__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

M AY 2 0 2 1

A U G U S TA

BE A

TOURIST IN YOUR

HOMETOWN MODERN STAYCATION MEMORIES AUGUSTA MURAL & SCULPTURE TRAIL

augustafamily.com


Join us for Summer Camps at Augusta Christian Schools!


MAY 2021

on the cover As shown below: Jaxon Roberts (2)

w w w.a u g ust afa m i l y. co m

Photo by Randy Pace

PUBLISHER

Ashlee Griggs Duren

EDITOR

Aimee Serafin

ART DIRECTOR

Michael Rushbrook

DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING Lisa Dorn

ADVERTISING SALES Doressa Hawes Mary Porter Vann

CIRCULATION/MARKETING Kimberly Stewart

PHOTOGRAPHY Randy Pace

CONTRIBUTORS Dr. Naesha Parks Dustin Turner Cammie Jones

A Publication of MCC Magazines, LLC A division of Morris Communications Company, LLC | 725 Broad St., Augusta, GA 30901 Morris Communications Company, LLC William S. Morris III, Chairman Craig S. Mitchell, CEO MCC Magazines Tina Battock, President, Morris Media Network Scott Ferguson, Vice President Finance and Operations Sherry Brown, Director of Manufacturing & Production Cher Wheeler, Publication Services Manager Veronica Brooks, Accounting Manager Michelle Rowe, Circulation Business Manager

Augusta Family Magazine is published 8 times per year and distributed throughout the Augusta and Aiken area. Send press releases, story ideas or comments to the editor at aimee.serafin@ augustafamily.com or mail to 725 Broad Street, Augusta, Ga., 30901. For advertising information, call (706) 823-3702. For circulation/ distribution, call (706) 828-4391.

Is your child ready for their “close up?” If you think you’ve got a “cover kid,” submit their photo and information on our website or to t.aimee. serafin@morris.com and they may grace the cover of Augusta Family Magazine. 4 � AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021

Facebook.com/ augustafamilymagazine

@AUGFamilyMag

We look forward to hearing from you; visit our website www.augustafamily.com and on facebook and twitter.


I B P!

M I THE

L O C T R E M S M P U ND D A S AM ALLS N AN C BING W, DESIG S N IM CL LUME ATIO VO TALL INS

G N

O T

E V I

T C A M

MBIN A E LIM

T UTH C

EA T G

YO

643 S. OLD BELAIR RD., GROVETOWN GA 30813 | 706-922-1054 • ACTIVECLIMBINGAUGUSTA.COM


contents www.augustafamily.com

Be a Tourist in Your Hometown

Tidbits

—Dustin Turner

Rooted and Growing Be Kind: You Never Know What Someone Is Going Through —Paige Tucker

18

11

12

6 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021

—Aimee Serafin


MAY 2021 8

Editor’s Page

32

Calendar

—Jennifer Mckee

The Hurried [and happy] Home Maker Modern Staycation Memories

The Modern Perspective

—Cammie Jones

Family Matters Transitions: Helping our Youth Past a Year of Endless Change —Dr. Jennifer Drake

16

24

38

Isaiah Hughes —Aimee Serafin

AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021 • 7


editor’s notes

I

t’s always exciting to visit new places and learn about the history and cultures. Adventure is a natural part of life’s journey, and that is why exploring Augusta and Aiken is something my family did together when we moved here nearly five years ago. I remember during preliminary visits that these two cities felt like sleepy Southern towns with corner alleys full of good finds. Bustling cities like Atlanta and DC with electric nightlife and daytime offerings have some advantages but moving to Augusta felt like a welcomed landing for my family of four whose children were in middle school at the time. One of the first places we visited was the Saturday morning Open Market downtown. The bread tent was a favorite find as were the tomato quiches from the quiche lady. We planned rides to Aiken to take in the painted horses and locally owned boutiques. We had the privilege of seeing Jason Mraz play acoustic style at the riverside amphitheater on a stage with a living room carpet and understated furniture—he played for 3 hours while we overlooked the beautiful water dotted with boats! Each fall, we experienced festivals like Arts in the Hearts, Westobou and Columbia County’s fairgrounds. Our competitive nature as a family would peak in early summer with trips down the canal, seeing if we could beat our best kayaking times for the distance. There were numerous trips to the Miller Theater and Imperial Theatre for performances, SRP Park and biking the Greeneway Trail in North Augusta on weekends. I’ve picked fresh blueberries with friends in Thomson, heard spoken word poetry at the Book Tavern downtown, sat in the botanical garden at Magnolia Cemetery and seen the “Tom” etched by a young Woodrow Wilson in his childhood home on 7th Street. One of my favorite dining locales is La Parisienne in Aiken—a euro-centric vibe café with authentic culinary treats like croque madame and café l’opéra. Vive la France !

8 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021

I guess what I am trying to say is that Augusta and the surrounding area are chock full of enjoyable interests for family outings. And that is why we have dedicated the May issue of Augusta Family magazine to these great cities and the many adventures within their boundaries—we’ve got our eye on all the hidden gems in our “Be a Tourist in Your Hometown” issue, so let us be your guide for things to do and places to go around town this summer.

Aimee Serafin aimee.serafin@augustafamily.com


BWBA

“Beauty and Bodycare for all no matter who you are”

Est.1994

Locally owned and operated UL Certified Alarm Company No contracts ever! Thank you for voting us #1...

5 years in a row!

3540 Wheeler Road, Suite 212 Augusta Ga 30909 706.736.2500 | Cruisesecuritysystemsinc.com

Handmade | Locally-owned | Cruelty-free

BODYWHIPBYANNA.COM

Bodywhipbyanna@gmail.com | bodywhipbyanna bodywhipbyanna | @bodywhipbyanna


36 Holes of Putt-Putt Golf • Laser Tag • Bumper Boats & Cars • Batting Cages & More!

Did Somebody Say

FUN?

Buy “2 Attractions” Get one “2 Attractions”

706-868-0083

FREE

OPEN EVERY DAY 3763 Martinez Blvd.

(Just off Washington Rd. at Baston Rd.) AUGUSTABIRTHDAY.COM

Must present coupon. Offer cannot be combined. One per person, per day. Expires 05/31/21

Join Us For SUMMER GYMNASTICS CLASSES SUMMER CLASS SESSIONS: Session 1: June 1 -10 Tues & Thur Session 2: June 15 - 24 Tues & Thur Session 3: July 13 -22 Tues & Thur Preschool gymnastics for boys and girls Developmental gymnastics for boys and girls • Tumbling PRESCHOOL CAMP: 9:30 -12:30 Mon - Fri • Ages 3-5 Wacky Water Week: June 14 - 18 Olympics Sports Week: July 26 - 30

Register online or visit www.gymnasticsgold.com for more information | 706-650-2111 | 124 Cedar Lane, Martinez


rooted and growing Paige Tucker

Be Kind: You Never Know What Someone Is Going Through

A

friend and I recently took our girls to do some arts and crafts on a day off from school. One of the ladies who works at the local place we visit regularly was kind and welcoming, as always, helping Julia Reynolds and her friends get settled in to create. She stopped by our table every so often to see if we needed anything and compliment the artists. She was friendly and warm and acted like it was any other Wednesday in the shop. As the girls were creating their masterpieces, a young couple burst through the front doors and the girl made a beeline for the employee. The two women embraced for some time and when they pulled apart, it was clear they were dealing with something heavy. They were both emotional but seemed to be breathing a sigh of relief. The store employee was crying as she told the girl she’d been so worried all morning. The reporter in me always wants to know “the story,” but of course, it was not our business. The family stepped away for a moment to gather themselves and when it was time for us to pay and leave, the lady was back at it and checked us out as if nothing had happened. My friend and I couldn’t believe the lady working had been upset about anything because she couldn’t have been nicer to us. We both remarked that it just proved the old adage you never know what someone is going through or what battles may be raging behind their smile. As she was helping the girls pick paints and brushes she never let on that she was tangled up with anxiety and worry. She might have been dying inside but she maintained her composure and served customers as she would any other day. Sometimes people aren’t able to do that. Have you ever had really bad service somewhere or been treated poorly by someone and wondered what could possibly have made their day so bad that they’re taking it out on you? It happens! I think with COVID, so many people are pushing through truly hard stuff. We all are, to some extent. As parents, we’ve put on a brave face to shield our children from the scariness and uncertainty of this COVID world in which we’re living. Folks are trying to go about their daily lives while worrying about children, parents, their own health and safety, employment...the list goes on and on. I think about our front-line workers and how they’ve had to persevere over the last year in the midst of so much hardship! Their jobs have been more demanding than ever, and they’ve had to balance that with personal struggles on the home front. It does feel like there is light shining on us from the end of the tunnel, doesn’t it? I hope you feel that, too. We’ve made it through a post-quarantine school year that looked different for everyone with a mix of virtual and face-to-face instruction. Julia Reynolds was blessed to be in a traditional classroom with the most precious first grade teachers, but it was an out-of-the-norm year: no lunchtime visits for parents, class parties or performances. The inevitable changes were sad, but many had it much worse. The mandated distance was another harsh reality of the pandemic. All those stolen moments should make future ones that much sweeter. For now, the wonder of summer stretches before us. We can regroup and hope for more normalcy. I’m planning lots of playtime outside, some great day trips and a little more travel and time with family and friends than in 2020. Most of all, I’m looking forward to making some sweet summertime memories with my girl. After twelve years in local news, most recently as evening anchor of NBC 26, Paige Tucker is now a work-at-home mom and freelance journalist. She produces two series for NBC 26 TV, First Responders and 26 Women Today, and you can see those stories on Tuesday nights. Paige and her husband have one daughter, Julia Reynolds, who is six years old.

Warm Water

Small Class Size

Water Safety

Dolphin Team AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021 � 11


RIVER TUBING Columbia SC (1 hour) www.palmettooutdoors. com

PUBLIC FISHING, ANTIQUES, LAVENDER FARM Thomson, GA (35 minutes) www.visitthomsonga.com whitehillsfarm.us

PHINIZY NATURE PARK, TRAILS Augusta, GA (20 minutes) www.phinizycenter.org

EUDORA FARMS DRIVE -THRU SAFARI Salley, South Carolina (1 hour) www.eudorafarms.net DORN GOLD MINES McCormick, SC (50 minutes) www.heritagegoldmine.com

FOODIES’ FUN STOP Madison, GA (2 hours) www.visitmadisonga.com

KETTLE CREEK BATTLEFIELD, MARY WILLIS LIBRARY Washington, GA (1 hour) www.exploregeorgia.org

TALLULAH FALLS AND GORGE Tallulah Falls, GA (2 hours 45 minutes) www.exploregeorgia.org

KEG CREEK WATERSPORTS Appling, GA (25 minutes) www.kegcreekwatersports.com

THE STORY SHOP AND REVOLUTIONARIES MARKET * EDITOR’S PICK Monroe, GA (2 hours) www.visitthestoryshop.com

Daytrips Outside of

AUGUSTA

CLARKS HILL BOAT RENTAL * EDITOR’S PICK Appling, GA (25 minutes) www.clarkshillmarina.com HEGGIE’S ROCK PRESERVE Appling, GA (25 minutes) www.exploregeorgia.org

tidbits M AY 2 0 2 1

12 � AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021

STUMPHOUSE PARK, MOUNTAIN TRAIL Walhalla, SC (2 hours 30 minutes) www.visitoconeesc.com


A

TOURIST AROUND YOUR TOWN

A SHRIMP’S HEART IS IN ITS HEAD, TRUE OR FALSE? TRUE. Shrimps are divided into only two parts, the head and the tail. Their heart is located in the head and it has three pairs of entrances. Through these entrances, blood comes to the heart. For an educational video from National Geographic on the ecosystems of shrimp, visit w w w.youtube.com/ watch?v=Nw-ks2jJGNA. (Resource: www.chiragsoccer.wordpress.com)

CAN YOU ANSWER THE FOLLOWING THREE RIDDLES IN UNDER 10 MINUTES?

THE IN

G A M E

1. Where is the only place in the world that yesterday comes before today? 2. You’ll find me in Mercury, Earth, Mars and Jupiter, but not in Venus or Neptune? What am I? 3. An elephant in Africa is called Lala. An elephant in Asia is called Lulu. What do you call an elephant in Antarctica? Answers at www.augustafamilymagazine.com.

AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021 � 13


tidbits

M

Sugar Magnolias Innovation

M

Spirit of Funk!

HAPPY!

Sun Lion

M

S

S

Invasive SoSal

Unstoppable

Augusta

M

S

Murals & Sculptures Coloring Page 14 � AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021

M

Popsicles

S


A Walk Inside the WALLS P

ublic art infuses a city with color and culture like a banner. Many cities become well-known because of their public art installations. Asheville’s River Arts District in North Carolina houses industrial artist studios below 30-foot walls of bright pigments and characters including a gargantuan depiction of Homer Simpson. Nashville, TN, has supported their artists’ rights to express themselves with design-fused collages of the city’s political, musical and innovative history. One of the most visited examples of public art in America is “La Liberté éclairant le monde” (Liberty Enlightening the World), or the Statue of Liberty. Since 2012, the Greater Augusta Arts Council has been doing the heavy lifting for creating public art in Augusta to develop the attraction of the city from inside the grid. They crafted master plans, cast calls for local artists and produced several installations including downtown’s latest sculpture and mural trails. A great way to experience Augusta is to locate the artistic murals and playful sculptures on a walking tour as a family. Augusta Family’s in-house designer, Michael Rushbrook, created the coloring page (opposite) for kids to locate some of these public art exhibits with their parents. This summer is the perfect time to get inspired by discovering what makes Augusta a diverse and fun community from inside its walls. Get up and go experience! Sculptures and Murals between 8th and 13th Streets

M M M M M

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

S S S S

6. 7. 8. 9.

“Innovation Mural of Augusta”, 100 Grace Hopper Lane. (Aort Reed) “Sugar Magnolia”, 1020 Reynolds Street. “SoSal”, 1008 Broad Street. (April Henry King) “Happy”, 2240, 210 10th Street #B. (Leonard Porkchop Zimmerman) “Spirit of Funk-James Brown Mural”, 190 James Brown Blvd. (Cole Phail) “Unstoppable”, 11th Street and Broad. (Gus and Lina Ocamposilva) “Invasive”, Augusta Common and Broad Street. (Jean Garrett) “Sun Lion”, Augusta Common and Broad Street. (D’jean Jawrunner) “Popsicles”, Augusta Common and Reynolds. (Craig Wood)

For a complete listing of the sculptures and murals in Augusta, including a walking tour app and scavenger badge hunt, visit www.augustasculpturetrail. com/about-us or www.nakedepicurean.com/2020/05/21/the-augusta-muralguide.

AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021 � 15


the hurried

[and happy] homemaker

Photo by Larry Crayton on Unsplash

C a m m i e Jo n es

16 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021


Modern Scrapbooking Staycation Memories

D

o you feel guilty when you snap photos of your family vacation or as of lately, your staycation, and can’t quite get around to organizing them into a photo book? Not a scrapbooker by nature? You are not alone, and you are forgiven. There are plenty of simple ways to remember your family times without having to lay out your photos in order, making sure to include all the kids with an equal number of images per page. Thank the dear Lord! PLAYING CARDS Many photo-related websites can turn any photo or series of photos into playing cards. We recently had a few decks of cards made for the grandparents from a family vacation we took before COVID set in. It is so much fun to conjure up fun memories as you compete to outplay each other in a game of Gin Rummy. CALENDAR A calendar is a great way to see family photos from the past year. Most sites make uploading photos easy and will assemble them by auto-filling the pages. If you want to change or swap any, you can go back and do that afterward. If you are pleased with the layout, just hit the order button and a 12-month photo montage will arrive at your door soon. FAMILY VACATION WALL Order a bunch of prints in various sizes and frame them to hang on a wall, or if you want to do something easier, tack a string or ribbon to the wall and attach photos with cute mini clothespins. When you head to another destination or have a photo-friendly weekend, switch out the photos for newer ones or hang another ribbon above or below to start a new row of memories. BLANKET OR THROW You can also collect photos for a keepsake blanket. Many companies have online offers, and your design can be one big photograph or a collage of favorites to make a lasting memory that will keep you warm all winter. STAMPS Yes, you can have your favorite photo made into a postage stamp. These would be great to use for holiday cards or birthday party invitations!

NOTE CARDS Why not make note cards? Even though we are in the age of electronic communication, sometimes a quick note means the world. You can make it personal with a family photo on the front. You may find more of an excuse to lay that pen to a piece of paper if it is personalized. PUZZLES Doing puzzles certainly passed the extra time at home during the pandemic. Why not make your favorite family photo a puzzle? You can even choose the count—starting at 25 pieces. For the more adventurous, a 1000-piece puzzle may be the way to go. How fun to see those little pieces come slowly together displaying a vacation photo of your loved ones! A PHOTO BOWL OR BOX Place a bunch of prints in a large bowl on the coffee table for people to look through at their leisure. Another idea is to get a decorative box (or hand decorate it using glue and clipped photos) and put the prints in it. Label according to year and/or month. It’s a great way to walk down memory lane and it’s fun for visitors, too. CANVASES If you need some artwork to cover bare walls, have a canvas made to hang using your staycation photos. These canvases come in various sizes and price points, so start with a few and go from there. CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES It’s not just T-shirts anymore. You can have leggings, hats or a pair of socks made with your favorite pictures. There’s nothing like thinking back to a fabulous vacation memory while putting on your socks! Honestly, there is no excuse for not taking plenty of photos on your next excursion. Throw that scrapbooking guilt aside and start looking online or at local stores near you for easy ways to keep those memories up close and personal every day of the year. Are you up for hitting the road? My camera is aimed and ready! Cammie Jones is an Augusta freelance writer and mother of three.

AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021 • 17


BE A

TOURIST IN YOUR

HOMETOWN BY DUSTIN TURNER

photo created by jcomp - www.freepik.com

e all dream of taking that grand vacation to an exotic destination to explore a new city, enjoy new restaurants and art, and see things we’ve never seen before. You can do all of that for a fraction of the cost by becoming a tourist in your own hometown. There are lots of interesting and fun things to do in Augusta and Aiken while you are out exploring what these cities have to offer. So, of course, the first thing to do is to become a tourist. That does not mean you have to wear a Hawaiian shirt, cargo shorts, socks with sandals and a big sun hat. Unless you want to, then by all means, you do you. Whatever you wear, just be sure to take plenty of photos to preserve the memories you are going to make.

18 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY/JUNE 2021


AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY/JUNE 2021 • 19


HERE ARE TIPS FOR BECOMING A TOURIST IN AUGUSTA AND AIKEN: Pick your transportation: You drive around Augusta/Aiken daily, making it difficult to truly see your surroundings. Try a different mode of transportation. Pull some friends in for a tourist day but get them to drive. Or use a rideshare app such as Lyft or Uber so you really get the feel of being in a different city. If you insist on driving, rent a fun ride for the day, like a convertible. Doing something different adds to your adventure. See the art: Augusta and Aiken are home to very large, diverse arts communities. You could spend an entire weekend just exploring the art in the area and still not see it all. In addition to the many independent artists’ galleries around the area, be sure to check out:

People vector created by pch.vector - www.freepik.com

The Augusta Sculpture Trail: The trail features 10 sculptures on display in downtown Augusta. Each month, a special event will be held somewhere along the trail.

The Morris Museum of Art, 1 10th St., Augusta: The Morris is the first museum dedicated to the collection and exhibition of art and artists of the American South.

Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art, 506 Telfair St., Augusta: The former home of Augusta mayor and U.S. Senator Nicolas Ware, the museum was founded by Olivia Herbert in 1937.

Artists Row, Broad Street, Augusta: Galleries, art studios, specialty shops, restaurants and coffee houses, Artists Row offers original works by internationally renowned artists, local fine art,

20 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021

pottery, hand-crafted glass work, sculpture, regional crafts, photography, jewelry and specialty gifts. •

Aiken Center for the Arts, 122 Laurens St. SW, Aiken: Five galleries feature works from local, regional, national and international artists and a gallery shop sells gifts and items made by local artisans.

Check out the history: There is so much history in Aiken and Augusta that many residents might not know about. Augusta was founded in 1736 as the second established town in Georgia because of its location on the Savannah River. Aiken was founded in 1835 as a Winter Colony for wealthy Northerners to escape the harsh winters. Many of the original homes and buildings still stand, and both cities are happy to show off their past. In Aiken, you can take a trolley tour or a Pedego Electric Bike tour of the historic and equestrian district to see the many Winter Colony homes and one of the oldest continually used polo fields in the country. Historic Augusta’s website offers a self-guided walking tour of some of the historic sites downtown. There are many noteworthy places to visit, but a good history tour must include: •

Magnolia Cemetery, 702 Third St., Augusta: Founded in 1818, the final resting place of seven Confederate generals, five Jewish cemeteries, a Greek cemetery and home to the oldest tree in Georgia.

Boyhood Home of Woodrow Wilson, 419 Seventh St., Augusta: Built in 1859, childhood home of the 28th president.


Aiken County Historical Museum, 433 Newberry St. SW, Aiken: Exploring the history of Aiken, exhibits include a one-room schoolhouse and a replica of a 1950s pharmacy.

Sacred Heart Cultural Center, corner of Greene and 13th Street, Augusta: Built by Jesuit priests, Sacred Heart had its first church service on Dec. 2, 1900. It now serves as an events center.

Willcox Hotel, 100 Colleton Ave. SW, Aiken: Built in 1898, guests at the Willcox have included celebrities, British royals and U.S. presidents.

Redcliffe Plantation State Park, S.C. Hwy 25, Beech Island: Begun in 1859, Redcliffe is representative of the architecture of the South in the early 1800s. Its builder, James Hammond, served two terms as governor of South Carolina.

Get out in nature: If you want to include some outdoor adventure in your tourism escape, there are plenty of options. There are, of course, dozens of options for an outdoor picnic or a short walk, but be sure these are on your list if you want to be a true tourist:

The oaks of South Boundary: Take a slow drive or a walk down South Boundary to see the famous canopy of oak trees that have been the subject of countless family and wedding photos. The scene is the official logo of Downtown Aiken.

Go to a museum: When planning something to do, many residents don’t think about the fantastic museums in the area. Aside from the above-mentioned sites, these are great places to learn more about the history of where you live. •

Augusta Museum of History, 560 Reynold St.: Exhibits and collections here are dedicated to the history of the Augusta Area.

Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History, 1116 Phillips St., Augusta: This small house museum is dedicated to the legacy of the prominent Black educator.

Augusta Canal Discovery Center, Blome Lane, Augusta: As the name suggests, this small museum in Enterprise Mill shows off the history of the Augusta Canal.

Laurel & Hardy Museum, 135 N. Louisville St. Harlem: Dedicated to the famous comedy duo in the hometown of Oliver Hardy. US Army Signal Corps Museum, 504 Chamberlain Ave. #29801, Fort Gordon: Exhibits in this museum dedicated to Army communications include a telephone from Hitler’s bunker.

Take a bike ride or walk in Hitchcock Woods. In the center of Aiken, Hitchcock woods is the largest urban park in the United States. Just watch out for horses; it’s also a popular place for equestrians.

A 1,100-acre nature park in Augusta, Phinizy Swamp Nature Park contains wetlands and woodlands and all the native flora and fauna.

The Serene 18 Paddle Trail includes 18 square miles of water trails along the Savannah River, Augusta Canal and Lake Thurmond. Complete a route and get an official passport stamped at approved locations along the way. Find out more at VisitColumbiaCounty.com.

Spend a day downtown: In recent years, the downtowns of Augusta and Aiken have truly become destinations in themselves. Many of the destinations above are in the downtown districts, which also are home to many locallyowned, unique restaurants, coffee shops, breweries and stores. You could easily spend a full day eating, shopping and exploring without ever leaving downtown. There are too many attractions to list, but you can find out all the details at VisitAugusta.com and AikenDDA.us. Whatever you decide to do, the whole point is to learn more about where you live and have new experiences without ever leaving your hometown. Make a day or weekend of it with friends or family. Have fun exploring— and be sure to share your experiences on social media! Dustin Turner is the Communications and Content Manager for Alison South Marketing Group. He lives in Aiken with his amazing, beautiful and very patient wife of 22 years, Jamie, and their artistic, sassy and fierce daughter, Abigail, 12. Dustin enjoys writing, shooting and editing video and acting and directing in community theatre.

AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021 • 21


SUMMER

A U G U S TA APRIL 2018

APRIL 2017

APRIL 2016

A U G U S TA

A U G U S TA APRIL 2019

A U G U S TA

A U G U S TA

Let’s Go Fishin’!

Get ready for some awesome summer fun

✲ 2017 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

✲ SETTING UP

Our guide for what’s new, where to go and what to do

YOUR SUMMER Sleepaways, Splash Pads Sack Lunches and Such

ADVENTURES IN AGRICULTURE AND GARDENING

Harper, 8, & Brewer, 6, Beckham, daughter and son of Christy & Michael Beckham of Augusta.

augustafamily.com

✲ 2018 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE Our guide for what’s new, where to go and what to do

augustafamily.com

2019

PITCH A TENT

SUMMER

CampGuide

BUILDING CREATIVE READING SPACES

FOF SIGNING THE BEAUTY

✱ Summer Johnson, 5, is the daughter of Rebecca Tyler of Evans.

SUMMER GUIDE

OUR CAMP CAMP GUIDE ISSUE FOR WHAT’S NEW, WHERE TO GO AND WHAT TO DO augustafamily.com

augustafamily.com

Logan Cira, 6, is the son of Sam and Jacque Cira of Evans.

augustafamily.com

Visit our Summer

22 � AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021

Camp Guide online at augustafamily.com


CAMPS • Summer camp dates

June 1st – August 6th

4014 Columbia Road Martinez, GA 30907

A U G U S TA

AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021 � 23


family matters

Photo by Alena Darmel from Pexels

Dr. Je nni fer Dra ke , M D

Transitions:

Helping our Youth Past a Year of Endless Change

I

t’s been a long year. It is hard to believe that over a year ago we entered the quarantine season thinking it would be brief—yet it continued, not for weeks, but months. My parenting calendar emptied quickly. Understanding the true nature of what we were facing, we reached out to our parents by FaceTime to make sure they were doing ok and had what they needed. We checked on friends by text to see how they were holding up. And we got word on neighbors from a safe distance. But were we checking on our own people, our children and teens? It’s been a long year for them, too. There were sports games we didn’t get to watch, the ones they didn’t get to play. There were performances

24 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021

called off and months of preparation lost. Senior proms and graduation got redlined. Gone forever. And time spent with friends, birthday parties, playdates, playoffs, and SATs—all canceled. We often talk about the resilience of children. As a pediatrician, I see children adapt to new circumstances all the time. But they usually experience a change that is part of their life as the rest of their life moves on as usual. This time last year nearly everything changed. Students went from attending school and extra-curricular events one day to not returning for the rest of the academic year. Then they had to learn how to navigate online school. Many parents were stationed at home while continuing to work, so the dynamics with Mom and Dad being less available were different. Other


parents couldn’t work at all, which brought financial stress to the family. Some got sick or even died. Kids are resilient, but they are also smart and observant. They’ve seen and felt the stress and worries of school, work, finances, the pandemic, and concerns about illness for themselves or those they love. All this has influenced their mental health. In my office, I have seen drastically increased rates of anxiety, depression, and general stress and worry. For younger children, lack of socialization has altered normal social development and ageappropriate interactions with peers and others. Some youths have developed fears or anxieties about leaving home or becoming sick. A recent survey showed that 50% of parents said the pandemic had negatively affected their teens’ mental health. From the stress of school at home, or hybrid school, or school with masks and social distancing to lost sports, missing those once-in-a-lifetime events such as graduation, or simply not being able to be age-appropriately independent, teens have had some major challenges in the last year. And none of this compares to the stress many experienced in losing a loved one to COVID-19 and the grief and anxiety that followed. Thankfully, we are nearing the light at the end of the tunnel. Vaccines are available for many and hopefully soon for younger teens and children. There will be an end to these adjustments we have had to make. Some sense of normalcy will return. Schools will reopen fully. We will sit on crowded sidelines of games and in full auditoriums for productions and graduations. We will hug our friends. And we will even toss our masks. Eventually. But, as we return to more of a “normal” routine, we will continue to face transitions. Readjusting will bring its own set of challenges and stressors. For some children, having been away from school for a year and a half could present significant academic or social struggles. There will be shifts again to their routines, social interactions, and development. Students may feel anxious about returning to school/ activities after a long break. They may wonder about the college process and how all of this will affect their future academics or careers.

So, how can we help our children and teens move forward and possibly have some healthy, happy memories of this whole experience? • Let them know you are there for them no matter what. Explain that you care and want to know how they are doing. Be honest about what is going on, but in an age-appropriate manner. Let them be children without grown-up worries. Try turning off the news or powering down on social media. Let them know you will continue to take care of them even when things are difficult. • Most importantly, talk to them. Communication is key. Start by asking how they are doing. What you hear may surprise you. They may have loved that you were home together, or the movie nights every night of the week, or the long walks you had time to take since you didn’t have to rush out the door. Or, they may be worried about something they haven’t voiced. Don’t negate anything they say. If it is a real worry to them, it should be real to you. Talk about it, validate it, and if needed, reframe it so they can see a more realistic picture. Reassure them and explain why things are getting safer—the vaccines work wonderfully, and we are seeing lower case numbers and improved understanding of treatments. • If there is severe depression or suicidal thoughts, or grief due to the death of a loved one, don’t hesitate to reach out for help. In nonpandemic times, counseling is often necessary for children and teens, so this past year has only compounded those needs. And remember, just because things are beginning to renormalize, that doesn’t mean your child or teen will simply move forward without repercussions. Make checking on your children a priority. Jennifer Drake, MD, has been in practice with Augusta Pediatric Associates for nearly 18 years. Dr. Drake attended Georgia Tech in undergraduate studies, the Medical College of Georgia for her MD and trained at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital for her pediatric residency. She is a mom to five beautiful children here in Augusta’s Garden City.

AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021 • 25


START HERE. GO ANYWHERE!


MEET

THE FAMILY FOX Augusta Family proudly introduces FINN, the family fox thatʼs full of life and adventure! A U G U S TA

MARCH 2021

SCHOOL CHOICES FOR ATHLETIC AND ARTISTIC FAMILIES

30 � AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021

HOW MUSIC AND ART GROW THE WHOLE CHILD augustafamily.com


MAGAZINE FOR FUN, PUZZLES AND MORE!

tidbits

tidbits

SUMMER CAMP CHECKLIST PERSONAL ITEMS/CLOTHING r Shirts r Bandana/buff r Pants/shorts r Deodorant r Raincoat/poncho r Toothbrush/ r Underwear toothpaste r Water shoes r Lotion r Extra socks r Soap r Bathing suit r Comb/brush r Masks r Flip flops/ (bring extra!) shower r Hair ties shoes

MISCELLANEOUS r Earplugs r Medication r Hat r Swim towel r Bug spray r Sunscreen r Lip balm r Flashlight r Hat

r Sunglasses r Camera r Earbuds r Ziplocks r Water bottle r Pillow r Antibacterial gel

OPTIONAL r Camera r Books for reading r Journal, pen, stamps r Stationery (pre-addressed envelopes for home) r Money, if needed

Riddle +

+

= 90

+

= 80

SAFE KIDS TIPS FOR A HAPPY CAMPER “Heading off to camp is a joyful child ritual and the opportunity for a test at independence and self-confidence. According to results from a Healthy Camp Study, 50% of camp-related injuries occur when protective equipment is not worn,” says Renée McCabe, RN, Injury Prevention and Safety Program Manager at the Children’s Hospital of Georgia. Here are some tips to help your child stay safe at camp and ensure that the memories made are happy ones!

of the Day

= 20

Did you know that the Eiffel Tower grows every summer? Due to thermal expansion , when an object expands in extreme heat , the Eiffel Tower can grow up to 15 centimeters (6 inches) during the hottest days of summer.

= ??

BE SUN SAVVY The intense heat and humidity of the summer can be dangerous. When we sweat, our bodies lose water so children must drink plenty of fluids, even if they aren’t thirsty. This is particularly important for children playing sports or games that involve running or physical activity. Children should carry a water bottle (or two) at all times. Sunscreen is a must! The sun is most intense between 10am and 4pm, but it’s best to make a habit of applying sunscreen when dressing in the morning. Choose a sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher and reapply at least every two hours and every time the child dries off after swimming. Teach your child the signs of heat exhaustion. Heat exhaustion occurs when the body heats up faster than it can cool down. Symptoms include fatigue, feeling overheated and weakness. Heat exhaustion can escalate rapidly. If your child begins to feel ill, he should take a rest indoors or in Travel vector created by macrovector - www.freepik.com

FOLLOW FINN THROUGHOUT THE

tidbits

Fun Joke!

APPROPRIATE FOOTWEAR AND CLOTHING Flip flops offer young feet no support, can lead to poor foot and leg position when running and jumping, and can pose a tripping hazard, especially on uneven ground. Children should wear sturdy, lace-up shoes for running in games and sports. Loose-fitting clothing should be worn on hot days to allow the body to cool, and hats will protect children’s heads and faces. GEAR UP Make sure safety equipment is provided and mandated for sports activities. Helmets should always be

worn for biking, horseback riding, football, zip-lining and challenge courses. DON’T PUSH THROUGH PAIN If your child is injured, it should be addressed right away. Injuries as small as a blister or mild sprain can have a significant impact if ignored. Pain is the body’s way of telling us that something is wrong. Injuries should be reported to camp staff, nurses and coaches when they happen so they do no worsen. We don’t want a child to miss an entire sports season for an injury that, if addressed immediately, could be resolved within a day or two. A helpful tactic is to remember the principles of RICE: Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation. BUCKLE UP When traveling in a vehicle, everyone needs to be buckled up in an appropriate car seat, booster seat or seat belt. Children under age 13 should ride in the back seat and remain in a booster seat until they are at least 8 years old and 4’9”. Safe Kids Greater Augusta, led by the Children’s Hospital of Georgia, works to prevent unintentional childhood injury, the leading killer of children ages 1 to 19. Safe Kids Greater Augusta is a member of the Safe Kids Worldwide network. To find out more about the local Safe Kids program, call 706-721-7606, or visit augustahealth.org/safekids. Check out more safety tips and the Ultimate Car Seat Guide at SafeKids.org.

Columbia County Parks & Recreation PEDIATRICS LOCATIONS AND PROVIDERS Interstate Parkway 1299 Interstate PKWY Dr. Jose Acevedo, Dr. Tito Sobrinho, Dr. Maya Ingram and Ashley Dahlman, NP

See page 14 to view the answer for the riddle.

APRIL 2021

the shade and the camp nurse should be notified. CHECK FOR TICKS Lyme disease is spread by tiny deer ticks living in tall grasses or wooded areas. Symptoms include a bulls-eye rash and flu-like symptoms within a few weeks of the tick bite. It’s a good idea to wear long sleeves and tuck pant legs into socks when hiking and stay in the middle of the trail. Always check the entire body for ticks following time spent in wooded or grassy areas. Finally, if a child finds a tick on their body, they should have it removed by the camp nurse or another adult using tweezers and pulling the tick straight out of the skin.

Registration Open Now!!! Most Camps Run From 8am until 1pm

WHY DO BANANAS USE SUNSCREEN? BECAUSE THEY PEEL!

12 � AUGUSTA FAMILY | APRIL 2021

Beach ball = 30 (30 + 30 + 30 = 90) Watermelon = 50 (2 watermelon slices + 30 = 80; two slices of watermelon are 50.) One slice of watermelon – 1 sunglasses = 20; 1 watermelon is 50/2 = 25; the watermelon – 5 = 20. The sunglasses equal 5.

AUGUSTA FAMILY | APRIL 2021 � 13

14 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | APRIL 2021

Belle Terrace 2467 Golden Camp RD Dr. Kathryn Williford and Dr. Sonali Harshman Garredd 1111 Garredd BLVD Dr. Halbert Capuy and Dr. Valerie Ertle Garredd 1113 Garredd BLVD Dr. Mary Lou Fernando

$100 Per Camp 706-863-7523 | Summer camp registration link: http://bit.ly/CCCamps2021

Toll Free Number 1-877-205-5006 AUGUSTA FAMILY | APRIL 2021 � 15

WHERE’S

Where could he be? Look for Finn throughout the magazine, find him and you could win!

Horse Creek Academy in Aiken County is an academic charter for grades 4K-9. Tenth grade will be added in 2021-22; 11th grade in 2022-23; and 12th grade 2023-24. It focuses on academics and, like public schools, offers many opportunities for students who want to explore arts and athletics. “A big advantage of being a charter school,” says Taylor, the lead learner, “is that we get to make decisions locally, which cuts out a lot of red tape. We have a board of directors that is elected from our families. They make fiscal and policy decisions just for us, not an entire district.” HCA places a heavy emphasis on relationships. “Parents have better access to me than say to [Aiken County schools superintendent] King Lawrence or the district office. I’m here every day. Every administrator here teaches, too. I teach social studies and criminology.” Taylor says that with a smaller student body and more flexibility, charter schools can focus on relationships. For example, “we do restorative justice that tries to create relationships. If there’s a disciplinary problem, we try to make things right, especially if there’s a victim. We don’t just look to suspend or expel.” Because students can start in 4K and go through graduation in one school, families with children of different ages don’t have to pick up their kids at two or three schools. “It also fosters a feeling of family among the students, their families and the teachers,” Taylor says. “We’re all in it for the long haul.” HCA offers a variety of programs in visual, digital and performing arts. As for athletics, students can choose from baseball, basketball, cheerleading, skeet shooting, cross country, track and field, soccer, softball and volleyball. Most arts and athletics options are offered from elementary through high school. As for transportation, all students have to be carriders. Families must provide transportation to and from school. Transportation for sports competitions is provided by teachers, coaches and parent volunteers. The school does thorough background checks on volunteers and vehicle inspections before allowing volunteers to transport students. HCA is not restricted to people who live in a specific district. Students come to the Aiken County school from North Augusta and Lexington. The only residency requirement for SAIL, in Columbia County, is to live in Georgia. “At the end of the day, we are moving and doing things. There is a lot of excitement and energy,” Taylor says. “We had over 400 students on last year’s waitlist, so we know people want to be a part of it.”

20 � AUGUSTA FAMILY | MARCH 2021

PRIVATE SCHOOLS Gay, the communications director at Augusta Prep, says private schools are a “land of opportunity because you can do a lot of different things here. Even in high school, we have a motorsports engineering class.” The Upper School students even built a cart from scratch and drove it around the parking lot. Gay’s children attend Augusta Prep and each has embraced different opportunities. One son plays several sports, and his daughter enjoys theatre. Because private schools often have small class sizes, they have been able to weather the COVID crisis well. “We have been able to spread out and spend a lot of time socially distanced outside.” Private schools also tend to allow more opportunities to participate in athletics. “I coach varsity baseball, and unlike public schools, we don’t have cuts. There are kids in many sports who play for Prep that wouldn’t have the opportunity to play in public schools.” Like many private schools, Augusta Prep has students in K-12. “We are a college prep school. Some people say that begins in high school, but we like to think it starts earlier than that,” Gay says. “Our goal isn’t to just get kids to college, though. It’s to prepare them to be successful, to understand and to be prepared for what’s out there.” Augusta Prep has a state-of-the-art auditorium and performs theatrical and musical shows in the lower, middle and upper schools. There also are a variety of visual arts classes, including ceramics and other mediums, chorus and more. At the varsity level, Augusta Prep is a member of the Georgia Independent School Association and Region 4-AAA and competes in 19 varsity sports, including baseball, basketball, clay target shooting, cheerleading, cross country, football, golf, soccer, swimming, tennis, track and field and volleyball. “No matter what, though, it still comes down to academics,” Gay says. “Augusta Prep is a great school to get a well-rounded education while participating in a variety of sports or arts programs.”

Dustin Turner is the Communications and Content Manager for Alison South Marketing Group. He lives in Aiken with his amazing, beautiful and very patient wife of 22 years, Jamie, and their artistic, sassy and fierce daughter, Abigail, 12. Dustin enjoys writing, shooting and editing video and acting and directing in community theatre.

THERE HE IS! AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021 � 31


calendar M AY 2 0 2 1

Baby photo created by freepic.diller - www.freepik.com

As more and more events start to happen around town, make sure to keep the Augusta Family calendar close by for all the information. Tear out the calendar, toss it in your car or let the kids hang it up in their rooms — these weekly ideas for getting together as a family will keep everyone in the loop and engaged in the community! Visit www.augustafamily.com for continued updates.

32 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021


AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021 � 33


MAY SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

1

FOR THE LATEST CALENDAR UPDATES, VISIT WWW.AUGUSTAFAMILY.COM

9

SATURDAY

11

10

5

6

12

13

7

8

14

15

FIFTH ANNUAL BOSS HOG STATE CHAMPIONSHIP COOK-OFF

FIFTH ANNUAL BOSS HOG STATE CHAMPIONSHIP COOK-OFF GUIDED K AYAK PADDLE

16

18

17

19

20

21

26

27

28

22

STORY TIME AT THE RYE PATCH

23

25

24

AMP THE ALLEY

NATIONAL BROTHER’S DAY

MEMORIAL DAY

Photo by Min An from Pexels

30

34 � AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021

31

29 AIKEN MEMORIAL DAY PARADE


Photo by Jadson Thomas from Pexels

4 -DAY KIDS ART CAMP

RECURRING EVENT INFO DAILY Civil War Tours at Augusta Canal Discovery Center, $14 adults, $12 seniors 60+, students and military. Starts at 1:30pm. Learn about Georgia’s role in supplying Southern troops during the Civil War. www.augustacanal.com/boat-tours.php Sculpture Trail Scavenger Hunt. The newest thing to come to downtown Augusta, the Trail features 10 sculptures by nationally renowned artists on City of Augusta sidewalks. www. augustasculpturetrail.com MONDAYS Hopelands Concert Series. A variety of outdoor performances this spring and summer. Bring your lawn chair and a picnic dinner. Parking at the Green Boundary Club. www. cityofaikensc.gov/parks-playgrounds-naturalareas/hopelands-gardens

TUESDAYS

THURSDAYS

Story Time at Rye Patch is a cherished program that promotes literacy in the community. It’s free to attend, and a free book is given to each family in attendance. 4pm. www.visitaikensc. com/whattodo/detail/rye_patch_reception_ center1

Veggie Park Farmers Market. Free entry. 4:30– 7:30pm. Shop your favorite local produce, meat and dairy. Health screenings and heart-healthy education on site. www.augustalocallygrown. org/farmers-markets

TUESDAYS, THURSDAYS AND SATURDAYS Get fresh local produce, baked goods and crafts from Aiken farmers and makers at the yearround Aiken County Farmers Market. Open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 7:30– 11:30am, or until sold out. www.visitaikensc. com/whattodo/detail/aiken_county_farmers_ market SECOND TUESDAYS Puddle Ducks: Kids and Caregivers Club, Phinizy Nature Swamp. $5, through age 5. Starts at 10am. Story time and crafts. www. phinizycenter.org/puddle-ducks

Enjoy live music, art and food from local restaurants at Amp the Alley. You’re even able to stroll through the alley with your favorite drink! The Alley at Bee Lane in Aiken. www. facebook.com/ampthealley FRIDAYS RecTeqTM Movie Nights. Gates open at 6pm. Movie starts at 7:30pm. Visit www.movienight. recteq.com for movie information. Learn the sport of fencing using special lightsabers at the Advanced Aiken Saber Academy. Free, 5–8:30pm. Odell Weeks Activity Center in Aiken. www.cityofaikensc. gov/event/advanced-aiken-saber-academy FIRST FRIDAYS

MONDAYS, WEDNESDAYS AND FRIDAYS A Day at the Farm, Hope for Hooves Rescue. Free. 11am-1pm. Farm tours include animal interaction with horses, donkeys, mules, rabbits, roosters, pigs, dogs and cats. Call 803.292.0496. www.facebook.com/HopeforHoovesRescue

36 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021

WEDNESDAYS THROUGH SUNDAYS Visit more than 200 exotic animals at Eudora Farms Drive-Thru Safari and try the brandnew Dino Hunt. Open Wed-Sun, 10am– 5:30pm. www.eudorafarms.net

Kids Night Out, Parents Night In! Kroc Center of Augusta. 6–10pm. Swimming, gym play, inflatables, arts and crafts. Children must be potty trained (those four and under will not swim). www.facebook.com/ events/2385158221772671


SATURDAYS Saturday Market at the River, downtown Augusta. Free entry. 9am–2pm. Vendors set up along and near the River Walk. www. theaugustamarket.com Learn about historic homes and churches, equestrian sites, the Civil War’s Battle of Aiken and much more on an Aiken Historic Trolley Tour. Departs from the Aiken Visitors Center & Train Museum at 10am each Saturday. www.eventbrite.com/e/aiken-trolley-tourtickets-35238190376 Go on a space mission, explore the marvels of the ancient world and much more at Aiken’s DuPont Planetarium. Reservations strongly suggested. Free, Saturdays at 7, 8 & 9pm. Masks required. www.usca.edu/rpsec/departments/ planetarium/public-shows SUNDAYS Get out and enjoy an afternoon of sport at the Aiken Polo Club. Games take place every Sunday at Whitney Field, 1pm. $5 at the gate, $30 for a ticket to the social tent. www. visitaikensc.com/calendar/event/sunday_ polo2 The oldest museum in the country for American South art and the only art museum in Savannah’s River Region, The Morris Museum offers free admission every Sunday.

12–5pm. Visit www.themorris.org/event/freesundays-at-the-morris/all.

development at home. www.facebook.com/ events/451813339003693

EVENT INFO

Guided Kayak Paddle at Mistletoe State Park starts at 1pm. Ages 7 and up. $20/person. Registration required, 706.541.0321.

MAY 14 & 22 Be front and center for the trial of Jesus, seated in Pontius Pilate’s courtroom at “The Witness.” $12 adults, $10 seniors and groups of 10 or more, $7 children under 12. Enopion Theatre Company in Martinez. www.enopion.com

MAY 25 The Aiken County Historical Museum is housed in a 1930s Winter Colony cottage named Banksia. Also on site are a one-room schoolhouse from the 1980s and a log cabin built in 1808. Reservations required. www. visitaikensc.com/calendar/event/banksia_ tours

MAY 14-15 Sanctioned by the Kansas City Barbeque Society, the Fifth Annual Boss Hog State Championship Cook-Off brings together competition cook teams and some of the best ribs, barbeque, brisket and chicken in the Southeast. May 14, 5–11pm; May 15, 10am– 4pm. Waynesboro.www.bosshogcookoff.com.

MAY 29

MAY 15

MAY 31-JUNE 3

Build early literacy skills for children five and under with parents and caregivers. Read & Play Day at the Kroc Center focuses on stories, arts and crafts and games, and parents receive additional info to continue this

4-Day Kids Art Camp, AR Workshop Evans, 9:30–noon. Limited seating, 4 projects. Ages 7-14. Abstract photo frame, cactus pot, plank tray and canvas pillow. Call 706.817.4113 for more information.

Don you red, white and blue and join area businesses, civic organizations, schools and churches for the Aiken Memorial Day Parade. Downtown Aiken. www. aikenmemorialdayparade.com

AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021 • 37


T H E

MODERN P E R S P E C T I V E

When did your interest in soccer start? I started playing soccer when I was around 4 years old. I played for fun at first with no intention of pursuing a future in soccer. One day after a game, my dad got an email from a local travel team saying they were interested in me trying out. My dad was confident in me, so he signed me up to try out the next season. I made the team and was one of the worst players. I worked my way up, though, and now I play with an older age group.

What skill is most important for a soccer player to master? I think ball control and composure are the most important aspects. Every position has different skills, but ball control and composure are strategic aspects of the game required from the goalkeeper to the striker. Remaining calm prevents your brain from panicking and keeps you from making dumb decisions. This will make the other team’s job much harder.

What is your proudest moment or memory in the sport? In the summer of 2019, I got invited to England to train with a professional team’s youth academy. It was a life-changing experience for me. My dream is to play professional soccer in England, so the ability to get a small taste of what life and soccer is like over there was surreal. England is home to the best soccer in the world, so that was certainly my proudest moment in the sport.

Who is your favorite soccer (fútbol) player and why?

Isaiah Hughes is 16 years old and a student at Davidson Fine Arts Magnet School. Isaiah has an older brother, a dog, and two happily married parents. He really enjoys music and sports. Most of Isaiah’s time is spent either watching soccer, playing soccer or listening to music. He recently returned to attending Curtis Baptist Church and he has high hopes for a positive future for his faith and soccer.

38 • AUGUSTA FAMILY | MAY 2021

My favorite soccer player is Cristiano Ronaldo. In my opinion, he’s the greatest player to ever play the game. The things he’s accomplished as well as what he can do with the ball is ridiculous. His passion for the sport is very admirable as well. No one hates losing more than he does. He’s a big inspiration to me.

Do you have any pre- or post-game habits or foods? I have a very sensitive stomach, so I have to watch what I eat before games and practices. My pre-game “go-to” food is a ham sandwich. Normally I’ll get a Jersey Mike’s sub which is probably an odd pregame food choice but it works for me. I also do some stretches from my physical therapist to prevent injury. I’m injury prone so it’s very important that I take good care of my body.


Profile for Augusta Family Magazine

Augusta Family Magazine May 2021  

Be A Tourist In Your Hometown Modern Staycation Memories Augusta Mural & Sculpture Trail

Augusta Family Magazine May 2021  

Be A Tourist In Your Hometown Modern Staycation Memories Augusta Mural & Sculpture Trail

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded