential heart issues. > Anxiety like a panic attack DR. DURHAM: Menopause can also be a factor for Did you know women may have all, none or just a few of the typical heart attack symptoms? While some pain, for no apparent reason women. Excess abdominal weight, compared to weight Did you know women may have none or just in a few the typical heart pressure orall, discomfort theofchest is still a attack common symptom in women, many have heart attack symptoms around the hips, is a risk factor for heart disease. After symptoms? While some pain, chest pressure or discomfort in the chest is still a common without pain. of the way hormones change, symptom in women,menopause, many have because heart attack symptoms without chest pain. Here some women can put on more abdominal weight, are some of the symptoms by gender: particularly if they live a sedentary lifestyle.

SIGNS OF HEART ATTACK: MEN VS. WOMEN MEN

WOMEN

How often should people visit their > Lightheadedness primary care provider for a checkup? What Pain the neck, back signs should they look>for toingauge their shoulders or jaw heart health?

> Dizziness or fainting

DR. MURPHY: The answer>isAbdominal different depending pain or on each individual. The minimum I would say is once a “heartburn” year. However, some people may need more regular > Chest discomfort or pain, follow-up. Exercise and physical activity tolerance can which may come and be a good indicator of heart health. Symptoms likego shortness of breath or chest>pain suggest you may have Nausea or vomiting an issue. For any symptoms you are concerned about, Heart palpitations consider seeking immediate> healthcare attention.

> Pain in one or both arms

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> Pain in the neck, back, shoulders or jaw

> Shortness of breath > Abdominal pain or “heartburn” > Nausea or vomiting > Unusual or unexplained fatigue, possibly for days

> Anxiety like a panic attack for no apparent reason

To learn more about the services at CHI St. Vincent Heart Institute, visit chistvincent.com/magazine.

WOMEN chistvincent.com/magazine 9


A Diet You Can Live With Looking at a long-term healthy and sustainable diet Trendy diets come and go, and while many promise great results—such as weight loss or improved energy—they also require careful attention and, ideally, help from a healthcare provider. For many people, these diets are also difficult to sustain over the long term, so the positive results gained can be lost when going back to a “normal” diet.

should be consumed in moderation. Keeping to this diet for the long term will not only help you lose weight, but will also improve your heart health by reducing your risk for issues such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol. For healthy recipes that follow the Mediterranean diet, check out our Healthy Foodie collection of recipes at: chistvincent.com/betteryou

WHAT DOES A LONG-TERM HEALTHY DIET LOOK LIKE? When it comes to making healthy eating a part of your lifestyle, there are many changes you can make to lose weight, feel better, and live longer. Diets such as the Mediterranean diet or the DASH diet are focused around building a large selection of healthy foods from all food groups, rather than avoiding specific macronutrients (such as carbohydrates or fats).

ARE HIGH PROTEIN DIETS HEALTHY AND SUSTAINABLE? One diet that you may have heard of recently is the Keto diet, which is a type of low-carb diet that can help you shed pounds quickly.

For example, the Mediterranean diet focuses on whole grains, fruits, and vegetables as the base of your diet, with healthy fats coming from foods such as avocados, nuts, and fish. Dairy, meats, sweets, and alcohol do have a place in the diet, but

While losing weight reduces your risk for diabetes and high blood pressure, some low-carb diets encourage eating more fats and meats, which could have an impact on your cholesterol level. However, that doesn’t mean the diets are dangerous. In fact, CHI St. Vincent offers a medically managed diet program based on the principles of the Keto diet, called Ideal Protein. To find out if this might be a good option for you, talk to your provider, or call 501.255.6087.

Heart healthy meals for your family don’t have to be complicated. Pledge to become the heart of your home today and get a copy of CHI St. Vincent’s Healthy Foodie magazine: chistvincent.com/moreheart


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Understanding AFib As the most common type of heart arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation, or AFib, is a heart condition that is estimated to affect up to sixmillion Americans. People with AFib experience an irregular heartbeat, but what does that really mean? Normally, your body will send an electrical signal I know AFib increases your heart rate. OUR AFib from the upper chambers Can I exercise if I have AFib? EXPERTS DR. HEBBAR: It depends on whether you’re being of your heart (the atria) to treated for AFib or not. If you are new to the diagnosis the lower chambers (the and not on medicine to control it, your heart rate will ventricles) causing blood to go up naturally and at some point it may trigger your pump from the atria to the heart to switch into AFib. But patients who have AFib ventricles and then out to can and should exercise, we just want them to be on your body. For people with medicine or otherwise have it managed to keep their Mangaraju hearts from racing out of control. Chakka, MD AFib, these electrical signals trigger erratically, causing the Will my AFib ever be cured? heart to quiver, or fibrillate. The DR. WALLACE: AFib can be easily managed. If you underlying cause of AFib can be have a true reversible condition—such as a tumor that one of many factors, including is causing you to go into AFib—then in all likelihood age, other heart conditions such you can be “cured” when the tumor is removed. However, for most patients we spend a lot of time with as high blood pressure or coronary Prabhat them talking about how we’re managing a chronic artery Hebbar, MD disease, sleep apnea or even disease. In that respect, our most important role is drinking alcohol or beverages with caffeine. managing their symptoms and making sure their stroke risk is appropriately assessed and addressed.

WARNING SIGNS OF Warning AFib Signs of AFib

Thomas W. Wallace, MD

> Palpitations > Irregular or racing heartbeat > Shortness of breath > Fatigue or weakness > Discomfort or funny feeling in the chest

Take the Heart of the Home pledge today and put your family’s heart health first: chistvincent.com/ moreheart chistvincent.com/magazine 9

THREE THINGS YOU CAN DO ABOUT YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE

Blood pressure guidelines published by the American Heart Association changed in recent years. Most importantly, the threshold for high blood pressure was lowered, which means many Americans who were previously in the healthy range may now have high blood pressure. So what can you do to address high blood pressure? Here are a few tips:

1

Have regular checkups. Schedule a visit with your primary care doctor to talk about your blood pressure, how often it should be measured and whether it is in a normal range. Watch what you eat.

2 3

Focus on whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and lean proteins, as well as foods that are low in saturated or trans fats. Cooking more instead of eating out lets you control your salt intake, which helps lower blood pressure. Stay active. Even an increase in steps can be a way to improve your heart health. Try taking a nice walk or even doing chores, such as mowing the lawn. Playing sports or games that get you moving can also be a fun way to increase the amount of physical activity you get.


Reinforcing Research Penn Medicine Collaborates CHI St. Vincent Heart Institute CHI St. Vincent Heart Institute recently announced the creation of an exciting collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania Health System’s Penn Medicine. “We’re honored by this opportunity to collaborate on the forefront of clinical research to ensure that geography no longer limits access to the latest best practices in the field,” says CHI St. Vincent CEO Chad Aduddell. “The ulti-

mate value, though, benefits our patients in Central Arkansas, who will experience advanced care and unique access to clinical trials for the treatment of heart disease and related illnesses.” This seven-year initiative pairs institutions that have extensive experience in cardiothoracic surgery research with institutions in areas with a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease.

Heart care has changed. Learn how CHI St. Vincent Heart Institute’s minimally invasive techniques can get you back to your family faster at: chistvincent.com/heart

Profile for AY Magazine

CHI St. Vincent Heart of the Home  

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among women in Arkansas, but they’re not the only ones impacted. Wives, mothers, daughters and s...

CHI St. Vincent Heart of the Home  

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among women in Arkansas, but they’re not the only ones impacted. Wives, mothers, daughters and s...

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