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55

WINTER 2015

Image credit: Bryce Thomas

ISSUE 55 PROUDLY SPONSORED BY

CRA Excellence Program

PUBLISHED BY


WINTER 2015 PAGE 2

A Walk to Remember The spirit of the Anzacs is evoked in a new architecturally stunning, stainless steel walkway that unfolds around Newcastle’s cliffs and links Strzelecki Lookout to Bar Beach.

The much-anticipated Newcastle Memorial Walk opened on 24 April 2015 on the eve of the Anzac centenary, and features spectacular 360-degree views of Newcastle city and coastline. The 450m raised walkway forms part of Newcastle City Council’s ‘Bathers Way Project’, a $29 million foreshore development and revitalisation program to link Merewether Beach with Nobby Beach via a coastal walk. The total cost of the walkway was $4.5 million, $3 million of which was contributed by BHP Billiton to mark their 100-year anniversary since the commencement of steel making in the Hunter region. In commemoration of the Anzacs the walkway features silhouettes of soldiers, laser cut from 10mm thick weathering steel, specified to withstand the coastal wind load. These silhouettes are engraved with 3,860 family names of almost 11,000 known Hunter Valley men and women who served in the Australian Imperial Force, Royal Australian Navy, Australian Army Nursing Service and British and Commonwealth forces during World War 1 from 1914-1918. EJE Architecture carried out the detailed design work, and lead architect Barney Collins said the historical significance of the project site inspired the walkway’s sinusoidal design. “During the design phase, we looked at the history of the site and build location next to Memorial Drive, which was originally constructed in 1922 to pay tribute to the soldiers who fought in World War I,” Collins said. “The design concept of what is commonly known as ‘the wave effect’ was drawn on the fact that DNA was used to identify the human remains of soldiers, and this process stood as the connection between the soldiers and their families.” Constructed by Waeger Constructions and engineered by Northrop Engineers, the walkway has a structural design life of 70 years, as required by Newcastle City Council. Grade 316L stainless steel was specified due to its sustainable, corrosion resistance and ductile properties. The cliff top location of the

walkway overlooking the Pacific Ocean was also a determining factor given the high wind and salt exposure. ASSDA Sponsor Atlas Steels supplied 64 tonnes of stainless steel for the walkway including DN150 x 10.7mm, DN125 x 6.5mm, and DN65 x 5.1mm wall pipe; 200mm x 100mm x 6mm rectangular hollow sections and 100mm x 100mm x 5mm square hollow sections for the bridge section frames; and 16mm diameter round bar and 50 x 2mm and 50 x 3mm round tube for the handrails and balustrades. Good scheduling and planning ensured on-time delivery of the stainless steel over a period of 14 weeks, which was sourced from three overseas mills. Positive material identification (PMI) testing was performed by the mills on all stainless steel supplied to ensure the specified grade of 316L was delivered. Fabricated and installed by ASSDA Member and Accredited Fabricator SGM Construction & Fabrication, the 160m of stainless steel bridge sections consist of eight, 20m single spans (four under trusses and four over trusses) each weighing 6.5 tonnes. The frame of each section is fabricated from 12 square hollow sections welded to two rectangular hollow sections, and the walking surface is laid over the frame. On either side of the truss, the wave-like effect was created by bending and rolling wall pipe to sweep above the frame for the over trusses and below the frame for the under trusses. Seven Y-shaped precast concrete pylons up to 8.8m high and 3.4m wide, and two abutments, support the bridge sections of the walkway that reach up to 9m above the ground. The decking of the walkway was laid with fibre-reinforced plastic, and being a non-structural component, was specified with a 44-year design life. The safety aspects of the bridge are completed with hand railings, which are welded on to the bridge trusses inside the curved pipe sections. Over 760m of handrails and 600m of vertical balustrades cover the length of the bridge, specified with a maximum Ra value of

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WINTER 2015 PAGE 3 0.5. ASSDA Member Australian Pickling & Passivation Service was contracted to electropolish the balustrades and pickle and passivate the completed bridge sections. A purpose-built electropolishing unit, consisting of six baths, was set up to handle and achieve the specified finish of the 1.5m high x 6m long balustrade panels each weighing 180kg. With an allotted fabrication period of only four months, SGM Fabrication & Construction manufactured the bridge sections using its 2000m2 workshop to full capacity to meet the critical deadline for Anzac Day. As the walkway runs parallel to Memorial Drive, the main thoroughfare from King Edward Park to Merewether Beach, the erection of the pylons and installation of the bridge sections took place only during a 10-hour window over two nights to avoid prolonged temporary road closures. Coastal undermining was a challenge for the structural engineers, however good design and construction ensured environmental protection of the sensitive coastal site to minimise erosion.

ASSDA MEMBER CONTACTS: Atlas Steels Richard Ayling, Service Centre Manager - Newcastle +61 2 4922 5566 richard.ayling@atlassteels.com.au www.atlassteels.com.au Australian Pickling & Passivation Service Richard Raper, Director +61 2 4964 8454 richard@apaps.com.au www.picklingandpassivation.com.au SGM Fabrication & Construction Scott McHugh, Managing Director +61 2 4964 9800 scott@sgmfab.com.au www.sgmfab.com.au

Image credit: Bryce Thomas

Mr Collins said the key to the project’s cost control and overall success was the engagement of local contractors. “The direct involvement of each contractor’s Directors ensured seamless communication and full control of each project phase. The walkway is already an icon for Newcastle, and everyone who has worked on the project is thrilled over its success,” Collins said. More than two million people visit Newcastle’s beaches every year, and the Newcastle Memorial Walk is already one of Australia’s most remarkable coastal walkways and a significant World War I tribute.

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WINTER 2015 PAGE 4

Welding Dissimilar Metals Welding the common austenitic stainless steels such as 304 and 316 to each other or themselves is routine and the easiest of fusion welding. Nevertheless, there are many situations where it is necessary to weld stainless steel to carbon steel. Two common examples are balustrade posts attached to structural steel or doubler plates connecting supports to stainless steel vessels. There are differences in physical properties such as thermal conductivity and expansion, magnetic properties, metallurgical structure and corrosion resistance, which all require attention. This article outlines the necessary procedures for satisfactory welding, including reference to standards, and explains the necessary precautions. Appendix H of AS/NZS 1554.6:2012 has a more detailed technical discussion including advice on welding carbon steel to ferritic, duplex and martensitic stainless steels. Welding process The normal TIG and MIG welding processes are suitable for welding austenitics to carbon steel. As a guide, welding should be carried out at ambient temperature with no pre-heating required (except possibly for drying), unless the carbon steel has more than 0.2% carbon or a thickness of more than 30mm and giving high restraint, in which case a preheat of 150°C is usually adequate. Because carbon steels are susceptible to hydrogen cracking, the consumables and the weld area must be dry. Weld area preparation When welding galvanised steel (or steel coated with a zinc rich coating) to stainless steel, it is essential to remove the zinc from the heated zone because it is possible to get zinc into the weld, which will cause liquid embrittlement and cracking along the zinc penetration line. It is possible that fume from the zinc coating will cause Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) problems. The weld areas of stainless steel must also be clean and free from grease or oil, as the contaminants will cause carbon pickup and possible sensitisation, leading to intergranular corrosion. In addition, because the nickel content of the austenitics makes the weld pool more viscous, the weld preparation must be more open (see Figure 1) and the root gap larger to allow wetting. Consumables with added silicon (Si) also assist with edge wetting. An additional effect of the nickel content is that the penetration into the no-nickel carbon steel will be greater than into an austenitic stainless steel (see Figure 2). Welding consumables (filler metal and gases) Carbon steel must not be welded directly to austenitic stainless steels as the solidified weld metal will form martensite, which has low ductility and which, as it contracts, is likely to crack. There is an easy way to select the higher alloy filler, which will dilute to give the correct austenitic microstructure with enough ferrite to avoid shrinkage cracks. Refer to Table 4.6.1 in AS/NZS 1554.6. Another way is to use a Schaeffler deLong diagram (see Figure 3) or the WRC 1992 diagram as described in Appendix H2 of AS/NZS1554.6. The standard recommends that carbon steel to 304(L) uses 309L, and carbon steel to 316(L) uses 309LMo.

FIGURE 1: Difference in weld preparation between carbon steel and stainless steel

Bevel angle: more open

Stainless steel Root face: reduced

Carbon steel

Root opening: larger

FIGURE 2: Relative penetration of weld with nickel content for equal energy input

Mild steel - 0% Ni 12% Cr SS - 0.5% Ni

304 SS - 8% Ni 2507 - 7% Ni

Alloy 600 - 72% Ni Monel - 70%

If nitrogen additions are used, care is required as it will decrease the ferrite content of the weld metal, which may cause hot cracking. The shielding gas must not include the oxygen often used in carbon steel mixtures. If an active gas is desired, then low levels of CO2 can be used. Thermal expansion There is a degree of distortion inherent in welding a low thermal expansion carbon steel to a high thermal expansion austenitic stainless steel. The expansion coefficient for mild steel is approximately 12 compared to 17 μm/m/°C for stainless steel in range 0 – 300°C. There is also the difference between the good heat conduction of the carbon steel compared to the poor heat conduction of the stainless steel (49 to 15 W/m°K at 200°C respectively), which means that the stainless steel will cool (and contract) more slowly than the carbon steel, especially if the welded sections are thick. To control distortion, the heat input should be minimised and the joint tacked before making the full weld run. One trick is to tack the ends, centre, 1/4 points and possibly 1/8 points in that order. Heat input and interpass temperature recommendations for stainless steel welding are given in section 5.10 of AS/NZS 1554.6.

Deliver confidence when specifying corrosion resistant alloys with ASSDA’s CRA Excellence Program Access materials experts - Reduce risk - Achieve optimal performance and delivery www.craexcellence.com +61 7 3220 0722

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Corrosion protection It is assumed that the carbon steel will be painted for corrosion protection. When a barrier or insulating coating is used for painting the carbon steel, carry the paint onto the stainless for up to 50mm (depending on the environment’s corrosivity) to cover the stainless steel that has been heat affected. Figure 4 shows a carbon to stainless steel weld with an inadequate coating. Normally in a stainless to stainless weld, the welded fabrication would be acid pickled and passivated using a hydrofluoric/nitric acid mixture, but this is clearly not possible for a carbon steel to stainless steel fabrication because of the corrosive effect on the carbon steel. If the weld zone is to be exposed to corrosive conditions, and it is intended to use a zinc rich final coating on the carbon steel, a stripe coating of a suitable barrier paint is required along the edge of the zinc coating to avoid possible galvanic dissolution of the zinc coating adjacent to the stainless steel.

Further reading NI #14018 “Guidelines for welding dissimilar metals” NI #11007 “Guidelines for the welded fabrication of nickelcontaining stainless steels for corrosion resistant services” IMOA/NI “Practical guidelines for the fabrication of duplex stainless steels” (3rd edition) ISSF “The Ferritic Solution” (page 36) deals generally with welding ferritic stainless steels AS/NZS 1554.6:2012 “Structural steel welding: Part 6 Welding stainless steels for structural purposes” Herbst, Noel F. “Dissimilar metal welding” © Peritech Pty Ltd 2002 (Available for download from ASSDA website)

FIGURE 3: Location of alloys on the Schaeffler deLong diagram

FIGURE 4: Example of a carbon to stainless steel weld with an inadequate coating

Nickel Equivalent = %Ni + 30 x %Cb+ 0.5 x % Mn

254SMO   20

   904L   Austenite

Ferrite

0%

16

20% 40%

316L   12

A+F Duplex

2507

304L  

80%

2205 2304  

8

100%

Martensite A+M+F

4

Ferrite

Mild +M 0 FSteel   0

 444  

M+F 4

8

12    CR12  

16

20

24

28

Chromium Equivalent = % Cr + % Mo + 1.5 x % Si + 0.5 x %Nb

32

36

40

The nominal composition of a weld with no filler will be midway between the joined alloys. If a high alloy filler is used, the final weld metal will be half way between the filler composition and the “no-filler” midpoint.

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Tel: 1300 304 320 www.ancon.com.au/fabrications International Tel: +61 (0) 2 8808 3100

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WINTER 2015 PAGE 5

Stainless clean up Quite apart from any weld to carbon steel, the stainless steel away from the weld area must be protected from contamination during fabrication. This includes weld spatter, carbon steel grinding debris and smearing of carbon steel on the stainless caused by sliding contact between carbon and stainless steels. If contamination occurs, then it must be removed either by mechanical means, followed by use of a nitric acid passivation paste or by the use of pickling and passivation paste. Passivation paste will not affect the surface finish of the stainless steel, whilst pickling and passivation paste will etch the stainless steel. All acids must be neutralised and disposed of according to local regulations. The surfaces must also be thoroughly rinsed after the acid processes.

Post weld cleaning After welding, clean the weld area to remove slag and heat tint to examine the weld integrity and also to allow the metal to be painted. If possible, blast the weld area with iron free grit but if that is not possible, grind along the weld line to avoid dragging carbon steel contamination onto the stainless steel. ASTM A380 has recommendations for passivation solutions for mixed mild and stainless steel welds. The formulations include peracetic acid and EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), but mechanical cleaning alone is the most common method.


WINTER 2015 PAGE 6

Stainless Steel in Western Australia Subsea Applications Stainless steel is the material of choice for subsea hydraulic and control line applications because of its excellent corrosion resistance, material strength benefits and weldability.

One of five subsea production manifolds for Apache Corporation’s Coniston and Novara Redevelopment Project. Image credit: Civmec, Cameron and Apache Corporation

Subsea production in the oil and gas industry involves offshore, in situ equipment to facilitate the exploration, development, production and transportation of energy reserves from underwater fields. It is a viable form of oil and gas production, providing economic, productivity and environmental benefits. Perth-based ASSDA Member and Accredited Fabricator Diverse Welding Services (DWS) recently completed detailed design and fabrication works on two major subsea projects operated by multinational oil and gas exploration and production companies. Apache Corporation’s Coniston and Novara Redevelopment Project, completed in February 2014, is a subsea oil field located 65km north of Exmouth. The project involved an upgrade to the Ningaloo Vision floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) unit and development of the neighbouring Coniston and Novara oil fields, which links these fields into the existing Van Gogh manifolds via dual production flow lines. The equipment operates in water 340 to 400m deep. DWS was contracted to detail the design, fabrication, installation and NDT testing of the small-bore hydraulic control and chemical injection lines for five subsea production manifolds. 2,380m of 316L stainless steel wall tube in various sizes ranging from 0.375” OD x 0.083” up to 1.000” OD x 0.156” was used, plus 30m of Inconel 625 0.750” OD x 0.134” wall tube. Chevron Australia’s Wheatstone Project, located 12km west of Onslow on the Pilbara coast of Western Australia, is one of Australia’s most significant LNG projects. Currently in progress and at almost 60% complete, it will become the country’s first third party natural gas hub. DWS was contracted to fabricate, install and test small-bore tubing and free issue components to Multiple Quick Connect (MQC) plates. The main free issue components consisted of logic caps, cobra heads, single line couplers and acid injection items requiring small-bore interconnecting tubing on four MQC plates serving the subsea isolation valves (SSIV) for the 44” trunkline, 24” and 14” flowlines, and the 18” APACHE/ KUFPEC line. SAF2507 super duplex stainless steel was used for the MQC plates including over 80m of 0.625” OD x 0.083” wall tube, 20m of 316L 0.375” OD x 0.083” wall tube and 130 Swagelok 90° elbow butt-weld fittings. The MQC plates were fabricated by PT Profab Indonesia, then shipped to DWS in Perth for detailed fitout using autogenous orbital welding processes. After testing, the completed MQC plates were shipped back to PT Profab Indonesia for installation into the SSIV manifolds.

All welding by DWS for both projects was completed using an autogenous orbital welding process, specified by the clients for the small-bore hydraulic tubing welding due to its excellent control of welding variables, repeatability of application and maximisation of corrosion resistance of exotic materials. DWS produced high quality welds that when tested under the G48 Method A – Pitting Resistance Testing, proved resulting weight loss to be less than 0.36g/m2. Orbital welding is an automatic method of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding of thin tubes, usually without filler wire. Its advantages are a uniform weld profile and excellent gas shielding giving minimal heat tint. The ends of the tube are prepared and clamped in an enclosed head, which is flushed with external shielding and internal purging gas – usually argon, although gas mixtures can be used. The cycle starts by striking the arc and proceeds as the head slowly rotates around the tube. A specific weld head can deal with several diameter tubes. The weld is usually in the centre of the head, although heads are available for offset joins used with joints to elbows or valves. DWS completed 1200 welds for the Coniston and Novara Redevelopment Project and 204 welds for the Wheatstone Project, which passed 100% radiographic/liquid penetrant testing in accordance with ASME B31.3 NFS. The excellent gas and heat input control of the orbital welding produced internal surfaces that did not require post-weld cleaning. The external surfaces around the welds were abrasively treated as required for aesthetics reasons. The DWS facility includes five autogenous welding machines complimented with seven welding heads of assorted ranges allowing DWS to complete weldments from 0.25” OD to 6” OD tube/pipe schedules as required for these project works. This coupled with their extensive range of other qualified weld procedures for this process allows DWS to meet clients’ stringent fabrication, application and quality specifications. ASSDA MEMBER CONTACT: Diverse Welding Services Karl Schmidt, Managing Director +61 8 9276 6000 karl@diversewelding.com.au www.diversewelding.com.au

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‘Under the Sun’ is a 1300kg, 6.5m diameter suspended stainless steel sculpture that embodies a symbol of the moon floating over the earth, and casts filigreed shadows under the sun. It is an inspiring architectural piece featured at the entrance of Stockland’s Point Cook Town Centre in Victoria, and was completed in 2014 as part of the shopping centre’s $20 million revamp.

Ronstan Tensile Architecture’s General Manager Rowan Murray said 3D modelling and analysis was a critical step in accurately predicting the structural behaviour and performance of cable structures. Applying this science upfront assures these structures are installed as designed and mitigates many of the risks of suspending art in the public realm.

The sculpture is an expression of the relationship between the moon and the sun, opening a space for visitors to reflect in moments of perspective and wonder. The sculpture’s concept was also inspired by the traditional feminist symbol of the moon, celebrating the role of women in the Point Cook community and embodying the role of nature in the life and tides of the local Bellarine Peninsula Wetlands.

ASSDA Member MME Surface Finishing was also engaged to mechanically and chemically polish the stainless steel sculpture to provide maximum protection against tea staining and corrosion, whilst presenting an architecturally pleasing surface finish. Firstly, 3 x 1.5m stainless steel plates were mechanically polished to a No. 6 Finish, 320 Grit (0.5μm Ra Max) ensuring a smooth and consistent linished finish. Once laser cut and fabricated, MME Surface Finishing pickled, passivated and electropolished the panels and rings.

It was designed by Melbourne artists Robert Owen and Joanna Buckley, engineered by Anthony Snyders of Adams Consulting Engineers, and fabricated by the artists in collaboration with Jeph Neale of Artery Cooperative and Luke Adams of Eco Electrics. The intricate detail in the sculpture was laser cut by Arrow Laser. The sculpture’s face panels and reinforcing ring beam were made using grade 316 stainless steel, specified for its excellent corrosion resistance. It is suspended between the building and a 10m high mast, using 22 grade 316 stainless steel cables of diameters 4mm, 7mm, 8mm and 10mm and of varying tensile strengths up to 71kN. The complexity of the suspension and installation of the sculpture required 3D modelling and detailed structural analysis, which was performed by ASSDA Member Ronstan Tensile Architecture (a division of Ronstan International). This analysis and modelling allowed Ronstan Tensile Architecture to manufacture cables to the exact lengths that would see the 1300kg sculpture held securely in the designed position, taking into account the weight of the structure, cable stretch, cable creep (elongation over time) and wind loads. The bending of the mast and loads applied to the building were also defined by the analysis and considered in the design and installation.

In addition to the structural design of the cable support structure, Ronstan Tensile Architecture’s project scope included the manufacture of the cables, installation of the foundations, the mast, brackets to the existing building, and the lifting and suspension of the sculpture.

The end result of this successful collaboration is an impressive sculpture with an outstanding balance of aesthetics, geometry, constructability and durability. ASSDA MEMBER CONTACTS: MME Surface Finishing Gerard Mulcahy, Managing Director +61 3 9775 1620 gerardmulcahy@mme.com.au www.mme.com.au Ronstan Tensile Architecture Rowan Murray, General Manager +61 3 8586 2000 rmurray@ronstan.com.au www.RonstanTensileArch.com

Image credit: John Gollings

www.assda.asn.au

WINTER 2015 PAGE 7

Under the Sun


‘A Way Forward’ Wednesday 14th & Thursday 15th October 2015 Outrigger Little Hastings Street Resort & Spa Noosa, Queensland, Australia

2015

PacRim Stainless is the Australasian stainless steel industry’s premier annual event, hosted by the Australian Stainless Steel Development Association (ASSDA). The conference provides a broad range of national and international speakers and delegates, plus a variety of opportunities to network, share knowledge and enjoy the conference destination. PacRim Stainless will be ASSDA’s 22nd National Conference and 11th International Forum focusing on the Asia-Pacific region. PROGRAM OVERVIEW: ››

Two half-day conference sessions providing: ››

Discussions on local and global trends, economic challenges and new opportunities

››

Developments in local and offshore technologies transforming our industry

››

Case studies of materials and product substitution

››

Marketing stainless steel through an industry collaboration of technical expertise and innovation

››

Wednesday night Gala Dinner with Happy Hour

››

Thursday afternoon PacRim Golf Ambrose

››

Thursday night Farewell Dinner with Happy Hour

To register your interest, contact lissel_p@assda.asn.au.

ABOUT ASSDA The Australian Stainless Steel Development Association (ASSDA) is a not-for-profit industry group that aims to increase the consumption of stainless steel in Australia. Established in 1992, ASSDA represents more than 180 member companies representing the stainless steel spectrum, including overseas mills, stockists and distributors, fabricators, engineering consultants, end-users and service providers. ASSDA aims to foster the understanding and use of stainless steel in Australia by developing the competence and efficiency of the industry through promotion, education and training, the provision of adequate technical advice and industry accreditation. ASSDA could not continue without the valuable support of its sponsors and members, who work with ASSDA to grow the market for stainless steel. www.assda.asn.au

AUSTRALIAN STAINLESS STEEL DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION

ASSDA SPONSORS 1

ASSDA SPONSORS 2 Midway Metals, Stoddart Manufacturing, YC Inox Co., Ltd. ASSDA SPONSORS 3 Australian Stainless Distributors, Dalsteel Metals, Fagersta Steels, Prochem Pipeline Products, Sanwa, Stalatube Oy, Valbruna Australia, Winsmore Pty Ltd is proudly brought to you by the Australian Stainless Steel Development Association (ASSDA).

MORE INFORMATION Enquiries for further information on any material presented in this publication should be directed to ASSDA: Level 4, 243 Edward Street Brisbane QLD 4000 AUSTRALIA www.assda.asn.au

P +61 7 3220 0722 F +61 7 3220 0733 E assda@assda.asn.au

EDITORIAL Contributions of story ideas specialising in stainless steel and its applications are welcome from members and non-members of ASSDA. ADVERTISING Advertise in the only publication that targets more than 7,000 readers in the Australian stainless steel industry. Rates available at www.assda.asn.au CONTACT Lissel Port, ASSDA Communications Manager: lissel_p@assda.asn.au DISCLAIMER ASSDA sources articles and advertisements from a variety of contributors and accordingly does not accept responsibility for the accuracy of the contents of this publication nor the suitability of specific applications referred to herein for any particular use. Competent advice should be sought before acting on any matter contained in this publication.


Product Profile Australia

Exclusive distributor for Sandvik Materials Technology

Sheet, plate, coil, tread plate, wear plate, tube, SHS, RHS, pipe, fittings, flanges, welding consumables, equal / unequal angle, channel, round, flat, square, hex and hollow bar, strip, wire, materials for medical applications. High temperature resistance alloys and systems. Cutting services – laser and plasma profiling, cut-to-length coil. Bandsaw cutting – tube, pipe and bar sections.


Make Vulcan Stainless your first choice – the reliable partner for stainless Whether you are a buyer, engineer or designer, this product profile will give you an insight into Vulcan Stainless’s comprehensive stainless steel stock program, helping you to meet the needs of your business. Vulcan Stainless is one of the largest stockists and distributors of quality stainless steels and special alloys in Australasia. In Australia, we have strategically located distribution and service centers across the country to best support the needs of our customers in terms of availability and speed of delivery.

Stainless steel pipe products

Stainless steel bar products Products

Size

Round

Ø 3.17 - 450 mm

Thickness

Square & hex

6 - 63.5 mm A/F

Equal Angle

20 - 125 mm

3 - 12 mm

Unequal Angle

65 - 130 mm

6 - 10 mm

Channel

40 - 200 mm

3 - 10 mm

Flat bar

10 - 200 mm

3 - 25 mm

Hollow bar

32 - 420 mm OD

8 mm - 60 mm

Grades

304, 304L, 316, 316L, SAF2205, SAF2507, 253MA, (2RK65) 904L

Finishes

Peeled, CD, CG, P+R, RT, HRAP

Stainless steel tube products Products

Size

Round SHS RHS Fittings Buttweld Flanges

1.59 - 305 mm OD 0.36 mm - 6 mm 12.7 - 200 mm 1.2 - 6 mm 40 - 200 mm 1.6 - 6 mm 15.88 - 204 mm 1.6 - 3 mm Bends, Tees, Reducers, End caps AS2129 Table D and E Slip-on and Blind, AS4087 PN16 Blind and Slip-on 304, 316L, 254SMO, SAF2205, SAF2507, LDX2101 180 Grit – Mirror

Grades Finishes

Thickness

Products

N.B.

Pipe Grades

6 - 600 mm Sch 10s - 160 304L, 316L, 253MA, 4C54, 904L (2RK65), SAF2205, SAF2507, SAF2707 HD

Fittings Type BSP NPT Socketweld Buttweld

Thickness

N.B. 6 - 100 mm 8 - 50 mm 8 - 50 mm 15 - 600 mm

Ratings/Sch 150 lb 3000, 6000 lb 3000 lb Sch 10s - 160

Grade CF8M / 316 / 316L 316L 304L, 316L 304L, 316L, SAF2205, SAF2507

Elbows 90° & 45°, Tees, Couplings, Half couplings, Reducing couplings, Reducing bushes, Plugs, Caps, Nipples, Reducing nipples, Hex nuts, Unions 3 pce, Barrel nipples, Screwed ends, Pipe branch outlets, Stub ends, Concentric & eccentric reducers Flanges

15 - 600 mm 304L, 316L, SAF2205, SAF2507 150 lb, 300 lb, 600 lb Slip-on, Blind, Weldneck, Socketweld, Lapjoint, AS2129 Table D and E Slip-on and Blind, AS4087 PN16 Slip-on and Blind

“Fittings can also be supplied via airfreight from our global warehouse stocks in one week”

Stainless steel wire and strip Products

Profiles, Spring steel, Slicklines/wirelines, Rig-rod, Compressor valve strip steel, Knife steel, Sancrêpe creping blades, Doctor blades, Precision strip & wire


Stainless steel flat products Products

Width

Sheet & Coil Plate Tread plate Grades

750 - 2000 mm 0.55 - 10 mm 1219 - 3000 mm 5 - 100 mm 1250 - 1250 mm 3.5 - 6.0 mm 304, 304L, 316, 316L, 321, 253MA, 5CR12, 904L (2RK65), LDX2101, SAF2304, SAF2205, SAF2507 2B, No. 4, 2E, No. 1, BA

Finishes

Stainless steel customer services

Thickness

Creusabro® wear plate Wear, impact and abrasion resistant Grades

Width

Thickness

Creusabro DUAL Creusabro 8000 Creusabro 4800

2400 mm 2400 mm 2400 mm

10 - 50 mm 5 - 100 mm 5 - 60 mm

Stainless steel welding products Products

Ø Wire

Consumables Type

0.8 - 3.2 mm MIG, TIG, Manual electrodes, Sub-arc, Flux cored, Strip, Flux 307Mn, 308LSi, 309L, 309LSi, 312, 316LSi, 347Si, 2RK65, 253MA, LDX2101, SAF2205, SAF2205Si, SAF2507, Sanicro 28, Sanicro 60, Sanicro 72

Grades

Stainless steel oil and gas products Products

Wirelines, Powdermet components, Umbilical tubing, Riser and flowline piping

Laser cutting

Stainless to >40 mm thick, 9,500 x 2,000 mm wide. Shapes and holes.

Plasma cutting

Stainless to 100 mm thick, 13,000 x 3,000 mm wide. Shapes and holes.

Coil cut-to-length

Plate and sheet to 10 mm thick, up to 2,000 mm wide x 15,000 mm length. Inline coating and printing.

Precision bandsaw cutting

Stainless tube, pipe, hollow bar, round, flat, angle, hex, square. Up to 660 mm dia.

Project services and indent

Project estimates, quotes, supply and administration. Ex stock and mill indent.

Technical and welding support

Application and materials recommendation, welding procedures. Local and international expertise. Positive Material Identification (PMI) testing.

Kanthal heating systems & solutions Products

Heating alloys, Precision wire, Superthal®, Metallic elements, Fibrothal®, Tubothal®, Tubes, Silicon carbide & Heating systems

Stainless steel medical materials Products

Medical alloys, profiles, tube, bar, wire, strip and powder. Specialist materials for medical implants, instruments, orthopaedics, cardiovascular, dentistry and medical devices


Stainless steel fittings and flanges Seamless and welded pipe Nominal Pipe Size NB NPS (mm) (inch)

Outside Diameter (mm)

Nominal wall thickness (mm) ASTM B36.10 ASTM B36.19 Sch 5S

Sch 10S

Sch 10

Sch 20

Sch 30

Sch 40S

STD

Sch 40

Sch 60

Sch 80S

XS

Sch 80

Sch 100

Sch 120

Sch 140

Sch 160

XXS

6

1/8

10.29

1.7

8

1/4

13.72

1.65

2.24

10

3/8

17.15

1.65

2.31

15

1/2

21.34

1.65

2.11

2.77

2.77

2.77

3.73

3.73

3.73

4.78

7.47

20

3/4

26.67

1.65

2.11

2.87

2.87

2.87

3.91

3.91

3.91

5.56

7.82

25

1

33.40

1.65

2.77

3.38

3.38

3.38

4.55

4.55

4.55

6.35

9.09

32

1.1/4

42.16

1.65

2.77

3.56

3.56

3.56

4.85

4.85

4.85

6.35

9.70

40

1.1/2

48.26

1.65

2.77

3.68

3.68

3.68

5.08

5.08

5.08

7.14

10.15

50

2

60.32

1.65

2.77

3.91

3.91

3.91

5.54

5.54

5.54

8.74

11.07

65

2.1/2

73.03

2.11

3.05

5.16

5.16

5.16

7.01

7.01

7.01

9.52

14.02

80

3

88.90

2.11

3.05

5.49

5.49

5.49

7.62

7.62

7.62

11.13 15.24

90

3.1/2

101.60

2.11

3.05

5.74

5.74

5.74

8.08

8.08

8.08

100

4

114.30

2.11

3.05

6.02

6.02

6.02

8.56

8.56

8.56

11.13

13.49 17.12

125

5

141.30

2.77

3.40

6.55

6.55

6.55

9.53

9.53

9.53

12.70

15.88 19.05

150

6

168.28

2.77

3.40

7.11

7.11

7.11

10.97 10.97 10.97

14.27

18.26 21.95

200

8

219.08

2.77

3.76

6.35

7.04

8.18

8.18

8.18

10.31 12.70 12.70 12.70 15.09 18.26 20.63 23.01 22.23

250

10

273.05

3.40

4.19

6.35

7.80

9.27

9.27

9.27

12.70 12.70 12.70 15.09 18.26 21.44 25.40 28.58 25.40

300

12

323.85

3.96

4.57

6.35

8.38

9.53

9.53

10.31 14.28 12.70 12.70 17.48 21.44 25.40 28.58 33.32 25.40

350

14

355.60

3.96

4.78

6.35

7.92

9.52

9.53

11.13 15.09

12.70 19.05 23.83 27.79 31.75 35.71

400

16

406.40

4.19

4.78

6.35

7.92

9.52

9.53

12.70 16.66

12.70 21.44 26.19 30.96 36.53 40.49

450

18

457.20

4.19

4.78

6.35

7.92

11.12

9.53

14.28 19.05

12.70 23.83 29.36 34.93 39.68 45.24

500

20

508.00

4.78

5.54

6.35

9.53

12.70

9.53

15.09 20.62

12.70 26.19 32.54 38.10 44.45 50.01

600

24

609.60

5.54

6.35

6.35

9.53

14.27

9.53

17.48 24.61

12.70 30.96 38.89 46.02 52.37 59.54

700

28

711.20

7.92

12.70 15.88

9.53

12.70

750

30

762.80

7.92

12.70 15.88

9.53

12.70

800

32

812.80

7.92

12.70 15.88

9.53

17.48

12.70

900

36

914.40

7.92

12.70 15.88

9.53

19.05

12.70

6.35

Stock range: Stainless steel fittings, flanges and welded pipe 1/4” – 24”, Seamless pipe 1/4” – 12”. Dimensions are nominal only – tolerances apply to both OD and WT – refer to the standards for details.

For enquiries please call your nearest Vulcan Stainless sales office Sydney

Melbourne

Brisbane

Newcastle

Adelaide

Perth

Phone: (02) 9828 0600 Fax: (02) 9828 0607 Email: stainless.nsw@vulcansteel.com.au Phone: (02) 4924 2150 Fax: (02) 4924 2155 Email: stainless.nsw@vulcansteel.com.au

Phone: (03) 9238 7200 Fax: (03) 9238 7205 Email: stainless.melbourne@vulcansteel.com.au Phone: (08) 8243 7700 Fax: (08) 8243 7765 Email: stainless.adelaide@vulcansteel.com.au

Phone: (07) 3347 0560 Fax: (07) 3347 0565 Email: stainless.brisbane@vulcansteel.com.au Phone: (08) 9412 5600 Fax: (08) 9412 5650 Email: stainless.perth@vulcansteel.com.au

Townsville

Phone: (07) 4722 4100 Fax: (07) 4722 4105 Email: stainless.townsville@vulcansteel.com.au

Australian Stainless #55  

Specialising in stainless steel and its applications. Feature articles include the Newcastle Memorial Walk, Welding Dissimilar Metals, Stain...

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