Augusta Family Magazine October 2021

Page 1

OCTOBER 2021

A U G U S TA

Teen

Issue

A DIFFERENT

SENIOR EXPERIENCE

COLLEGE ADMISSIONS: THE LATEST [UNTRADITIONAL] PATHWAYS TO SUCCESS

THE COLLEGE BLUES augustafamily.com


Brandon

Augusta’s Family Attorney 561 Greene Street | Augusta, Georgia 30901 | Telephone: 706.823.2001 | Fax: 706.823.2007 | www.brandondiallaw.com



on the cover

OCTOB ER 2021

Austin Brown (18) Photo by Randy Pace

w w w.a u g ust afa m i l y. co m

PUBLISHER

Ashlee Griggs Duren

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Hailea Boykin

ART DIRECTOR

Michael Rushbrook

ADVERTISING SALES Doressa Hawes

CIRCULATION/MARKETING Kimberly Stewart

PHOTOGRAPHY Randy Pace

CONTRIBUTORS Aimee Serafin Dustin Turner Paige Tucker Cammie Jones

A Publication of MCC Magazines, LLC A division of Morris Communications Company, LLC | 725 Broad St., Augusta, GA 30901 Morris Communications Company, LLC William S. Morris III, Chairman Craig S. Mitchell, CEO MCC Magazines Tina Battock, President, Morris Media Network Scott Ferguson, Vice President Finance and Operations Sherry Brown, Director of Manufacturing & Production Cher Wheeler, Publication Services Manager Veronica Brooks, Accounting Manager Michelle Rowe, Circulation Business Manager

Augusta Family Magazine is published 8 times per year and distributed throughout the Augusta and Aiken area. Send press releases, story ideas or comments to the editor@augustafamily.com or mail to 725 Broad Street, Augusta, Ga., 30901. For advertising information, call (706) 823-3702. For circulation/distribution, call (706) 828-4391.

Is your child ready for their “close up?” If you think you’ve got a “cover kid,” submit their photo and information on our website or to editor@ augustafamily.com and they may grace the cover of Augusta Family Magazine.

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contents www.augustafamily.com

A Different Senior Experience

Rooted and Growing

Tidbits

—Dustin Turner

Lessons Learned

Teenager Tips

18

10

12

FH

—Paige Tucker

* FINN HINTS Indicates additional information and family resources Look for Finn the Family Fox hiding in the magazine!

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— Augusta Family Staff


OCTOBER 2021

The Hurried [and happy] Home Maker

Family Matters

The College Blues

—Cammie Jones

College Admissions: the Latest [untraditional] Pathways to Success —Aimee Serafin

16

28

8

Editor’s Page

24

Fun Food

30

Calendar

—Family Features

—Hailea Boykin

The Modern Perspective Evan Mathews — Ashlee Duren

38

AUGUSTA FAMILY | OCTOBER 2021 • 7


editor’s notes

I

recently read a quote that said, “Teenagers are the most misunderstood people on the planet. They are treated like children and expected to act like adults.” I can remember being a teenager, (it wasn’t that long ago) and wanting so badly to be able to make my own decisions. Do whatever I wanted, when I wanted, without the watchful eye of my parents. No rules. If I had only known then what I know now. Be sure to cherish time with family and don’t be so quick to grow up, being an adult is not all cracked up to be. Being a teenager is hard, especially in today’s world. I honestly cannot imagine how difficult it must be coping with daily life in such an uncertain environment. (Thank you, Covid.) In this issue, Dustin Turner talks with three high school seniors about their final year. How they are coping with the daily uncertainty, staying motivated to finish strong and juggling their schedules. Dustin also speaks with their mothers and how they feel about the next chapter. Former Family editor, Aimee Serafin, helps navigate the options for college admissions testing and explains how the new approaches are untraditional and consider a student’s entire academic career and not rely on a sole standardized test score. Cammie Jones tackles the issue of homesickness for your college teens. Change is the name of the game for our children in today’s world, particularly for teenagers. The expression, “It takes a village to raise a child,” has never been more true. We’re happy to be a part of that village.

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Ashlee Duren ashlee.duren@augustafamily.com


2021 Physicians’ Directory

Download the Physicians’ Directory app for free and have contact information at your fingertips for Augusta and Aiken area physicians and dentists. Database is searchable by both specialty and by name. Brought to you by Augusta Magazine.


rooted and growing

Photo by Any Lane from Pexels

Paige Tucker

10 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | OCTOBER 2021


Lessons Learned 1. We are not in control. God pressed pause on the whole world in March 2020, and that was it. When it comes to the life lessons we take from the slow-down, however, we do have a little say. 2. Grace upon grace, upon grace. We all need grace more than ever and need to offer it freely. More often than not, we’re doing the best we can, whether it’s our co-workers, our children or the clerk at the grocery store. 3. Children are resilient. But they also love routines, their friends and their extended family. As parents, we can shield them from a lot, but they were keenly aware when the world seemed to stop turning last year. I know in our house, that made for some pushback and some tears. How could I fault my little girl, Julia Reynolds, when suddenly the words no, cancelled and postponed were the most frequent she heard? That’s where that grace comes in. 4. Busy isn’t better. Clearing the calendar proved therapeutic in many ways, for children and adults. Many of us now think twice before overscheduling and immediately regretting taking on too much. Make sure that yes is worth it. Sometimes no is the best yes to your family. 5. Family is everything. Relationships matter. Don’t wait to nurture them. Most of us had more time to communicate during Quarantine, but it’s a good reminder to keep our people close always. How fun was it reconnecting with college besties or long lost childhood friends, even if it was on ZOOM? 6. Nothing trumps in-person communication. We live in a text/email/video chat world, and while I’m thankful for all of that, nothing compares to seeing your people face to face. 2021 has opened some doors, but I’m looking forward to more gatherings and hugs in the future. 7. Life is not always going to look like we want it to. I’d say we’ve gotten some hands-on experience figuring out how to function when it’s not going the way we’d hoped.

8. Daily routines like making the bed and getting dressed for the day are beneficial. Even when you have nowhere to go! Your mom was right, making your bed is a worthwhile habit. It sets the tone for the day and when we weren’t leaving home too much, it helped break up the monotony of getting out of bed and seemingly getting right back in. Also, pants with buttons and a little mascara can do wonders for your day! 9. Quarantining is hard, and hopefully once in a lifetime, but thank goodness for a safe place to stay safe. Far too many are not so lucky. 10. Keep a good stock of things important to you and, you know, the basics. When we’re old and gray, we’re going to have stockpiles of toilet paper stashed in the closets. Some of my favorite moms and girlfriends contributed to this list. There was plenty of repetition as we collaborated. Themes of love, family, and faith rang true. A few bonus lessons: Noise cancelling headphones are considered essential. Get to know your neighbors, you might need to borrow a roll of TP. Learn how to make your favorite cocktail, you’ll need it. Distance learning is not for the faint of heart, and teachers are heroes! And the funniest – There is a lady out there, named Carole Baskin, who fed her husband to a tiger. As the end of the second year of this “new normal” nears, I think about all of the things we’ve missed and all that’s indelibly changed – families, school, parties, graduations, and weddings. Our lives are forever altered. But the really important stuff has been magnified. Let’s hope that rings true long after the pandemic passes. After twelve years in local news, most recently as evening anchor of NBC 26, Paige Tucker is now a work-athome mom and freelance journalist. She produces two series for NBC 26 TV, First Responders and 26 Women Today, and you can see those stories on Tuesday nights. Paige and her husband have one daughter, Julia Reynolds, who is seven years old.

AUGUSTA FAMILY | OCTOBER 2021 � 11


BEST JOBS FOR YOUNGER TEENS (14&15 YEAR- OLDS ) • Animal Shelter Volunteer • Assistant to Freelance Writer, Designer or Programmer • Babysitter/Nanny • Baseball Umpire for Little League • Busser • Camp Counselor in Training • Car Wash Attendant • Concession Worker • Dishwasher • Dog Walker • Garden/Nursery Center Assistant • Greeter • Grocery Bagger • Kennel Assistant

• Lawnmower • Leaf Remover • Lifeguard • Marketing Intern • Movie Theater Employee • Music Teacher for Beginners • Pet Sitter • Referee for Beginner Soccer, Basketball or Football • Restaurant Host/ Hostess • Stock Retail Clerk • Swim Instructor for Beginners • Tutor • YouTube Content Creator

TIPS FOR GETTING YOUR FIRST PART-TIME JOB Find out what the labor laws are in your state (there are restrictions on how many hours teenagers can work and what type of work they are allowed to do) Make sure you have the appropriate documentation to work Find a job that is flexible and is willing to accommodate your hours

TIPS FOR COMMUNICATING WITH YOUR TEEN Listen Validate their feelings Show trust Don't be a dictator Show praise Control your emotions Do things together Share regular meals Be observant - childmind.org

tidbits OCTOBER 2021

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DID YOU KNOW? Teenagers believe you are being hostile (even when you aren’t). Because the rational front part of their brains is underdeveloped, teenagers tend to rely on the more primitive back brain to interpret people’s facial expressions. This part of the brain is sensitized to danger and threat and is therefore more likely to detect hostile emotions when these aren’t actually present. Encouraging teenagers to talk about emotions (‘speak before you leap’) can help keep them out of trouble. And try not to join in when they fly off the handle unnecessarily. (According to the Positive Parenting Project, based in the UK)

TEENAGERS NATURALLY

FALL ASLEEP LATE AND WAKE UP LATE.

Melatonin, the hormone that makes you sleepy, is released later at night in a teenager’s brain and hangs around for longer the next day. That’s why teens often don’t feel sleepy until after 10pm and can be groggy in the mornings. But because their brains are growing at a phenomenal rate, teenagers need a lot of sleep (as much as toddlers!). There is a direct link between the amount of sleep a teenager gets and their grades at GCSE, so parents need to do everything they can to help them get their full 9-10 hours a night.

Fun Riddle! THE PERSON WHO MAKES IT HAS NO NEED OF IT, AND NEITHER DOES THE PERSON WHO BUYS IT. BUT THE PERSON WHO USES IT CAN NEITHER SEE NOR FEEL IT.

WHAT IS IT? See page 14 to view the answer for the riddle.

AUGUSTA FAMILY | OCTOBER 2021 � 13


tidbits

14 � AUGUSTA FAMILY | OCTOBER 2021

Riddle Answer: A Coffin


tidbits

A U G U S TA

open

AUGUSTA FAMILY | OCTOBER 2021 � 15


the hurried

[and happy] homemaker

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

C a m m i e Jo n es

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The College Blues

I

f you went to college in the 80’s or 90’s and became homesick the only way your parents would know was if you wrote them a letter or called them from a landline. In today’s world, instantaneous communication means that your homesick college student can text or call you at any time and tell you how they are feeling. Defined as “a feeling of longing for one’s home during a period of absence from it,” homesickness is something that can be overcome. RECOGNIZE THAT FEELING HOMESICK IS NORMAL AND TEMPORARY. According to a U.S. News & World Report article, “How to Handle Being Homesick in College” by Josh Moody, there are strategies your child can do to get over their homesickness. Knowing the feeling is normal and temporary will help you to not overreact to every text or thought your child shares with you. Just like anything new, there will be adjustments. Expectations may not be met. What your child thought would be their initial college experience may be different. It takes time to figure out classes and find real friends. Just remind them that they need to fake it till they make it and know that it will get better in the near future. TALK ABOUT IT WITH OTHERS. While reminding your child that their feelings are not going to last forever, the lines of communication need to remain open. Encourage them to reach out to others they trust that may be going through a similar experience. There should be resources at their college that deal with this type of issue. Look for a group or a mentor your child can speak with candidly about these feelings if they don’t seem to be easing with time. CREATE NEW TRADITIONS AT COLLEGE. If your student is missing familiar home meals, help them find a restaurant that serves something similar. Get them a gift card to pick up that particular food. Send them with recipes you fix at home that they can recreate if have a kitchen. Tell them to make a weekly “date” with some friends to go to a Sunday afternoon movie, meet for coffee or take a walk. Setting up an enjoyable activity will help them feel more at home in their new environment.

SEND A CARE PACKAGE. There are many resources online and locally that will help you put together and deliver a care package to your child. Just Google college care packages, include the college name, and you will be amazed at your choices. Or, make one yourself and mail it from home. This could include a note from family members, favorite candy or food that will not spoil on the way, a cute new piece of clothing, fun socks or gift cards to their favorite restaurant. Your college student will know that you care, and a surprise in the mail is always a welcomed sight! ENCOURAGE ESTABLISHING DAILY ROUTINES. Routines are good! Your child should try to set a routine that works for them and gives something to look forward to each day. Maybe set up a wake up time, study time, snack break, bedtime routine, etc. Of course, there will be social activities that will come into play that will disturb this routine but sticking to a routine during the week or going back to it after an interruption will help your child adjust. Make sure to include an incentive to look forward to — meeting a friend for lunch, eating a sweet treat or something that will add joy to their day. JOIN A CLUB. If your child is feeling homesick and not meeting new people, they may need to join a club or organization. Every college has groups looking for new members or volunteers. Encourage your child to check out various groups and see what interests him. There are many secular and religious groups where your child will fit in and find some like-minded individuals to navigate the newness of being out of the nest for the first time. The old adage that a parent is only as happy as their least happy child definitely applies in this situation. Take the time to listen to your child and sympathize, but be firm in that this is a temporary feeling they’re experiencing. It’s time for your student to learn to take care of themself and what better way than right now — in a college campus atmosphere! Cammie Jones is an Augusta freelance writer and mother of three.

AUGUSTA FAMILY | OCTOBER 2021 • 17


SENIOR A DIFFERENT

E X P E R I E N C E

Photo created by user18526052 - www.freepik.com

BY DUSTIN TURNER

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It’s no secret that senior year of high school can be difficult. Students are keeping up with schoolwork and extracurricular activities, making decisions about college and life after high school and preparing to leave home, often while maintaining a job. Today’s seniors have the added difficulties of navigating life during a pandemic. Still, they find lots to celebrate and enjoy this special time. Austin Brown is a senior and football player at North Augusta High School. He especially enjoys being a role model to younger students. “It’s a little overwhelming, but it’s fun,” he said. “I remember when I was a freshman and getting advice from older students. Now, it feels like all the underclassmen are looking up to me. I get to be the player that helps somebody and motivates them to be better.” At Midland Valley, James Hutto also enjoys some of the benefits that come with having three years of high school behind him. He is dual enrolled and is taking college-level English 101.


AUGUSTA FAMILY | OCTOBER 2021 • 19


knows college will be a great experience. “I’m very familiar with the faculty and staff now, “I am ready to watch him spread his wings,” she and I feel like I can go up to teachers I’ve had in the said. “It’s bittersweet, but more than that, it’s exciting. past when I need some help,” he said. “I just had I think about all the fun I had, and I want him to have an essay due for English 101, and I went to a prior those experiences.” English teacher who gave me a lot of guidance.” Before the seniors go to college they have to get As someone who loves to perform, Logan through their last year of high school, and that often McCaskill is enjoying senior year at Midland Valley. boils down to time management. “I got a band leadership position, so I get to be a Austin plays varsity football and is in the Beta big dog in the band, so to speak. I lead show choir and Club and Titans of Omega youth program that concert chamber choir and lead the worship team and focuses on community service. He also works at get to sing in church,” Logan said. “That’s a big deal Beamie’s restaurant in Augusta. Adrienna says he’s for me. I’ve been waiting on that and working toward balancing it well because Austin it for a while.” is focused on keeping his GPA As with many parents, “I REMEMBER WHEN up, even though he already has Austin’s mother has some mixed I WAS A FRESHMAN qualified for a Palmetto Fellows feelings about senior year. scholarship. “There’s a lot of excitement AND GETTING “It definitely gets tiring,” for me,” Adrienna Gibbs Brown ADVICE FROM OLDER Austin admits. “I just have to said. “Seeing the joy on his face remember to pace myself and get and knowing it’s almost over does STUDENTS. NOW, IT one thing done at a time. I always relieve some pressure. The time is FEELS LIKE ALL THE try to stay focused on the most drawing near for college, though, immediate task.” and it’s bittersweet. I want this for UNDERCLASSMEN In addition to band, chorus and him, but as a parent I don’t want ARE LOOKING UP TO show choir, Logan is dual enrolled him to leave.” and juggling college classes. James is the the youngest of ME. I GET TO BE THE “Being a senior, it’s hard to three boys, so the prospect of going PLAYER THAT HELPS get your ducks in a row and stay to college isn’t as tough for his motivated,” he said. “Realizing mother, Rachel Hutto. SOMEBODY AND where you need to focus is a hard “Thankfully, I’ve been MOTIVATES THEM TO thing. But it can be done. It just through this before,” Rachel said. takes time.” “Oh, it was difficult the first time; BE BETTER.” Logan said his primary focus I even got put on antidepressants. –Austin Brown is academics, but he encourages I’m very excited for James, though, all high school students to get to leave home and go have those involved in something they enjoy, whether it’s sports, experiences.” music, art or anything else. Logan’s mother, Sarah McCaskill West, says “You meet a lot of like-minded people, and it’s she has been struggling with the thought of him a nice way to have fun after focusing on academics leaving home. all day,” he said. “The most difficult thing I’m dealing with is James agrees and says being involved has made having to let go,” Sarah said. “Just the thought of him a better student. him being grown up enough to leave to go to school is “The most important thing I’ve learned – and I tough. I’ve been struggling with it for over a year. He’s learned it back in middle school - is to be involved definitely capable. It’s more a matter of me being able in clubs,” James said. “I’m in marching band, and to say I need to back off.” so is the majority of my friend group. People might Still, though, Sarah is happy for Logan and

20 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | OCTOBER 2021


wonder say it’s better to study and focus more on academics, but my band friends hold me accountable for schoolwork.” Many Class of 2020 seniors had a very different experience, thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic. Proms, football games, concerts and senior events were canceled. Graduations took place virtually and in drive-throughs. Even though many restrictions have been relaxed, COVID’s effect is still being felt. “To know that we could lose all our starters on game day because of COVID is very challenging, but a lot of underclassmen are stepping up and getting chances they might not get normally,” said Austin, a wide receiver for North Augusta. “I also worry about having to quarantine and do virtual learning. I feel like missing school puts you behind, and you have to try twice as hard to keep up. It’s hard knowing you can be doing everything right and might still get quarantined.” COVID is a challenge for Logan, who will have to audition for college programs in choral studies. Part of the process involves inviting college choral directors to concerts and performances. “It’s really disappointing because we aren’t having the performances to invite them to,” he said. “We couldn’t have band camp because of COVID and we haven’t been able to put together a marching band show because people are always being quarantined.” COVID has brought a lot of uncertainty, which James cites as his biggest concern. “You don’t even know what’s going to happen next week,” he said. “Will there be a full class or six people? Will I have to go home and do virtual class? It’s a lot to think about.” Regardless of the challenges of COVID or anything else, his mother is excited. “This is what we’ve spent 18 years working for,” Rachel said. “We’ve worked hard to get to the point where he can spread his wings and fly. Sure, it’s scary, but it’s more exciting to know he will meet new people and have wonderful experiences.” Dustin Turner has spent most of his career in journalism and is now the Website Project Manager for Alison South Marketing Group, where he works with Jamie, his wife of 24 years. They live in Aiken with their daughter, Abigail, a ninth-grade artist, video gamer and jiu-jitsu student. Dustin is on the board of directors of Aiken Community Theatre and enjoys grilling and making muscadine wine.

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Fall Festival and Silent Auction October 30, 10 am to 2 pm. There will be inflatables, a rock climbing wall, games, prizes, food concessions, a Country Kitchen with incredible home-baked goods, limo rides and much more. Come bid on beautiful theme baskets and other great stand alone items at our Silent Auction.

A F U N D AY F O R T H E W H O L E FA M I LY 313 Baston Road Martinez, GA 30907 706-863-2905 | www.augustachristian.org

A U G U S TA


TO MAKE RESERVATIONS, CALL 706.854.4700

|

WWW.EDGARSGRILLE.COM


fun food Co ur te sy of Fa m i l y Fe atu res Cul i na r y. n et

OATMEAL CREAM COOKIE SANDWICHES

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A Nostalgic Seasonal Treat

C

ooler weather often brings about nostalgic cravings for seasonal dishes and desserts. From grandma’s classic pies, to the sweet taste of apple cider touching your tongue, Fall is full of flavor, spice, sweets and treats, just waiting to be devoured with family and loved ones alike. Home chefs will know it’s time to tap into the flavor of fall once that first leaf drops to the ground. The pumpkins are set on porches and little ones all bundle up to go outside and play in the cool breeze. Nearly everyone can tell when the warm and cozy delight is here to stay for the season. The kitchen is often known as the “heart of the home” and homes all over the country will smell and taste like fall festivities all season long with this recipe for Oatmeal Cream Cookie Sandwiches. The best part about this timeless recipe is that it’s known to evoke memories from childhood and can help introduce a new generation to a treat many generations before them have enjoyed. Easy to make and pretty to look at, these cookies are great to make with little ones after a long day of pumpkin carving. Let the kids help with the preparation. They can use many ingredients you may already have in your pantry especially the ones they can reach with their little hands. The result are a soft and slightly chewy, cinnamon-spiced oatmeal cookies sandwiched around a fluffy layer of vanilla bean cream filling that can keep each member of the family reaching for another. Serve them to friends, neighbors, kids and adults and you will notice the delight spread across their faces with the very first bite. This recipe is something scrumptious that makes a statement for the upcoming season.

Find more seasonal dessert recipes and fall flavors for your family at Culinary.net.

AUGUSTA FAMILY | OCTOBER 2021 • 25


OATMEAL CREAM COOKIE SANDWICHES Servings: 10-12 Oatmeal Cookies: 1 cup unsalted butter, softened 1 cup dark brown sugar 1/2 cup light brown sugar 2 large eggs 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1 1/2 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves 3 cups rolled old-fashioned oats Vanilla Bean Cream Filling: 3/4 cup unsalted butter, softened 2 1/2 cups powdered sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 tablespoon heavy cream Heat oven to 350 F. Line baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside. To make oatmeal cookies: with a mixer, cream butter, dark brown sugar and light brown sugar on medium-high speed until creamy. Add eggs and vanilla extract; mix until combined. In medium bowl, whisk flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, cloves and oats. Gradually add oat mixture to wet ingredients, mixing until just combined. Spoon dough into hands and roll into balls. Flatten balls and place onto prepared baking sheet, leaving about 2 inches between each cookie. Bake 10-12 minutes, or until lightly golden brown around edges. Move cookies to wire rack to cool completely. To make vanilla bean cream filling: with a mixer, cream butter on medium-high speed until light and fluffy. Gradually add powdered sugar, vanilla extract and heavy cream; mix until combined. Pipe or spoon a large dollop of filling on bottom sides of half the cookies; top each with second cookie.

26 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | OCTOBER 2021


YOUR CITY. YOUR MAGAZINE. 1 YEAR $24 • 2 YEARS $29 • 3 YEARS $37 augustamagazine.com #augmagazine


family matters

Photo by Nguyen Dang Hoang Nhu on Unsplash

By Ai m ee Se rafi n

College Admissions: The Latest [Untraditional] Pathways to Success A 2021 Graduate Story At a young age, William Nettles wanted to be a doctor like his father. He started to prepare for the rigorous academic path in 7th grade as he charted course options with his advisors. Will continued with academic achievements through high school, reaching out for tutors to secure top grades in class. He paid for SAT prep courses and took standardized exams multiple times, which earned him high scores, enough to gain entry into some of the top institutions in the country. But last spring, colleges and universities made a wide-sweeping decision that changed the way students have traditionally been admitted to schools.

28 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | OCTOBER 2021

In the worlds of PSAT, SAT, ACT, superscores and test-optional, COVID-19 forged unusual pathways in late spring 2021 regarding the college admissions process. Some schools across the nation were already moving toward test-optional admissions before the pandemic, but now more colleges and universities are offering varying (or temporary) options for the 2021-2022 applicants. These new approaches are untraditional in that they do not interpret a sole standardized test score as the fulcrum of a student’s future academic success. For students like Will, this means the trend toward de-emphasizing SAT scores is growing. Although most Ivy


A CAUTIONARY WORD League institutions still weigh standardized test scores, a shift has occurred in many accredited four-year While schools move to downplay standardized universities and colleges. Flexibility in the admission test scores, there are valid reasons to exercise caution process allows students sway in how to represent their when deciding whether to have your child opt out of strengths to admissions officers. Test scores become taking the exams. One reason is with the scenario of only one component of the larger application history, two applicants whose extracurriculars, GPAs and letters giving candidates more academic real estate to present of recommendation are near identical. If one of the themselves on paper. applicants submits a high test score, institutions are apt to For test-optional colleges, the buzzword in accept this candidate over another who does not. In U.S. admissions offices is the “wholistic candidate approach” News and World Report’s article, “How Recent Events which is used for an applicant’s academic evaluation. Reshaped College Admission,” Clark Brigger, executive This approach considers the full four-year (high director of admissions at school) profile, weighing the University of Colorado extracurricular activities/ Boulder explains, “Beyond interests and academic the possible admissions initiatives along with advantage that testing personal recommendation It may be no surprise that decision making in higher offers, there is also the letters from teachers or education follows a piggy-back pattern. Reporter Jeremy matter of scholarships, employers. By examining Bauer-Wolf describes this scenario regarding the testout option for schools in 2020 in his article, “How which may be tied to “the whole” history of the National Test Optional Experiment Played Out at ACT and SAT scores. You the applicant’s profile, Colleges,” for www.highereddive.com: can apply without test colleges feel they can Decision-making in higher education is often a case of scores, but you’re not better determine the follow-the-leader. Shifting to test-flexible admissions going to get their best overall fit and potential during the pandemic was no exception. Almost all of the scholarships unless you achievements of students universities in the Ivy League announced they wouldn’t require test scores within about two weeks of each other in provide them.” (Paragraph on their campuses. June 2020. The same pattern occurred in April of that year 16) (www.usnews.com/ In addition to with many of the liberal arts schools ranked highest by U.S. education/best-colleges/ test-optional, there News & World Report. Other schools made the same move articles/how-recentseem to be two other between the spring and late summer of 2020. (paragraph 9) events-reshaped-collegepaths emerging in the For a comprehensive list of test-optional schools for 2022, admissions) admissions process for visit www.collegelifetoday.com and search “College Not It remains unclear students. The second Requiring SAT.” how this trend will option is test-flexible play out in the future. which houses different In general, admissions requirements in place officers are skeptical that the standardized exams will of the SAT. Those options might permit a minimum go away altogether. But what they are seeing is a present GPA for a specific program or AP/IB scores instead of requirement for applicants to be honest and authentic the SAT (requirements vary from college to college). about their broader academic narratives, which may give Test-blind admissions are the least prevalent rising 2022 seniors the opportunity to provide essays on among American universities and colleges, but there how they have managed and taken advantage of the last exist some institutions that are proponents of it. year and a half. Colleges that have this policy do not consider SAT scores as part of the student’s entrance portfolio: They will not accept SAT/ACT scores as part of the Aimee Serafin grew up in Atlanta and graduated from Georgia State University application process. This unconventional approach with a degree in French. She has worked to admissions could significantly change the way as a translator and editor of several students view their application experience to colleges publications during her career. She and her and universities in the future. husband, Scott Thorp, have two children.

FH

AUGUSTA FAMILY | OCTOBER 2021 � 29


30 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | OCTOBER 2021


calendar OCTOBER 2021

REMAIN SANE AND STAY IN THE GAME CALENDAR

Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels

Since many local events are still up in the air, we created a “remain sane and stay in the game” calendar with this issue of Augusta Family magazine. We added creative and adventurous suggestions that readers can use as a guide for things to do with their kids in October. Tear out the calendar, toss it in your car or let the kids hang it up in their rooms — these weekly ideas for getting together as a family will keep everyone engaged and in the game!

AUGUSTA FAMILY | OCTOBER 2021 • 31


OCTOBER SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

1

MOONLIGHT MUSIC CRUISE, CHRIS HARDY.

SATURDAY

2 SWAMP SATURDAY HIKE.

UNIVERSITY HEALTH CARE SYSTEM SYMPHONY SERIES: UNDER THE STARS.

3

4

5

6

SWANEE QUINTET 82ND ANNIVERSARY.

7 BERT KREISCHER ‘THE BERTY BOY’ WORLD TOUR. SHINEDOWN AT SRP PARK.

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8 ART AT LUNCH: ANILA QUAYYUM AGHA. MOONLIGHT MUSIC CRUISE, EUGENE GENAY. SOUTHERN SOUL AND SONG SERIES: DAN TYMINSKI.

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PAT BENATAR & NEIL GIRALDO.

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HALLOWEEN

Photo by Anna Tukhfatullina Food Photographer/Stylist from Pexels

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9 STARS ON FIRE THE BLACK JACKET SYMPHONY PRESENTS PINK FLOYD’S “THE WALL.”

16 MERCYME INHALE (EXHALE) FALL 2021 TOUR.

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SPOOKDUCKULAR.

SPOOKDUCKULAR.

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E.T. THE EXTRA TERRESTRIAL – FILM WITH LIVE ORCHESTRA.

THE ISLEY BROTHERS.

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30 PHINIZY FAMILY CAMPING – HALLOWEEN.


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R ECUR R ING EVENT INFO

DAILY The Murphys of Savannah at the Morris Museum of Art. Savannah, Ga., known for its vibrant life and appreciation for the arts, was home to the Murphy family artists. The work on display was taken from the Morris’ collection of over 170 works by members of the family. Exhibition on display until January 9, 2022.

The trail starts at Sacred Heart Culture Center. Free. www. augustasculpturetrail.com

Movie starts at 7:30 p.m. $10 per vehicle spot.

SATURDAY SUNDAY FREE Sundays at The Morris. Explore the Morris Museum of Art exhibitions every Sunday for FREE!

Evans Market. Stop by the Saturday market at Evans Towne Center for local fresh fruits and veggies along with local products and vendors. 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Mildred Weigle Nix Huie at the Morris Museum of Art. View Augusta native artist Mildred Nix Huie’s work of Saint Simons Island historic structures that became a big part of their culture. Exhibition on display until October 31.

FRIDAY

TUESDAYS

Films on Friday at the Morris Museum of Art. Finish off the work week with a relaxing movie! Each week features a different iconic film. Free.

Veggie Park Farmers Market. Shop your favorite local produce, meat and dairy. www.augustalocallygrown.org/ farmers-markets

Sculpture Trail Scavenger Hunt. Puzzle your way through the Sculpture Trail Scavenger Hunt in downtown Augusta.

Recteq Movie Night. Enjoy a family drive-in movie night at Recteq with yummy concessions from local food joints!

TUESDAYS AND SATURDAYS

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Aiken County Farmers Market. Get fresh local produce,


Photo courtesy of Destination Augusta

baked goods and crafts from Aiken farmers and creators year-round. Open Tuesdays and Saturdays from 7:3011:30 a.m. or until sold out. www.visitaikensc.com

WEDNESDAYS THROUGH SUNDAYS Eudora Farms Drive-Thru Safari. Visit more than 200 exotic animals and try the brand-new Dino Hunt! $20 per car. 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. www.eudorafarms.net

SATURDAY AND SUNDAY The Maize at Steed’s Dairy. Open from October 2 to November 28, the Steed’s Dairy Corn Maize is the perfect spooky season activity for all ages. General admission includes the maze, hay rides, petting zoo, pumpkin patch and more! Concessions are available. $11/person, $8/

senior or military. www.steedsdairy.com

for a family friendly movie night with snacks and drinks. 7:30 p.m. $10/spot. www.movienight.recteq.com

EVENTS OCTOBER 1. Moonlight Music Cruise, Chris Hardy. Cruise along the canal while listening to this Friday’s featured musician. $27/adult, $25/senior, military and student. 6-8:30 p.m. www.augustacanal.com

OCTOBER 1. University Health Care System Symphony Series: Under the Stars. $23-71/person. 7:30 p.m. www. augustasymphony.com

OCTOBER 1. Recteq Movie Night: “Cars.” Join Recteq

OCTOBER 2. Swamp Saturday Hike. Discover the importance of wetland ecology! Enjoy a guided hike through two and a half miles of trails while seeing and learning about various animals and plants. Pre-registration required, $2/person. 9-11 a.m. www.phinizycenter.org

OCTOBER 3. SwaneeQuintet82ndAnniversary.Featuring Shirley Caesar & Tim Rogers at the Bell Auditorium. $4046/person. www.augustaentertainmentcomplex.com

OCTOBER 7. Bert Kreischer ‘The Berty Boy’ World Tour. See Bert Kreischer at the Bell Auditorium $39.75-$59.75/

AUGUSTA FAMILY | OCTOBER 2021 • 35


person. 6-10 p.m. www.augustaentertainmentcomplex.com

OCTOBER 7. Create with Me: Marvelous Magnificent Masks. For toddlers to tweens, bring your child to create and decorate their own masquerade mask at The Morris Museum of Art. Free/nonmembers, $5/person.

OCTOBER 7. Shinedown at SRP Park. Witness the legendary artists of American rock band, Shinedown, play at SRP Park. $45-129/person. 7 p.m. www.milb.com/augusta

OCTOBER 8. Art at Lunch: Anila Quayyum Agha. Meet Augusta University’s newest William S. Morris Eminent Scholar in Art. Her lantern-like installations have been exhibited internationally. Catered lunch included. $5/

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members, $25/nonmembers. Registration due by October 1. 12-2 p.m. www.themorris.org

contributed to projects for artists like Martina McBride, Reba McEntire, Brad Paisley and more! 7:30-11 p.m. $20-50/person.

OCTOBER 8. Recteq Movie Night: “Coco.” Join Recteq for a family friendly movie night with snacks and drinks. 7:30 p.m. $10/spot. www.movienight.recteq.com

OCTOBER 9. The Black Jacket Symphony Presents Pink Floyd’s “The Wall.” Rescheduled from May 2020, join The Black Jacket Symphony at the Miller Theater for their performance of “The Wall” from famous English rock band, Pink Floyd. 8 p.m. $30-$35/person. www. millertheateraugusta.com

OCTOBER 8. Moonlight Music Cruise, Eugene Genay. Cruise along the canal while listening to this Friday’s featured musician. 6-7:30 p.m. $27/adult, $25/senior, military and student. www.augustacanal.com

OCTOBER 8. Morris Museum of Art presents Southern Soul and Song Series: Dan Tyminski. For over 30 years Dan Tyminski has made marks on modern music and has

OCTOBER 9. Stars on Fire. Join the Imperial theatre in paying tribute to some of the best performers to ever stand on stage with Stars on Fire. This year will tribute to the King, The Godfather of Soul, Rod the Mod and Captain Fantastic. $29-69/person. 7:30-9:30 p.m. www. imperialtheatre.com


Photo created by rawpixel.com - www.freepik.com

OCTOBER 12. Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo. This pair has created two multi-platinum, five platinum and three gold albums along with 19 top 40 hits. Together for more than three and a half decades, Pat and Neil continue to sell our concerts everywhere. $45.50-89.50/person. 7:30 p.m. www. augustaentertainmentcomplex.com

OCTOBER 15. Recteq Movie Night: “Hotel Transylvania.” Join Recteq for a family friendly movie night with snacks and drinks. 7:30 p.m. $10/spot. www.movienight.recteq.com

OCTOBER 16. MercyMe inhale (exhale) Fall 2021 Tour. The previously rescheduled tour has been rescheduled for this new date. $28.50-68/person. 7:00 p.m. www. augustaentertainmentcomplex.com

OCTOBER 21. E.T. The Extra Terrestrial – Film with Live Orchestra. Watch Steven Spielberg’s 1982 masterpiece on the big screen with the Augusta Symphony performing the award-winning score LIVE! $38-100/ person. 7:30 p.m. www.millertheateraugusta.com

OCTOBER 22. The Isley Brothers. Award winning Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees will be performing at James Brown Arena. $52-202/person. 8:00 p.m.

OCTOBER 26-27. Spookduckular. A fun-filled Halloween event for toddlers (up to age five) for themed fun at the Phinizy Swamp Nature Park. Don’t forget to wear your costume and bring your trick-or-treat bags! Pre-registration required. $12/child. 10-11:30 a.m. www. phinizycenter.org

OCTOBER 29. Dugout Theater Movie Night. It’s spooky season! Head out to SRP Park to watch “Hocus Pocus.” $5/ person and $10 Snack packages are available. 7 p.m. www. milb.com/augusta

OCTOBER 30. Phinizy Family Camping – Halloween. Camp under the stars this spooky season at Phinizy Swamp Nature Park! Enjoy a night of fun activities, campfire s’mores and tent-or-treating! Please bring a bag of pre-packaged candy for tent-or-treaters. There will also be a tent/pumpkin/costume contest. Bring your own pumpkin or order one through Phinizy for $15. Camp check in starts at 1 p.m., family camping ends at 12 p.m. the next day. $50/family (up to six people), $10/extra person. For more information visit www. phinizycenter.org

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T H E

MODERN P E R S P E C T I V E

Evan Mathews is a 16-year-old sophomore at George P. Butler High School. Evan has an older brother, an older sister, a younger brother and two happily married parents. In his spare time, he enjoys playing golf and drums. He is working towards his dream of attending Jackson State University in Jackson, Miss., to become a college band director.

When did your interest in drums begin? I became interested in drums at the age of 3. I would use anything to simulate a drum such as tables, cans, counter tops and pots. I would use pencils and pens and even forks and spoons as my sticks.

What skill is most important for a young drummer to master? The skill that is needed by a young drummer is consistency. A drummer must be able to play the same beat consistently throughout the song, because the repetitive nature of a drum beat is what makes a song catchy.

What is the proudest moment when playing the drums? My proudest moment is when I was chosen to serve as Drum Major for the school band this year as a sophomore.

Who is your favorite professional drummer? My all-time favorite drumline are the War and Thunder drummers of the Jackson State University.

What is your pre-performance ritual? I listen to the sounds of the great Jackson State University Marching Band.

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