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April 2012 SUMMER DAY CAMP GUIDE DITCH THE “MOMMY GUILT” IS IT TIME FOR SPEECH THERAPY? SCARY WEATHER DEMYSTIFIED

Family AUGUSTA

m a g a z i n e

Slide Into

Hailey, 6, is the sister of Brittney and the daughter of Jason and Jennifer Smith of Martinez.

Summer Camp Our Annual Guide


4 • Augusta Family | April 2012

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Family AUGUSTA

m a g a z i n e

w w w. a u g u s tafamily.co m Publisher Kate Cooper Metts Editor Karin Calloway

Contents

April 2012

25

Our Annual Guide To Day Camps Around the CSRA

Production Art Director Miles Anderson

- Lucy Adams

Graphic Artist Chris Goodman Advertising Director of Advertising Adriene Goldman Advertising Sales Donna Costello Elizabeth Sisson Maidi McMurtrie Thompson Mary Porter Vann marketing & circulation Manager Doressa Hawes

departments

photography Chris Thelen contributors Lucy Adams Grace Belangia Charmain Z. Brackett J. Ron Eaker, M.D. Cammie Jones Jennie Montgomery Danielle Wong Moores Michael Rushbrook

Augusta Family Magazine is published 10 times per year and distributed throughout the Augusta and Aiken area. Send press releases, story ideas or comments to the editor at karin.calloway@augustafamily.com or mail to 127A 7th Street, Augusta, GA 30901 or telephone (706) 828-3946. For advertising information, telephone (706) 823-3702. For circulation/ distribution, call (706) 823-3722.

7 editor’s page 9 mom2mom

Backseat Control Freak —Jennie Montgomery

10 news&notes 13 eating well with kim Take a Dip —Kim Beavers, MS, RD, LD, CDE

17 doctor/dad Eat for Life —J. Ron Eaker, M.D.

40 time out! Mama Bo Peep and Her Guilty

Sheep

—Lucy Adams

42 inspiration station Running for Natalie —Karin Calloway

44 calendar 54 talkin’ about my generation

18 healthy family It’s Just a Little Lisp...

on the cover:

Hailey, 6, is the sister of Brittney and the daughter of Jason and Jennifer Smith of Martinez. Photo by Jennifer Smith

Russell E. Foster, Ebonye LaSha’ Smith and Sarah Turner Simkins —Grace Belangia

—Danielle Wong Moores

20 home front The Weather Outside Is Frightful —Cammie Jones

April

q ui c k pi c k

“Today, we find ourselves part and parcel to many small groups, each with unique demands: family, work, clubs, committees. And that ancient emotion, guilt, still provides cues for balancing satisfaction of our own needs against meeting the needs of others. Read more about “Mommy guilt” in Lucy Adams’ article on page 40.

www.augustafamily.com

Augusta Family | April 2012 • 5


6 • Augusta Family | April 2012

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editor’spage by Karin Calloway

Day Camp

I

currently have four part-time jobs. That’s less than I had a year ago, but more than most people have, I guess. This isn’t anything new to me. In fact, the summer I was 17 I had three jobs. I was one busy teenager! I worked at the information desk at our local mall a couple nights a week, danced in the Electric Light Parade at Walt Disney World on the weekends and my “day job” was working as a camp counselor at a nearby day camp. It was a fun, busy summer and I had a blast working with my group of 6-year-olds at the camp. Most days we followed the same routine, with craft time, play time, swim time, etc., but we also took field trips. These were exciting for the children, as we loaded them up to go bowling, roller skating or to visit Central Florida attractions. One of the most memorable trips was to Sea World, where I was selected from the audience to be kissed by Shamu. You should have heard my group of children squeal, cheer and applaud that their teacher was picked. Having worked at a summer day camp gives me an appreciation for the people who provide this valuable summer service and also of the camps themselves. In this issue, our annual camp guide, you’ll find so many wonderful options for your children’s care and entertainment this summer. No matter what their interests are, there is probably a camp in the CSRA that is just right for them. Oh, and back to my original story…I bet you’re wondering what it was like to be kissed by Shamu. Well, it was interesting and a little scary. I mean that whale was huge—and warm—which shouldn’t have surprised me. He’s a mammal after all. Until May,

Karin Calloway is a wife and mother of two young adults. She’s also a journalist and recipe developer who writes the Wednesday cooking column for The Augusta Chronicle. You can follow Karin at twitter.com/KarinCalloway. Check out Karin’s cooking blog at www.cookingwithkarin.com. www.augustafamily.com

Augusta Family | April 2012 • 7


Activities

8 • Augusta Family | April 2012

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2

mom m m

Illustration by Michael Rushbrook

by Jennie Montgomery

Backseat Control Freak “No, I’m fine…go ahead and sit up front with your student driver,” I said to Scott as we got into the car with our 16-year-old. “You hate riding in the backseat,” my husband said, giving me a moment to change my mind. “On long trips,” I explained, “but not running errands around town.” My husband and Sky shot sideways glances at each other. I could tell they didn’t believe I could really ride in the backseat. “Careful, honey! You’re about to…” “She’s fine,” Scott interrupted. Annoyed. “Do you mind turning the air on a little bit?” I politely asked. It was getting stuffy inside that car. Scott messed with the controls, but at the rate he was going, we’d be at our destination before cool air got to the backseat. “Can you just switch it to rear seat control?” I politely suggested. He complied and everyone was happy...for about 90 seconds. “Where is my phone? Sky, you had my phone in the kitchen.” “Mom, I gave it to you!” “Did you put it in my purse?” “No!! I handed it to you. I put it in your hand.” “What? You know I was carrying lots of other stuff. Turn right up here.” Sky pulled into the parking lot and I hopped out at the bakery. When I came out five minutes later, Scott was in the back and the driver’s seat was empty. “I thought you wanted to drive, Sky.” “No m’am…Dad and I think we’d be much happier if you drive. It’s all yours.” No sooner had I gotten into mad Washington Road traffic, than I heard a strange, slow, deep mumbling coming from the backseat. “I’M DYING BACK HERE…GIVE ME AIR,” the Darth Vader voice demanded. Sky burst out laughing. “I NEED MY PHONE…WHO HAS MY PHONE?” the horrible voice moaned. Sky was in tears at this point. “I CAN’T BREATHE, GIVE ME MY PHONE!” the voice continued, no doubt pleased that I was laughing so hard I almost ran off the road. OK, family, I get it: You all think I’m a control freak. (I’LL TRY TO CHILL… REALLY!) JENNIE MONTGOMERY anchors the evening news at WJBF-TV. She’s married to Scott and they have three children: Zack, 19, Maddy, 17, and Sky, 16. www.augustafamily.com

Augusta Family | April 2012 • 9


news notes

“The pat on the back, the arm around the shoulder, the praise for what was done right

the sympathetic nod for what wasn’t are as much a part of golf as life itself ~Gerald R. Ford LEFT: Davidson Fine Arts student Alix Walburn won the the Best of Show award in this year’s Agnes Markwalter Youth Art Competition and Exhibition.

Award recipients for the 2012 competition are: Best of Show: Alix Walburn, Davidson Fine Arts Magnet School, Augusta Division 1 (Grades K-2) First Place: Sasha Hammarlund, Westminster Schools of Augusta Second Place: Kylie Trogdon, Greenbrier Elementary School, Evans Third Place: Cameron Perkins, Byrd Elementary School, Graniteville Division II (Grades 3-5) First Place: Jack Berman, Westminster Schools of Augusta Second Place: Deanna McCord, Gloverville Elementary School, Gloverville Third Place: Natalie Lively, Gloverville Elementary School, Gloverville

Winning Art ALIX WALBURN of Davidson Fine Arts Magnet School took home the Best of Show award at the 33rd annual Agnes Markwalter Youth Art Competition and Exhibition. The competition is held each year in conjunction with National Youth Art Month and is open to K–12 students from public, private and home schools in Aiken, Burke, Columbia, McDuffie and Richmond counties Participating schools entered over 100 pieces of student artwork in a wide range of media, designed to reflect the 2012 exhibition theme The Healing Power of Art. From these entries, jurors chose 13 particularly outstanding works of art for receipt of cash awards, including Best of Show and first-, second-, and third-place winners in each of four grade divisions. A number of additional works received non-cash Merit Awards. All winners were recognized at the exhibition’s opening reception on Wednesday, March 7, 2012, at the Institute.

Division III (Grades 6-8) First Place: Myles Neloms, Davidson Fine Arts Magnet School, Augusta Second Place: Will Nabholz, Westminster Schools of Augusta Third Place: Faith Totherow, New Ellenton Middle School, New Ellenton Division IV (Grades 9-12) First Place: Summer Barfield, Westminster Schools of Augusta, Second Place: Christina Huynh, Davidson Fine Arts Magnet School, Augusta Third Place: Brooke Mays, Lakeside High School, Evans

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Fresh Faces

Online Extra: Fun Food! March 201 2

Click our Fun Food tab for Web-exclusive recipes along with other fun, family friendly food-related news and recipes from our print publication.

IDEAS TO SPRUCE UP YOUR MOMMY HOME MAKEOVE

RS

SPRING FASH ION FOR KIDS

LEARNING TO

SAY, “I’M

SORRY”

Family AUGUST A

m a g a z i n e

Madelyn Ricker,

10 • Augusta Family | April 2012

4, is the daughter

of Don and

Laura Ricker

Is your child ready for their “close up?” If you think you’ve got a “cover kid,” submit their photo and information on our Web site and they may grace the cover of Augusta Family magazine!

of North Augusta.

www.augustafamily.com

EdVenture Tickets Enter for your chance to win one of two family four-packs of passes to the EdVenture Children’s Museum in Columbia. Winners will be drawn April 27.


news notes

Going for Gold Latasha Colander Clark, who earned an Olympic gold medal and was part of a world-record relay team, joins the Paine College athletic staff as head coach for men’s and women’s track and field and cross country. She comes to Paine from Mount Olive College in North Carolina, where she was assistant men’s and women’s track and field coach. Clark anchored the USA 4-by-400-meter relay team, which took home the gold medal at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, Australia. She also competed in the 400 meters at the 2000 Olympics after winning the U.S. Olympic Trials in the event. Clark retired as a professional athlete in 2006.

Latasha Colander Clark

Safe Kids Fast Fact More than 500 children have died since 1998 after being left or becoming trapped in a motor vehicle. The most deaths occurred at age 2 or younger, but even school-aged kids are at risk of entrapment. Older children mistakenly think the family car is a toy, so they get inside, quickly become disoriented and are unable to unlock the doors and get out. What’s the big danger? Heat is more dangerous to kids than adults. Children in hot cars are at great risk for heat stroke, which can lead to a high fever, dehydration, seizures and death. Never leave the kids in the car—even if it is “just for a couple of minutes.” Keep kids safe. Keep them out of hot, parked cars. Information provided by: Safe Kids East Central, led by Georgia Health Sciences Children’s Medical Center, Rene Hopkins, RN, Coordinator, 706-721-7606. Read the full article at www. augustafamily.com.

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Augusta Family |April 2012 • 11


12 • Augusta Family | April 2012

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eating well with kim by Kim Beavers, MS, RD, LD, CDE

Take a Dip Serving a Healthy Dip Encourages Children To Eat Raw Veggies

A

s we head into spring, I want to follow up on last month’s article about continuing to offer children vegetables even if they do not eat them as often as we might like. Parents are not the only ones who are at a loss on ways to encourage children to eat vegetables. Scientists and practitioners are as well. I know this because I recently attended a Webinar on taste perceptions in children. A study (“Offering ‘Dip’ Promotes Intake of a Moderately-Liked Vegetable Among Preschoolers With Genetic Sensitivity to Bitterness.” Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics; 2012; 112:235-245) was done to determine the effects of providing a palatable “dip” along with repeated exposure to a raw vegetable on preschoolers’ liking and intake. Using a dip to encourage intake is certainly nothing new to any experienced mother, but it has not been studied before. In addition, a few other pieces of valuable information came out of this Webinar. The first fact to note is that some vegetables are more bitter than others and that bitterness contributes to the rejection of vegetables by children. There is a genetic component to bitter flavor detection and some children are more “bitter sensitive” than others. Knowing that does not make your bitter-sensitive children automatically eat more vegetables, but it does provide an element of understanding on why some children are more easily coaxed into eating their vegetables and others are less easily persuaded. In fact, of the 147 preschoolers tested in this study 70 percent were bitter-sensitive, meaning bitter foods (think broccoli) have an unpleasant taste to them. Results: For the bitter-sensitive children the combination of a familiar dip (ranch) as well as repeated offerings of raw broccoli resulted in children eating more of the vegetable. They ate 80 percent more broccoli when served with a dip versus

when it was served plain. (In the interest of full disclosure this study was funded by an investigatorinitiated grant from Clorox Company, which owns Hidden Valley—the dip used in the study.) As a dietitian/mom of a child who is bitter sensitive (as am I), I love to read this stuff. It is reassuring and rejuvenates my enthusiasm to present vegetables in a different light. Here are some additional thoughts I have for you (and me) about deemphasizing or masking the bitter flavor of some vegetables. First, offer more vegetables that have a sweet or neutral flavor profile. Vegetables with a sweet flavor profile include: Beets, carrots, corn, red potatoes, snap peas and sweet potatoes. Vegetables with a mild or neutral flavor profile include: Swiss chard, eggplant, potatoes, spinach and zucchini. Second, offer children vegetables when they are most hungry. You know that time right before dinner when everyone wants something to eat “right now?” Keep a platter of raw veggies available and set it out for kids, teens and adults to snack on before dinner and, yes, offer a dip—from ranch to ketchup. If it will increase veggie consumption I am all for it. Finally another trick to increase palatability of vegetables on a crudités platter is to lightly blanch them. Good vegetables to blanch are broccoli, string beans, snap peas, asparagus and cauliflower. Blanching tends to help decrease the bitter or raw flavor of the vegetables and improve their texture. Until next time, eat well, live well. Kim Beavers is a Registered Dietitian and Diabetes Educator for University Health Care System. She lives in North Augusta with her husband and two children and she is the co-host of the culinary nutrition segment Eating Well with Kim, which airs at noon Monday, Wednesday and Friday on WRDW. To join the recipe club or view recipes, visit www.universityhealth.org/ewwk. You can also watch the segments at www.wrdw.com/ewwk. www.augustafamily.com

Vegetable Crudités Pre-dinner Platter This is a cut above the standard raw veggie tray. Keep this in the refrigerator and pull it out before dinner for hungry family members. If they end up not hungry for dinner it will be because they filled up on vegetables—not a bad problem to have! /2 pound sugar snap peas /2 pound broccoli florets 1 bag baby carrots 1 pint grape tomatoes Dip of choice 1 1

To prepare the vegetables pull the string off the end of the sugar snap peas and place in a vegetable steamer. Place veggie steamer in a pan filled with about 1 inch of water and steam for 1-2 minutes until just tender. Transfer the peas to a bowl of ice water to shock them and stop the cooking process (they should still be bright green). Drain the peas and pat them dry and place on a platter. Repeat procedure with broccoli. Fill in the platter with the raw vegetables. One veggie tray should get you through a couple nights. Yield: 20 servings Nutrient Breakdown (dip not included in the nutrient calculation): Calories 20, Fat 0g, Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 25mg, Carbohydrate 4g, Fiber 1g, Protein 1g. Percent Daily Value: 25% Vitamin C, 80% Vitamin A, 2% Iron, 2% Calcium Carbohydrate Choices: 0 Carbohydrates Diabetes Exchange Values: 1 Vegetable Augusta Family | April 2012 • 13


Summer

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Camps

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16 • Augusta Family | April 2012

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by J. Ron Eaker, M.D.

}Doctor/Dad

Eat For Life Four Simple Rules for Healthy Eating

T

he singular question posed in my office most often, other than how to improve a waning sex drive, is how to lose weight. Since around 45 million people in the country are overweight, it is no wonder that this dominates the frontal lobes of most of us. As in politics, there is a wealth of misinformation, confusion and flat-out deception when it comes to healthy eating. So in an attempt to stimulate, educate, motivate and masticate you into the healthy person you strive to be, let me present my version of the golden rules of eating well. Chew on! One of the most pleasurable experiences humans undertake is eating. We love our food and for good reason. Obviously we get enormous physical benefit (we eat—we live, we don’t—we die) and science and our own brains tell us there are psychological benefits to gastronomic indulgences. Everything from pleasant memories to soothing emotional hurts can arise from consuming certain foods. Although this column focuses on the physical act of consuming, never forget that you have to get your brain in the game to be successful. There are four golden rules of eating healthy and if you follow these you will not only maintain or lose weight, but feel better, act better and look

like you are 10 years younger. (Okay, that last one may be a stretch.)

Rule Number One: Eat Balanced Meals What Mamma always told you is true. There is no one super food, in spite of what the algae lovers claim, and there is likewise no naturally evil food. (Well, maybe Spam qualifies as evil.) We were created to survive on a variety of nutrients and no one food can provide everything you need, so mix it up to guarantee proper health. Balance protein, carbohydrates and fats by selecting a wide variety of foods. Get crazy and sample foods that are different from burgers, bacon and barbecue. Travel the world by making one night a week “ethnic night” and testdrive various foreign cuisines. There are three sub-rules in this category: Eat whole foods whenever possible, mainly plants, and prepare them in as close to the natural state as you can. In other words don’t fry, fritter and fricassee your food! And one final caveat, don’t overdo it. How much you eat is more important than the mix.

Rule Number Two: Eat Less Fat This is not to demonize fat but to remind you that too much of the greasy stuff is just not healthy. In spite of the cacophony of nutritional advice available, there are no reliable experts praising the benefits of lard. Some fat is necessary, but we should limit saturated and trans-fats. These include margarine, salad dressings, processed cakes, chips, cookies and gobs of other nasties. Become a label reader. If the serving size contains more than five grams of saturated fat, put the item down and run away screaming. Total fat in your diet shouldn’t exceed 25 percent of total calories. There are a number of fat counters available in smart phone apps and online, so it is relatively easy to calculate how much of the grease is sliding down your gullet. Don’t forget there are some good fats. For example, the omega 3 fatty acids found in abundance in some plants (flaxseed) and cold-water fish (tuna, halibut) are critical in assuring good health and are essential for their anti-inflammatory actions. www.augustafamily.com

Rule Number Three: Eat Less Sugar The average person consumes 156 pounds of sugar a year. Most sodas will contain the equivalent of 10 teaspoons of sugar in each can. Sugar, or glucose in fancy doctor talk, is necessary for energy, yet most of us eat enough sugar to power a high school soccer team. The low-carb craze of recent vintage did make us aware of the evils of consuming too much sugar (carbohydrates=sugar), yet everything in moderation and nothing in excess applies to this rule as it does to all the others. Keep in mind that your need for sugar and energy is directly proportional to your activity level. Marathoners need more carbohydrates than chess masters.

Rule Number Four: Eat More Fiber This rule may be a bit of a surprise because it doesn’t get the publicity that the others enjoy. However, fiber, both soluble and insoluble, is a key component of a healthy diet. These things that aren’t metabolized in the system serve a variety of vital functions such as binding excess cholesterol, promoting bowel health and regulating hormone levels. The American Heart Association has stated that consuming 25 grams of fiber a day may reduce your risk of heart disease, the number one killer of both men and women. Fiber is abundant in fruits and vegetables, grains, nuts, legumes and tree bark. (Just seeing if you were paying attention.) Choosing foods high in fiber not only fulfills the need for roughage, but these foods also tend to be low in calories and filling. Following these four simple rules can provide a lifetime of good health. Dr. Eaker is an Augusta Ob/GYN and author. He and his wife, Susan, have two teenage daughters.

Augusta Family | April 2012 • 17


healthyfamily}

by Danielle Wong Moores

courtesy of Danielle Wong Moores

It’s Just a Little Lisp... Or Is It Time for Speech Therapy?

Speech pathologist Terri Stewart uses sign language, play and other tactics when working with Zeke Tillman, 2, and his mother Tonya.

W

hich one is the boat, Zeke? Can you show Mommy the boat?” As speech pathologist Terri Stewart gestures in sign language and shows him the illustrated puzzle pieces, 2-year-old Zeke points to the boat, then grabs a set of plastic keys. “Whose keys are those? Are those Eden’s keys?” prompts Stewart, referring to Zeke’s younger sister. “My keys!” he responds with a grin. While it may seem like play, Stewart, CCP/SLP, a senior speech pathologist at Georgia Health Sciences Children’s Medical Center, is actually working on Zeke’s speech, by using tactics like speaking to him face-to-face at his eye level, repetition and sign language. By the time children reach first grade, roughly five percent have a noticeable speech disorder, according to the National Institutes of Health. But in order for children to become fully competent in speech, development of language skills needs to occur well before school age—in fact, 18 • Augusta Family | April 2012

the first six months of life are considered the most crucial. Zeke’s mom, Tonya Tillman, noticed a problem early on when Zeke didn’t seem to be reaching the same speech milestones as other children his age. “Four of us at work had babies about the same time,” says Tillman. “And they were coming into work and saying, ‘Kayla said, Hey, Mommy,’ and other short sentences, and Zeke wasn’t. Their kids were talking, and you don’t want to compare kids or measure kids to each other, but I also didn’t want him to be behind. It just really struck home, when I heard other people talking about their kids.” According to Stewart, it’s not uncommon for her to treat children as young as Zeke, or even younger, especially if there are underlying causes for speech conditions such as hearing loss or cleft palate. And there are certainly red flags that parents should be aware of that may indicate speech therapy may be needed: www.augustafamily.com

• 0 to 1 year: If children do not appear to be hearing sounds or are very quiet. • 1 year: If children are not babbling sounds or speaking words. • 18 months: If children are not speaking in short sentences or naming objects. • 2 years: If children do not have a vocabulary of around 50 words or if they seem frustrated because they can’t communicate. “Parents worry when children don’t talk,” says Stewart. “Often speech therapy can assure them that their child may just be a later or slow talker and give them that peace of mind. And if there is a speech delay, we can provide guidance on what to do.”

Causes of Speech Delay When a child has a speech delay, the first thing many parents worry about is autism. While delayed speech is a sign of autism, there are other symptoms too—including lack of interaction and poor social skills, repetitive behaviors and


sensitivity to light, sound and touch. “Pediatric speech pathologists are trained to look for signs of autism,” says Stewart. “If we do feel there is a problem, we refer parents on.” However, in children with no other health problems (for example, mental retardation or hearing loss), autism is actually not the most common cause of speech delay, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians. A simple maturation delay—being a slow talker—is very common. This delay happens more in boys than girls and can be hereditary. Yet these children have often caught up by the time they reach school age and go on to have no further language difficulty. Apraxia and aphasia are two developmental disorders that can also cause speech delays, and specific interventions are necessary in these cases. It is sometimes difficult to distinguish between a maturation delay and apraxia or aphasia at an early age.

What Can Parents Do? According to Stewart, there are a number of simple things that parents can do starting in infancy to help their child reach appropriate speech milestones. Turn off the TV. Studies have shown that children benefit more from 15 minutes of one-on-one time with parents than an hour of the latest DVD to help babies learn to read. “I have to get on my soapbox here,” says Stewart. “Children don’t learn from TV.” While TV engages children’s visual and auditory senses, it doesn’t engage their language skills. One-on-one interaction, with parents speaking to and engaging with children face to face, is the single most important thing parents can do to help build language and speech.

Studies have shown that children benefit more from 15 minutes of one-on-one time with parents than an hour of the latest DVD to help babies learn to read. Speak. Then repeat. Repetition helps build your child’s vocabulary. It’s a form of baby talk in a way—“Is that a dog? Do you like that dog? It’s a pretty dog”—but is grammatically correct, repetitive and spoken slowly and clearly to ensure that children can hear and understand all the sounds. Sign for success. “Sign language is very beneficial to learning to speak,” says Stewart. In using baby sign language—whether learned from a structured class, online or developing your own signs—parents spur intellectual stimulation, helping children learn how to communicate,

which aids in language development. The most important component, however, is interaction and keeping the environment conducive to interaction and speech, says Stewart. “We know that’s what seems to make the difference— interaction—especially face-to-face interaction.”

What To Expect From Speech Therapy If parents are worried that their child is not speaking as he or she should, the first step is to obtain a referral from their pediatrician or family practitioner for a speech therapist—specifically one trained in pediatrics and appropriate for the age of the child. Some therapists specialize in older children and others specialize in younger children and infants. And no time is too early. “If a family has a concern about speech, then early intervention results in a better prognosis,” says Stewart. “And it doesn’t have to be intrusive.” A speech therapist will conduct an evaluation to help identify the cause of the speech delay. If autism or other disorders are suspected, the therapist may refer the family to a developmental pediatrician. The therapist will also work closely with the family as practice at home and parental involvement are key in helping children with speech. “It’s all based in play,” says Stewart. “I get parents involved and play with children, and give them ideas to elicit speech…and build language and vocabulary comprehension. I tell families, ‘Make it part of everyday.’” With Zeke, Stewart suggested that Tillman continue to work at home on Zeke’s focus and listening skills, through repetition and routine. Tillman put together a book of family photos and sat with Zeke to look at and identify the people in the photos. And she’s continued to work on enunciating words clearly and putting actions to words, especially during playtime (for example, “The truck goes vroom, vroom”), to engage with him and encourage communication overall. And Tillman has seen results. Zeke’s attention span and his ability to speak in short sentences is much improved, she says. “His development in speech overall as far as clarity and actually being able to understand him is better, and he’s building his vocabulary more,” says Tillman. “And instead of saying just, ‘Mama,’ and pointing or dragging me somewhere, he’ll actually say what he wants.” Tillman encourages other parents not to wait if they think there’s an issue with their child’s speech. “Don’t be in denial and don’t be afraid. Be encouraged that it’s O.K. for your child to go to speech therapy,” she says. “Don’t think they will outgrow it because you never know. I would hate for my child or anyone’s child not to be where they could be when they could have gotten help in the beginning. If you think your child isn’t hearing properly or their speech seems a little www.augustafamily.com

delayed, don’t make excuses, but take those steps to have your child evaluated.” Danielle Wong Moores is an Augusta freelance writer.

When To Seek Help

Stewart bases her therapy on the practices of the Hanen Centre, which focuses on parental involvement to promote speech development. They recommend that you seek the advice of a speech language professional if your child:

By 12 Months

• Doesn’t babble with changes in tone (e.g. dadadadadadadadada). • Doesn’t use gestures like waving “bye bye” or shaking head for “no.” • Doesn’t respond to her/his name. • Doesn’t communicate in some way when s/he needs help with something.

By 15 Months

• Doesn’t understand and respond to words like “no” and “up.” • Says no words. • Doesn’t point to objects or pictures when asked, “Where’s the...?” • Doesn’t point to things of interest as if to say “Look at that!” and then look right at you.

By 18 Months

• Doesn’t understand simple commands like, “Don’t touch.” • Isn’t using at least 20 single words like “Mommy” or “up.” • Doesn’t respond with a word or gesture to a question such as “What’s that? or “Where’s your shoe?” • Can’t point to two or three major body parts such as head, nose, eyes, feet.

By 24 Months

• Says fewer than 100 words. • Isn’t consistently joining two words together like “Daddy go” or “ shoes on.” • Doesn’t imitate actions or words. • Doesn’t pretend with toys, such as feeding doll or making toy man drive toy car.

By 30 Months

• Says fewer than 300 words. • Isn’t using action words like “run”, “eat”, “fall.” • Isn’t using some adult grammar, such as “two babies” and “doggie sleeping.”

3-4 Years

• Doesn’t ask questions by 3 years. • Isn’t using sentences (e.g., “I don’t want that” or “My truck is broken”) by three years. • Isn’t able to tell a simple story by four or five years. Source: The Hanen Centre Augusta Family | April 2012 • 19


homefront }

by Cammie Jones

The Weather Outside Is Frightful How To Help Your Kids Cope With Weather Fears

A

pril showers may bring May flowers, but for many children these spring showers and thunderstorms equate to utter fear and terror. Denise Parrish of Waynesboro, mother of two boys, ages 7 and 5, says her oldest son, Hunter, is afraid of heavy rain, wind, thunder and lightning. “It scares me,” Hunter says. “I’m afraid our house is going to tear up or I’m going to die. I am afraid I might get struck by lightning.” Hunter is not alone. Dr. Bernard Davidson, family psychologist at Georgia Health Sciences University, says that fear about the weather is quite common in children and is listed in the top 20 things kids are most afraid of. The medical term for this fear is astraphobia or fear of thunderstorms and lightning and is a normal expression of a child’s development that will usually resolve on its own.

Why They’re Afraid There are several reasons children are afraid of storms. “Lack of knowledge about the weather and an exaggerated sense of danger, most likely due to the unknown, as well as consequences of thunder20 • Augusta Family | April 2012

storms, all contribute to the fear,” Dr. Davidson says. “Also loud sounds often produce startle responses and autonomic nervous system reactivity.” He says the child may be startled and then misinterpret this as something that is going to happen. “They are waiting for the feared thing to occur, ‘knowing’ it will,” he adds. Claire Cooper, of Augusta and mother of two girls ages 7 and 3, says her oldest daughter, Madison, is afraid of heavy rain and thunder and lightning. “It can be a beautiful day, but if the wind picks up, she will dart in the house and ask if a storm or tornado is coming,” says Cooper.

Ways Parents Can Help What can parents do to help alleviate these fears? Dr. Davidson suggests educating your child about the weather. “Share a book about the weather, see a TV show or go to the library or Internet and learn what causes weather changes and how likely they really are to do damage,” he says. Dr. Davidson also offers the following suggestions for parents to help their children cope: • Teach your children relaxation skills, such as deep breathing. www.augustafamily.com

• Encourage positive self-talk. • Help them express their fears in drawings or writing. • Have them talk to people who have experienced severe weather and come out unscathed. • Limit television exposure, as reporters will often sensationalize the storm. Both Cooper and Parrish say the beeping on the television or radio during a severe weather report tends to panic their children. When bad weather is approaching, Parrish does her best to explain to Hunter that God made the weather and God will take care of the storms. “Even though there is no guarantee, I tell him we are safe and the storm will not hurt us,” she adds.

“It can be a beautiful day, but if the wind picks up, she will dart in the house and ask if a storm or tornado is coming.” Cooper says she used to warn Madison ahead of time if bad weather was near, but it did no good— Madison still cries and worries. Now she just tries


to distract her with a board game or movie and if that doesn’t work, a close hug and reassuring words help. “It’s anxiety, and sometimes all you can do is hug them,” says Cooper. Parrish agrees and says that Hunter says he feels better just being near her in bad weather. “So I guess just spending time with him and reminding him everything will be okay seems to be the best remedy,” Parrish says.

Education and Planning Can Help Jay Jefferies, meteorologist at NBC 26 in Augusta, hosts free Storm Spotter seminars throughout the year along with NBC 26’s weather team that inform viewers about severe weather and teach them weather safety tips. “Practicing weather safety makes everyone more comfortable whether they are at home or away from home when severe weather occurs,” says Jefferies. Jefferies suggests having a plan in place before the storm hits and practicing what you might do in case you need to evacuate or take cover. He says that 80 percent of residents are not fully prepared for a disaster. “You can prepare a plan in as little as an hour,” he says. “Have a family plan in place that you have gone over and practiced with all family members before severe weather strikes.” He also suggests going to www.nbc26.tv/weather to sign up for Weather Call, a free service that alerts you to severe weather where you live. Dr. Davidson agrees with having a plan and says, “The more you practice and let them know that this is helping them and their family stay safe, the less anxious they may become. It makes good sense for people to be prepared.”

Seeking Professional Help for Your Child Although astraphobia is attributed to a normal childhood fear, there are times when a medical professional may need to be sought. Some warning signs to look for include helplessness or lack of typical responsiveness, difficulty talking about the weather, nightmares and sleep disturbances, separation fears, regressive behavior such as bedwetting, somatic complaints such as stomachaches or nausea, preoccupations with death and danger and social withdrawal. “Kids show fear of bad weather and this is normal,” says Dr. Davidson. “But it becomes a problem when it interferes with daily functioning and causes them to stress over time.” A fear becomes a true phobia when it has persisted for six months or more.

“Practicing weather safety makes everyone more comfortable whether they are at home or away from home when severe weather occurs.” -Jay Jefferies Most likely, your child is just experiencing a normal childhood fear of severe weather. Help them through it using knowledge and comfort and, most likely, they will outgrow it. As Jefferies points out, “Children unconditionally trust their parents, so explain to them that you will protect them always.” Remember that those scary April showers do tend to bring those beautiful May flowers. Cammie Jones is a n Augusta Freellance writer and mother of three.

www.augustafamily.com

Augusta Family | April 2012 • 21


Summer

www.augustafamily.com


Fun

www.augustafamily.com


Summer Camps

24 • Augusta Family | April 2012

www.augustafamily.com


C

MP

GUIDE Our Annual Guide to Day Camps Around the CSRA

H

elp your kids lose the nothingto-do summer blues. From golf and sailing to art and music, and almost anything else a child could wish for, organizations in the CSRA are offering it through day camps, overnight camps and other summer programming. Whatever your child’s interests or needs, finding the perfect fit is easier than you think. Here’s Augusta Family’s guide to this summer’s lineup.

By Lucy Adams

A Child’s World

925 Stevens Creek Rd., Augusta, 706-863-9485. 4124 Madeline Dr., Augusta, 706-210-7000. 4204 Columbia Rd., Martinez, 706-860-0059. 4689 Hardy McManus Rd., Evans, 706-364-4216. 325 Old Wrightsboro Rd., Grovetown, 706-868-9966. Summer Camp. May 21-August 10. Fun for all ages with weekly themes. Water play, reading programs, field trips, dramatic play, art projects and more. School-age children also team with teachers to research different activities and planning for a group activity. Call for complete details.

Aiken County Parks, Recreation and Tourism

Photo Courtesy of Westminster Schools

www.aikencountysc.gov/tourism. 803-642-7559 or elangston@aikencountysc.gov. Outpost Camps. Ages 6-12. June 4-15 at Busbee/Corbett Elementary/Middle School in Wagener. June 18-29 at Jackson

www.augustafamily.com

Augusta Family | April 2012 • 25


Middle School/Beech Island. July 2-13 (no camp July 4) at The Recreation Center in Graniteville, July 16-20 at Harrison-Caver Park in Clearwater. 7:45.a.m.-5:30 p.m. $190 per week. Two day-trips during each camp. Register early. Spaces are limited. Call for more information.

Aldersgate United Methodist Church

3185 Wheeler Rd. www.aldersgateum.com. 706-733-4416. “Transformers” Themed Camps. K-2nd grades, July 23-25, $30. 3rd-5th grades, July 9-12, $40. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Includes t-shirt, snacks and field trips. Campers must bring their own lunches. Register by June 18.

and up. June 4-7. 10-11:30 a.m. $70. Eight rehearsals, quality instruction, a T-shirt and concert. The camp will meet in the Augusta Christian Band Room (Fine Arts Building). Camp instructor is Rob Nordan, ACS band director and music director of the Columbia County Youth Orchestra. The camp will be held one evening a week (evening of the week to be determined, 6-8 pm), June through July. For more details and online registration visit www.columbiacco.org. (The evening of the week will be listed on the Web site soon.)

Sports Camps

Artsy Me

Boys Basketball. Rising 4th-8th. One evening a week (TBD) June-July. 6-8 p.m. $25. This camp offers an opportunity for younger players of all skill levels to take the next step in reaching that illusive goal of individual potential. This intense basketball camp is a great opportunity for your game to soar!

Augusta Ballet School

Girls Basketball. Rising 4th-8th. June 4-7. 9 a.m.-12 noon. $80 for ACS students, $90 for all others. This camp for girls focuses strictly on the fundamentals of ball-handling. The staple of this camp is repetition and progression drill work. Although the intent for this camp is to sharpen the fundamentals skills of ballhandling, the campers will also learn valuable lessons in self-esteem, teamwork and the value of hard work!

4275 Washington Rd., Evans. www.artsymestudio.com. 706-432-6396. iCreate Camp. Ages 5 and up. June 4-July 20. 10 a.m.-1p.m. $150 per week, includes supplies and lunch. Create with pottery, mosaics, paper maché and more. 2941 Walton Way. www.augustaballetschool.com. 706-733-5511. Augusta Ballet School will offer a variety of summer classes. Please call or visit their Web site for a schedule. Nutcracker Dance Camps. Explore in-depth the choreography, music and specialties of this timeless holiday classic as presented each year by Dance Augusta. They will learn a different section of Nutcracker choreography each day. Sessions end with a performance for friends and families. Instructor is Carlee Snyder. Session 1: June 4-8, ages 3-5. 2:30-4:30 p.m. $100. Session II: June 11-15, ages 3-5. 2:30-4:30 p.m. $100. Session III: June 18-22, ages 6-8. 2:30-5 p.m. $110.

Augusta Cheer Academy

4150 Washington Rd., Suite 4, Evans. www.augustacheeracademy.com. 706-364-1138. Please call or check their Web site for camp information.

Augusta Christian Schools

313 Baston Rd. Call 863-2905 ext. 136 or augustachristian.org.

Enrichment Camps Camp Invention. Rising 1st-6th. June 18-22. 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $215. This is a nationally-acclaimed, week-long science and creativity day experience for elementary school children. Cultivate the ideas critical to science, technology, engineering and math by encouraging exploration and curiosity through exciting hands-on activities. For more information, or to register online visit www.campinvention.org. Pottery Camp. Rising 6th-8th. June 4-7. 10-11:30 a.m. $70. This camp will include hand-building pinch pot and slab vessels. Both will be glazed. 2012 Orchestra Camp. Third-year level students 26 • Augusta Family | April 2012

Little Lions Basketball Camp–Co-ed. Rising 1st-3rd. May 23-25. 9 a.m.-11 a.m. $50. Don’t miss this opportunity to be introduced to the basic fundamentals of basketball. The camp will offer easy, but challenging drills, competitions and games. This will be a fun-filled camp with prizes, ribbons and a camp t-shirt. Dr. Piccolo’s Team Basketball 101–Co-ed. Rising 3rd-8th. June 18-21. 5-8 p.m. $80 for ACS students, $90 for all others. This camp offers four straight evenings of team basketball. Dr. Piccolo will introduce team concepts like floor spacing and movement without the ball in this camp of mainly 5-on-5 full-court games. Increase your knowledge of the team aspects of the great game of basketball. Baseball—Boys. Rising 5th-8th. June 4-7. 8:30 a.m.-noon. $80 for ACS students, $90 for all others. Camp will include daily devotionals, hitting, fielding and throwing drills, base-running and a camp t-shirt. Football—Boys. Rising 5th-8th. June 11-14. 9 a.m.-noon. $80 for ACS students, $90 for all others. Campers will be introduced to the basics of football including proper techniques of stance, footwork, terminology, positions and more. Games, prizes and guest speakers included. Non-contact. Speed Development—Co-ed. Rising 6th12th. June 18-21. 6-8 p.m. $80 for ACS students, $90 for all others. Do you desire to be faster, quicker and have better agility for the sports you play? This camp offers drills and techniques for developing your athletic ability to its fullest potential. Learn how to be more explosive, quicker and faster at this unique camp. www.augustafamily.com

Volleyball—Girls. Rising 5th-8th. July 23-27. 4:30-6:30 p.m. (Wednesday 3:30-5:30 p.m.). $80 for ACS students, $90 for all others. Learn the fundamentals of the game of volleyball in this fun and safe environment. Team work and team effort along with spiritual development are emphasized. Soccer—Co-ed. Rising 2nd-8th. June 18-21. 9 a.m.-12 noon. $80 for ACS students, $90 for all others. G.O.A.L. (Giving Our All for the Lord) offers an opportunity for younger players of all skill levels to develop the fundamentals of soccer. This camp offers skill work and drills to help ensure success on the field, as well as spiritual development for success in life. Prizes and camp t-shirt included. Cheerleading—Girls. Rising K5-5th. June 1114. 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. $80 for ACS students, $90 for all others. This camp offers the basic fundamentals of motions, jumps and stunts along with sideline cheers. Daily devotional and motivational sessions as well as snacks and a camp t-shirt are included. Held at Fury’s Ferry Campus Gym, 470 Fury’s Ferry Rd.

Augusta Jewish Community Center

898 Weinberger Way, Evans. www.augustajcc.org. 706-228-3636. AJCC Day Camp. Ages 3-13. Eleven 1-week sessions from May 21-Aug. 3. Monday through Friday 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Early drop off and late stay available for an additional fee. $160 per week for regular camp, $130 per week May 29-June 1 (no camp May 28) and July 2-6 (no camp July 4) and $225 per week for specialty camps. Visit website for info on specialty camps to be offered and discounts available. All campers, including specialty campers, will participate in swimming, tennis, archery, taekwondo and arts and crafts during the camp week. All camp staff is first-aid and CPR certified. All lifeguard staff is first-aid, CPR and WSI (Water Safety Instructor) certified. Mini Camp. Ages 3-4. Eleven 1-week sessions from May 21-Aug. 3. Monday through Friday 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $125 per week, $100 per week May 29-June 1 (no camp May 28) and July 2-6 (no camp July 4). All mini campers will participate in swimming, arts and crafts and many other activities during the camp week. Our mini camp takes place in The Bee Hive Preschool housed in the AJCC.

Augusta Players

706-826-4707. www.augustaplayers.org/youth.shtml or summercamp@augustaplayers.org. Theatre Camps. Ages 6-high school. June 25-July 6 and July 16-July 27. Cost begins at $200. Performancebased camps teach kids the fundamentals of musical theatre.

Augusta Preparatory Day School

285 Flowing Wells Rd., Martinez. www.augustaprep.org. 706-863-1906. Visit their Web site for the latest camp information and


online registration. Contact Cornelia Isaac, program manager at Cornelia.isaac@augustaprep.org for camp information. Camp Cavalier. Ages 3-14. Weekly camps June 11July 27. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $180 per week, Ants Camp halfday, 9 a.m.-noon, $100 per week. Fosters growth and independence. Daily sports and recreation, creative arts, exploratory and structured activities and more. Camp Groupings: Ants Camp—age 3-4, Grasshoppers,—ages 5-8, Life Skills In the Middle—ages 9-14. $250 per week. Not all age groups meet every week. Call or visit the Web site for dates and details.

Creative Arts Camps Ballet. Ages 3-5, 9-11 a.m. Ages 6-8 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. June 11-15. $120. A creative movement/ballet class as well as a daily take-home craft. Beginning Guitar. Ages 6-10, 11 a.m.-noon. Ages 11 and up, 1-2 p.m. June 11-15, July 9-13. $120 per week. Maximum of 10 students per class. Ceramic Arts. Grades 5-12. July 8-20. 9-11 a.m. and noon-2 p.m. $200, includes art supplies. Children

will learn hand-built and wheel-thrown pottery. Mini-Musical Theater. Grades K-2nd, July 1620. Grades K-5th, July 23-27. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $200 per week. Musicals will be introduced to students through story time, videos and puppetry. Students will paint and create backdrops, memorize speaking parts and sing songs for a performance on the final day of camp. Photography & Photoshop Basics. Ages 13 and up. June 11-15. 9-11 a.m. and noon-2 p.m. $125, includes cost of field trip and three high-quality prints to take home. Go inside and outside of the classroom setting and learn about the camera, photo, composition and editing basics. Theater. Ages 6-8 (must be 6 years old by Jan. 1, 2012), June 18-22, $250. Ages 9-14, June 11-22, $450. 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Dance and swordplay, drama and music with other fun stage craft included. Culminates with an informal presentation showcasing the skills developed over the course of the workshop.

Exploratory Camps Asian Art. Ages 5-15. June 11-15. $150. Create mixed media projects inspired by Asian art techniques. Creative Writing. Grades 5th-9th. July 9-14. 10:30 a.m.-12 noon. $130. Develop skills as an emerging writer through differentiated writing instruction, one-on-one writing support and writing workshop sessions. Focus is on creativity and personal expression. Forensic Science. Ages 9-14. July 9-13 and July 16-20. 9 a.m.-noon. $150. Explore the science behind crime investigation through mock crime scenes, gathering and processing evidence, analyzing data and attempting to link the evidence to the correct suspect. Forestry/Ecology. Ages 9-14. July 9-13 and July 16-20. 12:30-3:30 p.m. $150. Investigate the fundamentals of functional ecosystems, conservation and forest management.

Photo Courtesy of Westminster Schools

Music and Math. Grades 7th-12th. July 16-20. 1-3 p.m. $130. Explore sounds of different musical instruments and discover the secret side to how math plays a part in music. Painting with Style. Ages 9-14. July 16-20. 9-11:45 a.m. $150. Improve our painting techniques and brush control while learning about style in art. Playwriting/Directing. Grades 5th-9th. July 9-14. 12:30-2:30 p.m. $140. Trace the development of a tale from the pages of a text to the bright lights of Hollywood or Broadway. Robotics/Programming. Ages 9-14. July 9-13. 12:30-3:30 p.m. $150. Build and program robots that move, talk and respond to their environment. Spanish Immersion. Grades 7th-9th. July 16-20. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $300. A week of Spanish immersion is the www.augustafamily.com

equivalent of a month of instruction. Rapid improvement of conversational Spanish. Strategic Games. Ages 9-14. July 16-20. 9 a.m.noon. $150. Explore specific play strategies for strategic board games. USA Chess Camp. Ages 9-14. July 16-20. 12:15-3 p.m. From beginner to advanced, all are welcome. Offered by USA Chess. Visit www.chesscamp.com for program details. Introductory Video Game Creation. Ages 8-15. June 11-15. Receive step-by-step guidance and instruction to design your own video game. For more information visit www.gamebuildercamp.com/video. htm. Video Game Creation—The Sequal. Ages 8-15. June 11-15. Use Game Maker software to create a sidescrolling platform game with running, jumping, falling, climbing, blasting and enemy stomping. For more information visit www.gamebuildercamp.com/video.htm.

Enrichment Camps Jump Start. Rising pre-school-1st. July 30-August 3. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $200. Get a jump start on the upcoming school year and brush up on readiness skills for starting the next grade. Algebra Prep. Grades 8 & 9. July 23-27, July 30-August 3. 11-11:55 a.m. $125. Brush up on math skills necessary for Algebra I. English Grammar Review. Rising 7th-8th graders, July 23-August 3, 8-8:55 a.m., $190. Rising 6th graders, July 23-August 3, 9-9:55 a.m., $190. Study Skills. Rising 5th-8th graders. July 23-27, July 30-August 3. 10-10:55 a.m. $100. Organizational Skills. Rising 5th-8th graders. July 23-26, July 30-August 2. 11-11:55 a.m. $100. Math Test Strategies. Middle schoolers. July 2327 and 30-August 3. 10-10:55 a.m. $125 per week. This camp will help you develop strategies, organization and skills in preparing for assessments. We will find ways to retrieve Math information from your thoughts while learning and studying the material and while taking a test or an exam. Middle School Pre-Algebra Prep. Rising 7th graders. July 23-27, July 30-August 3. 9-9:55 a.m. $125 per week. For students who want to be well prepared in their math skills for entrance into middle school 7th grade Pre-Algebra. PSAT/SAT Critical Reading/Writing. July 23-27, 1-2:30 p.m. July 30-August 3, 10:30 a.m.-noon. $155. A review of skills, strategies and concepts to help students prepare for the Critical Reading and Writing sections of the PSAT/SAT. Students need to bring a copy of The College Board’s The Official SAT Study Guide: For u Augusta Family | April 2012 • 27


Photo Courtesy of Westminster Schools the New SAT (newest edition) to use for the course. PSAT/SAT Math. July 30-August 3. 1:30-3:30 p.m. $155. The course reviews the mathematical content covered on the PSAT and SAT standardized tests and addresses test-taking strategies that can be used when taking the multiple-choice and student-response sections of the test. Spanish I—Transition. Grades 6 & 7. July 23-August 3. 2-3 p.m. $200. Basic elements of Spanish language will be taught. Spanish II—Transition. July 23-August 3. 8-10 a.m. $300. For students new to Prep and entering high school in the fall. Spanish IV—Transition. Grades 6 & 7. July 23-August 3. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $300. For students who wish to continue study beyond Spanish III.

Sports Camps All Sports. Boys and girls grades 1-7. June 11-15 and July 9-13. M-Th, 8 a.m.-3 p.m, Friday 8 a.m.-noon. $160 per week. Includes activities such as basketball, soccer, volleyball, flag football, baseball/softball, floor hockey, scooter hockey, kickball, catch-me-in, ultimate frisbee and many more recreational games. Basketball. Boys and girls grades 4-8. July 30-August 2. 12:15-4:15 p.m. $100. A balance of skills and fundamentals with games, contests and fun. The basic skills of ball handling, passing, shooting and defense will be taught throughout the week of camp. British Soccer. Mini Soccer, ages 3-5. Half-day Player Development Camp, ages 6-16. Full-Day Advanced Camp, ages 7-16. June 4-8, June 18-22. Foot 28 • Augusta Family | April 2012

skills, technical drills, tactical practices, small-sided games, coached scrimmages and a daily tournament. Equally important are lessons in self-discipline, good sportsmanship and respect for others and for the game.

Augusta State University

Football. Cavalier Camp, rising 1st-5th. Cavalier Pride Camp, rising 6th-12th graders. June 25-28. 9 a.m.-noon. $120 if registered by May 20, $150 if registered after May 21. Designed to give players a head start on the 2012 football season.

Chamber Music Institute. June 4-8. $50. Acceptance to this half-day (afternoon) camp is by audition only. Up to 15 students. Coached chamber music sessions for advanced players. Auditions held Sunday, April 15, 4-6:30 p.m. Call 706-731-7971 or e-mail dtucker2@aug.edu to schedule an audition.

Tennis. Boys and girls grades 1-4. June 11-14. 9 a.m.noon. $100. Whether you’re a beginner or intermediate player, this camp will help you play better tennis and get more enjoyment from the game. Volleyball. Rising 5th-8th graders, 9 a.m.-noon. Rising 9th-12th graders, 1-4 p.m. June 18-21, July 1013. $130 per week. Girls learn the fundamental skills of volleyball in a competitive and fun environment. Golf. Ages 6-12. June 4-8, June 25-28. 9 a.m.-noon. $110. Beginner golfers learn rules of the game, terms, equipment, playing tips and more.

Augusta Recreation, Parks and Facilities Department

www.augustaga.gov/departments/recreation. 706-796-5025. Day Camps. Ages 4-12. Four sessions: June 4-15, June 18-29, (No camp July 2-6), July 9-20, July 23-August 3. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $85 per two weeks. Games, sports, arts and crafts, field trips and swimming. Before and after care available at selected locations. Camps are held at seven recreation and parks locations in Augusta, Blythe and McBean areas. Please call for specific details.

Augusta Rowing Club

The Boathouse, 101 Riverfront Dr. www.augustarowingclub.org. 706-432-0022. Rowing Camp. Ages 12-18. June 18-22 and July 9-13. 8 a.m.-noon Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Friday. $100 per week, includes T-shirt and lunch. The camp provides a $50 discount to participants who join the team in the fall.

Augusta Sailing Club

Contact Jim Holder at 706-651-0587 or cv.jholder@ mainsheet.net. www.augustasailingclub.org. Junior Sailing School. Ages 8-14. Weekly camps Monday-Friday beginning May 29 through July 22. Camp May 29-June 4 is for previous students. No camp week of July 4th. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Registration is limited and registration forms are available on the club’s Web site. Pricing: Week 1 (for previous students only) $150. Remaining weeks are $200 for club members (includes a $25 nonrefundable cancellation charge), $225 non-members (includes a $25 nonrefundable cancellation charge). There is a $25 discount for applications received by April 30. www.augustafamily.com

Music Camps

www.ced.aug.edu. 706-731-7971. dtucker2@aug.edu.

Choir Camp. Rising middle school and high school students. June 11-15. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Friday. $170. Two concert choirs, show choir and musical theater class, voice instruction and electives. Early bird registration deadline: May 28. Band Camp. Rising middle school students. June 1822. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Friday. $170. For students with at least a full year of school band experience. Two concert bands, jazz band and sectional ensembles and electives. Early bird registration deadline: June 4. Orchestra Camp. Rising middle school and high school. June 25-29. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Friday. $170. This full-day camp is for rising middle school and high school string players with at least a full year of orchestra experience or private lessons. Two orchestras, chamber music ensembles and electives. Early bird registration deadline: June 11.

Continuing Education

www.ced.aug.edu. Multiple week discount. Download brochure and register at www.ced.aug.edu or call ASU Continuing Education, 706-737-1636. Kids University Kids University—Rising K-1st Grades Themed Camps. In the Spotlight, June 4-8. Lego Engineering—Let’s Build a Playground, June 11-15. Lego Engineering—Let’s Visit Outer Space, July 9-13. Plus 30 more courses to choose from: Exploring art, dance, Panda Tai Chi/Kung Fu, music, cooking, writing, Spanish, social studies, STEM-science, technology, engineering, math. June 4-8, 11-15, 18-22 and 25-29, July 9-13 and 16-20. Half day 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., $105. Full day 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., $165. Kids University—Rising 2nd-3rd Grades Themed Camps. Lego and K’nex Engineering— Bridges Big and Tall, June 11-15. Lego Engineering— Legos in Space, June 25-29. Plus 30 more courses to choose from: Exploring music, art, dance, cooking, Panda Tai Chi/Kung Fu, Spanish, writing, social studies, and STEM-forensics, science, digital photography, 3D engineering and math. June 4-8, 11-15, 18-22 and 25-29, July 9-13 and 16-20. Half day 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., $105. Full day 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., $165.


Kids University—Rising 4th-6th Grades Lego Camps: Lego Engineering—Pneumatics, June 18-22. Lego Engineering—Space Station Projects, July 9-13. Stop Motion Mania with Legos, July 16-20. Half day 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., $105. Full day 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., $165. Kids University—Rising 4th- 6th Grades: Thirty different courses exploring art, fitness, Panda Tai Chi/Kung Fu, nutrition, agriculture, cooking, environmental science, forensics, digital technology, 3D building, physics, game theory and statistics, creative problem solving plus nine morning themed camps: Filmmaking with Video Cameras: It’s the News, Manga Art and Super Hero Science, Building 3D Cities, Triple Decker Science, Global Adventures, A Sharper U!, Going Green and Purple!, Cooking Green and Being Fit, Agro Economics and the Art of Recycling! June 4-8, 11-15, 18-22 and 25-29, July 9-13 and 16-20. Half day 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., $105, Full day 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m., $165. Kids University Teen Edition Rising 6th-8th grades. Panda Tai Chi/Kung Fu. Rising 7th-9th grades. June 4-8, 11-15, 18-22, 25-29 and July 23-27, 8-9 a.m., $25 per week. Construction and Math Mania. Rising 7th-9th grades. June 4-8. 9 a.m.-12:15 p.m. $165. Build five-foot models of famous bridges in teams using K’nexs while learning basic engineering principles, then in pairs, manipulate a hydraulic robotic arm, calculate math coordinates and get ready for team contests. Digital Photography and Photoshop. Rising 7th-9th grades. June 11-15. 9 a.m.-12:15 p.m. $165. Using digital cameras (provided) learn camera basics and how to compose a photo. Enjoy unique photographic assignments and practice editing your photos in the lab. Fun with Pen & Ink and Drawing Faces. Rising 7th-9th grades. June 18-22. 9 a.m.-12:15 p.m. $165. Develop your drawing skills and recognition of the seven elements of art with local artist Xavier Jones. China Xplore! Rising 7th-9th grades. June 25-29. 9 a.m.-12:15 p.m. $165. In a multimedia class, learn Chinese and Chinese culture and history by playing Go and Chinese Checkers, discovering Chinese calligraphy as well as the names for Tai Chi and Kung Fu moves. Your final hour each day is an introduction to Kung Fu. Asian Art—Bento Boxes and Masks from Japan. Rising 7th-9th grades. July 23-27. 9 a.m.12:15 p.m. $165. Using watercolors, acrylic, pencil and pen, learn the design features of Japanese Bento Boxes and explore color theory in making cultural masks from Japan and other countries.

Additional Camps and Classes Arabic Language and Culture 101. Rising 6th-12th grades. June 11-July 18 (skips week of July 4). 4:30-6 p.m., Monday and Wednesday. $165, includes textbook. In this interactive course for beginners, explore the Arabic alphabet and some calligraphy. Discover cultural elements common to Egypt, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia and Jordan as well as learn basic phrases and vocabulary for Modern Standard Arabic. Your instructor was an Arabic linguist and is an experienced foreign language instructor. Chinese Language and Culture 101. Rising 6th-12th grades. June 18-July 25 (skips week of July 4). 4:30-6 p.m., Monday and Wednesday. $155 plus Chinese in 10 Minutes a Day. Using multimedia resources and the popular Chinese in 10 Minutes a Day, beginners learn useful conversational phrases and vocabulary and the Chinese pronunciation (pinyin) system for traveling or working in China. Focus on culture and traditions and how they influence the language. Learn about various internet resources to continue your language development. Your instructor is a native speaker and experienced language instructor. Drawing Skills for Comics and Children’s Books. Rising 8th graders to adults. June 21July 26 (skips week of July 4). 4:30-6:30 p.m., Thursday. $89, plus supplies. Strengthen fine art and design basics needed for the sequential art forms in comics and storyboards. Instructor is local artist, Xavier Jones. All skill levels accepted. Fun with Pen & Ink. Rising 6th-8th graders. June 20-July 25 (skips week of July 4). 4:40-6:30 p.m., Wednesday. $89, plus supplies. Using pen and ink and other media, work on detailed projects and learn color, line, structure, value and depth, cross hatching and faces. Your instructor is local artist, Xavier Jones. Drawing Skills. Rising 5th-8th grades. June 19July 24 (skips week of July 4). 4:30-6:30 p.m., Tuesday. $89, plus supplies. Work on building the fine art skills needed to draw faces and background using graphite pencil, pen and colored pencils. Students can adapt the skills learned to their chosen project. The class will be structured with time for drawing and guide children in their recognition of the seven elements of art: Line, shape, form, space, texture, value and color. Your instructor is local artist, Xavier Jones. SAT and PSAT Quick Prep: Critical Reading/Writing/Grammar. August 23-September 27. 6-7:30 p.m., Thursday. $110, plus The Official SAT Study Guide by The College Board. SAT and PSAT Quick Prep: Math. August 20-October 1. 6-7:30 p.m., Monday. $140, includes textbook. These are intense courses focusing on learning the best strategies for answering SAT multiple choice questions and math grid ins. All sections of the SAT are covered. Practice every meeting with the relevant section of the SAT. All math and verbal concepts on the SAT are rewww.augustafamily.com

viewed. Homework testing samples are assigned.

Augusta West Dance

262 Furys Ferry Rd. www.augustawestdance.com. 706-860-0998. Dance Camp. Ages 3-7, June 11-15 Princess Power theme, June 18-22 Wild, Wild West theme, July 9-13 Under the Big Top theme, July 16-20 Princess Power theme. Ages 8-12, July 9-13 Decades of Dancing theme, July 16-20 Broadway Bound theme. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Come join us for fun instruction in ballet, tap and jazz, arts and crafts and an end of the week performance. North Augusta Dance Camp. June 9-13 Princess Power theme. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Come join us for fun instruction in ballet, tap and jazz, arts and crafts and an end of the week performance. 401 West Martintown Rd., Suite 143.

Beulah Grove Community Resource Center

Beulah Grove Baptist Church Building of Opportunities. 1434 Poplar St. Jean Callaway, 706-722-4999. Summer Explosion Day Camps. PreK-8th grade. May 29-July 6. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. $40 non-refundable registration fee, $90 per week. Breakfast, lunch and snacks provided. Program places students in their promoted grades to work on curriculum for the upcoming school year with certified teachers during the morning hours. Afternoons include recreation, Spanish, drama, dance, art, music, computer science and field trips.

Boys and Girls Club of Augusta

706-504-4071. Multiple locations throughout Augusta. Ages 6-14. May 29-July 29 with week of July 4 off. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $300 early-bird registration, $350 after May 4. Jamestown Club camp will run May 29-June 29, $200. Theme-oriented summer camp with a funfilled environment. Field trip, breakfast and lunch included. Extended drop off available starting at 7:30 a.m. Late pick up until 5:30 p.m.

Bricks 4 Kidz

www.Bricks4kidz.com/augusta. jgriffin@beicks4kidz.com. Jeremiah Griffin, 706-513-5789. Lego Creativity Camps. Ages 5-12. One-week sessions throughout summer beginning May 21st. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Military, teacher, current customer and sibling discounts available. Weekly themes include Star Wars, Robotics, Ninjago, Movie-Making and more. Each camper will receive a custom Lego mini-figure, camp t-shirt and other Lego prizes. Early drop off and late pick up available. Call or email for a detailed camp guide.

Camp Gravatt

The Bishop Gravatt Center, Aiken. www.bishopgravatt.org.

u

Augusta Family | April 2012 • 29


Scott McNeely, 803-648-1817. camp@bishopgravatt.org. Junior High Camp. June 18-28, $650. July 6-July 12, $450.

Say Cheese! Photography Camp. Rising 1st2nd graders. June 25-28. 9-11:30 a.m. $100. Bring your own digital camera.

Class choices include arts and crafts, sports, cooking, science, literature and more. Campers should bring a healthy snack or a sack lunch.

Elementary Kids. June 3-June 9, June 10-16, and July 14-20. $450.

Lights, Camera, Action! Drama Camp. Rising 3rd-6th graders. June 25-28. 9-11:30 a.m. $100. Students will learn theater basics and musical production concepts. Students will put on a Dessert Theater musical performance on Friday.

EDS Preschool Camp. Rising 3s-K. June 11-15, 18-22, 25-29, July 9-13 and 16-20, July 23-27. 9 a.m.1 p.m. $110-$125 per week. Weekly themed activities, such as Our Feathered Friends, Flower Power, Digging for Dinosaurs, All About Me, Kids Café, etc. Campers should bring a healthy snack or a sack lunch.

Junior High and Elementary. July 22-28 for all ages. $450. Senior High Service Camp. June 30-July 3. $280. Family Camp. May 19-20. Parents and children. $120 for two family members. $40 each additional member. $220 family maximum. August 3-5. Parents and children. $160 for two family members. $40 each additional family member. $260 family maximum.

Columbia County Ballet

639 Fury’s Ferry Rd. www.columbiacountyballet.com. 706-860-1852. Princess Dance Camps. Ages 3-7. Weeks offered in June & July. Registration begins in April. Call for more Information.

Columbia County Recreation Department

Bobby Waters Gymnasium Complex, Patriots Park. www.columbiacounty.gov, click on Recreation Department. Robby Kiser, 706-868-3458. Day Camp. Ages 6-12. May 21-July 27. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. with early drop off and late pick-up available. Fun-filled days with different themes throughout the summer, field trips, arts and crafts, games and more. No camp week of July 4. $95 per week.

CSRA Bridge Club

808 Shartom Drive. csrajuniorbridgeleague@yahoo.com. Ray Coleman, 706-833-6496. Junior Bridge League Summer Camp. Ages 8 and up. June 4-8 with a play day on June 9, July 9-13 with a play day on July 14. 9 a.m.-noon. $50 per week. Includes an instruction booklet, a play guide placemat, handouts and instruction. Learn to play a game that is played all over the world and that offers skills, friendships, scholarships and international competition.

Curtis Baptist School

1326 Broad Street. http://www.curtisbaptistchristianschool.org. 706-828-6624. Discounts for attending two or more weeks. Basketball Camp. Rising 4th-8th graders. June 18-21. 9-11:30 a.m. $100. Cheeks Gym. For boys and girls. Bring three bottles of water per day. Soccer Camp. Rising 7th-12th grade boys. June 1821. 9-11:30 a.m. $100. Cheeks Gym. Bring three bottles of water per day. 30 • Augusta Family | April 2012

Cake Decorating. Rising 6th-12th graders. June 25-28. 9-11:30 a.m. $100. Students will learn the basics of cake decorating design and will make the goodies for Lights, Camera, Action! Musical production Dessert Theater on Friday. Art 101. Rising 7th-12th graders. June 25-28. 9 a.m.11:30 a.m. $100. Students will learn the basics of pastel and watercolor while making props for the Lights, Camera, Action! Musical Dessert Theater on Friday. Wilderness Adventure Camp. Rising 6th-12th grade boys. June 25-28. 9-11:30 a.m. $150. Participate in outdoor activities while learning campfire cooking, survival skills, knot tying. CSI-Calculation, Science and Investigation. Rising 6th-12th graders. July 9-13. 9-11:30 a.m. $100. Explore geometric wire bubble-makers, weathermania, rocket launching, and fingerprinting and forensics. Solar Seekers. Rising 1st-5th graders. July 9-13. 9-11:30 a.m. $100. Study all about the solar system and build a planet of your own. Roving Reporters Literary Camp. Rising 1st-5th graders and rising 6th-12th graders. July 9-13. 9-11:30 a.m. $100. Practice investigative journalism and creative writing and create an illustrated published original work.

Diamond Lakes Tennis Center

101 Diamond Lakes Way. 706-772-4913. Tennis Camps. Ages 8-18. May 22-25, May 29-June 1, June 4-8, 11-15, 26-29, July 9-13 and 16-19. 9 a.m.noon. $60/full week, $48/short week. All campers are evaluated on court and placed by the DLTC staff in proper grouping for the instructional programs. Emphasis is placed on learning the fundamentals for all strokes and mechanics, strengthening strokes and developing more power and control, examining match play strategies to improve competitive results. The day will consist of competitive drilling and match play.

Episcopal Day School

2248 Walton Way. www.edsaugusta.com. Julie Kneuker, 706-733-1192. jkneuker@edsaugusta. com. Enrichment Camps. Rising 1st-5th. June 11-15, 18-22, 25-29, July 9-13, 16-20, and 23-27. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $110-$125 per week. Traditional summer day camp. www.augustafamily.com

EDS Sports Camps. Rising 1st-8th. June 11-15, 18-22, 25-29, July 9-13, 16-20 and 23-27. Afternoons. $110-$125 per week. Basketball, soccer, dance, cheerleading, volleyball, disc golf and more.

Family Music of Augusta

www.familymusicofaugusta.org. Kathleen Haley, 706-955-7819. Early-bird discount: Deduct $5 from materials fee if paid before May 8. Ask about sibling discounts. Also available: Piano 1.5, beginning keyboard and flute lessons. Nimble and Quick. Ages 1-5. June 12-July 5. 1010:45 a.m., Tuesday and Thursday. $75 plus materials or pay per class. Nursery rhymes come to life for children and their parents. Lots of movement for the toddlers while challenging the 3-and-ups with language development. Music Makers at the Seashore. Ages 4-6. June 12-July 5. 11 a.m.-noon, Tuesday and Thursday. $85 plus materials or pay per class. Singing, playing instruments in ensemble, early music-reading, lots of movement, storytelling, listening, dancing and art activities. Piano Review. Current students or those with some playing experience. June 5, 12, 26, July 10, 17, 31. Advanced 1-2 p.m., Intermediate 1:30-2:30. $80 or pay per class, no materials fee. Review of keyboard skills, plus theory games, drumming, dancing, etc. Introduction to Percussion. Rising 5th-7th graders. June 18-22. 2:15-3 p.m. $65 plus materials. Emphasis placed on bells and snare drum with other percussion instruments introduced. Proper stick and mallet technique, steady beat, rhythm reading, snare drum rudiments and ensemble work will be taught. Introduction to Piano. Ages and up by 3/1/12. June 18-22. 1-2 p.m. $65 plus mater6 ials. For beginning pianists. Uses singing and movement as well as keyboard activities to help children learn to play the piano. Strongly recommended for new students planning to enroll in Keyboard I in the fall. A second session may be added at the end of summer. Music in My Neighborhood. Ages 4-7. Morning mini-camp. Explore the music made by people and animals who live right in our neighborhood. Activities include singing, moving, listening, playing instruments, stories, dancing, outdoor activities and nature crafts each


Family Y

www. thefamilyy.org. 706-922-9622. Financial assistance is available for all Family Y programs. Camp Lakeside. www.camplakeside. 706-922-9595. The following camps are held at Camp Lakeside— Eighty-eight acres on the banks of J. Strom Thurmond Lake in Lincolnton.

Camp Lakeside Day Camps Adventure Day Camp. Ages 7-14. May 21-August 10. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.$120 per week member, $150 week non-member. Experience everything from swimming to canoeing to archery to camp games. Arts and crafts, sports and environmental education. Separate activities for boys and for girls. Kinder Day Camp. Ages 5-6. May 21-August 10. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Go hiking, swimming, canoeing, play sports and other fun camp activities. Included is a snack time, reading time, arts and crafts and rest time. Counselor in Training (C.I.T.) Day Camp. Ages 15-17. May 21-June 8, June 11-29. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $240 Y members, $315 non-members. Campers in the C.I.T. program must complete three weeks of training to earn the C.I.T.

badge. Then C.I.T.s are given a reduced camp rate and paired with a counselor.

vival, camp cooking and more. Includes an overnight canoe/kayak trip to a private campground.

Camp Lakeside Resident Camps

Explorers. Girls ages 9-15. July 22-26. $180 for Y members, $210 for nonmembers. A four-day extended slumber party with fun, games, skits, songs and excitement while learning about self-esteem, friendships and personal value. Enjoy favorite activities, learn new skills, make new friends and reconnect with old ones.

Tiny Trekkers. Ages 7-8. July 4-7. $180 for Y members, $210 for nonmembers. Four days full of fun and excitement and enough stories to last a lifetime. Co-ed. Pathfinders. Ages 9-10 and Trailblazers Ages 1112. One week sessions June 3-30. $299 for Y members, $375 for non-members. Campers enjoy age-specific activities and fun and stay in age-specific cabins. Co-ed. Leaders-In-Training (LIT). Ages 14-17. June 17-30. $299 for Y members, $375 for non-members for the entire two-week session. LITs get the best of both worlds—they are campers and they learn valuable skills. The best LITs are selected to become future summer staff (once they are of age). Space is limited and requires an application process. To apply, please contact the Camp Lakeside office.

Other Family Y Branch Day Camps Day camps are also offered at the following Family Y branches. Call each branch or check the Family Y Web site for details. Family Y Child Development Center. Age 4. May 21-August 3. $90 per week members, 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. $100 per week non-members. Campers participate in education enrichment activities that teach confidence, encourage self-expression and enrich social development in a state licensed facility.

Pioneer Camp. Boys ages 9-11. July 8-12. $180 for Y members, $210 for non-members. Learn the basics of camp cooking and fire building, Native American traditions and invent your own game. Camp ends with a canoe/kayak trip to a private campground to set up camp for the night.

Camp Marshall. Ages 5-12. May 21-August 3. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $85 per week members, $110 per week non-members. Campers will enjoy arts and crafts, games and sports, weekly field trips, devotion and character development activities. Location: Wesley United Methodist Church.

Adventurers Primitive Camp. Boys ages 12-14. July 15-19. $180 for Y members, $210 for non-members. Adventurers will learn to set-up camp, use a compass, basic wilderness sur-

Camp North Augusta. Ages 5-12. June 4-August 10. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $80 per week members, $110 per week non-members. Campers will enjoy arts and crafts, games and sports, field trips, devotions and character develop- u

Photo Courtesy of Family Y

day. See web site for more details about this July camp.

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Augusta Family | April 2012 • 31


ment activities. Mossy Creek Elementary School. North Augusta Family Y Specialty Camps. Ages 5-12. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $90 per week members, $120 per week non-members. Dance Camp: June 11-15. Art Camp: June 18-22, July 30-August 3. Sports Galore Camp: June 25-29, July 23-27. Baking Camp: July 9-13. Construction Camp: July 16-20. Leaders In Training, Ages 13-17, June 11-August 10, $60 per week members, $75 per week non-members. Mossy Creek Elementary School. Camp Augusta South. Ages 5-7. May 21-August 3. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $65 per week members, $85 per week non-members. Campers will enjoy arts and crafts, games songs, interactive skits, character development activities and more. Augusta South Family Y.

p.m. $80 per week members. $110 per week non-members. Aiken County Family Y. Family Y of Aiken County Specialty Camps. Ages 5-12. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $90 per week members. $115 per week non-members. Sports Camp: June 11-15. Dance Camp: June 25-29. Art Camp: June 18-22. Waterworks Camp: July 9-13, July 23-27. Aiken County Family Y. Camp Y130. Ages 5-12. May 21-August 3. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $65 per week members, $75 per week non-members. Campers will enjoy arts and crafts, games, songs, field trips and character development activities. Y130 Center in Thomson and Dearing Elementary School. Y130 Center Specialty Camps. Gymnastics Camp, Ages 5-17, July 9-13. Times vary depending on skill level, Art Camp, Ages 7-11, July 30-August 3. Clay Camp, Ages 10-14, June 18-22. Tennis Camp, Ages 5-12, June 11-15. Golf Camp, Ages 5-12, Session July 16-20. $40 per week members, $60 per week non-members.

Camp Aiken. Ages 5-12. June 4-August 3. 9 a.m.-4

Camp Wilson. Ages 7-12. May 21-August 3. 9

Wilson Family Y Specialty Camps. Little Tykes Mini Camp, Ages 3-4, May 21-August 3, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., $55 per week members, $75 per week non-members. Traditional Camp, Ages 5-6, May 21–August 3, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., $110 per week members, $150 per week non-members. Teen Leadership Camp, Call for details.

First Baptist Church

3500 Walton Way Ext. www.fbcaugusta.org. Patti Fowler, 706-731-5366. Registration: Friday, April 13 in the Preschool Building hallway from 9-10 a.m. Camps are held for eight weeks from May 22-July 19, with no camp June 4-8 due to vacation Bible school. 9:30 a.m.1:30 p.m, Tuesday & Thursday. Summer Playcation Days. Babies to age 4. $176.

Photo Courtesy of Augusta State University Continuing Education

Camp Southside Tubman. Ages 8-12. May 21-August 3. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $65 per week members, $85 per week non-members. Campers will enjoy arts and crafts, games songs, interactive skits, character development activities and more. Southside Tubman Branch. Bring lunch, snack, drink.

a.m.-4 p.m. $110 per week members, $150 per week non-members. Begin and end each day in a traditional camp setting where campers will have the opportunity to be challenged in one specialty breakout session weekly. Wilson Family Y.

32 • Augusta Family | April 2012

www.augustafamily.com


Climber’s Club. Rising kindergartners and 1st graders. $224. Reinforces academic skills to prepare children for the coming year through small and large group experiences and individualized opportunities.

The First Tee

3165 Damascus Rd. www.thefirstteeaugusta.org. 706-364-4654. Open Camps I, II and III. Ages 8-18. June 4-8, Open Camp I. June 11-15, Open Camp II. June 1822, Open Camp III. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. $50 week/members, $125 week/non-members. All skill levels are welcome. Instruction tailored to the level of each student. Focus on golf fundamentals for various skill levels. Instruction will focus on all the basics of the golf swing, correct grip, stance, alignment and swing. Campers will work on putting, chipping, pitching and full swing. Campers will have several opportunities to play holes on the course and enjoy fun competitions.

Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art www.ghia.org. rhenry@ghia.org or 706-722-5495.

Morning Art Camp. Ages 5-11. June 4-8, 11-15 and 18-22 at Quest Church, 4020 Washington Rd., Martinez. June 25-29, July 9-13 and 16-20 at Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art, 506 Telfair Street. 10 a.m.-noon. $65 per week members, $80 per week non-members. Summer Art Camp 2012 with the theme The World of Imagination, creating projects inspired by the art of Vincent van Gogh, Jan van Eyck, Larry Rivers, Lenora Carrington and others. Whether your young artists prefer working with pencil and paint or creating 3-D projects, there is a camp option to match their interests! Curriculum choices include drawing, painting and mixed media and sculpture. Instruction will focus on the use of color, line, shape and form, space and texture as it applies to each of these concentrations. All supplies will be provided. Afternoon Art Camp. Ages 5-12. June 25-29, July 9-13, July 16-20. 12:45-2:45 p.m. $65 per week members, $80 per week non-members. An opportunity for campers to explore specific mediums of art, including clay, weaving and photography. Offered at the Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art, 506 Telfair Street.

Girl Scouts of Historic Georgia

www.gshg.org. Cheryl Hecker, 706-863-0764. Choose from one of five Girl Scout summer camps throughout the state of Georgia where you will have a blast discovering the world around you. Camp Tanglewood, located in Columbia County, will be offering week-long resident and day camps. Each session has its own theme. Not a Girl Scout or member of a traditional Girl Scout troop? No problem. All girls ages 6-17 are welcome. Check Web site for dates of Camp Tanglewood Open House.

Gymnastics Gold

124 Cedar Lane, Martinez.

www.gymnasticsgold.com. 706-650-2111. Camp Flip Flop. Ages 4-13. May 21-August 3. Daily from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Early drop-off at 7:30 a.m. and late pick-up at 5:30 p.m. for no additional charge. No special equipment needed. Gymnastics, games, movies, arts and crafts with a different theme per week. Please call for specific dates and pricing. Half-Day Preschool Camp. Ages 3-5. Please call for specific dates and pricing.

Haydens Gymnastics Academy 4300 Evans To Locks Rd., Evans. www.haydensgym.com. 706-868-0608.

Camp Haydens. Ages 5 and up. Eight one-week sessions during June and July. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Half-day available. Early drop-off and late pick-up available. $55 registration fee. Each week explores a new theme through arts, crafts, games, movies, swimming and gymnastics. Camp cost varies due to drop-off and pick-up. Junior Camp Haydens. Ages 2-4. Tuesday-Thursday, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Six one-week camps. $20 per day. Junior camps explore the same themes as older campers, but through an age-appropriate curriculum.

Hickory Hill Plantation

502 Hickory Hill Drive, Hickory Hill Farm, Thomson. 706-595-7777. www.hickory-hill.org. Sydney Peden, sfpeden@hickory-hill.org. Dig History Archeology Camp. Ages 11-17. July 9-13 and July 23-27 (second session is Advanced Camp for those who have attended before). 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $60 per week. Children will participate in survey, excavation, artifact analysis and prehistoric hunting methods. Eco-Adventures Camp. Ages 10-16. June 11-15 and June 25-29. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $60 per week. Campers will learn to test water for pollution, meet Georgia native critters, learn about organic farming, and more.

H. Odell Weeks Center

1700 Whiskey Rd., Aiken. www.cityofaikensc.gov. 803-642-7631. Summer Adventures Day Camp. Ages 5-12 at the start of the session. Weekly camps June 4-August 17. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. $60 per session ($48 July2-6), $77.50 for out-of-city residents who do not have a recreation membership. Themed sessions with sports, swimming, games, special guests and arts and crafts. Extended care available for additional fee. Campers must bring a snack, drink and sack lunch daily. Extended camp from 3-5:30 p.m. available for $5 per child. Register on-line or at the Weeks Center beginning April 1. 50 percent deposit per child at time of registration.

Hilltop Riding Stables www.augustafamily.com

North Range Road, Fort Gordon. www.fortgordon.com. 706-791-4864. Horse Camps. Ages 7-13. May 29-June 1, June 4-8, 11-15, 18-22, 25-29, July 9-13, 16-20, 23-27 and July 30-August 3. 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $200 for active duty military, Department of Defense employees and retired military. $225 for others. May 29-June 1 is $160 for active duty military, Department of Defense employees and retired military, $180 for others. Learn horse grooming, saddling, bridling and bathing. Take part in arts and crafts, outdoor recreation, arena and trail riding, swimming.

Just 4 Kidz

846 Edgefield Road, North Augusta. 803-341-9371 or 803-634-2393. Weekly Camps. June 4-August 10. Ages 4 and up. Extended day available beginning at 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. Field trips, lunch and afternoon snack included. Pickup available in certain areas. Call for complete details.

Kane & Co

4321 Evans To Lock Rd., Evans. www.kanecodance.com 706-447-9007. Summer Dance Camps. Dance your way into summer fun. Princes Power Camp, ages 3-5, June 1822. Rockin’ Rockstarz, ages 6-9, July 9-13. Glamour Girls, ages 6-9, July 9-13. $100 per week.

Kindermusik by Musical Impressions, Inc.

Martinez United Methodist Church, Washington Rd. Nancy Cleveland, 706-228-4877 or musimp@bellsouth. net. Summer Adventure Camps. June and July. Ages 18 months to 7 years.

Kindermusik of Augusta

www.kindermusikofaugusta.com. Nichole Kuehl, 706-724-9641. Summer Camps and Programs. Ages 0-7. St. John United Methodist Church, Greene St. Check Web site for more information.

Kingdom Kids Development Center

Beulah Grove Baptist Church Building of Opportunities. 1434 Poplar Street. Calandra Brown, 706-724-1086. Kid Zone. Ages 4-12. July 9-August 10. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. $90 per week. A creative, fun-filled spiritual summer of activities that includes theme weeks and field trips.

Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History

1005 Broad St. 706-724-3576. Summer Camp 2012. Ages 6-12. $125 per week. June 4-8 and 11-15. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fun and educational classes with a range of activities. Scholarships are available for those who qualify. Registration and fees are due by May 14. u Augusta Family | April 2012 • 33


MACH Academy

Fleming Tennis Center, 1850 Chester Ave. www.machacademy.com. 706-796-5046. mparks37@comcast.net. Scholarships are available. Summer Tennis Camp. Ages 5-17. May 28-July 20. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $100 per week per person, includes lunch and supplies. Comprehensive tennis education to help develop a genuine love for the game and respect for the ideals of good sportsmanship. Reach for the Stars Summer Camp. Ages 5-17. 9 a.m-5 p.m. May 28-July 20. $100 per week, includes lunch and supplies. Academic enrichment, technology, career exploration, college planning, nutrition, fitness, tennis instruction and more. Beginner Tennis: Catch the Tennis Bug. Ages 4-9. May 28-July 20. Mondays and Tuesdays only. 6-8 p.m. $25 per week. Games and drills designed to introduce tennis as a fun game for a lifetime. High Performance Summer Tennis Camp. Ages 6-18 (intermediate and advanced players). May 28-July 20. Mondays and Tuesdays only. 6-8 p.m. $50 per week. Individual player development. Trainers/ coaches will use a variety of effective training methods to help participants achieve high performance development and winning results.

M.A.E.S. Education Center

4116 Evans To Locks Rd., Evans. www.maeseducationcenter.com. 706-860-8585. Private instruction can be scheduled upon request. SAT/ACT Intensive Course in Reading Comprehension /Writing. To prepare for the June 2nd SAT. May 23-27. 1-4 p.m. $425. SAT/ACT Intensive MATH Course. To Prepare for the June 2nd SAT. May 21-25, 4-5:30 p.m. $215. Discount available if registering for both courses. SAT/ACT Reading Comprehension. June 4-8, July 9-13, July 16-20. 3-5 p.m. $295. Also offering oncea-week sessions June 11-July 23, 3-5 p.m., Mondays. No classes June 25 or July 2. $295. SAT/ACT Math. June 18-22 or July 9-13. 3-5 p.m. Also offering once-a-week sessions on Tuesdays from 3-5 p.m. $295. No classes on June 26 or July 3. SAT Writing. June 18-22 or July 9-13. 1-3 p.m. Once-a-week sessions June 13-July 25, 1-3 p.m., Wednesdays. No classes June 27 or July 4. $295. Math 1 and Math 2 Review or Preview. 9th & 10th grade math. July 23-27. 3-5 p.m. $295. Weekly sessions may be available. Call to inquire. 34 • Augusta Family | April 2012

Writing College Essays. Rising 12th. July 30-August 3. 3-5 p.m. $295. Focus will be identifying essay topics and developing personal statements for college applications and scholarships. “Get Ahead.” Sessions for students taking AP Classes next year. Grades 9-12. Our sessions will provide instruction and guidance for AP Summer Reading and will prepare students for success in AP classes. Call to request information, dates and cost. Study Skills and Organization. Middle school-rising 9th. July 30-Aug 2. 1-3 p.m. $185. Identifying personal study techniques and organizational strategies. Middle School Math Review and Preview. 6th-8th. June 18-22 or July 9-13. 1-3 p.m. $195 per session. Review basic concepts to retain skills and to prepare for success next year. Middle School Writers Workshop and Grammar Review. June 11-15, 1-3 p.m., June18-22, 1-3 p.m., July 9-13, 3-5 p.m., July 16-20, 1-3 p.m., June 14-July 26, 1-3 p.m., Thursdays. $195 per session. No Classes June 28 or July 5. Review basic grammar and writing techniques using a variety of writing styles while building vocabulary. Elementary Reading Comprehension. Grades 1st-5th. June 4-8, 1-3 p.m. June 11-15, 3-5 p.m., July 16-20, 1-3 p.m. July 23-27, 3-5 p.m. June 14-July 26, 1-2 p.m., Thursdays. $195 per session. Using appropriate level resources and CRCT guidelines, students will practice reading comprehension strategies to improve fluency and comprehension. No classes June 28 or July 5. Elementary Math Review and Preview. Grades 1st-5th. June 1-8, 3-5 p.m. June 11-15, 1-3 p.m. July 16-20 3-5 p.m. July 23-27, 1-3 p.m. Once-a-week sessions on Wednesdays from 3-5p.m. $195 per session. Students will review math concepts and practice skills that are essential for success at their level. No classes June 27 or July 4.

Martinez Elementary School www.campinvention.com. 706-863-8308.

Camp Invention Envision Program. Rising 1st-6th. June 4-8. 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $215. Explore the power of magnetism. Build boats, buildings and towers. This is a nationally recognized program that focuses on fun ways to incorporate math and science with handson summertime activities. Camp Invention Encounter Program. Rising 1st-6th. June 11-15. 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $215. Use problem-solving skills to recover the lost treasure. Create a shelter, cross a volcano, feed a hungry islander and navigate a booby-trapped passage. This is a nationally recognized program that focuses on fun www.augustafamily.com

ways to incorporate math and science with hands-on summertime activities.

Musical Theater Workshop

3833 Martinez Blvd., Martinez. www.onwiththeshow.biz. Mickey Lubeck, 706-231-1759. Theater Camps. Ages 7-11, June 11-15. Ages 12-17, June 25-29. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $125 first child, $100 second child. Improvisation, theater games, singing, dancing, acting technique, monologues, scenes. Performance on Friday night of camp week at 6:30.

Newman Tennis Center 3103 Wrightsboro Rd. 706-821-1600.

Summer Tennis Lessons. 9-10 a.m. $60 per session. Session I: May 22, 23, 24, 29, 30, 31. Session II: June 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14. Session III: June 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28. Session IV: July 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19. Ultimate Tennis and Swim Camp. Ages 9 and up. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. A program for youth to learn or improve their existing game and have fun. Individual instruction. Beginners to tournament-level players. Swimming daily at the Augusta Aquatics Center. $170. FREE Family Membership with signup. Camp I: May 21-25. Camp II: June 4-8. Camp III: June 11-15. Camp IV: June 18-22. Camp V: June 25-29. Camp VI: July 9-13. Camp VII: July 16-20. Camp VIII: July 30-August 30. Learn tennis or improve your existing game through individual instruction and game play.

Oxford Learning Center

536 Washington Rd., Suite 4, Eagle Pt. Shopping Center, Evans. 706-650-2225. Summer Brain Camp. Preschool-6th grade. June 4-last week of summer break. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Skills improvement in language arts, math, art, music and science.

Petersburg Racquet Club

421 The Pass, Martinez. www.prctennis.com 706-860-9288. Tennis Camp. Juniors all ages and skill levels. Nine weeks beginning in May. 9 a.m.-noon. Tennis followed by free swim. Information will be posted on Web site.

Portman’s Music Academy 4020 Washington Rd., Martinez. 706-738-1651.

Music Camp. Ages 7-11. June 11-15. 9:30 a.m.noon. $145. Spend a week exploring instrumental music through rhythm, melody, harmony, tone color and form. Also an introduction to playing the piano.


Guitar Camp. Rising 4th-6th graders, May 2125, June 18-22, July 16-20. Rising 7th-9th graders, June 4-8, June 23-27. 9:30 a.m.-noon. $145 per week. Introduction to the most popular instrument in North America. Students will learn basic chording, tuning, changing strings and an introduction to reading music and lead playing. Rock Camp. Ages 12-17. June 20-24. 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. $250. For students who want to play in a rock band! Meet other players just like you while taking your playing to another level. Players must have at least one year musical experience. Jumpstart to Beginning Band. 6th grade and up. July 30-August 3. 10 a.m.-noon. $145. For students with no band experience. Students will learn key signatures, time signatures, note names and values and rhythm. Sight-Reading Made Easy. 7th grade and up. July 30-August 3. 1-3 p.m. $145. For students with band experience. Students will strengthen their sight-reading skills as well as learn advanced scales and music composition.

Robert Sapp Baseball Camps Sweetwater Park, Thomson. www.robertsappbaseballcamp.com

Baseball Camp. Ages 7-14. June 25-June 29. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $130. Team rates available. Teaching the fundamentals correctly and emphasizing that baseball should be fun. Also emphasize improving work habits, discipline, sportsmanship and social skills. Softball Camp. Girls ages 7-14. June 25-June 29. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $130. Team rates available. Topnotch instruction in all aspects of the game. Same format as their traditional baseball camp.

Ruth Patrick Science Education Center

www.campinvention.org. John Hutchens, 800-968-4332 or johnh@usca.edu. campinvention@invent.org. Camp Invention. Rising 1st-6th graders. June 18-June 22. 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $190 by March 30, $215 after. Led by local educators, the weeklong Camp Invention program immerses elementary school children in exciting hands-on activities disguised as fun, summer activities. Participants spend their time navigating an island via upcycled ships, learning the power of combining magnetism and electricity, while developing and designing inventions with their peers. Each lesson explores connections between science, technology, engineering and innovation. Bring lunch.

Salvation Army Kroc Center 1833 Broad Street, Augusta. www.krocaugusta.org. 706.364.KROC or info@krocaugusta.org

Themed Camps. Thirteen different themed camps for ages 5-12. The Amazing Race May 21-25. Challenge Week, May 28-June 1. Raiders of the Lost Kroc, June 4-8. Hawaiian Hullabaloo, June 11-15. Water World, June 18-22. Kroc Star Olympics, June 25-29. Too Fit to Quit, July 2-6. Christmas in July, July 0-13. Game Show Mania, July 23-27. Tons of Talent, July 30-August 3. Everything 80’s, August 6-10 Around the World, August 13-17. Members $125, Nonmembers $150.

St. John Choir Camp

St. John United Methodist Church, Greene Street. www.stjohnaugusta.org. Jamie Garvey, 706-724-9641. Junior Choir Camp. Rising 1st-7th graders. July 16-22. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. With guest director Tom Long. Instruction in singing, movement, hand bells and drama. Includes lake party. Culminating in Sunday service.

Stephanie’s Dancers

717 Industrial Park Dr., Evans. www.stephaniesdancers.com. 706-650-0366. stdancers@aol.com. Call or visit web site for camps and details.

Symphony Orchestra Augusta

Sue Alexanderson, 706-738-7527. Symphony Orchestra Augusta, 706-826-4705 or walexanderson@comcast.net. Collage Creative Arts Camp. Rising K-5. May 21-25. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. At The Vineyard, 3126 Parrish Road. June 11-15 and June 18-22. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. At Woodlawn UMC, 2220 Walton Way. $125 per week. Sponsored by Friends of Symphony Orchestra Augusta. 2012 marks the 31st year of summer camp. Winner of the Gold and Silver awards from the League of American Orchestras. Brass, woodwind, string and percussion instruments, plus drama, art, weaving, chorus, movement, puppetry, story-telling and creative writing. Six different “hands-on” classes each week.

University of South Carolina Aiken

USCA Office of Continuing Education. 471 University Parkway. www.usca.edu/kidsincollege. 803-641-3563. lauraa@usca.edu.or maryanc@usca. edu. Summer Day Camps. USCA offers a wide variety of half-day summer camps beginning June 11. Preregistration is required. Camps include: Beginning Tennis, Battle Bots (Lego Camp), Vehicle Engineering (Lego Camp), Art Party, Real World Solutions, Super-Science, Hoopla!, Eco-Crafts Sampler, Young Writers, Even Younger Writers!, CSI Chemistry, Study Skills for Middle School, Brush-up on Math, Brush-up on Reading (2nd and 3rd graders only), and Health & Wellness Camp. E-mail for the complete brochure which includes descriptions, dates, prices and ages accommodated. School Web site will be updated with the complete brochure in April. www.augustafamily.com

Very Vera

3113 Washington Rd., Augusta. 706-860-3492. http://veryvera.com/school/ School of Good Taste Summer Cooking Camp. Beginner, ages 8-10, June 4-8 or 11-15, $225. Advanced Beginner, age 11-14 and never attended cooking camp, June 18-22 or 25-29, $250. Intermediate, for those who have attended Beginner or Advanced Beginner Camp, July 9-13 or 16-20, $250. Advanced, for those who have attended two years of camp, July 23-27, $250. Advanced Plus, for those who have completed three years of camp, July 30-August 3, $250. Tuition includes a cookbook, daily snack and lunch and lessons in the kitchen.

Westminster Schools of Augusta 3067 Wheeler Rd. 706-751-5260. Go to www.wsa.net for complete camp details.

Camp Wildcat. Rising grades K-5. June 4-8, June 11-15, June 18-22, June 25-29, July 16-20, July 2327. Full day 9:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m., half day 9:00 a.m.noon or 12:30-3:30 p.m. $200 full day, $115 half day. Grouped by grade levels. Daily devotions and prayer, games, indoor and outdoor activities and more in the morning. Afternoons include one activity plus swimming at the Aquatic Center on Damascus Road. Extended hours available.

Lower School Academic Courses Jump Start for Lower School Students. Rising K-5th. Dates and times vary per grade. $150. Jump Start is an exciting one week class, designed to give your child a “Jump Start” to the grade level he or she will be entering in the fall of 2012.

Enrichment Classes Chinese Language and Culture Camp. Rising 3rd-6th. June 25-29. 9 a.m.-noon. $150. Learn the foundational basics of speaking, listening and writing Mandarin Chinese. Crazy Science. Rising 4th-6th. June 18-June 22. 12:30-3:30 p.m. $175. A hands-on class that stimulates interest in science. Activities will involve concepts of life science, chemistry, physics and more. Cool demonstrations, edible activities and a few competitive challenges. Spanish Language and Culture Camp. Rising 5th-7th. July 16-20. 9 a.m.-noon. $155. Learn key vocabulary words and conversational phrases in conjunction with learning culture. Modern Dance. Rising 3rd-12th. June 25-June 29. 12:30-3:30 p.m. $150. Basic skills of modern dance. Fundamentals of movement, stretching and rhythm. Dance to several musical styles—jazz, contemporary and techno. No previous experience is required. Con- u Augusta Family | April 2012 • 35


cludes with a mini-recital the last day of the camp. Robo Camp. Rising 5th-8th. June 11-15. 9 a.m.noon. $175. Excite middle school children about math, science and teamwork using robotics as a teaching tool. Students will be introduced to the NXT line of Lego Robotics and practice building and programming with light, touch, ultrasonic and sound sensors. Culminates with a training mission to the fictional planet to design and program robots to help accomplish tasks. Summer Ceramics. Rising 5th-8th. June 4-15. 9 a.m.-noon. $325. Learn basic and advanced techniques in clay building. Create six to eight completed works. Creating a cup by throwing on the kick wheel. Students will also meet with a local sculptor. You Can Act. Rising 4th-7th. June 25-29. 9 a.m.-noon. $150. Learn the basics of acting through theatre games, group activities, improvisation and pantomime. The week ends with a hilarious performance from the entire group. Short Stories. Rising 8th-12th. June 11-22. 10 a.m.noon. $260. Structured to help students improve their analytical reading and writing skills while exposing them to the world of publishing. Sculpture. Rising 8th-12th. June 4-15. 12:30 p.m.3:30 p.m. $325. Students learn advanced techniques in 3D art, create completed works and learn about the history of sculpture.

Athletic Camps All-Sport Camp. Rising K-2nd. June 13-17. 8:30 a.m.noon. $150. Introduces boys and girls to a variety of sports in age-appropriate short segments of time. Baseball Fun-damentals. Rising 1st-4th. June 4-8. 9 a.m.-noon. $150. Learn the fundamentals of baseball in an age-appropriate, fun and challenging curriculum. Learn to throw, catch, field and hit while engaging in a fun atmosphere filled with game play, devotionals and prayer. Baseball: Advanced Skills and Strategies. Rising 5th-8th. June 4-8. 9 a.m.-noon. $150. Professionallevel instruction tailored to ability and experience level. Basketball: Advanced Skills and Strategies for Boys. Rising 5th-8th. May 29-June 1. 12:30-4 p.m. $150. Advanced individual and team concepts along with daily devotionals and game play. Professional-level instruction by a top-level collegiate coach. Basketball: Advanced Skills and Strategies for Girls. Rising 5th-8th. May 29-June 1. 12:30-4 p.m. $150. Advanced individual and team concepts along with daily devotionals and game play. Professional-level instruction by a top-level collegiate coach. Basketball Fun-damentals for Boys. Rising 1st-4th. May 29-June 1. 9 a.m.-noon. $150. A week of skill 36 • Augusta Family | April 2012

development. Learn the fundamentals of shooting, dribbling, rebounding, passing and defense. Basketball Fun-damentals for Girls. Rising 2nd-5th. June 18-22. 9 a.m.-noon. $150. A week of skill development. Learn the fundamentals of shooting, dribbling, rebounding, passing and defense. Cheerleading: Lower School. Rising 1st-5th. June 4-8, June 11-15. 9 a.m.-noon. $150 per session. Skill development and team building. Focus on motions, tumbling, stunting and jumping. Learn material for a performance at the end of the week. Cheerleading: Middle School/JV. Rising 6th9th. June 4-8, June 11-15. 9 a.m.-noon. $150 per session. Skill development and team building. Focus on motions, tumbling, stunting and jumping. Soccer Fundamentals. Rising 1st-4th. July 2327. 9 a.m.-noon. $150. Focuses on individual instruction, technical training and small sided games to improve each player’s abilities and confidence. Football: Advanced Skills and Strategies. Rising 5th-8th. July 18-22. 9 a.m.-noon. $150. Skill development and team building. Players will be submersed in the team offensive and defensive strategies that they will use in the fall. Daily devotionals and prayer time by the coaching staff. Football Fun-damentals. Rising 1st-4th. June 2529. 9 a.m.-noon. $150. Fundamentals of tackling, blocking, passing and catching. Individual positions, as well as team offence and defense concepts will also be taught. Soccer: Advanced Skills and Strategies. Rising 5th-8th. July 23-27. 9 a.m.-noon. $150. Individual instruction, technical training and small-sided games to improve each player’s abilities and confidence. Perfect for preparation for the upcoming school and club seasons for boys and girls.

Middle and Upper School Academic Courses SAT Prep. Rising 10th-12th. June 25-29. 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $300. This course will build confidence and knowledge in preparing for the SAT course. For more information, contact Mrs. Weidman at mweidman@wsa.net. Drivers Education. Age 15 by July 15, 2012. May 31-June 3, plus 6 driving hours to be scheduled. 8 a.m.4 p.m. $400. Thirty hours of classroom instruction, 6 hours of driving time. Instruction will take place May 29-June 1, at the Westminster Upper School. Classroom instruction attendance is mandatory to participate. Driving hours will be scheduled around the student’s summer schedule during the first week of class. Enrollment limited to the first 30 students who return the registration www.augustafamily.com

form and deposit. Full payment is due by May 1, 2011. Math Review. Rising 8th-12th. July 16-27. $325. Designed to prepare students for the rigors of the Upper School math courses. These comprehensive courses focus on pre-algebra (grades 8-9) and algebra I and algebra II (grades 9-12). Please contact Mrs. Cantrell at mcantrell@wsa.net for assistance and placement questions. Study Skills. Rising 6th-8th. July 16-20. 9 a.m.noon. $130. Focuses on organization, time management, goal setting, note-taking, testing, essay writing and study skills. Writer’s Workshop. Rising 8th-12th. July 16-27. 10 a.m.-noon. $250. Intensive writing instruction to equip students with tools of structure and style. This high energy class improves the writing of all students.

Three-Day Camps with a Cause Cooking and Crafts. Rising K-8th. June 5-7. 1:30-3:30 p.m. $60. For campers of all cooking levels. Campers will take new recipes home in their own personalized recipe book. Photography for Kids. Rising 2-7th. June 1921. 1:30-3:30 p.m. $60. Ideal for any beginning photographer. Learn the basic elements of photography, from how to compose shots to how to edit. Jewelry Making. Rising 3rd-8th. June 19-21. 1:303:30 p.m.. $60. Learn exciting techniques for creating jewelry from basic objects.

Whole Life Ministries

2621 Washington Rd. www.wholelife.org. 706-737-4530. Journey 2012 Youth Camp. Ages 13-18. July 2-7. Overnight camp. Call for details. KidRiffic Summer Program. June 4-29. Ages 5-12, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Ages 1-4, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Activities include water games, bowling, movies, gym games, Kid’s church and more. Early drop off and late pickup at no additional cost. Call for details.

A World of Hope Christian Learning Center New Hope Baptist Church of Harlem. 671 Robinson Ave., Grovetown. 706-868-8955.

Summer Enrichment Camp. Ages 4-12. Weekly sessions beginning the week after school ends. 5:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Academic adventures providing activities to maintain the academic progress your child has made during the school year, while taking advantage of fun summer activities. Indoor and outdoor adventures are planned. Call or visit their Web site for details.

Camp information is provided by the organizations listed and is subject to change.


Summer Fun

www.augustafamily.com

Augusta Family | April 2012 • 37


Summer

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Fun

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timeout}

by Lucy Adams

Mama Bo Peep and Her Guilty Sheep How To Shear Mom-Guilt From Your Day

I

’m lying in bed listening to the sound of my husband’s soft breath, in and out, in and out. He’s sleeping. I’m not. I try counting sheep, but each one, as it steps forward for numbering, morphs into something I’ve left undone today: The load of laundry, the lemon pie, the game of catch in the front yard, the dog’s afternoon walk, the writing assignment due tomorrow, my husband’s birthday gift. I shoo those impertinent sheep away to the shadowy corners of the paddock. Others approach for me to acknowledge, one at a time. But as I concentrate on falling asleep, these sheep begin to change into all the ways I failed, disappointed or damaged my family: I lost my temper, I burned the baked chicken, I arrived late to the baseball game, I said I was too tired to read out 40 • Augusta Family | April 2012

loud tonight, I discussed grades again at dinner. The sheep surround me, baa-baaing intrusively. The sound of nagging guilt is overwhelming as I stare up at the dark ceiling. Tomorrow I will do better, I promise myself, again, tonight. I’ll make up for everything tomorrow. But tomorrow will come with its own set of responsibilities and demands and very likely my herd of dirty sheep will multiply.

Why the Guilt? “There’s so much to feel guilty about,” says Jessica LeRoy, M.A., M.F.T., executive director of the Center for the Psychology of Women in Los Angeles. “You can feel guilty about everything.” What is the point of all this guilt, though? Or www.augustafamily.com

even just a portion of it? For early humans, explains Amy House, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Psychology and Health Behavior at Georgia Health Sciences University, guilt was an adaptation that enabled them to stay in groups. Living within a group increased chances of survival. Guilt spurred cohabitants to treat each other fairly and to make amends for wrongs. It helped them maintain beneficial cooperative relationships. Today, we find ourselves part and parcel to many small groups, each with unique demands: family, work, clubs, committees. And that ancient emotion, guilt, still provides cues for balancing satisfaction of our own needs against meeting the needs of others. “Guilt really comes from a mismatch between what our moral code is and


what we actually do,” says Dr. House. When we don’t live up to internalized expectations, we feel guilty. It prods us to do the right thing.

Motherhood’s Guilty Little Secret Women, particularly mothers, are subject to a whole host of expectations, some reasonable, some not so much. “This is possibly one of the first generations where, as women, we are expected to do it all—be an amazing mom, amazing career woman, amazing spouse, amazing homemaker,” says LeRoy. Not only that, but many of the social expectations women internalize and accept as standards of measurement for success are contradictory. For example, norms dictate that mothers should be the primary caregivers for their children, while at the same time society tends to diminish the contributions of the stay-at-home mom. “In that environment how could we not feel guilty?” poses Dr. House. By the same token, a working mother blames her child’s misbehavior on her absence and a stay-at-home mom blames her child’s misbehavior on her inept parenting. Unreasonable standards stage inevitable defeat and subsequent self-blame. But women look around themselves, at their friends, their co-workers, their female relatives, moms in the grocery store and see other women who are doing it all, well. At least, that’s what they think they see. Relax. Let that notion go. Like a magician’s sleight of hand, it’s an illusion. LeRoy assures her clients, “Actually, no one is doing it that well. It’s not possible to do it all.” Repeat: It’s. Not. Possible.

Letting Yourself Off the Hook “(Guilt) does make us strive to be better people, sometimes to our detriment. But it pushes us forward and that can really be a positive,” says LeRoy. Guilt, when appraised appropriately can work to a person’s advantage. On the other hand, left to its own devices, “Guilt bullies us into doing things not in our best interest,” says Dr. House. Taking control of guilt relies heavily on taking control of all those internalized standards, norms, values and expectations and reducing them to a meaningful handful. Decreasing the number of expectations we have for ourselves decreases the number of opportunities we have to make negative self-evaluative judgments. Part of that process is to accept that we can’t be everything to everybody. Key in on the people, activities, events and values that are the most impor-

tant, and let go of petty stuff like impressing other people with that homemade lemon ice-box pie. When guilt does rear its ugly head, Dr. House suggests asking the right questions: “Is this guilt useful to me? Is it telling me something important about how I’m living my life?” If the answer is yes, then by all means take corrective action. Make a change. If the answer is no, move on. Either way, don’t wallow in it. According to LeRoy, standing immobile, ankle deep in guilt, can contribute to anxiety, in the form of I’m not good enough, and depression, in the form of I’ll never be good enough. Put guilt in perspective. Sure, your child has to eat a school lunch today because the morning was hectic and you didn’t pack one for him. Will eating chicken nuggets and tater tots on a Wednesday in April be the death of him? Doubt it. Could he benefit from learning to make his own lunch? Probably. “Step back and notice these standards you’re holding yourself to,” says Dr. House. “Do they make sense to you? Are they helpful?” It isn’t always easy to answer those questions on your own. LeRoy and Dr. House both encourage women to surround themselves with friends who are honest, who don’t mind admitting that they experience challenges and sharing how they overcome them. “From what I hear from my clients,” says LeRoy, “one of the major sources of stress is the comparison to peers.” When we associate with and compare ourselves to women who portray a constant face of perfection, we do ourselves a real disservice. Nothing is gained from the relationship except diminished self-worth and the belief that we could do more, do it better and do it while still maintaining everything else. Truly good friends hold our feet to the critical fires that demand attention and they give us permission to extinguish the ones that have us running around fanning the flames but getting nowhere. Tomorrow, I am going to do something differently. When I’m lying in bed waiting for sleep to descend, I’ll shush the bleating of the sheep. I’ll count all that I did during the day to benefit myself, my children, my husband: Prepared dinner, talked out a difficult homework assignment, gave a hug, drove carpool, picked up drycleaning, finished a book, laughed. These are the sheep that keep getting lost from my flock. It’s time to shepherd them home. Lucy Adams is the author of Tuck Your Skirt in Your Panties and Run. She lives in Thomson, GA with her husband and their four children. Email Lucy at lucybgoosey@aol.com and visit her web site, www.IfMama.com. www.augustafamily.com

Augusta Family | April 2012 • 41


inspirationstation}

by Karin Calloway

Running for Natalie Beth Holloway Visits Augusta To Attend Fundraising Run

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ugusta Preparatory Day School students, Maggie McLeod, 18, and Amanda Murphy, 17, love to run. The two cross-country runners channeled that love toward a good cause, the Natalie Holloway Resource Center (NHRC), when they inspired their school, a bevy of sponsors and other students to hold a 5K race to raise money and awareness for the cause. The run, held February 25, brought 230 runners to the Augusta Prep campus, raising more than $8,000 for the NHRC. Plans for the race began in August with student, faculty and community sponsors working together. While the pair knew the run would please Beth Holloway, the mother of Natalie Holloway, the teen who vanished in 2005 while visiting Aruba on a senior class trip, they weren’t sure whether Beth would come to Augusta for the event. But a letter delivered directly to Beth’s home, her address located through a family friend who lives in Birmingham, Ala., brought the bereaved mother to Augusta to speak to the entire Augusta Prep Upper School student body. Beth told the audience that she felt a special connection to students this age, as Natalie was very active in her high school, participating in clubs and the dance team. Natalie had been accepted into the honors program at the University of Alabama with a full scholarship. “She had big plans of living in the dorm and going through sorority rush,” she says. But the events on May 30, 2005, meant those plans would not come to fruition.

photo courtesy of marian yu

A Mother’s Worst Fear

Augusta Prep senior Maggie McLeod (left) and junior Amanda Murphy (right) are pictured with Beth Holloway, who came to Augusta to speak to the students at their school and support a 5K run fundraiser they headed up for the Natalie Holloway Resource Center.

42 • Augusta Family | April 2012

www.augustafamily.com

“I’m here to bring you Natalie’s story,” Beth tells the audience. “It’s still making headlines today. My daughter was kidnapped and murdered on the last night of the trip. I had warned her of the dangers, especially regarding nightclubs and alcohol, date rape drugs. I had talked to her about not leaving her drink unattended.” Beth says she even reviewed safety precautions on their way to the airport. “As parents, we want to make sure our children have everything they need, but just four days later my cell phone rang and in an instant my life was changed forever.” Natalie, who was always on time and where she was expected to be, hadn’t shown up at the airport. Beth immediately went to Aruba and found Natalie’s cell


phone and packed suitcase in her room. “She was last seen leaving a nightclub. She may have thought she was getting into a taxi. Joran van der Sloot, who had claimed to be a 19-year-old tourist in Aruba for the summer, staying at the same hotel as Natalie, told many lies. He was 17, not a tourist and not staying in the hotel.” Beth went to van der Sloot’s house, where he described the sexual contact he had with Natalie in the back of a car while she was falling asleep and waking up. He said he had dropped her off at the hotel, but on the fourth day after arriving in Aruba, at 3 a.m., hotel security knocked on her door and to tell her that there was no sign of Natalie on the security tapes. “Another lie Joran had told us.” People at home and all over the country showed support. Yellow bows were tied to mailboxes all over her hometown. Natalie’s friends made and distributed special prayer bracelets signifying Ecclesiastes 4:12, “Though one may be overpowered, two can defend themselves. A cord of three strands is not quickly broken.” There was an outpouring of support in the community and a “Wall of Hope” was set up for prayers and messages. “I received cards and letters from every one of our states and as far away as Jerusalem.” Over the course of the investigation, Beth says Van der Sloot gave 22 different accounts. He confessed on tape that Natalie was having seizures and that he

wasn’t sure if she was alive or not when he disposed of her body. Beth believes Van der Sloot gave Natalie an overdose of the date rape drug, which produced the seizures. “He just decided to get rid of her. She isn’t his only victim. He murdered another beautiful woman.”

Empowering Students To Make Safety a Priority Beth says she “could have crawled in a hole, but we all have a choice in how to live.” She believes the best choice she can make is to share Natalie’s story, hoping other families can avoid this devastation. “You also have choices to make,” she tells the students. “Don’t leave a group with someone you don’t know. Don’t drink underage. Don’t leave your drink unattended.” Beth explained to the students that parent’s don’t teach them how to stay safe to frighten them, but to make them aware of the dangers out there. “You’re excited about your newfound independence. You’re too old to be guarded by your parents 24 hours a day and too young not to be reminded.” Beth says that everyone should be aware that they are responsible for their own safety. “What if Natalie and a friend had made a plan to leave together?” She cautioned the students not to allow themselves to get in a condition or situation where they no lon-

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ger have control of themselves, such as when they might over-consume alcohol. “You are your best protection,” she says. Beth says she was confident that she had taught Natalie all the things she needed to know, but “she had a false sense of safety—she was too confident and let her guard down for a moment and she vanished.” When traveling out of the country, Beth reminded students that there aren’t the same dedicated law officials as in the U.S. You can’t call 911. She recommends going to www.mayday360.com, an organization she founded that provides services to those traveling abroad. Beth also recommends getting international services activated on your cell phone before leaving our borders. The NHRC has many lists of travel and college safety tips. According to the Web site, www. helpthemissing.org, the center, “focuses on educational programs, including a traveling safe program, crime prevention and encourages careers in the fields of forensic science and law enforcement.” The center also provides assistance to families of missing persons. “Make your own personal safety plan and remember—you have to have your own back,” she says. Karin Calloway is an Evans wife and mother of two and is the editor of Augusta Family Magazine.

Augusta Family | April 2012 • 43


Calendar

Don’t miss this year’s Undercover Artists auction, April 12, to benefit Walton Rehab’s Camp To Be Independent for brain-injured children. The main event is a silent auction of artwork created by Augusta artists and celebrities whose names aren’t revealed until after the bidding closes. 706-724-7746.

Special Events Through May 6. Storyland: A Trip Through Childhood Favorites. Beloved children’s books come alive at this exhibit at the EdVenture Children’s Museum in Columbia. www.edventure.org. April 1. Easter Eggstravaganza. Bring your family and celebrate Easter with games, crafts and an Easter egg hunt. Salvation Army Kroc Center. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. 706-364-KROC. April 2 and 3. Masters Camp. Cutno Dance Center. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Dance, arts and crafts, etiquette and more for girls ages 4-10. Lunch included. Call 706-364-3442 or go to www.cutnodance.com to register. April 2-6. MACH Academy Masters Week Camp: Exercise Your Mind and Body. Ages 4-16. Fun activities to enhance personal growth and pro-

44 • Augusta Family | April 2012

mote positive lifestyles. Science, math, creative writing, computers, nutrition, healthy eating, tennis/fitness and more. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at Fleming Tennis Center, 1850 Chester Ave. Register by calling 706-796-5046. April 2. Mayor’s Masters Reception. Don’t miss this annual event where visitors can sample foods from more than 40 local restaurants. Golf legend Tom Watson will be honored at this year’s event. Gates open at 6 p.m. Augusta Common. www. augustaga.org. April 3. Annual Golf Breakfast. Free Southernstyle breakfast with guest speaker PGA Tour player Aaron Baddeley. Hosted by the Greater Augusta Fellowship of Christian Athletes. 7 a.m. Warren Baptist Church. www.GreaterAugustaFCA.org. April 3 & 4. Children’s Golf Academy. Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History will hold children’s

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golf lessons with Paine College golf instructor Herman Belton at Jones Creek Golf Club. Other activities will include a trip to the Augusta Canal and more. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Jones Creek Golf Club. Contact Christine Miller-Betts at cbetts@lucycraftlaneymuseum.com or 706-724-3576. April 3. Annual Rock Fore! Dough Concert. Performances by Darius Rucker, Corey Smith, NeedToBreathe and the Farm Inc. This year, for the first time, the concert will include a side stage for more music. Benefits First Tee of Augusta. Gates open at 3:30 p.m. www.rockforedough.com. April 5. Horses and Courses Festival. Performing and visual artists displaying artwork and a parade with artistic golf carts, carriages and more. Live performances beginning at 5:30 p.m. on Laurens Street. Parade at 6:30 p.m. on Laurens Street between Park and Richland Avenues. 5-9 p.m. Downtown Aiken.


calendar April 7, 14, 21 & 28. Augusta Market at the River. Vendors offer fresh produce, breads, food, jewelry and more. Every Saturday. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Eighth Street Plaza off Reynolds Street. Downtown.

ers, Camp Sweet Life and Columbia County Cares. Check-in at 8:30 a.m. Water events begin at 10 a.m. Local fest starts at noon. Riverside Park Boat Launch. Evans. www.benderdinker.com.

April 12. Sixth Annual Undercover Artists. Benefits Camp to Be Independent for brain-injured children and young adults. 7 p.m. Walton Rehabilitation Health System lawn.

April 28. Hounds Around Towne. Head over to Evans Towne Center for a day made for dogs and dog lovers. Doggy vendors, K-9 demonstrations, “Ask a Vet,” Pooch Parade, “Glamfur” photo booth and more. Featuring Hyperflight Skyhoundz DiscDogathon. Well-behaved dogs on leashes welcome. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Free.

April 14. Healthy Kids Day. A carnival health fair with fun, engaging and creative activities for children and families to enjoy. Live demonstrations and more. Part of the YMCA’s Activate America initiative. Augusta Mall. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. April 14. WRDW Family Fair. A day of family fun and excitement on the Augusta Common. Noon-4 p.m. Call 803-278-1212 for information. April 20-22. Ninth Annual Olde Towne Artisans’ Fair. Meet the artists at the free preview gala reception. Friday, 5-7 p.m. Artisans’ Fair features arts and craft items for sale and craftsmen demonstrations. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturday. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sunday. Historic North Augusta’s Living History Park. www.colonialtimes.us. April 20. GHSU Earth Day Event. From eco-friendly exhibits to green building tours, the event offers students, staff, faculty and the community an opportunity to learn about sustainability or “green” practices and services applicable to everyday life and work. GHSU campus. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

April 28. First Annual Good Boats Dragon Boat Festival. Paddle for a purpose in the dragon boat races celebrating Asian American culture. Opening ceremony, featuring a Lion Dance, at 10 a.m. Boat races begin at 10:30 a.m. The festival features an Asian-themed marketplace complete with food, music, crafts, children’s activities and more. Proceeds benefit Goodwill Industries. April 28. ArtFest. An artists’ row, silent auction, children’s activities and culinary attractions. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Augusta Preparatory Day School. Visit www.augustaprep.org/artsfest for more information. April 28. Blocks Are Beautiful Celebration. Celebrate the revitalization of Laney-Walker/Bethlehem area. Featuring a Southern Soul Food Cook-Off, local choir competition, a raffle and fun for the whole family. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Pine Street between Laney Walker and Florence. www.augustaga.com. Museum and Science Events

April 21. Swamp Stomp 5k. 11th annual 5K at Phinizy Swamp Nature Park. 8 a.m. To register, call 706-828-2109 or register online at www.active. com. April 21. Diamond Lakes Spring Fling. Come browse, shop and enjoy a relaxing day at the Diamond Lakes Community Center. 103 Diamond Lakes Way, Hephzibah. Call 706-772-2418 for vendor and other information. April 27. Earth Day at Hopelands Gardens. Annual event featuring environmental experts and fun, interactive exhibits. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. For more information call 803-642-7613. See “Short Takes,” page 21. April 27-29. Sacred Heart Garden Festival. Exhibits, lectures, entertainment and unique Garden Market vendors. Tour private gardens in the community. Sacred Heart Cultural Center. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. SacredHeartGardenFestival.com. April 27. Family Dinner and Movie Night at Camp Gravatt. Enjoy a hamburger or hot dog dinner and then watch Rio. Call 706-642-7559 for reservations and fees. Camp Gravatt, Aiken. April 28. The Benderdinker. A whimsical, musical kayak/canoe event and local fest for the whole family. Children’s activities, water sport demonstrations, pig roast, farmers market, crafts, local business vendors and delicious foods. Benefits Augusta Locally Grown, the Savannah Riverkeep-

April 1–June 30. Epochs of Courage: African American Exhibition. This exhibition explores the history of the roles and contributions that African American golfers and caddies have made in sports. Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History. 706724-3576. Augusta Museum of History 560 Reynolds St. 706-722-8454. Museum Hours: Thursday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, 1-5 p.m. April 1-8. Celebrating a Grand Tradition, the Sport of Golf. Explore the history of golf and its legacy in Augusta. Highlights include the evolution of golf equipment, the extraordinary people that changed the game and the unique courses that helped make the region a golf destination. Reed Creek Nature Park and Interpretive Center 3820 Park Lane, Martinez. 706-210-4027. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Preregistration required. April 21. Feeling Ants-y? Explore the underground world of ants. Indoor activities showing the behavior and social life of ants and outside activities to look for signs of ant life. Ages 5 and up. 10-11 a.m. April 27. Busy Bees. Bzzzz! Learn why bees are so

www.augustafamily.com

important to our ecosystems and why it’s important to help save them from decline. For ages 5 and up. 4:30-5:30 p.m. The Arts, Music and More April 6, 7, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21. Twelfth Night. There is little not to love about this Shakespearian classic. 8 p.m. April 15, 3 p.m. Aiken Community Playhouse. URS Center for Performing Arts. 803648-1438. April 12. New Edition 30th Anniversary Tour. The highly influential R&B crooners are back with their timeless smooth moves, suave disposition and heart melting voices. Bobby Brown, Johnny Gill, Ricky Bel, Mike Bivins, Ronnie DeVoe and Ralph Tresvant will perform. 7:30 p.m. USC-Aiken Convocation Center. www.georgialinatix.com. April 12. Tim O’Shields: My Story, My Music, My Passion. A show featuring tales about life, with positive and motivational stories and original piano compositions. Imperial Theatre. 706-722-8341. April 13-May 25. Biennial Creel-Harison Community Gallery Artists’ Exhibit. New works by the regional artists who have exhibited since the gallery’s opening in fall 2009. Opening reception April 13. 6-8 p.m. Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art. 706-722-5495. April 16. Greater Augusta Youth Orchestra. ASU Conservatory Program. 7-8:30 p.m. Maxwell Theatre. ASU campus. 706-731-7971. April 16-20. The Clothesline Project. Sexual Assault Awareness project. All day. Maxwell Theatre front lawn. ASU campus. 706-737-1471. April 17. Columbia County Youth Orchestra Spring Concert. 7 p.m. Genesis Church. www.columbiacco.org. April 18. The Golden Goose. Play presented by the Patchwork Players. 9:30-10:15 a.m. and 10:30-11:15 a.m. Maxwell Theatre. ASU Campus. 706-737-1625. April 18-21. Intimate Apparel. Wed.-Sat. 7:30 p.m. Sun. 2 p.m. Etherredge Center. USC-Aiken. 803641-3305. April 21. Johannes Brahms Ein Deutsches Requiem. Presented by the Augusta Choral Society. 7:30 p.m. Saint Paul’s Church. www.augustachoralsociety.org. April 21-22. Columbia County Orchestra With South Boundary’s Men Chorus. 3 p.m. Saturday, West Acres Baptist Church. Sunday, First Baptist Church, Aiken. 706-755-5849. April 26-27. The Grascals Go Mayberry. URS Center for the Performing Arts. Aiken. 803-643-4774. April 27. SOA and Aiken Symphony Guild’s Spring Classics Concert. 8 p.m. Etherredge Center. USC-

Augusta Family | April 2012 • 45


calendar April 7, 14, 21 & 28. Augusta Market at the River. Vendors offer fresh produce, breads, food, jewelry and more. Every Saturday. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Eighth Street Plaza off Reynolds Street. Downtown.

ers, Camp Sweet Life and Columbia County Cares. Check-in at 8:30 a.m. Water events begin at 10 a.m. Local fest starts at noon. Riverside Park Boat Launch. Evans. www.benderdinker.com.

April 12. Sixth Annual Undercover Artists. Benefits Camp to Be Independent for brain-injured children and young adults. 7 p.m. Walton Rehabilitation Health System lawn.

April 28. Hounds Around Towne. Head over to Evans Towne Center for a day made for dogs and dog lovers. Doggy vendors, K-9 demonstrations, “Ask a Vet,” Pooch Parade, “Glamfur” photo booth and more. Featuring Hyperflight Skyhoundz DiscDogathon. Well-behaved dogs on leashes welcome. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Free.

April 14. Healthy Kids Day. A carnival health fair with fun, engaging and creative activities for children and families to enjoy. Live demonstrations and more. Part of the YMCA’s Activate America initiative. Augusta Mall. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. April 14. WRDW Family Fair. A day of family fun and excitement on the Augusta Common. Noon-4 p.m. Call 803-278-1212 for information. April 20-22. Ninth Annual Olde Towne Artisans’ Fair. Meet the artists at the free preview gala reception. Friday, 5-7 p.m. Artisans’ Fair features arts and craft items for sale and craftsmen demonstrations. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturday. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sunday. Historic North Augusta’s Living History Park. www.colonialtimes.us. April 20. GHSU Earth Day Event. From eco-friendly exhibits to green building tours, the event offers students, staff, faculty and the community an opportunity to learn about sustainability or “green” practices and services applicable to everyday life and work. GHSU campus. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

April 28. First Annual Good Boats Dragon Boat Festival. Paddle for a purpose in the dragon boat races celebrating Asian American culture. Opening ceremony, featuring a Lion Dance, at 10 a.m. Boat races begin at 10:30 a.m. The festival features an Asian-themed marketplace complete with food, music, crafts, children’s activities and more. Proceeds benefit Goodwill Industries. April 28. ArtFest. An artists’ row, silent auction, children’s activities and culinary attractions. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Augusta Preparatory Day School. Visit www.augustaprep.org/artsfest for more information. April 28. Blocks Are Beautiful Celebration. Celebrate the revitalization of Laney-Walker/Bethlehem area. Featuring a Southern Soul Food Cook-Off, local choir competition, a raffle and fun for the whole family. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Pine Street between Laney Walker and Florence. www.augustaga.com. Museum and Science Events

April 21. Swamp Stomp 5k. 11th annual 5K at Phinizy Swamp Nature Park. 8 a.m. To register, call 706-828-2109 or register online at www.active. com. April 21. Diamond Lakes Spring Fling. Come browse, shop and enjoy a relaxing day at the Diamond Lakes Community Center. 103 Diamond Lakes Way, Hephzibah. Call 706-772-2418 for vendor and other information. April 27. Earth Day at Hopelands Gardens. Annual event featuring environmental experts and fun, interactive exhibits. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. For more information call 803-642-7613. See “Short Takes,” page 21. April 27-29. Sacred Heart Garden Festival. Exhibits, lectures, entertainment and unique Garden Market vendors. Tour private gardens in the community. Sacred Heart Cultural Center. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. SacredHeartGardenFestival.com. April 27. Family Dinner and Movie Night at Camp Gravatt. Enjoy a hamburger or hot dog dinner and then watch Rio. Call 706-642-7559 for reservations and fees. Camp Gravatt, Aiken. April 28. The Benderdinker. A whimsical, musical kayak/canoe event and local fest for the whole family. Children’s activities, water sport demonstrations, pig roast, farmers market, crafts, local business vendors and delicious foods. Benefits Augusta Locally Grown, the Savannah Riverkeep-

April 1–June 30. Epochs of Courage: African American Exhibition. This exhibition explores the history of the roles and contributions that African American golfers and caddies have made in sports. Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History. 706724-3576. Augusta Museum of History 560 Reynolds St. 706-722-8454. Museum Hours: Thursday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, 1-5 p.m. April 1-8. Celebrating a Grand Tradition, the Sport of Golf. Explore the history of golf and its legacy in Augusta. Highlights include the evolution of golf equipment, the extraordinary people that changed the game and the unique courses that helped make the region a golf destination. Reed Creek Nature Park and Interpretive Center 3820 Park Lane, Martinez. 706-210-4027. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Preregistration required. April 21. Feeling Ants-y? Explore the underground world of ants. Indoor activities showing the behavior and social life of ants and outside activities to look for signs of ant life. Ages 5 and up. 10-11 a.m. April 27. Busy Bees. Bzzzz! Learn why bees are so

www.augustafamily.com

important to our ecosystems and why it’s important to help save them from decline. For ages 5 and up. 4:30-5:30 p.m. The Arts, Music and More April 6, 7, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21. Twelfth Night. There is little not to love about this Shakespearian classic. 8 p.m. April 15, 3 p.m. Aiken Community Playhouse. URS Center for Performing Arts. 803648-1438. April 12. New Edition 30th Anniversary Tour. The highly influential R&B crooners are back with their timeless smooth moves, suave disposition and heart melting voices. Bobby Brown, Johnny Gill, Ricky Bel, Mike Bivins, Ronnie DeVoe and Ralph Tresvant will perform. 7:30 p.m. USC-Aiken Convocation Center. www.georgialinatix.com. April 12. Tim O’Shields: My Story, My Music, My Passion. A show featuring tales about life, with positive and motivational stories and original piano compositions. Imperial Theatre. 706-722-8341. April 13-May 25. Biennial Creel-Harison Community Gallery Artists’ Exhibit. New works by the regional artists who have exhibited since the gallery’s opening in fall 2009. Opening reception April 13. 6-8 p.m. Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art. 706-722-5495. April 16. Greater Augusta Youth Orchestra. ASU Conservatory Program. 7-8:30 p.m. Maxwell Theatre. ASU campus. 706-731-7971. April 16-20. The Clothesline Project. Sexual Assault Awareness project. All day. Maxwell Theatre front lawn. ASU campus. 706-737-1471. April 17. Columbia County Youth Orchestra Spring Concert. 7 p.m. Genesis Church. www.columbiacco.org. April 18. The Golden Goose. Play presented by the Patchwork Players. 9:30-10:15 a.m. and 10:30-11:15 a.m. Maxwell Theatre. ASU Campus. 706-737-1625. April 18-21. Intimate Apparel. Wed.-Sat. 7:30 p.m. Sun. 2 p.m. Etherredge Center. USC-Aiken. 803641-3305. April 21. Johannes Brahms Ein Deutsches Requiem. Presented by the Augusta Choral Society. 7:30 p.m. Saint Paul’s Church. www.augustachoralsociety.org. April 21-22. Columbia County Orchestra With South Boundary’s Men Chorus. 3 p.m. Saturday, West Acres Baptist Church. Sunday, First Baptist Church, Aiken. 706-755-5849. April 26-27. The Grascals Go Mayberry. URS Center for the Performing Arts. Aiken. 803-643-4774. April 27. SOA and Aiken Symphony Guild’s Spring Classics Concert. 8 p.m. Etherredge Center. USC-

Augusta Family | April 2012 • 45


calendar Columbia County Recreation 5445 Columbia Road, Grovetown. 706-863-7523. April 23-May 11. Summer Basketball Registration. CSRA Defensive Arts 803-221-0330 or csraDefensiveArts.com. Martial Arts Classes. Ages 8-adult. Taught by a certified Karate for Christ International instructor with 18 years of experience. Classes are held at Heights Church, behind Mi-Rancho in Clearwater, S.C., directly on the Aiken-Augusta Highway. Kroc Center Augusta 1833 Broad Street, Augusta. www.krocaugusta.org. 706-364-KROC or info@krocaugusta.org. Every Wednesday. Craft Corner. Ages 3-10. 9-10 a.m. Call for pricing. Every Wednesday and Saturday. Junior Fitness. Ages 7-12. 5:30-6 p.m. on Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. on Saturday. Call for pricing. April 2-6 Children’s Camp. Ages 5-12. Play games, swim, do arts and crafts and more. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. with early drop-off beginning at 7 a.m. and late pickup until 5:30 p.m. for additional fees. April 2-6. Spring Break Sports Speed and Agility Camp. Ages 7-18. Designed for youth involved in athletics and sports to maintain sports-specific fitness during season down time and prepare for spring sports. 1-3 p.m. Call for pricing. April 6. Kids Night Out. Dinner included. Activities may include swimming, gym play, inflatables and crafts. 6-10 p.m. April 9-May 5. Swimming Lessons Session 2. Ages 3-senior citizens. Call for times. April 27. Family Night: Movie night. Enjoy eating popcorn and watching a family friendly

movie in the theater. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Call for fees.

Y. Kick your way to confidence. Ages 6 months to 12 years.

The Family Y Financial assistance is available for all Family Y programs. Register at any branch or online at www.thefamilyy.org or call 706-922-9622.

April 14. Parent’s Night Out at the Family Y of North Augusta. Ages 2-12. 6-9:30 p.m.

Spots Still Available for Spring Session: Miracle League Baseball Registration. Miracle League is a baseball league specifically designed for youth and adults with physical and developmental disabilities. Games are played on a rubberized surface located behind the Uptown Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center on Wrightsboro Road. Ages 4 and up. Spring season is April 14June 9.

April 14 & 28. Parent’s Night Out at the Family Y of Aiken County. Ages 2-12. 5:30-9 p.m. April 14. Freedom Friday for Military Families. Free entertaining night for children of deployed soldiers. Ages 8 weeks to 12 years. 6-9:30. Family Y of Augusta South. April 28. Parent’s Night Out at Wilson Family Y and Family Y of Augusta South. Ages 2-12 at the Wilson Family Y and 8 weeks to 12 years at Augusta South. 6-9:30 p.m.

Homeschool Clinic at the Family Y of North Augusta. Students enjoy two-hour classes once a month. Each month has a different class for kids and parents.

April 28. Parent’s Night out for Children of Deployed Soldiers at the Marshall Family Y. 6-9:30 p.m. Ages 2-12. Free for children of deployed soldiers.

Through April 15. Summer Baseball Registration at the Family Y of Augusta South and Wilson Family Y. Recreational baseball for boys and girls ages 6-12.

April 30. Men’s and Women’s Basketball Registration Begins. Men’s basketball is ages 18 and up, women’s 16 and up. Season begins June 11.

Through April 22. Register for T-Ball School at the Marshall Family Y. Ages 3-4. Season is June 9-Juy 28. Through April 22. Marshall Family Y Lacross Registration. For boys and girls ages 7-15. April 1-30. Adult Swim Lessons. Family Y of Downtown Augusta and the Wilson Family Y. Ages 13 and up. Days and times vary by branch. April 2-6. Masters Week Camp at the Family Y. Camp activities from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. with early drop off at 7 a.m. and late pickup at 6 p.m. at no additional cost. Ages 5-12. Camps will be held at Family Y of Augusta South, Wilson Family Y, Family Y of Aiken County and Family Y of North Augusta. April 9-May 3. Youth Swim Lessons at the Wilson Family

Parents’ Morning Out Programs Enjoy the morning out while your child plays games, does arts and crafts and more. Augusta South Family Y Drop and Shop. Monday-Friday from 8:30 a.m.-noon for ages 8 weeks-4 years. North Augusta Family Y Drop and Shop Program. MondayFriday, 9 a.m.-noon. North Augusta Family Y Mother’s Morning Out. Basic educational curriculum and rotating instruction in creative arts, swimming and sports. Monday and Wednesdays or Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 a.m.-noon for ages 2-4. Wilson Family Y. Ages 3-4. Tuesday and Thursday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Family Activities Aiken Home School Times Playgroup 803-648-7042 or fourmckeels@ yahoo.com. Thursdays. This playgroup is

www.augustafamily.com

Augusta Family | April 2012 • 47


A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Q

A


calendar open to all home schoolers. Meets at the O’Dell Weeks playground for unstructured play for the children and time with other home school parents for the adults. Noon.

provides discussion forums, an events calendar and more. Meeting are held online, at local parks, members homes (for monthly BUNCO) and on field trips. All mothers are welcome.

Augusta Jewish Community Center 898 Weinberger Way. 706-228-3636 or log on at augustajcc.org.

Augusta Food Allergy Group Does your child have severe, potentially fatal food allergies. Would you like to get together with other parents who face the same challenges? This group meets the fourth Monday of each month in Earth Fare’s community room, Furys Ferry Rd., Martinez. Free and welcome to anyone dealing with food allergies. Meetings often include special guest speakers. 6 p.m. Contact Sheena Whitlock at augustafoodallergy@gmail.com.

Ongoing. The Mothers Circle. Free course, resources, education and events for women of other backgrounds raising Jewish children. Call for details. Sign Up for Class! The AJCC offers a wide variety of classes for children of all ages and adults, including athletics, the arts, cooking, language and more. Log on to download a complete listing. Classical Conversations Visit classicalconversations.com or e-mail Terri at classicalaugusta@yahoo.com. A Classical Christian Community of home schoolers that meets once a week from August through April with the goal of training their children to know God and to make Him known in all areas of life. E-mail Terri for information. Homeschool Playgroup Creighton Park, next to Living History Park in North Augusta. Call 803-613-0484 or emilykohlbacher@hotmail.com. Every Thursday at 10:30 a.m. All welcome. Monkey Joe’s 368 Furys Ferry Rd. 706-922-JUMP (5867). monkeyjoes.com. First Sunday of Each Month. Special Needs Night at Monkey Joe’s. This event is held the first Sunday of each month after general store hours to ensure a calm environment for special needs children and their parents. 6-7 p.m. PHC Weight Loss and Wellness Martinez: 706-868-5332. Augusta: 706-796-6267. Aiken: 803-649-3428. Logon at www.phcweightloss.com. Student Plan Orientations. Students with parent or guardian can attend 45-minute complimentary sessions by appointment on Mondays, Tuesdays or Thursdays between 3 and 6 p.m. Call for information. Childbirth, Breastfeeding and Parenting Support Groups AugustaAreaMommies Contact Jennifer Stanley at 706-855-0072 or phlegalesfan@att.net. A community for moms in the Augusta area offering support, friendship and fun as well as the opportunity to exchange information. The group, which is part of The Mommies Network, also

Better Augusta Birth Experience (BABE) Free weekly meetings each Monday. Go to www. AugustaBirthNetwork.org for calendar and contact information of the CSRA’s many birthing options. Founded in 1985 by Lynn Reed to promote safe alternative awareness for pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding and parenting. (See below for list of BABE meetings and dates) Augusta Birth Network (ABN) April 2. “VBAC: A Safe Alternative to Repeat C-sections.” Augusta Birth Network believes that birth is normal, natural and healthy and promotes motherfriendly care through: Advocacy, information and support by ensuring that families have a network of experienced, encouraging people to help them make informed choices and embrace birth. Contact ABN co-leaders Betsy Alger 206-890-3387 or Lynn Reed 706.833.5101 or go to www.AugustaBirthNetwork.org. Monthly meetings are held at Earth Fare, 368 Fury’s Ferry Rd. 7-8:30 p.m. Meet the Doula Tea Party April 9. You ask…”Who Should Come To My Birth?” Enjoy a cup of tea, watch a short DVD and meet certified and trained doulas. Topics include: Coping with labor the doula way, who should come to my birth, what are the benefits of having a doula? Free and open to any friends or family members that are also interested in learning about doulas. This is a couple’s event, so bring your partner if they would like to meet us, but we do ask that you not bring children to this tea. (Lap babies only.) Please confirm by contacting Laura Selvidio CSRADoula@gmail.com or 706-288-4440. Monthly ABN Doula Tea are held at Steinle Wellness Center, 122 Old Evans Rd. 7-8 p.m. VBAC Baby Augusta April 16. Birthing The Easy Way. Book presentation by Lindsey Whinghter, DONA trained doula and mother of two. VBAC Augusta is an Augusta Birth Network support group for moms who desire Vaginal Birth After Caesarean, offering in-person facilitated meetings to listen to and share birthrelated stories in a safe and confidential setting, as well as support and referrals to local community and national resources for Vaginal Birth After Cesarean (VBAC). Call co-leader Christine Strickland, 706-631-7284 or e-mail bcbstrickland@yahoo.

www.augustafamily.com

com. Monthly meeting are held at Steinle Wellness Center, 122 Old Evans Rd. 7-8:30 p.m. Trust Birth Augusta Birth Stories and Cinema Circle April 23. Birth As We Know It. Director Elena Tonetti-Vladimirova shares her experiences as one of the co-creators of the “Conscious Birth” movement in Russia during the early 1980s. Discussion will follow the movie along with time to share birth stories. Trust Birth Initiative stands on the truth that birth is safe, interference is risky and that women (and their partners) have the ability and responsibility to educate themselves to make informed choices. We do not promote any birth attendant as being more essential to the process than the woman herself and we fully support a woman’s right to choose birth at home with any attendant or no attendant. Contact Lynn Reed, Trust Birth facilitator, at 706-833-5101 or TrustBirthAugusta@comcast.net. Monthly meeting are held at Steinle Wellness Center, 122 Old Evans Rd. 7-8:30 p.m. La Leche League This breastfeeding support group meets the second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m. at the First Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church, 2204 Kimberly Dr. Evening meetings are held on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at Wesley United Methodist Church. Call 706-737-2405 or log on at lllusa.org/web/AugustaGA.html. Peaceful Parenting Augusta This unofficial Attachment Parenting support group is for families who believe in parenting gently and building children’s spirits, minds and bodies through nurturing, attentive and practical approaches. Join their Yahoo! group at Peaceful_Parenting_Augusta or e-mail Jen at theotherbradford@ yahoo.com. Celiac Disease Support Group E-mail RoseforHealth@aol.com. Meets the third Tuesday of every month in Suite 120 of the Summerville Building, adjacent to Trinity Hospital of Augusta. Open to those with celiac disease, gluten intolerance or on a gluten-free diet. Discussions include information on celiac disease, do’s and don’ts of a gluten-free diet and more. 7-8:30 p.m. Common Bond Parent Support Group Geneice McCoy, organizer. 706-729-0012 or commonbond@comcast.net. For parents of children of all ages and diagnoses with challenging disabilities but remarkable perseverance and resilience. Meets the second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. Call for location. Georgia Health Sciences Health System (formerly MCGHealth) Mom’s Connection This weekly support group for mothers meets each Tuesday at 1225 Walton Way in Room 101C. The group is for new moms and babies looking for support in the early stages of parenthood. Call 706-721-8283 or go to georgiahealth.org.

Augusta Family | April 2012 • 49


calendar Parent Support Group The Child Advocacy Center, a program of Child Enrichment Inc., a nonprofit organization serving victims of sexual abuse in our community, is offering a support group for parents and caregivers of children who have been sexually abused. Groups will be held the second Tuesday of each month. Call 706-737-4631 for information and location. This group is not appropriate for sex offenders. Mothers of Advanced Maternal Age (Mama’s) Did you have a child at age 35 or older? Are you expecting? This group of “older” moms welcomes you for meetings, support and play dates. Disabled children welcome. Contact Ami McKenzie at 706-364-5245 or hoopnhollar2@yahoo.com or go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MaMasInAugusta/. MOMS Club Visit momsclubaugusta.org. Ever feel like you’re the only mother who stays home? You are not alone! Come meet other athome mothers at the MOMS Club, an international nonprofit organization. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) A nondenominational Christian group for mothers of preschool-aged children. Meets the first and third Tuesday of each month from 10 a.m.-noon

and the first Tuesday of each month from 7-9 p.m. at Trinity-on-the-Hill United Methodist Church on Monte Sano Ave. Call 706-738-8822 or visit orgsites.com/ga/trinityumcmops. The Aiken Charter group of MOPS meets the Second Tuesday of each month for moms to learn, share, support each other and socialize. Meetings are held in the South Aiken Presbyterian Church fellowship hall, 1711 Whiskey Rd. Free childcare and dinner for those attending, reservations required. You do not need to be a member of South Aiken Presbyterian to attend. Check out MOPS Aiken on Facebook, contact Jennie Beat at 803-640-4742 or e-mail mopsaiken@ gmail.com for more information or to register for childcare. Hospital Programs Doctors Hospital Call 706-651-BABY (2229) or go to doctors-hospital.net for registration and class location. Preregistration required for most programs. April 10. Pickles and Ice Cream. Nutrition, exercise, fetal development and body changes are discussed. 7-9:30 p.m. April 10. The Daddy Class. Taught by an experienced dad and focusing on the joys and challenges

of fatherhood and ways to support mom. 7-9 p.m. April 17 & 24. Showing and Glowing. A two-session class during mid-pregnancy that dispels myths of pregnancy and childbirth. Intended to be taken with Ready and Able. 7-9 p.m. April 19. Baby 101. Learn about infant development and care. 7-9:30 p.m. April 21. You’re a Big Girl Now. Girls ages 9-12 with their mothers. Information on puberty and adolescence including emotions, acne, menstruation and normal body changes. 10 a.m.-noon. April 26. Breastfeeding. Getting started, latching on and positioning are discussed for a smooth start to breastfeeding. 6:30-9:30 p.m. April 28 & 29. Short and Sweet. A weekend childbirth class covering the process of labor and delivery, comfort techniques and childbirth, medication/ epidurals and relaxation and breathing techniques. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday and 1-5 p.m. on Sunday. April 28. Oh Baby! A free event featuring Dr. Harvey Karp, nationally renowned pediatrician, child development specialist and creator of The Happiest Baby on the Block and The Happiest Toddler. Raffles, tours, Q & A and more. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Call

Easter Services A D V E R T I S E M E N T

St. Mark United Methodist Church

St. Mary on the Hill Catholic Church

1420 Monte Sano Avenue • Augusta, GA 30904 • 706.733.6627 Holy Thursday, April 5 *Evening Mass of the Lord’s Supper - 7:00 pm Holy Saturday, April 7 *Easter Vigil Mass - 8:00 pm

Good Friday, April 6 *Stations of the Cross - 12:00 pm *Celebration of the Lord’s Passion - 7:00 pm Easter Sunday, April 8 *7:30 am, 9:00 am, 10:45 am, & 12:30 pm

First Presbyterian Church of Augusta

2367 Washington Road Augusta, GA 30904 www.saintmarkaugusta.com • 706.736.8185

Sunday, April 1 *11:00 am - Service in Music presented by the Music Ministry of St. Mark Thursday, April 5 *7:00 pm - Maundy Thursday Worship Service with Holy Communion

Sunday, April 8 *7:00 am - Sunrise Service at Westover Cemetery *9:00 am - Easter Celebration Service

Reid Memorial Presbyterian Church

642 Telfair Street Augusta, GA 30901 • firstpresaugusta.org • 706.262.8900

2261 Walton Way Augusta, GA 30904 • www.reidchurch.org • 706.733.2275

Good Friday Service, April 6 *7:00 pm - Communion will be served at our Good Friday service as we remember and honor the sacrifice of Christ.

Thursday, April 5 *7:00 pm - Maundy Thursday Service (Sanctuary)

Easter Services, April 8 *8:30 am & 11:00 am - Join us on Easter Sunday as we celebrate the triumphant resurrection of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.

Saint Paul’s Church 605 Reynolds Street Augusta, GA • www.saintpauls.org • 706.724.2485 Holy Service Schedule Maundy Thursday, April 5, 7:30 pm • Good Friday, April 6, 12:00 noon • Easter Sunday, April 8 *7:50 am - Easter Breakfast in Tyler Hall *9:00 am - Easter Celebrations of the Resurrection with the Canterbury and Saint Nicholas Choirs, Trumpet and Drums *Annual Easter Egg Hunt on the Lawn immediately following the 9:00 am service

Bethel African Methodist Episcopal 623 Crawford Ave. Augusta GA • 706.736.4060 Rev. Mark S. Pierson Easter Sunday, April 8 *6:00 am - Sunrise Service *7:30 am – Free Full Breakfast *10:00 am - Easter Church Service

*11:00 am - Easter Celebrations of the Resurrection with the Saint Paul’s Choir, Brass and Percussion

50 • Augusta Family | April 2012

Easter Sunday, April 8 *9:00am - Easter Morning Breakfast (Congregational Life Center) *8:30 am and 10:30 am - Easter Sunday Worship (Sanctuary)

www.augustafamily.com


calendar 706-651-4343 to register. Georgia Health Sciences Health System Register online at georgiahealth.org. Ongoing. Support Group for Families Who Have Lost a Baby During Pregnancy, Childbirth or Early Infancy. Call 706-721-8299 or visit their Web site. April 3. Autism Spectrum Disorder Support and Resource Group (The “A-Team”). Provides support for families, caregivers and friends of children with autism spectrum disorders including autism, Asperger’s and PDD NOS. 6-7 p.m. Georgia Health Sciences Children’s Medical Center, First Floor, Family Resource Library, Room 1801. Call Family Services Development at 706-721-5160 or e-mail ddrakele@georgiahealth.edu for more information. April 5. Safe Kids East Central Presents Cribs for Kids. Learn how to provide a safe sleep environment for your child. Families who demonstrate a financial need will receive a portable crib, fitted sheet, sleep sac and pacifier for a small fee. 5:458 p.m. Building 1010C, 1225 Walton Way. Call Rene Hopkins, RN, at 706-721-7606. April 6. Safe Kids East Central Safety Seat Inspection. Four out of five car seats are used

incorrectly. Schedule an appointment to make sure yours is installed properly by calling Rene Hopkins, RN, at 706-721-7606. Building 1010C, 1225 Walton Way. April 11. Safe Kids East Central Safety Seat Inspection. Four out of five car seats are used incorrectly. Schedule an appointment to make sure yours is installed properly by calling 706-541-3970. 10 a.m.-noon at the Columbia County Sheriff Substation, 650 Ronald Reagan Dr., Evans. April 12. Car Seat Class. Car seat safety, education and training. Financial assistance is available to Medicaid and Peach Care-eligible families. 5:45-8 p.m., MCGHealth Building 1010C, 1225 Walton Way. Call 706-721-7606 to register. April 17. Breastfeeding Class. This free class, led by an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, helps expectant parents gain knowledge and support to ensure successful breastfeeding. 7-9 p.m. Georgia Health Sciences Medical Center, 1120 15th St., West Entrance, First Floor, Patient and Family Resource Library. Trinity Hospital of Augusta Call Women’s Health Services at 706-481-7727 or visit trinityofaugusta.com for information and registration. April 11. Infant CPR. Learn how to respond in an emergency situation using infant mannequins and a

www.augustafamily.com

simple step-by-step method. 6-8 p.m. April 13. Baby Care Basics and Breastfeeding. Two popular classes offered together. 9 a.m.-noon. April 19. Childbirth Education 101. Learn about the signs and symptoms of labor as well as labor and delivery. 6-8:30 p.m. April 21. Lamaze Childbirth Education. Helps mother and support person understand the final stages of pregnancy as well as labor and the birth of your baby. Covers natural and medicated deliveries, Lamaze coping techniques and more. 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. April 23. HUG Your Baby. Class provides Help, Understanding and Guidance for young families as they prepare for the birth of their infant. 4-5 p.m. April 28. Growing Boys. Boys ages 9-12 with their father, male relative or friend, learn what to expect in the pre-adolescent years. 9:30 a.m.-noon. University Health Care System Call 706-774-2825 or logon at www.universityhealth.org/calendar for information. Registration is required for most programs. Young Women with Breast Cancer. Meets the third Friday each month. A support group for women in their 20s through 30s dealing with breast cancer. 12:20 p.m. at the University Hospital Breast

Augusta Family | April 2012 • 51


calendar Health Center, Professional Center 2, Suite 205, 818 St. Sebastian Way. April 9-30 (Mondays), April 10-24 (Tuesdays) or April 11-May 2 (Wednesdays). Childbirth Preparation. This four-week series is designed to inform and prepare all expectant parents regardless of birth plans. Class topics include various stages of labor, breathing and relaxation and how to care for yourself and your new baby.

Movie Marathon. 2 p.m.

Erik Larson. 6:30 p.m.

April 20. Young Adult Program: Authors Scavenger Hunt. 5:307:30 p.m.

April 17 & 24. Teen Guitar Lessons. Bring your guitar and learn some new chords. For beginners. 4 p.m. Call to register.

April 13 & 14 or 27 & 28. Weekender Childbirth Preparation Class. A complete childbirth preparation class designed for those with time constraints or fluctuating schedules. Friday from 6:30-9:30 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m.5:30 p.m.

Appleby Branch 260 Walton Way. 706-736-6244.

April 28. Children’s Class: Drawing for Beginners the Ed Emberley Way. 2 p.m.

Story Times Wednesdays. 10:05-10:20 a.m., ages 18-35 months (adult must stay with child). 10:30-11:15 a.m. age 3 and up.

April 19. Brown Bag Book Club. The Library of Shadows by Mikkel Birkegaard. 11:30 a.m. Diamond Lakes Library Diamond Lakes Regional Park. 706-772-2432. Story Times. Tuesdays at 10 a.m. No Story Time April 3. April 2 & 3. School’s Out Movies. Bring snacks and enjoy a free movie. Call the branch for movie titles.

April 3. Young Adults Movie Time. 13 Going on 30. Ages 12-18. 11 a.m.

April 12. Rhyming Story Time. Celebrate National Poetry Month. 10 a.m. Call library to make reservations.

April 7. Easter Egg Hunt. 10 a.m.noon. Bring your Easter basket.

Friedman Branch 1447 Jackson Rd. 706-736-6758.

Augusta Headquarters Library 823 Telfair St. 706-821-2600.

April 16, 23 & 30. Introduction to Crochet. 5:30-7 p.m. All supplies provided. Call to register.

Story Times Tuesdays. 10 a.m.

Story Times Preschoolers: Tuesdays at 10 a.m. Ages 2 and under: Wednesdays at 10 a.m. (parent must stay with child).

April 19. Rainy Day Craft Workshop. Ages 3-5. Bring glue, crayons or markers. Call to register. 11 a.m.

April 19. Breastfeeding Class. 7-9 p.m. at Babies R Us, 4225 Washington Rd., Evans. April 26. Introduction to Infant CPR. 7-8:30 p.m. Library Events

Lunch and Learn Poetry Movie Series Bring your lunch and enjoy and learn. April 12. Emily Dickinson: A Life. April 19. Edgar Allan Poe Tell Tale Heart. April 26. The Poetry Lounge 2004 National Slam Contest. April 3. Young Adult Movie Day. Audience will vote on the movie to be shown. 2-4 p.m. April 4. Young Adult Just Dance Program. 2-4 p.m. April 5. Young Adult Craft Day. Make braided bead necklaces, bookmarks and picture frames. 2-4 p.m. April 14. Poetry Workshop. Instructor: Lucinda Clark. Come explore your creative self. 1:30-3:30 p.m. April 14. Children’s Afternoon

52 • Augusta Family | April 2012

April 21. Go Fly a Kite. Make kites and fly them. Ages 6-11. 2 p.m.

Columbia County Library 7022 Evans Towne Center Blvd. 706-863-1946. Registration is required for all programs. Story Times Tuesdays. 11 a.m. for under age 2. Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. 10:15 a.m. for 2-year-olds. Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. 11 a.m. for preschoolers. April 11 or 12. Money Management for Kids. Learn how to use your allowance to make more money. Ages 8-11. 1 p.m. on April 11, repeats at 5 p.m. on April 12. April 12. Teen Poetry Workshop. Get creative and write some new poems in celebration of National Poetry Month. Call the library to register. 4 p.m. April 16. Monday Night Book Club. In the Garden of Beasts by

www.augustafamily.com

April 10. Jazz for Kids. Replaces usual preschool story time. 1010:30 p.m. Harlem Branch Library 375 N. Louisville St. 706-556-9795. Story Time. Tuesdays. 10:30 a.m. April 12. Family Movie Night: Rio. 5 p.m. April 19. Book Club. Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo. 4 p.m. Maxwell Branch Library 1927 Lumpkin Rd. 706-793-2020. Story Times. Wednesdays. 10 a.m. Books, songs, finger plays, poems, crafts and more. Pre-registration required. April 26. Maxwell Morning Book Club. A Reliable Wife by Robert Goolrick. 10 a.m. Submit calendar entries by e-mail to Karin Calloway, editor, Augusta Family Magazine, at karin.calloway@augustafamily.com or enter your event online at www.augustafamily.com.


Talkin’ About My Generation

Three residents representing three age groups share their reflections on family, life and fun.

by Grace Belangia photos by Chris Thelen

South Augusta, lives with her parents and sister. She attends John S. Davidson Fine Arts Magnet School.

Russell E. Foster, 42, lives on

“The Hill” with his Maine Coon Cat Samson. He works as project manager of the Augusta Canal Authority.

Sarah Turner Simkins, “over

Favorite Possession: My golf clubs my dad bought me.

Likes To: Caddy at the Augusta National.

Likes To: Read, cook, arrange flowers, yoga, audit classes at ASU...

Ebonye LaSha’ Smith, 12, of

Love or Hate Golf: I love it. Favorite Thing About Masters Week: Watching Tiger Woods play. Song Playing in Her Head: No One by Alicia Keys.

Favorite Possession: Invicta Watch. Love or Hate Golf: Love it! Favorite Thing About Masters Week: Knowing that of all the four majors, it is the only one that will always be in Augusta.

70,” is married to Roy Simkins. The couple has two children, five grandchildren, one scruffy cat and two white labs.

Love or Hate Golf: Don’t play. Everybody else does. I do like to watch. I don’t much play anything. Favorite Thing About Masters Week: The whole thing. The family, the friends united and the Masters itself.

Words She Lives By: Faith. Courage. Integrity.

Least Favorite Thing About Masters Week: All the people at the tournament. As a caddy since 1988, I’ve grown accustomed to seeing the course with no people, no scoreboards, no ropes and no traffic.

Friends Say She’s: Interesting.

Favorite Indulgence: Bacon.

Favorite Place To Be: At my Nana and Poppie’s house on the weekends.

Favorite Place To Be: Our house on the river.

Words He Lives By: A brilliant mind is never closed.

Admires the Most: My mom.

Favorite Indulgence: Indolence. Just reading and being lazy.

Finds Inspiration: From the goodness that undoubtedly resides in most people and the fact that we have a country where this trait is allowed to flourish.

Message in a Bottle: “There will come a time when you believe everything is finished. That will be the beginning.” -Louis L’Amour.

Favorite Indulgence: Playing the piano.

Well Known Person She’d Like To Meet: Alicia Keys and Tiger Woods. 54 • Augusta Family | April 2012

www.augustafamily.com

Least Favorite Thing About Masters Week: Well, there is a lot of dish and towel washing and a little ticket confusion.


Augusta Family Magazine April 2012  

Annual Summer Camp Guide Issue

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