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AUG/SEP 2021

A U G U S TA

FIVE “BE” REMINDERS FOR SCHOOL THE NEW SCHOOL WITH A

BIG VISION

Back to School augustafamily.com


Brandon

Augusta’s Family Attorney 561 Greene Street | Augusta, Georgia 30901 | Telephone: 706.823.2001 | Fax: 706.823.2007 | www.brandondiallaw.com


AUGUST/SE PT EM B ER 2021

on the cover

As shown below: Gray (7) and Hudson (4) Moye Bus Driver: Mr. Ron Carmichael Photo by Randy Pace Thanks to Columbia County Schools for providing the bus and driver.

w w w.a u g ust afa m i l y. co m

PUBLISHER

Ashlee Griggs Duren

EDITOR

Aimee Serafin

ART DIRECTOR

Michael Rushbrook

DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING Lisa Dorn

ADVERTISING SALES Doressa Hawes

CIRCULATION/MARKETING Kimberly Stewart

PHOTOGRAPHY Randy Pace

EDITORIAL INTERN Elana Koehler

CONTRIBUTORS Dustin Turner Paige Tucker Cammie Jones

A Publication of MCC Magazines, LLC A division of Morris Communications Company, LLC | 725 Broad St., Augusta, GA 30901 Morris Communications Company, LLC William S. Morris III, Chairman Craig S. Mitchell, CEO MCC Magazines Tina Battock, President, Morris Media Network Scott Ferguson, Vice President Finance and Operations Sherry Brown, Director of Manufacturing & Production Cher Wheeler, Publication Services Manager Veronica Brooks, Accounting Manager Michelle Rowe, Circulation Business Manager

Augusta Family Magazine is published 8 times per year and distributed throughout the Augusta and Aiken area. Send press releases, story ideas or comments to the editor at aimee.serafin@ augustafamily.com or mail to 725 Broad Street, Augusta, Ga., 30901. For advertising information, call (706) 823-3702. For circulation/ distribution, call (706) 828-4391.

Is your child ready for their “close up?” If you think you’ve got a “cover kid,” submit their photo and information on our website or to aimee.serafin@ augustafamily.com and they may grace the cover of Augusta Family Magazine.

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Facebook.com/ augustafamilymagazine

@AUGFamilyMag

We look forward to hearing from you; visit our website www.augustafamily.com and on facebook and twitter.


contents www.augustafamily.com

The New School with a Big Vision —Dustin Turner

Rooted and Growing

18

11

FH

2 Teach is 2 Touch Lives 4Ever —Paige Turner

* FINN HINTS Indicates additional information and family resources Look for Finn the Family Fox hiding in the magazine!

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Tidbits

After-School Sweet Treats —Aimee Serafin and Elana Koehler

12


AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021

The Hurried [and happy] Home Maker

Family Matters

Five “Be” Reminders for Managing the Start of School —Cammie Jones

Interesting and Forward-Pacing School Programs —Elana Koehler

16

28

8

Editor’s Page

24

Fun Food

31

Calendar

—Family Features

—Aimee Serafin

The Modern Perspective Where are They Now? —Aimee Serafin

37

AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021 • 7


editor’s notes

E

xcitement, anticipation, joy, and a few shaky nerves are some of the shared responses from students about heading back to school this August. Students seem most excited about the idea of seeing classmates and friends face-to-face in learning environments and extra-curricular activities. They are looking forward to a more normal school year. I imagine parents are excited about the same thing. August is the back-to-school month. Let that sink in as something to celebrate! School is where familiar faces and routines provide stability for families throughout the year, and Augusta Family magazine has crafted the August/September issue around interesting and fun topics related to the return to school. In this issue, we feature a great new school in Harrisburg called Challenge Preparatory Academy. The article, “The New School with a Big Vision,” shares how the school’s curriculum includes some innovative ideas on learning and the important vision for revitalization in the community. In keeping with the academic theme, we highlight a burgeoning school program at North Augusta High School as the first Introduction to Aviation course in the area. Students in 9th and 10th grades have the first-time opportunity to learn about and get credit for coursework in aviation that could lead them to jobs as pilots, air traffic controllers or mechanics. And don’t miss the infographic tree in Tidbits that lists after-school sweets spots in Grovetown, Martinez, Evans, North Augusta, Augusta and Aiken. Look for Family Fox Finn’s hints indicating kid’s favorite treat selections. And, in case you have yet to cross the gothic threshold of Vampire Penguin in its North

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Augusta or Aiken location, you can read why we think it is the snowiest treat in all the area (page 10). Seriously, it tastes like dessert snow from the heavens. We wish all families in the Savannah River Region the best academic year for 2021-22. You know, it’s a good time to throw around some morning sunshine—and get ready for school!

Aimee Serafin aimee.serafin@augustafamily.com


• Join the school band, we can help! • Back to School Rental Program • FREE 1ST MONTH’S RENT for beginner band students (w/ purchase of needed accessories) • We Offer Private Lessons (Weekdays, Weekends, Evenings) • All ages and levels welcome! 18 months to seniors • Lessons on all instruments

3946 WASHINGTON RD | AUGUSTA, GA | 706.738.1651 | PORTMANSMUSIC.COM


rooted and growing Paige Tucker

2 Teach is 2 Touch Lives 4Ever

S

ummer 2021 was full of fun and sun and tooth fairy visits! Now, my snaggle tooth girl is off to second grade. When I think back on my second-grade year, I get all the warm fuzzies! It was pure magic. To this day, when asked about my favorite teacher of all time, the answer is always my second-grade teacher. Mrs. Melcher made every day fun. She taught with catchy rhymes, songs and games. Even math had a fun twist. A different student was featured each morning in the short word problem that Mrs. Melcher wrote on the chalkboard. I remember the anticipation of walking into the classroom looking for the daily math problem and the delight in finding the one all about Paige. Mrs. Melcher taught us many things about her Jewish faith. She shared her Hanukkah traditions with us and was just as excited about Christmas. She gave us dreidels, and we played games and sang songs associated with the holiday. We had a Hanukkah celebration, along with a party for just about every other special day on the calendar. While out of school with a terrible case of chickenpox, I was so sad to miss a pizza party our class had earned. (How’s that for aging me?!) She sent a pizza to our house to soften the blow and include me in the treat from afar! You can only pray your children are blessed with educators who leave lasting imprints on their hearts. So many years later, I still remember what Mrs. Melcher taught me and, more importantly, how she made me feel. She nurtured my love of learning and treated me like one of her own. I’d venture to say the hundreds of students lucky enough to be in her class likely share my sentiments. Julia Reynolds has only been in school a few short years and already several of her teachers have earned a forever place in our hearts. I can’t wait to meet the others along the way who will have that same distinction. Wishing all of our local teachers a wonderful school year that is one to remember for the students in your care! After twelve years in local news, most recently as evening anchor of NBC 26, Paige Tucker is now a work-at-home mom and freelance journalist. She produces two series for NBC 26 TV, First Responders and 26 Women Today, and you can see those stories on Tuesday nights. Paige and her husband have one daughter, Julia Reynolds, who is seven years old.

AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021 � 11


AUGUSTA AND NORTH AUGUSTA Holy Shakes www.facebook.com/holyshakesllc Milkshakes, ice cream, crazy bowls Dippin’ Dots Dippin’ Dots ice cream, sherbert, frozen yogurt

MARTINEZ, GROVETOWN AND EVANS

Vampire Penguin Kid’s Favorite: cotton candy, peanut butter, cheesecake flavors (GF)

The Meadows Original Frozen Custard Creamy frozen custard in delightful flavors of unicorn swirl, cookie dough, dirty turtle and more

FH

Sno-Cap Drive-in Kid’s Favorite: ice cream cone FH with sprinkles or root beer floats Pink Dipper Banana splits, ice cream floats, milkshakes Kid’s Favorite: FH Superman with sprinkles or gummy bears

Rita’s Italian Ice & Custard Frozen custard, Italian ice, Gelati (GF) Small Cakes Every cupcake flavor under the sun including hot fudge, wedding cake, cookies and cream, and lemon blueberry (GF) Wild Sugar Ice cream, shakes, Italian ice, smoothies, frozen yogurt, fudge Kid’s Favorite: FH Birthday Cake shake

FH Finn Hint: Kid’s Favorite (GF): Gluten Free Options

AIKEN Flanigan’s Ice Cream Milkshakes, sundaes, and homemade waffle cones Cyndi’s Sweet Shoppe Chocolates, candies, fudge Kid’s Favorite: FH bins of Swedish fish, gumballs, rock candy and nonpareils Vampire Penguin Shaved snow in delicate and creamy flavors with toppings La Parisienne Croissants, waffles and crepes Kid’s Favorite: the FH rainbow-colored rows of macarons under the counter (GF)

tidbits A U G U S T/ S E P T M E B E R 2 0 2 1

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DID YOU KNOW? •

The primary school in Phuma Changthang, Tibet, is the world’s highest school with an elevation of 5,373 meters above sea level. (That is 200 meters higher than the base camp on the west side of Mount Everest!)

The Bottle School in the Philippines is made completely of (9,000) recycled plastic soda bottles.

The City Montessori School in India is the 2019 Guinness Book of World Records holder for their number of students, reaching more than 56,000 students daily.

In the Netherlands, kids start school on their 4th birthday.

Mealtime in France is considered part of the curriculum.

Summer vacations for students in Chile start in mid-December and end in early March.

In remote areas of Columbia kids take zip lines to school!

Source: www.schooladvisor.my/ articles/fun-facts-education-aroundworld

THE RHYMING ANIMALS

WORD GAME GOES LIKE THIS...

Give kids a rhyme and have them come up with the animal, food, or place that you are thinking about. For example: “I rhyme with new, what I am? I am a (zoo).” I rhyme with log, what am I? I am a (frog).” “I rhyme with make, what am I? I am a (cake).”

Fun Riddle! WHY WERE THE TEACHER’S EYES CROSSED ON THE

first day of school? See page 12 to view the answer for the riddle.

AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021 � 13


tidbits

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Answer: She couldn’t control her pupils!


SPOOKY SNOW TREATS by Aimee Serafin and Elana Koehler

PEDIATRICS LOCATIONS AND PROVIDERS Interstate Parkway 1299 Interstate PKWY Dr. Jose Acevedo, Dr. Tito Sobrinho, Dr. Maya Ingram and Ashley Dahlman, NP Belle Terrace 2467 Golden Camp RD Dr. Kathryn Williford and Dr. Sonali Harshman Garredd 1111 Garredd BLVD Dr. Halbert Capuy and Dr. Valerie Ertle Garredd 1113 Garredd BLVD Dr. Mary Lou Fernando

“It’s as if snow fell from the sky in any flavor you wished and you could eat it off the ground with a spoon,” said manager, Tyler LaVigne, when asked to describe the frozen dessert served up at Vampire Penguin’s unique shop located in North Augusta. While the dessert appears at first glance to be shaved ice with delicious toppings, the many flavors of shaved snow have a creamy taste and delicate texture unlike any other ice creams or shaved ices. They really do taste like snow that has fallen from the sky and landed on your spoon! The menu features snowy options with kid-friendly names such as the Yabadabadoo, Sweet Tooth, Mexican Candy and the Green Jacket. The Yabadabadoo includes vanilla melt-in-your-mouth shaved snow, strawberry sauce and sweetened condensed drizzle topped with Fruity Pebbles and a side of whipped cream. The Green Jacket showcases a mint and vanilla snow base, crushed Oreos and chocolate syrup. One of the most popular flavors across all franchises is the Strawberry Cheesecake which combines graham crackers, marshmallows, strawberry and white chocolate sauces, and strawberry boba balls. The North Augusta Vampire Penguin franchise opened on September 7, 2020. There is also a Vampire Penguin in Aiken. The company was started by a father and two brothers from the Philippines who moved to the United States. The very creative name, Vampire Penguin, originated because one of the brothers was born on Halloween and the other brother loved penguins. The whimsically dark decor features a gothic throne, hanging icicles and plush playful penguins with vampire fangs. If you have food allergies or dietary restrictions, Vampire Penguin is a great option for you. There are dairy-free options, and all the snow is gluten-free! The website contains a helpful comprehensive ingredient list for everything on the menu. Though deliciously sweet, all the dessert snow is low-calorie and the highest sugar content of any base flavors is 15 grams.

Store hours are 12-9pm, Tuesdays to Saturdays, and 12:30-9pm on Sundays. Vampire Penguin’s delicious snowy treats and fantastical decor are sure to be a wonderful adventure for any after-school crowd! www.vampirepenguin.com/menu

Toll Free Number 1-877-205-5006

Great things are happening at Augusta Christian Schools

New Educational Building Opening Fall of 2021 Limited Openings Available for the 2021-2022 School Year 313 Baston Road Martinez, GA 30907 706-863-2905, ext.206 | www.augustachristian.org AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021 � 15


the hurried

[and happy] homemaker

Photo created by mego-studio - www.freepik.com

C a m m i e Jo n es

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Five “Be” Reminders for Managing the Start of School

T

he 2020-21 academic school year topped the charts for the year that was anything but ordinary. Relentless uncertainties and last-minute disruptions to our routines were common occurrences that every parent experienced. With hopes high for a normal academic 2021-22 school year, we are providing some practical reminders of how to ease your child’s anxieties as the school year starts.

and allows them the assurance of understanding that solutions may unfold naturally. It’s okay to have a few unknowns. That is all part of life!

BE PATIENT AND FLEXIBLE Patience and flexibility are great partners as we have learned this past year. This means not only being patient and flexible with your child but also with the school’s administration and teachers. You may not like a decision made by the school/school board, BE POSITIVE but they are doing the best they can. Reach out to the school’s Parents set the tone for how the family reacts to life changes. principal or a local school board member if you are unhappy… Setting a positive tone, especially as we are easing out of only practice the 24-hour rule. Waiting until you cool down will more than a year-long pandemic, is one practical way to help help alleviate any defensive posture due children with the transition. to your tone. Talk to your child’s teachers before or during the beginning of the According to Dr. Lauren Grodin, Dr. school year to understand their approach Ximena Flanders and Dr. Tina Jules’ to the curriculum and let them know that article, “5 Ways to Cope with Back to If your child is anxious in general, there you are there to help all parties succeed. School Anxiety during Covid-19”, it’s are some small ways you can ease feelings when returning to school. Dr. Hayley Starting with a positive tone is always in important to talk with your children about van Zwanenberg, Child and Adolescent the best interest of everyone! safety procedures and how to stay safe. Be Psychiatrist at Prior Wellbeing Centre positive in your approach and “talk to the Oxford and blog host of “Managing Children’s Fears Around Returning to BE ON A ROUTINE kids about the ‘social-emotional benefits’ School after Coronavirus ‘Lockdown,’” Most children have not been on a routine in words they can understand,” says shares some advice for parents: since 2019. A routine may be more Grodin, Flanders and Jules. Make sure to • Drive past the school when you are difficult to establish this summer due to focus on the fun they will experience with on essential trips around town the long break from it. A few weeks before their classmates. With the ease of Covid • If within walking distance, make school starts, return to an earlier bedtime. restrictions in many states, especially walking past the school a regular route • Request contact with various teachers Begin a more structured wake-up time Georgia and South Carolina, explain the via online meetings before school starts and meal plan. Summer is a great time to latest updates and how they may affect • Ask to bring your child to the school relax restrictions for bedtimes and formal your child’s school year. Hopefully, to walk around, pick up a textbook or see a teacher (safely distanced) dinners but building a more structured many restrictions will be loosened as we routine early will make the transition a approach the beginning of school and that Source: www.priorygroup.com/blog little smoother for you and your children can only help your children as they prepare once those school days begin. mentally for learning.

FH

BE OPEN AND NON-JUDGMENTAL It’s important to acknowledge your child’s worries and thoughts about the new school year. Be willing to discuss their concerns and fears while remaining non-judgmental during the conversation. They may be worried about something trivial or insignificant to you, but try not to make them feel silly about any concern. As a parent, you may have questions about your child being behind due to the inconsistencies of school learning last year. You may want to know if your child can handle a regular school day. They, too, might be nervous. The “let’s wait and see” approach helps recognize their concerns

BE IN THE HABIT OF LAUGHING Laughter keeps life in perspective and helps release tension stored up in the body. Keep a sense of humor about things that may pop up as school begins. Spin something that may have upset your child into a light or humorous situation. Don’t sweat the small stuff and recite that same mantra to your children. Here’s to a great 2021-22 school year! Cammie Jones is an Augusta freelance writer and mother of three.

AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021 � 17


BIG THE NEW SCHOOL WITH A

V I S I O N BY DUSTIN TURNER

photo created by jcomp - www.freepik.com

On the western end of Ellis Street, one block off John C. Calhoun Expressway, Challenge Preparatory Academy sits among a collection of abandoned homes that are slowly being reclaimed by trees and vines. One nearby home is nothing more than charred boards and burned memories, left to the elements after a house fire. Vehicles line the road, many on jacks or with missing parts and broken glass.

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AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021 • 19


The location of the school, though, is intentional. Challenge Preparatory Academy is a small school with a very large vision—neighborhood revitalization through education. Starting this August with fifth and sixth graders, Challenge Prep eventually will grow to include grades K through 12. “I love this area and the idea of being a part of the revitalization of this community,” says the principal, Dr. Mayreather Willis. “I think having a school here that they can anchor the movement on is going to be instrumental. We are going to expand from this building going east and we are going to create a campus. A part of our vision also is to provide community-based support for families and a part of that is education.” She points to the fact that the neighborhood is in the backyard of the cyber industry. The problem, though, is that many adults don’t have access to the education to take advantage of that. “Here in this community, a lot of people aren’t going to have access to Fort Gordon, and many aren’t going to

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feel comfortable going to the Cyber Innovation Center,” she explains. “AU may be a stretch even though it’s just up the hill, and with Augusta Tech, the travel to get there is difficult for some folks.” That’s why, in addition to a private school for children, Challenge Prep also is a Cisco Network Academy, which uses the same platform Augusta University, Augusta Tech, Fort Gordon and the Cyber Innovation Center use in their curriculums. The school will offer certifications in programming, IT, cybersecurity, design and more, focusing especially on parents who have been displaced by Covid or are unemployed, or just want to have improved economic stability to help their families. “Just think about what it will do for this community to have a space like this and the motivation and the draw it can have to give parents that economic power to change their future with stable jobs that pay 50 to 60 thousand dollars a year,” Dr. Willis says, her voice full of excitement. “Anyone in the community that wants to come to Cisco Academy, they will be welcomed. Many places charge


not just with the other teachers, but with the students.” $1,500 to $3,500 for one class. We are nowhere near that. As part of the concept, teachers will use their strength We are a nonprofit, and our goal is to be a communityto help any students who are struggling in a certain area. based school. In order to be able to do that, the parents “If I’m in the pod and my specialty is writing, then have to be able to afford to come here.” we’ll do a differentiated instruction center where I’m Giving parents that economic power helps their focused on the writing and will work with any kids that children. are struggling with writing,” Willis says. “A teacher with a “We believe if the parents are secure, the kids are specialty in grammar will help any students who need to secure,” she explains. “If I’m not worried about feeding focus on grammar, and they’ll move through that. It really my family and I have a career opportunity, my children closes gaps in learning.” are more apt to learn and succeed in school.” Another concept Willis and her team will implement Challenge Preparatory Academy is starting with fifth is looping. With looping, the teacher moves up to teach and sixth grades because Dr. Willis sees a need to close the same students in the next grade each year. some educational gaps among those students. “That lets the teacher know what the students are “After I looked at the data for this area, I saw a mastering and where the deficits are. So, when the fifth gap between fifth and sixth graders. There are amazing grade ELA teacher moves up with the students and becomes programs and lots of resources out there for children in the sixth grade ELA teacher, he or she already knows primary and pre-K; those kids get all sorts of support, but where the strengths and weaknesses are there’s not much for this age group,” she and can go from there,” Willis says. “The points out. “It’s difficult enough to go “WE WANT TO teacher can plan more authentically and from fifth to sixth grade because now you HELP CREATE on purpose to close the gaps and really have more responsibility, and you have to prepare kids for the next year.” change classes and all of that. Compound ECONOMIC In addition to core subjects that that with the fact that you’ve been home POWER FOR are part of any school’s curriculum, and learning online all year because of Challenge Prep will teach Cyber Literacy Covid, and many kids are going to the next PARENTS TO HELP Connections, a program Challenge grade who just aren’t ready.” CHILDREN BE affectionately calls CLiC. Willis’s original plan was to start “With CLiC, cyber education is a part a charter school in the Harrisburg BETTER CITIZENS of the curriculum and not an elective,” area, but after four years, she and her AND TO GROW Willis says. “They will look at the morals committee were struggling to make that and ethical side of the internet. What does happen. So, they started an after-school ACADEMICALLY.” it mean to have a cyber footprint? They’ll program in a partnership with Greater –Dr. Mayreather Willis learn the history of the internet and what St. John Baptist Church in the upstairs of it means to have an Internet of Things.” the Family Life Building. That program Dr. Willis emphasizes that Challenge Prep’s goal is was such a success that the Rev. Dr. Melvin Ivey gave to be a community-based school that will be a catalyst to them the entire building to start a private school, which help with neighborhood revitalization. is where Challenge Prep is located. “I want to see this community grow and not get At 1948 Ellis St., the building includes two classroom pushed out. If they don’t get on this cyber boat that is pods downstairs and offices and smaller classrooms moving through their neighborhood, they risk getting upstairs for cyber education, music, art and more. The pushed out,” she explains. “We want to help create fifth and sixth grade classrooms are called pods because economic power for parents to help children be better they are inside of cubicle walls that can easily be moved citizens and to grow academically.” to facilitate collaboration, a method Willis picked up from her time working with the Department of Defense Education and Activity (DoDEA). Dustin Turner has spent most of his career “I really liked their 21st Century methodology in journalism and is now the Website Project of teaching, and that’s how we’re going to implement Manager for Alison South Marketing Group, where he works with Jamie, his wife of 24 instruction here. They see their schools as communities, years. They live in Aiken with their daughter, they are ‘our children.’ They call their classrooms pods, a Abigail, a ninth-grade artist, video gamer and jiu-jitsu student. Dustin is on the board concept known as classrooms without walls,” she explains. of directors of Aiken Community Theatre and “Twice a day, teachers remove the walls and they collab, enjoys grilling and making muscadine wine.

AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021 • 21


A U G U S TA


SCHEDULE YOUR “BACK TO SCHOOL” SKATE PARTY TODAY!

Warm Water

Water Safety

Small Class Size

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TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY EVENINGS ARE SET ASIDE FOR SCHOOL FUNDRAISERS. CALL 706-796-4048 OR EMAIL KATHYSK8LAND@GMAIL.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION.

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AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021 � 23


fun food Co ur te sy of Fa m i l y Fe atu res

Chopped Chicken Taco Salad

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Deliver Flavor and Nutrition Despite Busy Schedules

A

s kids and parents return to busy schedules full of sports, homework and weeknight activities, building a plan for nutritious and easy meals can be challenging. Piecing together a menu that fuels active minds without spending hours in the kitchen is a common goal for many families. These recipes require minimal prep and call for on-hand ingredients like dairy food favorites that provide nutrients people of all ages need to grow and maintain strong bodies and minds. Whether you enjoy it together in the morning before getting the day started or mix it up with breakfast for dinner, this Sustainable Frittata is called “sustainable” because you can use leftover cheeses, veggies, ham, sausage and more to recycle ingredients you already have on hand. For a customizable kid-pleaser, turn to Chopped Chicken Taco Salad and garnish with your family’s favorite toppings. When it’s time to put a twist on a classic while changing up your dinner routine, Roasted Red Pepper and Pesto Grilled Cheese Sandwiches are perfect for putting something new on the table. Make supper a cinch with Slow Cooker Macaroni and Cheese, which lets you put the work in the hands of your slow cooker for a versatile dish that can be served when homework is finished. Visit milkmeansmore.org to find more recipes for bringing loved ones together.

CHOPPED CHICKEN TACO SALAD Recipe courtesy of Megan Gundy of “What Megan’s Making” on behalf of Milk Means More Prep time: 15 minutes Cook time: 15 minutes Servings: 4 Dressing: • 1 cup plain Greek yogurt • 1/3 cup buttermilk, plus additional (optional) • 1 tablespoon fresh-squeezed lime juice, plus additional (optional) • 3 tablespoons chopped cilantro • 2 tablespoons taco seasoning Salad: • 2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts • 2 tablespoons taco seasoning • 2 tablespoons olive oil • 1 head leaf lettuce, chopped • 1 avocado, chopped into bite sized pieces • 1 cup black beans, drained and rinsed

• • •

1 cup corn 1 pint grape or cherry tomatoes, chopped 1 cup shredded cheese (Monterey Jack or Mexican) tortilla strips or crushed tortilla chips, for topping

To make dressing: In small bowl, stir yogurt, buttermilk, lime juice, cilantro and taco seasoning until combined. Taste and adjust lime juice and cilantro as needed. If dressing is too thick, add buttermilk 1 teaspoon at a time until desired consistency is reached. Refrigerate until ready to serve. To make salad: Season chicken on both sides with taco seasoning. Heat large skillet over medium-high heat and add olive oil. Add chicken to pan and cook on both sides until outside is golden brown and chicken is cooked through. Remove to cutting board and slice into strips. On large platter, heap chopped lettuce. Sprinkle chicken over top. Add avocado, beans, corn, tomatoes and shredded cheese. Drizzle dressing on top and sprinkle with tortilla strips or crushed tortilla chips.

AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021 • 25


Slow Cooker Macaroni and Cheese

Sustainable Frittata

SUSTAINABLE FRITTATA Recipe courtesy of Jenn Fillenworth of “Jenny With the Good Eats” on behalf of Milk Means More Prep time: 5 minutes Cook time: 20 minutes Servings: 8 • • • • •

12 eggs, beaten 1/4 cup whole milk, half and half or heavy cream 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 cups shredded cheese, any variety 3 cups assorted cooked vegetables and pre-cooked meats

fresh herbs, for garnish (optional)

Preheat oven to 450 F. Preheat cast-iron pan or oven-safe skillet over medium heat. In large bowl, mix eggs, milk and salt then add shredded cheese. Add cooked vegetables and meats to pan to reheat. Once vegetables have softened, add egg mixture to pan and scramble. Let sit over medium heat 1 minute. Carefully transfer to oven and bake 10-15 minutes. Frittata is done when eggs have set. Remove from oven and top with fresh herbs.

SLOW COOKER MACARONI AND CHEESE

Recipe courtesy of Rachel Gurk of “Rachel Cooks” on behalf of Milk Means More Prep time: 20 minutes Cook time: 2 hours Servings: 8

• • • • • • • • •

16 ounces elbow pasta 4 tablespoons butter 3 ounces reduced-fat cream cheese 2 cups whole milk 12 ounces evaporated milk 1/2 cup light sour cream 2 large eggs, beaten 3/4 teaspoon ground mustard pepper, to taste

8 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, shredded 8 ounces grated provolone cheese

Cook pasta al dente according to package directions. Drain and pour into large slow cooker. In small saucepan over medium heat, whisk butter and cream cheese until melted. Stir in milk, evaporated milk and sour cream; whisk until combined. Remove from heat; whisk in eggs, ground mustard and pepper, to taste. Stir in cheeses. Pour mixture over cooked macaroni and stir to combine cheese and pasta. Cover and cook 2 hours on low. Switch to warm until ready to serve.

ROASTED RED PEPPER AND PESTO GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICHES Recipe courtesy of Katie Serbinski of “Mom to Mom Nutrition” on behalf of Milk Means More Prep time: 5 minutes Cook time: 10 minutes Servings: 2 • • • • •

4 slices French or Italian bread 3 tablespoons prepared pesto 2 large roasted red peppers 4 slices mozzarella cheese 2 tablespoons butter, softened

Preheat skillet or grill pan over medium-low heat. Spread insides of bread slices evenly with pesto. Stack red peppers and mozzarella cheese. Spread outer sides of bread with softened butter and grill until toasted and cheese is melted, about 5 minutes per side. Rest 1 minute before cutting. Roasted Red Pepper and Pesto Grilled Cheese Sandwiches

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AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021 • 27


family matters

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels

By El a na Ko e hl e r

Interesting and Forward-Pacing School Programs NORTH AUGUSTA HIGH SCHOOL’S AVIATION PROGRAM North Augusta High School is encouraging their students to fly high with the start up of a new course: Introduction to Aviation. Honors World History teacher and pilot with 20 years of flight experience, Travis Spears, will be instructing the course that implements a curriculum written by the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. During the class, students will learn the information required to take the Federal Aviation Administration exam, which will put them on the path to obtaining a pilot’s license. Though North Augusta High School does not offer the license exam for students, interested students can register to take it at Aiken Tech. After finishing the course and taking the Federal Aviation Administration exam Spears explains, “…there is an FAA Practical exam including an oral exam given by the FAA Flight Examiner. These classes will also

28 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021

help with those oral exam questions.” In addition to passing the exams, students will need to complete 20 hours of flight with an instructor and 20 hours of solo flight to obtain the license. They will seek these requirements outside the classroom. The high school course will also offer insight into different jobs in aviation such as pilots, mechanics and air traffic controllers. It is aimed toward rising ninth and tenth graders and will be a yearlong course. Spears says that advanced classes will be available for students who have completed the Introduction to Aviation. The class will be taught on campus at North Augusta High School, and although students will not practice flying a real plane, Spears notes that Augusta Aviation has donated a flight simulator that students will use for simulated practice. Spears feels the importance of introducing this course to students is because of an existing pilot shortage. According to Boeing, “as commercial traffic demand returns in upcoming


years, aspiring aviators will have the opportunity to fill open positions created by a combination of personnel retirements and fleet growth.” This makes the opportunity for students to take this course even more valuable. He notes that “people often have this idea that aviation is only for millionaires, but it’s not.” He emphasizes that there are many career opportunities in aviation. The Federal Aviation Administration lists additional career paths to include air traffic control specialists, electricians, engineers, flight attendants, ground crew members, safety inspectors, sales and service representatives and technical operations specialists. The FAA website details many partner programs available for high school students. Some include: •

• •

Build A Plane for which a plane is donated to a high school for students to either assemble or refurbish; Academy of Model Aeronautics which promotes model aviation as a hobby and sport; The International Aviation Art Contest encourages young artists to enter pieces that engage with aeronautics and aviation.

North Augusta High School is the first local school to offer this type of class. It is providing its students with an interesting academic path, one that schools do not usually highlight in this manner. The class begins in the fall, and the hope is that more schools will follow the precedent by offering introductory courses in new and interesting fields to their students. Sources: www.boeing.com www.faa.gov www.wrdw.com.2021/05/26 acpsd.net/NAHS GREENBRIER HIGH SCHOOL’S CAREER, TECHNICAL AND AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION PATHWAYS Greenbrier High School in Columbia County offers CTAE or the Career, Technical and Agricultural Education program. Their program combines academic courses with hands-on learning experiences. A few of the offered pathways include early childhood education, JROTC (Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps), essentials to

healthcare and cybersecurity. By participating in one of these pathways, students will experience academic courses targeted at the career in which they are interested. The school also has a Work-Based Learning program, allowing CTAE students to receive credit for real work experience. One of its goal is to lessen “the skills gap between employee and job requirements” by “increasing the skill level of potential employees.” A few of the local businesses that are offering Work-Based Learning opportunities for students in a CTAE pathway are Augusta Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Specialists, Richmond County Sheriff’s Office, Columbia County Board of Education and Georgia Iron Works. The Work-Based Learning program is offered in schools throughout the state of Georgia. To learn more about these opportunities in local schools, visit www.gawbl.org. Sources: www.ccboe.net/wbl www.greenbrierhs.ccboe.net

MIDLAND VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL EARLY COLLEGE PROGRAM Another local high school offering an atypical option for its students is Midland Valley High School. Midland Valley offers the Early College program that allows participating students to graduate high school with a diploma and an Associate of Arts or Science degree. Students begin taking the courses required for this program as early as the summer before their sophomore year of high school. Professors from Aiken Technical College teach some courses on campus at Midland Valley, while during the summers the participating students attend Aiken Tech. To participate in the Early College program, students must have a PSAT score of at least 500 in the reading/ writing section, achieve an 80 in the Accuplacer test reading skills section, a 90 in writing skills and partake in an interview. According to the Midland Valley website, the entire Early College curriculum is 61-course hours spread over three years. The program allows students to begin experiencing college courses at an earlier age, as well as save money on future college courses by completing them early through the Early College program. The first class of graduates of the Early College program, which consisted of twelve students, graduated in 2019. Source: www.acpsd.net/MVHS

Elana Koehler is a student at Augusta University and Augusta Family’s summer editorial intern.

AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021 • 29


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calendar AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2021

AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021 � 31


AUGUST SUNDAY

1

NATIONAL FRIENDSHIP DAY

MONDAY

2

TUESDAY

3

WEDNESDAY

4

THURSDAY

5 RICHMOND COUNTY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STARTS

FRIDAY

6

SATURDAY

7

AUGUSTA GEM, MINERAL AND FOSSIL SHOW

COLUMBIA COUNTY SCHOOL STARTS

8

9

10

11

12

RICHMOND COUNTY MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL STARTS

15

16

23

17

24 NATIONAL WAFFLE DAY

Photo by Alexandr Podvalny from Pexels

29

30

14

SCREEN ON THE GREEN AT GATEWAY PARK

18

31

32 � AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021

19

20

21

27

28

AMP THE ALLEY

AIKEN COUNTY SCHOOL STARTS

22

13

25

26

EVENING OF LOVE, ERIC BENET


SEPTEMBER SUNDAY

MONDAY

6

TUESDAY

7

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

1

2

3

4

8

9

10

11

13

14

15

16

20

21

22

23

24

25

JOHN CRIST COMEDY TOUR

PHINIZY SWAMP MOTH CAMPOUT

PHINIZY SWAMP MOTH CAMPOUT

LAST REGULAR SEASON GAME AT SRP PARK

19

ARTSCITY AUGUSTA

Photo by Pixabay from Pexels

26

SWAMP SATURDAY HIKE

5K RUN FOR HOPE

LABOR DAY

12

SATURDAY

27

NATIONAL FAMILY DAY

28

NATIONAL DOUBLE CHEESEBURGER DAY

29

17

ARTSCITY AUGUSTA

30

AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021 � 33


Photo by Shelley Pauls from Pexels

R ECUR R ING EVENT INFO DAILY Civil War Tours at Augusta Canal Discovery Center, $14 adults, $12 seniors 60+, students and military. Starts at 1:30pm. Learn about Georgia’s role in supplying Southern troops during the Civil War. www.augustacanal.com/boattours.php Puzzle your way through the Sculpture Trail Scavenger Hunt, beginning at the Sacred Heart Cultural Center. 8am– 11:50pm. Free. www.augustasculpturetrail.com

Shop your favorite local produce, meat and dairy. Health screenings and heart-healthy education on site. www.augustalocallygrown.org/farmers-markets

Experience beautiful art at The Morris Museum of Art. The museum hosts Free Sundays at The Morris. 12–5pm. Free. www.themorris.org Sunday FUNdays at SRP Park have different themes each Sunday home game including Comic Book Hero Night, Bark in the Park, Mystery Ball and Bobblehead Night, Jr. Jackets Kids Club, Auggie’s Birthday Bash, and much more. See home game schedule for tickets, times and specific information for this family-friendly event! www.milb.com/ augusta/tickets/promotions MONDAYS, WEDNESDAYS & FRIDAYS Tour the Hopes for Hooves Farm to see pigs, donkeys and more at Day at the Farm. 11am–1pm. $10 per child. www. facebook.com/HopeforHoovesRescue Sit down and read with Peanut, the pony, at Hopes for Hooves Rescue. Reading with Peanut is from 11am–1pm. Free. www.facebook.com/HopeforHoovesRescue TUESDAYS Veggie Park Farmers Market. Free entry. 4:30–7:30pm.

Evans Market has local artisans, farmers, produce and vendors. Evans Towne Center Park, 9am–1pm. www.facebook. com/events/473852437076911

TUESDAYS AND SATURDAYS Get fresh local produce, baked goods and crafts from Aiken farmers and makers at the year-round Aiken County Farmers Market. Open Tuesdays and Saturdays from 7:30– 11:30am, or until sold out. www.visitaikensc.com WEDNESDAYS THROUGH SUNDAYS

SUNDAYS

SATURDAYS

Visit more than 200 exotic animals at Eudora Farms DriveThru Safari and try the brand-new Dino Hunt. Open WedSun, 10am–5:30pm. $20 per car. www.eudorafarms.net

EVENTS AUGUST 6: Kids Night Out, Parents Night In at the Kroc Center. 6–10pm. Ages 2 -12. Swimming, inflatables, arts and crafts and more. Swim requirements and per-registration information at www.facebook.com/events/2385158195106007 AUGUST 6 - 7: Ed Turner and Number Nine returns to the Imperial Theatre. 7:30–11pm. $35 - $50. www.imperialtheatre.com/events

THURSDAYS Enjoy live music, art and food from local restaurants at Amp the Alley. You’re even able to stroll through the alley with your favorite drink! The Alley at Bee Lane in Aiken. www. facebook.com/ampthealley

AUGUST 6 - 8: Annual Aiken-Augusta Gem, Mineral and Fossil Show. 10am–6pm. Julian Smith Casino. CASH only. $4/person; $6/weekend pass. Children under 12 are FREE. www.facebook.com/events/3605425146171834

FRIDAYS

AUGUST 7: Rumours: A Fleetwood Mac Tribute showcases authentic renditions and recreations of the original band songs at the Miller Theater. 7:30pm. www.millertheateraugusta.com

Laney Walker Farmers Market happens every four weeks on First Fridays. 850 Laney Walker Blvd. 4:30pm–7pm. Free. www.augustalocallygrown.org Drive in to Recteq Movie Night held at RecTec Grill. Concessions are available. Movie begins at 7:30pm and each parking spot costs $10. www.movienight.recteq.com Enjoy some delicious treats and fun tunes at Food Truck Fridays with Bands & Brews at the Columbia County Amphitheatre, 6–9pm. Free admission. www.exploregeorgia.org/evans/events/culinary-food-winebeer/food-truck-fridays-with-bands-and-brews

34 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021

AUGUST 11, 28: Augusta Moms Connection, August 11th: 10–11:30am. Riverview Park playground and splash pad. 100 Riverview Park Dr., North Augusta AUGUST 28TH: 9:30–11am. Covenant Presbyterian Church playground. 3131 Walton Way, Augusta Augusta Moms Connection is a non-profit organization dedicated to making a positive difference in the lives of


AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021 • 35


Photo provided by Aimee Serafin

mothers, their children and our community! The Meet and Greet events are a great opportunity to meet other moms and learn more about the group while the kids play. For more information, visit membership@augustamomsconnection.com! AUGUST 13: FREE movie night at Gateway Park. Bring your chairs and blankets to Screen on the Green, 7–10pm. Vendors on site. www.facebook.com/events/gateway-park/ screen-on-the-green/413337969753349. AUGUST 14: Children’s Hike with Story Time, Phinizy Center and Nature Park. 8–9:30am. www.phinizycenter.org/ guided-hikes-family-camping AUGUST 14: Tony Howard’s Motown Review. Imperial Theatre. 7–11pm. $15 - $50. www.imperialtheatre.com/events AUGUST 20: [Rescheduled event] Cody Jinks is at the Bell Auditorium. Tickets previously purchased will be honored for this event. 7pm. $27 - $100. www.augustaentertainmentcomplex.com AUGUST 27: Southern Rockers 38 Special in concert at the Miller Theater. 7:30pm. $53 - $83. www.millertheateraugusta.com AUGUST 28: Eric Benet with Keke Wyatt and “The Prince of Soul” Calvin Richardson come to the Bell Auditorium. Soul singer-songwriter and 4-time Grammy nominated artist will sing from his 9 studio albums and 21 singles as he shares his artistry in an Evening of Love with Augusta. 8pm. $45 - $85. www.augustaentertainmentcomplex.com SEPT 4: Swamp Saturday Hike at Phinizy Center and Nature Park. 8–10am. $2/person. www.phinizycenter.org

SEPT 10: The Southern Rock Tribute Goin’ South plays southern rock classics with local Aiken and Augusta musicians. 7pm. $44-$79. www.millertheateraugusta.com SEPT 11: RUN for HOPE, 5k Run/Walk for hope starts at the Augusta Dream Center. $30. 9am. www.facebook.com/ events/130303395556081 SEPT 11: Darci Lynne & Friends: Fresh Out of the Box Tour. Singer/ventriloquist winner of NBC’s “America’s Got Talent” at 12 years old with the most votes on a final performance. Bell Auditorium. $30 - $100. www.augustaentertainmentcomplex.com SEPT 12: Augusta GreenJackets versus the Columbia Fireflies for last regular season game at SRP Park. 6:35pm. Luau Party theme and post-game fireworks. Sunday FUNday. For information, visit https://www.milb.com/augusta/ tickets/promotions. SEPT 17: BORDER BASH returns to the SRP Park with Georgia and South Carolina cheerleaders and mascots. Live music and Big Al from the Kid Kraddick Morning Show on HD98.3. SRP Park. For tickets and information, visit www. milb.com/augusta. SEPT 17 - 19: ARTSCITY Festival in Augusta! This scaled down mini-Arts in the Heart Festival will have plenty of fine crafts, international flair and food and performances. Support Augusta arts downtown and in the Commons. www.eventeny.com/events/artscityfestival-1280 SEPT 23: Fresh Cuts Comedy Tour with John Crist. Crist is best known for his viral videos “Honest Football Coach,” “Every Parent at Disney,” and “Brands that need to be CANCELLED” that launched the comedian into sold-out shows on the road from coast to coast. 7pm. Bell Auditorium. $30 - $50. www.augustaentertainmentcomplex.com

36 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021

SEPT 24: Festival of the Woods with guest speaker Rudy Mancke, host of NatureScene. Hitchcock Woods, Aiken. 6–8pm. www.discoveraikencounty.com/organizer/thehitchcock-woods-foundation SEPT 25: Santana, Blessings and Miracles Tour. As a ten-time Grammy award winner and three-time Latino Grammy winner, the talent of Santana is legendary. This Afro-Latin-blue-rocker and smooth vibes guitar player will provide a night to remember. 8pm. Bell Auditorium. $50 - $150. www.augustaentertainmentcomplex.com SEPT 25: Cookin’ for Kids Oyster Roast at Daniel Field Airport. All you can eat steamed and roasted oysters, live music and auction. E-Z Go Golf Cart Raffle. $50/person. www.childenrichment.org/cfkoysterroast SEPT 24 - 25: Join the Randall Bramblett Band Friday night for a FREE evening of music with the Blind Willie Kick Off Concert in Thomson. Thomson Depot. 7–9pm. www.visitthomsonga.com/new-events/2021/9/24/ blind-willie-kick-off-concert. Then return on Saturday morning at 11am for the 27th Annual Blind Willie McTell Music Festival. Tickets required for this event. $41/person. General admission. www.blindwillie.com. JULY 24 - 25: Count, take photos and identify all different species of moths at the overnight Phinizy Swamp Moth Campout. From 7:30pm–9am. $5 per person. www. phinizycenter.org SEPT 24 - 26: Young Frankenstein, The Augusta Players. Imperial Theatre. Two 8pm shows and 3pm on Sunday. The adaptation of the Mel Brooks’ hauntingly hilarious film will leave you in stitches! www.secure.ticketsage.net/websales. aspx?u=augustaplayers


T H E

MODERN P E R S P E C T I V E

So, where are they now? We caught up with some of the past subjects we featured in the Modern Perspective and share their updates in this issue of Augusta Family magazine.

DECEMBER 2019/ JANUARY 2020 JACK MONNIG (Photographer) Jack continues his education at Georgia Tech majoring in Business Administration, with a minor in Linguistics and a minor in Spanish. He started an internship in June with Buckhead Church doing live production. Jack says, “The internship incorporates the audio, video, and lighting aspects of worship. It’s an incredible experience and I’m able to explore some of the interests I found in photography.”

MAY/JUNE 2020 TYSON OMAR RILEY II (Runner)

OCTOBER 2019 GENESIS WILLIAMS (Actor and Comedian)

Best known as “Hollywood GenGen or Augusta’s Teen Madea”, Genesis is a fulltime college student while managing and promoting his career as an actor and comedian. Genesis caught the attention of Steve Harvey and actor Cocoa Brown, and he recently worked on Tyler Perry’s newest Netflix movie. He continues to raise his social media influence with 868K followers and engagements following his hashtags have reached 62.2M views.

AUGUST/ SEPTEMBER 2020 SKY POOLE (Ballet Dancer)

Tyson had a good year at USCB. He qualified as a

Sky will be attending the

freshman for his indoor

University of Georgia this

and outdoor conference

fall where she will major

meets and received several

in Psychology and minor

scholarships. He also ended

in Dance. She is also

the year with a GPA of 3.0.

returning to Colton Ballet to

Tyson explained, “It was

participate in the Nutcracker

challenging trying to balance

since her senior year

track and my academics.

performance was cancelled.

I will be transferring to

Sky is thrilled to see what

Alabama State University in

the next four years have in

the fall continuing with track

store for her professionally

and my degree in Biology.”

and personally. AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021 • 37


T H E

MODERN OCTOBER 2020 SAIRA SMITH (Flutist) Saira has continued to expand

P E R S P E C T I V E

FEBRUARY/ MARCH 2021 CAMDEN PARADA (Basketball Player)

her knowledge in the music

Camden was invited to play

field. She met with local music

with an Under Armour 15-year-

enthusiasts and entreprenuers

old travel basketball team from

at a recent convention, and

Atlanta. He played against

discussed music programs

top competitors from all over

and how music plays a part

the country including Atlanta,

in everyday life today. She

Tennessee, Indiana and Texas.

is looking at a few different

He was recognized for his

colleges she could attend that

performance and ranked 7th in

will help further her goals.

Georgia for his age group and position. Camden continues to train and work on his game in preparation to play at the college level.

MAY 2021

JUNE/JULY 2021

ISAIAH HUGHES

ROSIE WILLIAMS

(Soccer Player)

(Ballet Dancer)

Since the Modern Perspective interview, Isaiah participated in

Rosie continues to find joy

and won two Coerver

and happiness in dancing

5v5 tournaments. He

ballet. She also brings joy

is currently signed up

and happiness to those

for an ID camp, a high

around her through her art.

school/college soccer program, and he has two more Coerver Kid sessions left in the season.

38 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021


Profile for Augusta Family Magazine

Augusta Family Magazine August/September 2021  

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