Falmouth Living by the Sea | Spring 2021 Issue

Page 1

$6.95 Spring/Summer 2021

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM falmouthlivingmag.com

1


508.563.5100 | 222 MAIN STREET | FALMOUTH, MA 02540


P E R F E C T I S C LO S E E N O U G H


We invite you to start at Main Street

MAKE HOME YOUR FAVORITE PLACE TO BE

SHOWROOM INNOVATIVE TRENDING ENDLESSLY INSPIRING

Cabinetry | Millwork | Doors & Windows | Explore ideas to create spaces that support the way you live

CAPE COD & ISLANDS

SOUTH SHORE

BOSTON

MAINSTREETBOTELLOS.COM | 508-477-3132 | MASHPEE, MA


CASE STUDY #21 DESIGN On Time CONSTRUCTION On Budget MOVE IN As Scheduled the bad weather, “ Despite Integrata completed our project

New Homes + Additions + Remodeling

ahead of schedule with a feat of consummate organization. I could not recommend a design/build firm more highly. – MONICA, HOMEOWNER

508.495.6575 View more projects at: www.INTEGRATA-AC.com


Falmouth Glass & Mirror

Frameless Shower Doors | Mirrors | Commercial Store Front | Glass Railings 537 Teaticket Highway | East Falmouth | 508-540-0317 | falmouthglass.com


Windows and Doors Inspired by How People Live

Pho to g r a pher : Jane Messing er A r c hitec t: Julia N eub auer Ar c hitec ts


A s p e c i a l t y s t o re o f fe r i n g a t i g h t l y c u ra t e d co l l e c t i o n o f wo m e n’s co n t e m p o ra r y fashion and accessories. Inspired and designed by tastemakers from Los Angeles, NYC, London, Copenhagen, and beyond. Stop in and say hi, we’ve been waiting for you. 352 Main St ., Falmouth, MA

774-763-5451

w w w. s tor y falmouth.com

IG @ s tor y falmouth


LOVE IN VERONA COLLECTION

Roberto Coin Boutique 16 Steeple Street 9-102 | Mashpee, MA 02649 | 508.477.7772 | robertocoin.com


contents

82

111

68

F E AT U R E S

38 FACES OF FALMOUTH 8 locals who are shaping the community

52 KATHARINE LEE BATES Daughter of Falmouth, literature professor and animal lover, she penned “America the Beautiful”

57 SUMMER COCKTAILS 6 cool concoctions from Falmouth restaurants

68 IT’S A WOW IN WOODS HOLE Spring and summer fashion from two top Falmouth boutiques

8

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


DEPARTMENTS 12 Publisher’s Letter 14 Editor’s Letter 16 Contributors 20 Our Town

AutoCamp glamping, mother-and-daughter pet business, Falmouth High grad in the NFL, Tommy’s Place update, bikes at WHOI, local craft beer, sustainable style, pandemic mask maker

104

116 Photo Essay

Local photographer Mary Cuddy captures magical moments around town

123 Shopping Guide 131 Calendar of Events 137 Restaurant Guide 144 Last Word

20

116

82 THE GREAT OUTDOORS Local design and build pros spruce up residential outdoor living spaces

94 STRIPED BASS SAFARI The best local beaches for fly fishing

104 FALMOUTH ROAD RACE A long-running hit

111 MADE BY HAND Hometown ceramicists share their passion for shaping clay

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

$6.95 2021 Spring/Summer

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM falmouthlivingmag.com

1

on the cover: Bikes at the

beach along Surf Drive. Photo by Mary Cuddy. 9


1

KinlinGrover.com

Serving

in every 4 Home Sales on Cape Cod

*

1,665,990,000

$

$761M

2,822 | 232

1,262 |

133

586 | 192

598 | 141

$322M

Gibson SIRE

$219M

$536M

Sotheby’s IRE

$466M

$575M

Robert Paul

$549M

William Raveis

Units

$766M

$1M+ Listings

Kinlin Grover Real Estate

The Undisputed Market Leader

$238M

692 | 132

2020 Transactions by Volume

For a complete list of our 23 offices serving Cape Cod and Coastal Massachusetts please visit KinlinGrover.com/offices

*For over a decade. Since 1/1/2008, Kinlin Grover was either on the seller or buyer side of 27% of the residential listings sold on Cape Cod per CCIAOR MLS 2020 Transactions by Volume Data Source: CCIAOR MLS 1/1/2020 - 12/31/2020 all transactions in Barnstable County. Run date 1/14/21


SMALL POOLS. BIG BENEFITS.

PHOTO TIM MURPHY, FOTO IMAGERY

CUSTOM PRECAST CONCRETE PLUNGE POOLS soakepools.com 603.749.0665 Pembroke, NH | Delivery throughout New England


publisher’s letter

Celebrating everything Falmouth! Hello and welcome to the Spring/ Summer issue of Falmouth Living. What an honor it’s been over the past year. I’ve met some fascinating people within the community, and the outpouring of enthusiasm for Falmouth Living has surpassed my wildest dreams. From Cape Cod all the way to Florida, folks have reached out to us with such positive reactions to the magazine. It’s truly amazing and so humbling. To my incredible team, our contributors, and to everyone in the Falmouth community, thank you! From the bottom of my heart, thank you as well to our wonderful advertisers for their support. We couldn’t have produced this magazine without you. Over the past year, faced with the shifting sands of today’s new landscape, we have worked extremely hard to create this issue of Falmouth Living. We hope you enjoy reading the magazine as much as we enjoyed creating it for you. I am pleased to announce that this October we will publish a Fall/Winter issue. Follow us on Instagram and Facebook for updates. Come join us as we explore Falmouth, voted one of the most charming small cities in the USA!

12

P H OTO B Y L E E G E I S H E C K E R

Suzanne Ryan Publisher Falmouth Living

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


FIND YOUR PERFECT SH ADE

Draperies • Blinds • Shutters

Thibaut • Stout • Carole • Sunbrella Fabrics EAST FALMOUTH 706 Teaticket Hwy 508-457-0077

MASHPEE 387 Nathan Ellis Hwy 508-419-1008

kcsdraperyfalmouth.com FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

13


editor’s letter

A Beloved Town’s Many Connections

W

hat struck me most as I worked on this issue during the height of the pandemic is how interconnected the people of Falmouth are and how supportive they are of one another and their community. Time and again, I would be researching one article and a reference to another would pop up in conversation. When I interviewed landscape designer Barbara Conolly, for example, she told me that her first job when she went out on her own was pruning roses at the Katharine Lee Bates house. This made me think about Amanda Wastrom’s engaging article on Bates (page 52), the woman famous for composing “America the Beautiful,” and how much I learned from it. Our memories of the late Tommy Leonard are inextricably linked to the Falmouth Road Race (page 104), which he founded in 1973. His legacy continues at Tommy’s Place (page 26), an amazing example of local generosity that at press time was scheduled to welcome its first families this summer. I could go on, but suffice it to say that Falmouth is a very special place for many, many reasons. In this issue we attempt to capture the essence of the town from its natural beauty and cultural richness to its more intangible qualities like civic pride and entrepreneurial gumption. Just walk down the main streets of Falmouth and Woods Hole to savor the feeling of familiarity at longtime storefronts, like Eight Cousins Books and the Captain Kidd, mingled with the excitement of newer faces like story. boutique and Aquatic Brewery. All are covered in these pages. Falmouth is a town where people love to live, look forward to vacationing year after year, or are excited to discover for the first time. Whichever category describes you, we are delighted to share Falmouth Living with you. We invite you to join us as we usher in spring and summer 2021 with a sigh of relief and a sense of adventure.

Sincerely,

Janice

Janice Randall Rohlf Editor Falmouth Living

14

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


design : Joseph W. Dick Architecture,

bannon

Imagine a home, build a legacy www.bannonbuilds.com | 508-833-0050


contributors DAN CUTRONA’s work has appeared in Chatham Living by the Sea, South Shore Home Life & Style and Gulfshore Life. Cutrona divides his time between Miami and Cotuit with his wife and three young children.

wife, Lyra, their two teenagers, Rye and Leanna, and their rescue puppy, Mulligan.

soccer matches. Beyond fun and games, Bill’s most memorable and proudest moments have been with his family and 39-year marriage to Marsha. They have a son and daughter and four grandchildren.

JOE HEALY is a staff editor with Active Interest Media and a frequent visitor to East Falmouth. He was an editor at Outdoor Life; served as vice president and editorial director of American Angler, Fly Tyer and Saltwater Fly Fishing; and held leadership roles with Vermont and Saratoga Living magazines. Healy has also worked in various communications roles

VERONICA NETO is a freelance writer who resides in Centerville. She graduated from Suffolk University in 2018 with a degree in print journalism and has CHRIS KAZARIAN is a freelance writer who enjoys telling stories about people who are making an impact nationally, regionally and here on Cape Cod. His writing has appeared in Hemispheres InFlight Magazine, espnW, The Hockey News, Boston Herald, Worcester Telegram & Gazette, Providence Journal and the Cape Cod Travel Guide.

16

AMANDA WASTROM is a curator, writer and artist based in East Sandwich, where she lives with her family, a flock of chickens, an overgrown garden and some feisty honeybees. On most days, you can find her at Heritage Museums & Gardens in

Sandwich, where she works as assistant curator.

DERRICK ZELLMANN is a commercial and editorial photographer based between Boston and Cape Cod. His passion for portraiture has brought him diverse opportunities to photograph a written for Fortune magazine. In her free time, she likes kayaking, reading and spending time with family and friends.

MICHAEL PETRIZZO is an award-winning photographer based in Falmouth with decades of experience shooting family portraiture,

and is the author and editor of several books, including The Pocket Guide to Fishing Knots, When Bears Attack and Unspeakable Horror from Skyhorse Publishing.

BILL HIGGINS is an awardwinning former newspaper sports editor and writer who has covered everything from World Series, Super Bowls, Stanley Cups and NBA championships to the Masters golf tournament, Boston Marathons, America’s Cup yacht races and World Cup

SUSAN MOELLER is a former newspaper editor and reporter who writes for the Boston Globe Magazine, AARP and other outlets. She’s lived on Cape Cod for 45 years and has a pandemic puppy named Moses.

professional headshots and landscapes. The framed prints of this accomplished landscape and fine art photographer hang in homes and offices internationally.

RICH MACLONE is the senior sports reporter for Enterprise Publishing in Falmouth. He also is the author of Season on the Brink, and has two other upcoming book projects in the works. He lives in East Falmouth with his

wide range of subjects including celebrities, artists, professional athletes, heroic firefighters, Academy and Emmy Award winners, and models for a number of fashion editorials.

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


PHOTOS BY SALTY BROAD STUDIOS

IT ALL STARTS HERE... THE CAPE COD LIFESTYLE

YOUR LOCAL BOUTIQUE AGENCY Serving Falmouth, Bourne and Mashpee

100 Palmer Avenue | Falmouth | 508-444-6891 | saltpondrealty.com


Follow Falmouth Living online for year-round updates on all things Falmouth! FUN LOCAL EVENTS & ACTIVITIES BEAUTIFUL PHOTOGRAPHY

VOLUME 2

~

ISSUE 1

SPRING/SUMMER 2021 PUBLISHER Suzanne Ryan suzanne@falmouthlivingmag.com

BEHIND THE SCENES MAKING OUR MAGAZINE

EDITOR Janice Randall Rohlf janice@falmouthlivingmag.com

CONTESTS & GIVEAWAYS

ART DIRECTOR Alison Caron alison@falmouthlivingmag.com

falmouthlivingmag.com facebook.com/flivingmag instagram.com/falmouthliving.mag

COPY EDITOR Nan Fornal

ADVERTISING Suzanne Ryan

WRITERS Mike Ciolino, Joe Healy, Bill Higgins, Chris Kazarian, Rich Maclone, Susan Moeller, Veronica Neto, Amanda Wastrom

PHOTOGRAPHERS Mary Cuddy, Dan Cutrona, Michael Petrizzo, Derrick Zellmann

ADVISORY COMMITTEE Mindy Reasonover, Janice Rogers

falmouthlivingmag.com @flivingmag @falmouthliving.mag

P.O. Box 183, Sagamore Beach, MA 02562 Spring/Summer magazine price $6.95 All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without the written permission of the publisher. Publisher disclaims all responsibility for omissions, error and unsolicited materials. Printed in the USA.

18

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Boston | New York | Cape & Islands SEADAR.COM | 508.419.7372

FINE CUSTOM HOMES and

Architect: Hutker Associates | Interior Design: Vivian Hedges | Photographer: Brian Vanden Brink

PROPERTY SERVICES

Construction

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

.

Renovations

.

Maintenance

.

Repairs

19


OUR TOWN

Camping Haute Great design meets the great outdoors at AutoCamp Cape Cod. BY JANICE R ANDALL ROHLF | PHOTOGR APHY BY MAT T KISIDAY

F

or 99 years there has been a family campground on Palmer Avenue in Falmouth. Founded in 1922 by Charlotte and Harold Dodge, the property was owned and operated by Louis and Anne Tessier from 1961 to 2018. Now, on the eve of its second century, what was once Sippewissett Campground is now AutoCamp Cape Cod, a five-star–focused destination with 108 campsites that’s part of a red-hot nationwide glamping trend. The idea is that highend hospitality coexists with the old-timey appeal inherent to camping—just kicked up a few notches. Eighty-eight 31-foot Airstreams equipped with TempurPedic mattresses and flat-screen TVs were designed specifically for AutoCamp, which has locations in Yosemite, Zion, Joshua Tree and Russian River. The Falmouth location, opened on April 1, is its first East Coast site, which, like the others, offers its guests amenities including luxe linens and high-end bath

20

products in spa-inspired bathrooms with walk-in showers. “The idea was to continue the camping tradition but bring it into something people want to do today,” Brad Guidi of the Boston-based development team Blue Flag Partners told WCVBTV Channel 5’s Chronicle early this spring. For the Falmouth property, Blue Flag partnered with AutoCamp and real estate investment management company Whitman Peterson. In addition to the heat- and air-conditioning–equipped Airstreams dotting the 14-acre property, there are luxury tents, X suites (tiny houses a little larger than the Airstreams) and accessible suites. Each campsite has its own outdoor dining area and fire pit for which AutoCamp provides wood and charcoal buddies. An 8,100-square-foot clubhouse features a mid-century modern lounge with an indoor fireplace and cozy seating, a bar serving cold brew and kombucha, a retail shop, a locally sourced food and beverage program, and restrooms with luxury showers. FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Featuring mid-century modern design, 31-foot Airstreams are equipped with queen-sized Tempur-Pedic beds, spacious bathrooms, a sleeper sofa, a flatscreen TV with cable, heat and air conditioning, a microwave, a mini-fridge, cookware, BBQ accessories and a private firepit. The clubhouse, below right, features a lounge and several intimate gathering spaces surrounding an indoor fire pit. Upstairs is private meeting space.

The second floor offers a reservable private space for corporate retreats, meetings and social events. With its million-dollar view overlooking Buzzards Bay, vacationers may wish to stay put. For others, bicycles are available, and there’s direct access to Shining Sea Bikeway, a gorgeous stretch for pedaling just three miles into the center of Falmouth and six miles to Woods Hole. The campground is a car-free, dog-friendly environment, and as part of the company’s commitment to preserving natural ecosystems, AutoCamp will restore more than 22,000 square feet of wetlands with native plants on the property, which will expand local wetland habitat, reduce water runoff into local waterways and support native pollinator plants. While AutoCamp couldn’t have foreseen the pandemic, its design naturally allows for physical distancing. autocamp.com   FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

21


AN IMAL INSTINCT Mother and daughter Jodi and Casey McGowan share a love for animals that brings them together as entrepreneurs.

I

BY JANICE R ANDALL ROHLF

f Tucker, Ellie and T.D. could talk, they’d tell you that Jodi McGowan is their best friend. Roxy, Ruby and Lewy would give her two thumbs up, if they could, but the best they can do is offer a paw. Dogs all, these six four-legged friends represent a much larger group that McGowan dotes on one at a time as the owner of Trots and Treats, her one-woman pet care service based out of her East Falmouth home. “I want to be outside and be active,” says McGowan, a former publishing professional who vacationed in Falmouth for years

22

before settling permanently in Teaticket in 2017 with her husband, Bob, and their 17-year-old daughter, Casey. Before launching Trots and Treats, Jodi worked for a pet care business on the Cape that grew too large for McGowan, who takes pride in showering her furry charges and their owners with personal attention. Visits of 30 minutes or more include walking, feeding, playtime, snuggles, treats and brushing, and if there’s something specific your pet needs, just ask. “I have a client who likes when I blow-dry her cavapoo puppy after walking in the rain,” says McGowan, who also FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021

S U Z A N N E R YA N

OUR TOWN


As a complement to her mother’s pet care service, Casey McGowan has her own pet portraiture business.

has tended to chickens, bunnies, pigs, frogs and turtles. Crazy about dogs, McGowan didn’t own one—a pug named Cooper—until shortly after she and Bob were married. “He changed my entire lifestyle, altered my daily routine and turned my life upside down,” she says, but it was all for the good. “He taught me what unconditional love is, he taught me what absolute responsibility for another life is, he taught me about sacrifice, and he made me more aware of how much I love dogs.” Finally a pet owner, McGowan not only became “obsessed” with dogs—specifically, pugs—she also gained a heightened awareness of backyard breeders and puppy mills, and didn’t like what she learned about them. From then on, she decided, “I would rescue only older dogs.” She has adopted five dogs, all of them either adult or senior. The McGowan household currently includes two deaf rescued pugs, Brody and Buddha, who is also blind, and a rescued pug-chihuahua mix named Peggy. “When I moved to Falmouth, I left my career in publishing to walk dogs and pet-sit and I haven’t regretted one single second,” shares McGowan. “I owe all of it to Cooper for showing me how deep the love for a pet can be and how important it is for me to always have dogs in my life.” Dog-walking and dog-sitting are the focus of Trots and Treats, but there’s more on the menu of services, including pet portraits, thanks to daughter Casey’s artistic talent. “When my friend Maddy’s golden retriever passed away, I drew a picture of it for her,” says the Falmouth High School rising senior. It turned out so well that her mom thought it would be a great option for her clients. “I posted it on Facebook and got a crazy response,” says McGowan. “She had a waiting list in no time.” Casey has always enjoyed drawing. “I have been interested in art since I could get my hands on a pencil,” she shares. “Right now, I love to draw with pencil and ballpoint pen, and paint with acrylics. Occasionally, I pick up my iPad and use the Procreate app, but I tend to stick to traditional media.” FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

Casey concedes that people are her favorite subject, but animals run a close second. “They tend to vary in their fur types,” she says. “Drawing a goldendoodle and drawing a lab are very different. I like to put the most emphasis on the eyes, nose, jaw and ears, as they are what people pay most attention to.” Like her mom, Casey is an exercise buff and hopes to one day become a certified personal trainer as well as study psychology once she gets to college. She works part-time at Starbucks. For the two of them, the pandemic has had a silver lining. “It offered us so much more time together,” says McGowan. “We walked many miles together, combing beaches for cool shells, cooking lots of vegetarian meals, watching movies. “Casey joined me on some of my jobs, too,” adds McGowan, who is quick to clarify that it’s hard to call it work when she gets to combine her passions for pet care, the outdoors and physical activity. trotsandtreats.com

23


OUR TOWN

WALKING TALL AMONG GIANTS Former Falmouth High School athlete Dr. Lani Lawrence finds her calling in the NFL.

I

n an NFL game, careers can be made, or ended, on each and every play. The stakes are sky-high, and so are the pressures that accompany them. Falmouth native Lani Lawrence, 39, is helping the players, coaches, and staff of the New York Giants through it all. Lawrence, a 1998 Falmouth High School graduate who had a dominant career as a Clipper and then went on to play basketball at Northeastern University, was hired in January 2020 to become director of wellness and clinical services for the New York Giants. Dr. Lani, as she is known around the Giants campus, is no stranger to the pressure that comes with high-level athletics. She endured the college recruiting process and then had to fight for playing time at Northeastern University, where she holds several records. After playing professional women’s basketball in Europe, she shifted her focus. She began coaching back in New England and earned a master’s degree in counseling psychology at Boston University. Counseling became her passion. She loved helping others deal with the stress brought on by athletics and earned a doctorate at the University of Denver in 2012. From there she accepted a job at the University of Southern California, where she completed a postdoctoral fellowship. USC soon hired her to work with its Division 1 athletics programs—21 in all—as an on-campus clinical and sports

24

psychologist. Her work there caught the attention of professional sports franchises, and she had offers from the Giants and an NBA team to move to the big leagues. After much consideration, the Big Apple won out and she joined up with the Giants just before the start of the Covid-19 pandemic. Having just completed her first year with the G-Men, Lawrence is already at work on year two. Once the season ended, she began helping the front office review prospects and recruit people who fit the mold of the culture that New York is trying to build. “I’m checking in with players that typically live in other places, making sure that everything is okay, and prepping for the draft, going through different prospects to get a feel for who they are as people and make sure that they’re a good fit,” she says. “I really love the group of men that the Giants try to bring in. They have great character.” Likening the NFL season to life inside a submarine, Lawrence says that she is looking forward to finding some time to decompress this summer. She and her wife, Joanna, are expecting in the spring, after which they hope to visit Lani’s parents, Doreen and Kenneth, at their Mashpee home. “I realize that taking care of my body and my mind is important. I try to keep up with meditations on a daily basis and checking in with the people I need to check in with,” she says. “I’m trying to make sure to restore myself so that when we go back into the submarine, I’m ready to go.”  FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021

P H OTO S: N E W YO R K F O OT B A L L G I A N T S

BY RICH MACLONE



OUR TOWN

IT TAKES A VILLAGE Thanks to helping hands and warm hearts, Tommy’s Place is poised to open this summer.

I

BY JANICE R ANDALL ROHLF

f you’ve recently walked by Elm Arch Way, just off Main Street in downtown Falmouth, you’ve noticed a near-constant buzz of activity inside and out at #26, a big, white 200-year-old house that operated for many years as the Elm Arch Inn. The building is being restored and renovated by local real estate developer Tim O’Connell as Tommy’s Place, a vacation destination for children with cancer, along with their families, friends and, in some cases, their medical attendants. With amenities like a swimming pool, a game room, a home theater, a catering kitchen and more, the sprawling, 11-bedroom house promises to be a magical place for kids and adults alike. Once restored to its former glory, and then some, O’Connell says it will be “an HGTV Dream Home/Walt Disney–type experience.” If all goes according to plan, Tommy’s Place will welcome its first vacationers this summer. “Our goal is to stay open 50 weeks for 50 families, one at a time,” says O’Connell, explaining that the groups will have the opportunity to invite guests to fill all the bedrooms, each one sponsored by different individuals and

26

Tim O’Connell with HGTV host and designer Taniya Nayak, who has organized interior design services for Tommy’s Place.

decorated by a volunteer designer. “It’s a way for the families [of the sick children] to give back to everyone who has helped out along the way,” says O’Connell. As Tommy’s Place gears up to throw open its doors, “Lots of exciting things are happening!” reported O’Connell when we checked in with him in mid-April. On a single day you might see volunteer work crews from Patriot Plumbing, Northeastern FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Cape Cod 5 is here to support your banking needs today and every day.

Mortgage • Personal Banking Business Banking • Wealth Management

Call us today or visit us at www.capecodfive.com

www.capecodfive.com 888-225-4636 NMLS# 401717


OUR TOWN Mechanical and Coastal Electric trooping in and out of the house, clearly on a mission. Another day, Reliable of Cape Cod could be putting up fencing in the big yard with a swimming pool and plenty of space for outdoor games, plus a fire pit. Generous donations have come from Pocassetbased Paine’s Patio and landscaper Francisco Tavares of East Falmouth. Mashpee’s Botello Lumber was one of the first to jump on board. These are just a few of the legions of generous individuals and businesses pitching in to make Tommy’s Place, O’Connell’s dream, come true. “We are beyond grateful for their incredible support and generosity,” says O’Connell who rattles off a long and growing list of all the products and services that have been donated not only to sensitively restore a 19th-century house on its last legs but also to focus on its raison d’être

From supplying and installing plumbing and electrical to painting and landscaping, legions of generous individuals and businesses are pitching in to make Tommy’s Place a reality.

moving forward. “It doesn’t matter if the floors are crooked, what happens inside is what’s most important.” Early this spring, HGTV host and designer Taniya Nayak stopped by to admire the progress. “I gathered up a bunch of my super-talented friends to each design a room in this magical house,” she posted on Facebook. “We’re proud to be teaming up with Tommy’s Place to create a home away from home for kids fighting cancer.”

28

Tommy’s Place is built in memory of Grifyn Sawyer, a terminally ill 8-year-old when O’Connell treated him and his family to a Martha’s Vineyard vacation in 2007, shortly before Grifyn died. “While I never met Grifyn, he remains the wind beneath my wings for opening the doors to Tommy’s Place,” shares O’Connell. “No matter how tough things get, I will keep pushing forward, for I will never have a bad day compared to what he went through in his short lifetime.” The house also honors beloved local hero Tommy Leonard, a generous, humble man and the inspiration for the Falmouth Road Race, who passed away in 2019 at the age of 85. Occupying a cozy space on the main floor is Tommy’s Tavern, a replica of the bar at the Quarterdeck restaurant on Main Street, where Leonard liked to hang out. This room, like all the others in the house, has a generous sponsor behind it. “People have given from $5 to $75,000,” says O’Connell, clearly in awe of the outpouring of support, not only locally, but from throughout the country. “At Tommy’s Place, we aren’t in the business of curing cancer,” says O’Connell, “but we are in the business of giving these little kids and their families a break from the harsh reality of their days fighting childhood cancer.” For more information: tommysplace.org   FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


A FULL SERVICE COUNTRY MARKET Boar’s Head Deli | Old Fashioned Butcher Shop | House Smoked Meats Maison Villatte Breads | Fine Wines | Beer and Liquor Catering | Weekly Thursday Night BBQ | Montilio’s Bakery Products

623 WEST FALMOUTH HIGHWAY | FALMOUTH | 508-548-1139 | WESTFALMOUTHMARKET.COM


OUR TOWN

WHOI’s Bike Loaner Program is

The Wheel Deal T

he Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s Bike Loaner Program helps visiting students and researchers get around the village, but it’s about more than pedal power. Under the direction of Stephanie Madsen, coordinator of WHOI’s Sustainability Task Force, and ably assisted by volunteer Susan Mills, the program is one of the institution’s green transportation initiatives to reduce human impact on the environment. A fleet of 45 used bicycles, with locks and helmets, are available to WHOI guests for up to three months for a nominal fee of $40 ($20 is refunded when everything is returned in good order). The program runs from spring through fall and fills up quickly during the summer when students and scholars are on campus. The League of American Bicyclists honored WHOI with a Silver Bicycle Friendly Business award for its efforts

30

BY BILL HIGGINS

Volunteer Susan Mills, primary operator of WHOI’s Bike Loaner Program, holds a certificate declaring her as winner of the Winter 2020 “Green It Forward” award from the WHOI Sustainability Task Force.

to promote cycling to help ease traffic, reduce pollution and encourage a healthy lifestyle among its employees. Madsen and Mills practice what they preach, commuting by bike from their Falmouth homes to WHOI. Mills, an emeritus research scholar, was honored with the institute’s Winter 2020 “Green It Forward’’ award for her contributions. “We couldn’t do this without Susan’s extraordinary commitment,” says Madsen, who took over the program five years ago from Andy Beet when he was with the WHOI International Committee. “She loves connecting with our global community of young people. “Reducing carbon emissions from gas-fueled engines can definitely make a difference,” adds Madsen. “Less congestion on the roads is a good thing. We have beautiful areas to show off so there is also a wellness benefit to biking, mentally and physically.”

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


BUY

SELL

VACATION

Celebrating 86 Years of Service to Our Clients and Community!

ErmineLovell.com 550 West Falmouth Hwy. Falmouth

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

508-548-0703 Locally Owned & Operated

31


OUR TOWN

BEER NUTS Intrigued by the science of brewing beer, two friends trained as oceanographers open Falmouth’s newest watering hole.

T

he way Alex Bergan sees it, “The more breweries, the more people will want to come to Cape Cod for beer tourism, and that is good for everyone.” Bergan and business partner Greg Horning, both Falmouth residents and in their early 30s, opened Aquatic Brewing last September in the midst of the pandemic. With restaurant restrictions loosening, at press time they looked forward to opening their taproom on May 29. “We’ll still keep all the recommended safety protocols,” says Bergan, adding that he hopes they will also have outdoor seating and, eventually, a rotating lineup of high-quality food trucks. Until now the brewery has been open only for takeout, on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, when craft beer aficionados come for “growlers,” 64-ounce refillable glass containers, and “crowlers,” 32-ounce cans, both filled from tap on demand. “We don’t sell anything that was filled on another day,” says Bergan, who touts the immediacy of the experience as high on the list of Aquatic’s selling points. “You buy it fresh, and drink it fresh.” Once the taproom opens, Bergan says they’re planning to sell 12-ounce and 6-ounce pours of from eight to 12 beers on any

given day. Beers range from a hazy wheat ale to an amber-colored lager along with a hefeweizen—the first beer they brewed—and, just released in mid-May, a session IPA. While a New England– style IPA is currently their most popular beer, they also have a following for Pie in the Sky Coffee Oatmeal Stout, made with whole coffee beans from Pie in the Sky Bakery and Cafe in Woods Hole, a place both men got to know as PhD students in oceanography at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. While at WHOI, Bergan, from Mountain View, Calif., and Horning, from Portland, Ore., were extracurricular home brewers, and they have continued to refine their recipes over the years. For now, Aquatic Brewing is a two-man band, the tasks shared equally. But with the burgeoning interest in craft beer on Cape Cod, what is now a humble operation is poised for growth. “When we decided to pursue a brewery here, it was because we saw a great opportunity on Cape Cod,” says Bergan. “I can foresee a future where you can walk from one brewery to another and it still wouldn’t be too dense.” aquaticbrewing.com

BY JANICE R ANDALL ROHLF 32

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Specializing in high-end landscaping

and world-class stone masonry for the design community

508-271-7750

ianm@blueclawassociates.com

2957 Falmouth Road, Suite B2, Osterville blueclawassociates.com


OUR TOWN

The Lobstah Abundant from Maine to Rhode Island, lobsters are an icon of New England’s history, sustenance and accent. I love their look and changing colors. It’s so fun to create them from wood. Everyone should have at least one “Losbtah” in their life. ~ RR

The Whale A New England favorite, the whale has a gentle soul, making it very appealing to carve and paint. Their sheer beauty and size have always kept me in awe! ~ RR

SUSTAINABLE STYLE Made with recycled plastic, StepChange clothing helps keep oceans clean, supports nonprofits and promotes artists, all at the same time. BY JANICE R ANDALL ROHLF

T

he next time you find yourself depositing empty soda containers into the machine at your local redemption center, think about this: It takes 16 plastic bottles to make one shirt. Not just any shirt, of course, but an incredibly soft and durable long-sleeved performance shirt made by StepChange, a brand that has roots in Falmouth. “We thought it would be great to start a brand whose voice is really about helping people understand that you can take recycled bottles and turn them into really cool things,” says Kevin Hall, who, along with business partner and longtime friend Joe Wagner, started StepChange in early 2020. Not only does the passion-project company spin straw into gold, so to speak, but it also donates a portion of its proceeds to nonprofits fighting ocean pollution, and it recruits artists to create custom designs for its line of T-shirts.

34

Falmouth artist Ronnie Reasonover

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Buster the Crab Crabs present a strong and bold character. They are amazing creatures whose claws and exterior shell were strengthened by evolution. You may think they look the same, but each has a unique personality. I call this one “Buster.” ~ RR

One such talented individual is Ronnie Reasonover, who owns The Village Gallery in West Falmouth with his wife, Mindy, also an artist. “I’m so excited to be working with StepChange and help promote their mission to restore the health of our oceans,” says Ronnie. “Our coastal waters are fragile. The cost of doing nothing is far greater than everyone doing their part to recycle.” Other artists collaborating with StepChange are from Florida, New York, and South Carolina, and the newest reached out to Wagner and Hall all the way from a coastal town in Iceland. “We try to find artists who are specifically passionate about the ocean and help promote them and their art as part of helping promote ocean clean-up,” explains Wagner, who lives with his wife in East Falmouth. They were customers of the Reasonovers years before StepChange came into being, and knew instinctively that Ronnie and his art would be perfect complements to their endeavor. “Ronnie and Mindy have such a passion, and they really help bring some excitement to the line,” says Wagner. “I think that’s kindled interest in other artists and it’s a pretty deep part of what we do.” Reasonover’s designs for StepChange include a lobster, a crab, and a whale—all very lifelike. “I’m inspired by nature and the beaches of Cape Cod that have so much character,” says Reasonover. “I’m proud to have the opportunity with StepChange to help make a difference.” stepchangeclothing.com   FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

35


OUR TOWN

MASK MASTER Versatile artist Kathleen Hall stares down the pandemic by donating hand-painted face coverings to the community. BY JANICE R ANDALL ROHLF

I

f you’re attracted to art and cultural events in Falmouth, chances are you’ve seen the work of Kathleen Hall—an acrylic of a boathouse at the Falmouth Art Center; shore birds and cresting waves at The Gallery at Falmouth Community Television; a miniature lighthouse creation for “Fairy Houses of Highfield Hall”; glittery unicorns and exquisite dragons on the cheeks of kids walking through town. Hall, a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh, where she majored in Studio Arts, has a repertoire that includes photography, murals, portraiture, glass blowing, sculpture, and body art in addition to painting in a variety of mediums. Last year, Hall’s artwork took a new twist, one she never could have anticipated: face masks. “When a woman asked me to paint one of my designs on a mask for her autistic 4-year-old who refused to wear one, I was delighted,” she says. “He loved to wear his special mask with Sponge Bob on it so much that his mom had to wait until he was asleep to wash it.” That was early April 2020 and to date she’s made over 3,200 masks, many of them hand-painted or studded with “jewels.” Hall started out using a stash of fabric remnants she’s collected over the years, and once people learned of her endeavor, they donated fabric, thread and elastic to the effort. “Every mask is hung on a column in front of my house,” she says, “free for the

36

taking!” Last summer her goal was to put out a dozen a day, and often they were snatched up within an hour. Fortuitously, her house is located on a street that gets a lot of foot traffic between downtown and the beach. Hall’s career highlights include commissions from big-name companies like Coca Cola, Walgreens and Macy’s, among others. On Cape Cod, for more than 45 years, she has made something of a name for herself with her expert face painting at the local Renaissance Faire and other festivals. “That came to a grinding halt [with the pandemic],” she explains. “And I don’t see face painting coming back.” Fortunately for Hall, who founded her custom artwork business, Popular Palette, in 1980, versatility is a strong suit. Lately, in addition to the face masks, she’s been creating stunning mosaics from ordinary paint sample chips. And she has proposed donating her time and talent to paint murals in some of the kids’ bedrooms at Tommy’s Place (see story on page 26). No one could have predicted that face masks would become something of a fashion statement, but now that they are, it’s nice to have people like Kathy Hall in town. “I’m glad to have people wear them,” she says, “and it’s a way to keep myself busy and amused.”  FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


For those seeking exceptional results

Recent Sales by The Annie hArT Cool TeAm

Victorian with Waterviews

Waterfront Splendor

Sold for $2,600,000

Sold for $1,610,000

Gambrel with Inground Pool

Johns Pond Charmer

Sold for $1,300,000

Sold for $855,000

FALMOUTH | 7BD/4.5BA| 28WORCESTER.COM

FALMOUTH | 4BD/4BA| 29FIDDLERSCOVE.COM

EAST FALMOUTH | 3BD/2.5BA| 52OYSTERSHELL.COM

MASHPEE | 3BD/3BA| 49PONDCIRCLE.COM

The Annie Hart Cool Team Falmouth Brokerage annie.hartcool@sir.com | 508.868.0664 anniehartcool.com This material is based upon information which we consider reliable but because it has been supplied by third parties, we cannot represent that it is accurate or complete and it should not be relied upon as such. The offerings are subject to errors, omissions, changes without notice. Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity.


FACES OF 38

FALMOUTH FALMOUTH LIVING LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


FALMOUTH BY CHRIS K AZARIAN

PHOTOGR APHY BY MICHAEL PE TRIZZO

Erik Bevans, left, and Tom Hughes are coowners of the Quahog Republic Dive Bar.

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

39


Erik Bevans and Tom Hughes R E S TAUR ATEUR S

40

In addition to serving delicious food, the Quahog Republic has launched several of its own products including bloody Mary mix, bourbon and golden ale.

the philosophy, embodied in the Quahog Republic’s motto—Live, Give, Relax. It’s an attitude they would have to draw on two years later when neighbors purchased the Mashnee Island parcel where the Quahog Republic was located. That left the business temporarily without a home; the pair had to improvise, launching a retail store in Plymouth featuring Quahog Republic apparel,

including hats, T-shirts and sweatshirts. In 2010, they were able to reestablish the restaurant on a strip mall on Spring Bars Road in Falmouth. Complete with a video game room, a hook and ring toss game, Keno, a Mug Club and aquatic-related décor, including a full scuba diving suit mounted to the ceiling, there’s a real element of fun to the restaurant dubbed

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021

P H OTO S ( T H I S PAG E ) : Q UA H O G R E P U B L I C

E

rik Bevans’ and Tom Hughes’ friendship started as many do, over a pint of beer. The initial meetings were strictly business-related—Erik was the owner of the Mashnee Island Grill and Tom was a patron who loved the one-of-akind atmosphere at the Bourne beach bar overlooking Phinneys Harbor. “You could just feel the lifestyle there,” Tom says. “It epitomized Cape Cod.” For Erik, who grew up in Mashpee, the opportunity to own “one of the coolest beach bars ever” was a dream come true. “It was really a special place. There was a big giant pool, a volleyball court, access to the water, and you had great characters there,” he says. While Tom was one of those characters, he was also a kindred spirit. Plus, he had a background in marketing. Eventually becoming business partners, their first stroke of genius was the name— Quahog Republic. It came about while Erik was tending bar in the off-season in Brookline and started talking about Mashnee Island Grill with one of his regulars. “I told him, it was just a bunch of quahoggers trying to get along. Kind of like a quahog nation,” Erik recalls. “He said, ‘Funny, it sounds more like a quahog republic.’ I kept the name to myself, did my due diligence, and by that time I had met Tom and decided it was a good time to start talking about the idea of the Quahog Republic and rebrand the restaurant.” That was 2007, the year the Quahog Republic was born. What came next was


Their success can be attributed to several factors, from the food to the inviting atmosphere to the love they have for what they do. Their passion has not waned even in the midst of the pandemic.

the Quahog Republic Dive Bar. That atmosphere has extended to the annual events they’ve held, from stuffed quahog eating contests just because to ugly Christmas sweater contests to benefit Wings for Falmouth Families to the Silver Shores Wiffle Ball Tournament and the Hog Off stuffed quahog contest to benefit the Quahog Republic’s Life Scholarship Fund. FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

The pair started the fund ito give back to graduating Falmouth High School seniors who epitomize the Quahog Republic’s mantra, regardless of whether they end up going to college or taking a year off to travel the world. In the past decade, they’ve given out over $20,000 in scholarships. The initial years were lean with both Tom and Erik sinking their time,

energy and passion into all aspects of the business, but eventually their hard work paid off. While they closed their Plymouth retail store, they have opened up additional Quahog Republics in Onset with views of Onset Bay and on the cobblestone streets of New Bedford. Their success can be attributed to several factors, from the food to the inviting atmosphere to the love they have for what they do. Their passion has not waned even in the midst of the pandemic which Erik says, “has been devastating.” It’s the only time in the interview where their positivity is subdued. But they don’t stay there long. “We each have young kids and families so we’re looking at this as a way to grow and adapt,” Tom says. “If you don’t adapt, you don’t survive.” Live, give, relax, and adapt. Since March 2020, that’s what Erik and Tom have had to do. They’ve added to-go orders and launched several Quahog Republic products, including their own clam chowder, bloody Mary mix and bourbon in partnership with Cleveland Whiskey. Last June, they collaborated with Mayflower Brewing, releasing Quahog Republic Golden Ale; a portion of the proceeds benefits the Cape Cod Commercial Fishermen’s Alliance. “All of these things happened because of COVID,” Tom says. “We couldn’t just depend on our restaurant. When something like this happens, we have our brand to fall back on.” Despite the events of the past year, they remain optimistic. “We want to have the first restaurant on the moon. That’s our goal,” Erik jokes. “He says the moon, I say Mars, baby,” Tom follows. While made in jest, they have a grandiose idea of one day creating their own small village on Cape Cod, complete with a lagoon, mini-golf, retail shop and, of course, a restaurant. “It’ll be our own section of the Cape where people can step away. Wherever you are, you’re now in this Quahog Republic,” says Tom. “Just to give people a good time and let them relax.”

41


Jeny Christian FAR MER

42

FALMOUTH FALMOUTH LIVING LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


N

ear the intersection of Gifford Street and Brick Kiln Road, Jeny Christian fires up a small propane torch as she sets up an irrigation system to nourish a 50-foot by 50-foot garden perched atop a small lush green hill underneath the town’s power lines. Her 10-year-old Irish wolfhound-border collie mix, Seamus, sits quietly behind her in a small bed of Swiss chard and kale. It’s an idyllic scene, especially as the sun begins to set on this seasonably warm day in early November. There’s nowhere the pair would rather be. “I get to be outside all day,” Christian says when asked what she likes best about farming. “I genuinely don’t do well sitting still or down. To make this my office is a really big, beautiful thing.” Nearby is a backpack with a patch on it that reads, “U.S. Army Hippie.”

That journey led Christian from her home in Western Massachusetts to Falmouth in 2014, after she graduated from Greenfield Community College with an associate’s degree in food and farm systems and a certificate in renewable energy and energy efficiency. Her first four years in Falmouth were spent helping Matt Churchill manage Pariah Dog Farm in Teaticket. She left that job two years ago, venturing off to start Feather Light Farms in 2019. Christian chose the name because, she says, “the thought behind farming is it has to be this big thing and this very consumptive thing that is very machine-driven, like a destructive force. Then you create life from that destructive force.” Her farms—she has another off Acapesket Road in East Falmouth—take a minimalist approach. “I wanted to farm lighter on the land and I wanted to be able to be my own boss without having my own equipment that I needed to constantly fix or repair,” she

Christian is at the center of what she hopes will be a town-wide movement for people to live more sustainably by growing their own food.

“Self-described,” Christian laughs about the moniker. A veteran, Jeny served eight years in the Army National Guard, which included a deployment to Iraq and Kuwait. “I was a heavy diesel mechanic. I worked on semi-trucks, hauled tanks and worked on lots of big, big equipment,” she says. Her time in the military showed her what she was capable of. “It tested me. In ways, it made me a good leader,” she says. “It put this motivation in me. The Army has a saying— ‘Always forward’—that has stuck with me. We can’t go back. We’ve got to move on and keep going and see what is next.” What is next for Christian? Inspiring others to embrace our country’s roots—agriculture. As the owner of Feather Light Farms, the manager of the Falmouth Farmers Market and the director of a new educational nonprofit, Farming Falmouth, she is at the center of what she hopes will be a town-wide movement for people to live more sustainably by growing their own food. “Food is transcendent,” she says. “It is this great connector. Whenever you go to a new place, the food is part of the thing you remember the most. We are communal creatures. We’ve always gathered around food.” She was first exposed to the importance of locally grown food as a cook at The People’s Pint in Greenfield. “I was in the back of the house working with all this fresh food, stuff I had never tasted before and I had never heard of. It was really eye-opening,” she says. That was the start of a roughly 14-year journey to live more sustainably and encourage others to do the same through the food they put on their table. FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

explains. “As for feathers, I have an affinity for feathers. They are light and the perfect creation.” The design of her farms can be summed up in one word— simplicity. They are easy to manage and contain a mix of greens, including radishes, a variety of lettuces, kale and baby kale. “I’ve narrowed it down to a select group of crops I saw that we could never produce enough of,” she says. Along with direct sales to consumers, her vegetables are sold at Windfall Market as well as Water Street Kitchen in Woods Hole. Her goal is to use her farms as a model for what others can do on their properties. Aside from land, the barrier to entry is relatively low. “To say to someone, I can put in a garden for you or I can farm your land with this model and have it be a cookie-cutter approach, a homeowner can pick it up and run with it,” she says, pointing to her plot under the powerlines as an example. “This is a ton of space for a homeowner. You could feed a whole neighborhood with this space and we wouldn’t feel food insecure. There would be an abundance and we’d all be sharing food all the time.”

43


Michael Kasparian COM M UNIT Y LE A DER

44

F

rom outward appearances, Michael Kasparian had the ideal job. But in 2007, he said farewell to a 21-year career in the banking industry where he held a senior management position. The long hours and commute to Providence were wearing on him. “It was so stressful my doctor said, ‘If you don’t quit that job, you’ll be dead by the time you’re 50.’ The commute was killing me and then I was spending 10 hours a day in the office and never got to see my kids,” he says. “It was a young guy’s game and I got out.” Over the next 18 months, Kasparian swallowed his pride and took any job that would help support his family. He accepted a part-time position locking the beaches up for the town. He mowed lawns, washed windows and did handyman work. “My friends were like, ‘What are you doing? You have an MBA,’” he recalls. “What does it matter? You have to put food on the table.” In 2008, he took a part-time job at the Falmouth Chamber of Commerce, continuing in that capacity even as he accepted a full-time position a year later at Cape Cod Healthcare Foundation as the manager of donor relations. Six years ago, he settled into a position suited to his enthusiasm, energy and FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


“ We get to collaborate and work with the town, police, fire rescue, all the nonprofits in town, the schools and community organizations as we all try to make Falmouth a better place.”

affability—CEO and President of the chamber. He succeeded Jay Zavala, whom he credits for teaching him what the chamber’s focus should be: community. “Obviously, it’s business- and tourism-focused, but we get to collaborate and work with the town, police, fire, rescue, all the nonprofits in town, the schools and community organizations as we all try to make Falmouth a better place,” he says. His involvement in the community extends to membership in both the Falmouth Rotary Club and the Marine Lodge A.F. & A.M. as well as serving on the board for Together We Can, a nonprofit that supports Falmouth’s homeless. He also is a mentor to students at Falmouth High School. These are the benefits of working in the town where he lives. As to his commitment to giving back, he explains it in this way: “I sincerely believe a true leader is the servant of all. I think family is the most important thing and then community is next. FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

If you don’t give back to your community, it will die.” When not working to make Falmouth a better place, Kasparian keeps himself busy exercising every day, riding his Harley-Davidson Switchback, doing home improvement projects and appraising antique American furniture. A transplant from Rhode Island, Michael and his wife, Daria, an English teacher at Falmouth High School, moved here in 2004 shortly after their second daughter was born. The couple met in 1992 when they were in a mutual friend’s wedding party, but things didn’t get serious until a wedding party reunion five years later. “We got reacquainted and we started talking about motorcycles and the rest was history,” he says. “I saw she had a keen eye and a love of motorcycles. She was my kind of girl, all the way.” They have two children—Phoebe, a sophomore at the University of Vermont, and Sophia, a senior at Falmouth High School—who grew up here. “Falmouth is a great place to live and to raise a family,” he says. “We hope it will be a great place to raise grandchildren, of which I hope there are many. This is our forever home. We’re never leaving.” While he holds firm to his Providence roots—“It’s the crown jewel of New England,” he says proudly—it’s evident Kasparian has a real affinity for Falmouth that has little to do with his job. “It is a big small town and a real community,” he says. “I love the fact that there’s two degrees of separation here and people care about one another and care about the town.” At the chamber, he works with a small staff—Vice President of Tourism & Member Services Maura Aldrich and Office Manager Susan Zavala—who share his love of all things Falmouth. “It’s a lot of fun to run a small shop like this,” he says. “I’ve worked with them for as long as I’ve been at the chamber. There’s been no turnover. We have an amazing team. “The biggest benefit is I have fun,” he continues. “I love coming to work every day. I love the people I work with. And I love serving our members.” That passion continues to drive him. At the age of 57, he shows no signs of slowing down. “Retirement is a word that doesn’t compute with me,” he says. “I want to stay in this position for as long as I can. I’m not somebody who can just sit back and read a book in a hammock.”

45


Sara Hines and Eileen Miskell BOOK S TOR E OWNER S

A

t one point, there were as many as eight bookstores in Falmouth. Today, only one remains, Eight Cousins, prominently situated on Main Street. It stands out, not only for its brick façade and large arched windows, but also for its longevity. Opened in 1986, the store is celebrating its 35th anniversary this year. Six years ago, Sara Hines, Mary Fran Buckley and Eileen Miskell purchased Eight Cousins from Carol Chittenden, who originally founded it as a children’s bookstore with her mother, Betty Borg. Both Sara and Mary Fran, who retired in December, had been store employees. Eileen? She was a longtime customer and a member of its book club that was organized by Mary Fran. “We all care about the store a lot and wanted to keep it running,” Sara says. “When Sara and Mary Fran were looking at buying the store, Mary Fran approached me [seeking] some business advice,” says Eileen, who had co-owned Wood Lumber with her husband, Dana, since 1986. “The three of us sat down. They had bookstore experience and I had more general business experience. We thought the three of us might make a stronger partnership.” What Eileen may lack in “bookstore experience” Sara more than makes up for. She holds two master’s degrees, one in children’s literature and the other in European literature. She received her PhD from The University of Edinburgh in English literature. While she has long had an affinity for children’s books—her primary role over the last six years has been purchasing this genre for the store—she has gained a newfound appreciation for adult fare after assuming the responsibility of buying these books after Mary Fran retired. Sara takes these duties seriously because she knows how important reading is. “Books are important because they can be conversation starters,” she says. “With kids, we can read a book together. And with kids, books can generate a conversation. …They also help connect us to our emotions and feelings that we’re not alone. Books let us know that there are other people experiencing the same feelings we do.” Although Eileen’s day-to-day focus is on the bottom line, she too has a passion for reading. “My whole life, books have opened up the world to me—places I want to go and people’s lives which intrigue me,” she says.

46

Owning a bookstore has given Eileen a new late-night haunt to feed that passion. “I love having the keys and coming in here with my husband after eating dinner on Main Street to see what books we have that are new,” she laughs. “Whenever anybody comes in looking for something and says, ‘Hey, what have you read lately?’, I start looking at the shelf and pick something out and the conversation goes from there.” For both, there is a special magic to Eight Cousins and a sense of duty in making sure the store remains a piece of Falmouth’s landscape, both for their staff and their community. Having an independent bookstore in town, Sara says, is important because it not only exposes customers to unique titles, but it offers new authors an opportunity to reach a larger audience. “Another reason independent bookstores are different is we are a reflection of our community,” Sara says. “We’re responding to what our community wants and needs. We have what we’re excited about, but we also have what our community is excited about.” The connection between Eight Cousins and Falmouth was never more apparent than in the beginning of 2018, when a flood forced the temporary closure of the store which was eventually rebuilt thanks to the support of the community. In 2020, through COVID-19, the community once again rallied around Falmouth’s last remaining bookstore to ensure that its 35th anniversary won’t be its last. “The outpouring of support from the community has been extraordinary,” says Eileen. To say the past six years have been challenging for Sara and Eileen would be an understatement. All of it has emboldened the pair to remain on the path they started when they purchased Eight Cousins in 2015. What have these experiences taught the pair? “We can have a massive amount of change and still retain the core of what matters In March, Hines and Miskell welcomed Janet Totten as a third owner. Totten is a familiar face in Falmouth, having resided in the town for more than 30 years and worked in nonprofit management, first at the Falmouth Historical Society and later at Highfield Hall & Gardens. In addition, she has served on several local boards including Falmouth Service Center, Falmouth Education Foundation and the Cape Cod Theatre Project. “I’ve been a big fan of the store since it opened,” says Totten. “It is an integral part of the Falmouth community.”

to us,” Sara says. “There have been times we’ve lost a lot, but we still have a mission statement—to share a love and appreciation of books and reading with the wider Falmouth community and to support the continued innovation, educational, diverse and artistic creations of authors, illustrators, editors, publishers and booksellers. “That has kept us focused on what really matters,” Sara continues. “We can change the way things look and our operations, but who we are at our core has been consistent. Our mission is the core of who we are.” FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Co-owners Sara Hines, left, and Eileen Miskell both feel there is a special magic to Eight Cousins and a sense of duty in making sure the store remains a piece of Falmouth’s landscape.

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

47


Nipam Patel EDUC ATOR

I

t started with a dead swallowtail butterfly that Dr. Nipam Patel found outside his El Paso, Texas, home when he was eight years old. “It was very beautiful, so I read a book on how to mount it,” he says. “Then I got my mom to sew me nets, took the heads off my dad’s golf clubs and beheaded a bunch of brooms and attached them to the nets and started to run around collecting butterflies.” While his youth included other scientific exploration— collecting rocks, building rockets—it is the butterfly that has stayed with him as he’s forged a career in biology that eventually brought him to Woods Hole 21 years ago. His introduction to the village was through the Marine Biological Laboratory’s (MBL) Molecular Evolution course, which he taught in the summer of 2000. He returned the following summer, this time as an instructor for the MBL’s Embryology course, which he continues to teach to this day. A little over two years ago, Dr. Patel’s role at the MBL expanded significantly when he was named the 18th director in its 133-year history. Prior to accepting the post, he held the William V. Power Endowed Chair in Biology at the University of California Berkeley, where he was a professor and co-chair of the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and professor in the Department of Integrative Biology. “It’s an amazing scientific and educational institution,” he says of the MBL. “I’ve been excited to be a part of strengthening our mission and affiliation with the University of Chicago and finding ways to expand science and education here.” At the heart of the MBL’s work is “expanding our understanding of basic biology which ultimately affects everything we do,” Dr. Patel says. From its Ecosystems Center where scientists are investigating the impact of climate change on our world to the Eugene Bell Center for Regenerative Biology and Tissue Engineering where scientists are researching organisms like sea lampreys and their ability to regenerate spinal cords, the MBL is at the forefront of scientific discovery. While Dr. Patel remains committed to maintaining the MBL’s standard of excellence with the research it conducts, he is focused on expanding its presence beyond the busy summer

48

months. Currently, it has 27 year-round resident scientists. “We’re trying to figure out how to grow that number,” he says. Education is also a priority. The bulk of its classes take place in the summer when its graduate and postdoctoral student population swells to over 500. “One of our endeavors is to make our education more year-round,” he says. As he focuses on these bigger-picture goals for the MBL, Dr. Patel remains invested in the parts of his job that enable him to do what he loves most—teaching and conducting research. “Personally, I feel a real joy in teaching people how to do things and seeing the enjoyment they get out of learning.” Through FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


“When a student asks, ‘is this really true?’ or ‘how do you know this?’ it improves my own scientific research.”

teaching, he has become a better scientist. “It makes you much more of a critical thinker,” he says. “When a student asks, ‘is this really true?’ or ‘how do you know this?’ it improves my own scientific research.” As for his research, he says, the excitement lies in “the discovery of finding answers to questions that nobody knows the answer to.” The focus of his research—he maintains his own lab at MBL—is on two separate organisms. One is a small marine crustacean named Parhyale hawaiensis, or beach hopper, that he has established as a genetic model for understanding how diverse body plans develop and evolve. The second animal is the butterfly. “We study the way they make greens and blues,” he says. “They don’t do it by traditional pigment colors that absorb white light. In fact, they create color through soap bubbles. By light interference and refraction, that’s how they are able to FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

generate these intricate nanostructures.” Even today, as the director of a world-renowned scientific institution in Woods Hole, Dr. Patel holds firm to his fascination with an animal that he was first introduced to as a kid. The butterfly has remained a constant in his life. Outside of work, he prefers to capture butterflies these days on his camera. “I think there is an amazing appeal to butterflies, from the complexity of their life cycle to their beauty,” he says. “When people ask me what is my favorite butterfly, I pull out drawers of very drab looking ones because they have this amazing life history. Caterpillars, before they become butterflies, are completely dependent on ants to survive. It appeals to me beyond the ones you might think of as pretty. They all tell interesting stories of the history of Earth and the history of life.”

49


Where will home take you?

As leaders in the sale of distinctive properties across the South Coast, Cape Cod & Greater Boston, we can help you wherever the tide should take you on your next move.

©2021 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of Columbia Insurance Company, a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate. Equal Housing Opportunity.

279 Main Street Falmouth, MA 508.540.9800 robertpaul.com


Green Creative Furniture Since 1970 508-362-2676 • Open 7 Days 9 –4 2454 Meetinghouse Way, West Barnstable westbarnstabletables.com

“Duality in Blue” Sofa Table/Server Art Piece made from Antique Pine with Original Paint and custom inlays. FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM 66" x 17" x 33 ½"

Trestle Table made from 2" Antique Wormy Chestnut. 97" x 41½" x 31"

Trestle Table made from Live Edge Spalted Bird’s Eye Maple.

86" x 37"– 41" x 30"

51


K atharine Lee Bates

Daughter of Falmouth, literature professor and animal lover, Bates penned the cherished hymn “America the Beautiful.” BY AMANDA WASTROM PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE FALMOUTH HISTORICAL SOCIE T Y, FALMOUTH, MASS.

52

FALMOUTH FALMOUTH LIVING LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


O

ne of my favorite things about working in the museum field is the chance to learn about the stories and people from our past. So often, I fall in love with the characters I discover and desperately wish I could have met them. At the top of my list of fascinating Falmouth residents is Katharine Lee Bates (1859–1929), author of what is considered our second national anthem, “America the Beautiful.” She lived in this quiet seaside town from 1859 to 1871. While she is most noted for this significant piece of poetry, she also experienced a life as fulfilling as any modern woman—all the more remarkable for one born just before the Civil War. Bates was an English literature professor, at Wellesley College, and a prolific writer, publishing 11 books and 12 volumes of poetry. Her career as a professor and a writer allowed her to travel and work in different parts of the world including France, Switzerland, England, Italy, Egypt, Palestine and Spain, which she affectionately called her second country. Her political ideals as a feminist and a social activist shine through many of her works. As a scholar and teacher, she was passionate, quick witted and beloved by her students and fellow professors. She had a menagerie of animals, mostly named after characters from Shakespeare. There were Polonius the parrot and Hamlet the dog. This description by a colleague, Katharine Balderston, captures her character: “Intense idealism and stern rectitude combined in Katharine Lee Bates with great human warmth. Her unwieldy body and slow movements were in Falstaffian contrast with her agile, almost legendary, wit. Penetrating dark eyes dominated her round, benevolent face, and her muffled contralto voice broke often into infectious chuckles.”

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

53


Above: Bates lived at 16 Main Street from 1859 to 1871 and always had close ties with Falmouth. Left: A professor of English literature at Wellesley College, Bates named her dog Hamlet.

A 19th-Century Falmouth Childhood Katharine Lee Bates spent her early years in Falmouth, where her father was minister of the First Congregational Church (he died only one month after she was born). She described herself as “a shy, near-sighted child, always hiding away with a book.” Falmouth of the 1860s was a small village where the age of whaling was just ending. For young Katie, retired sea captains made captivating neighbors. She developed her love of literature and writing early. As she later wrote in her autobiography, “It was in vain that unclothed dolls were given [to her]. She would promptly spin a romance that left them wrecked on a desert isle and obliged to wrap themselves in a raiment of oak leaves secured by thorns and grasses.” Both Wellesley College and the Falmouth Historical Society have collections of her personal papers. Even in her childhood notes and drawings, Katie’s vivid imagination and wit are already visible. My personal favorites are a menacing cartoon she drew of a teacher (she was obviously not a fan) and the handmade copies of the “Weekly Journal,” a newspaper she wrote with her best friend, Hattie Gifford.

54

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Although she moved to Wellesley Hills (just outside Boston) when she was eleven, Falmouth was always close to her heart. Throughout her life, Bates continued to make regular visits to stay with Hattie Gifford, and upon her death, she was buried in Oak Grove Cemetery.

Creation of “America the Beautiful” In the summer of 1893, Katharine Lee Bates was a visiting professor at Colorado College, an experience that provided her with the chance to travel almost the entire distance of the country, from east to west. On July 22, 1893, she joined a group visiting the summit of Pike’s Peak, which she later described as “the most glorious scenery I ever beheld.” Upon descending the mountain, Bates was inspired to write her most famous verses. As she wrote later, “It was then and there, as I was looking out over the sea-like expanse of fertile country spreading away so far under those ample Bates, seen here in a painted portrait, developed her love of writing early, as shown by these handmade copies of the “Weekly Journal,” a newspaper she wrote with her best friend and Falmouth Grammar School classmate, Hattie Gifford.

skies, that the opening lines of the hymn floated into my mind.” Bates’ most famous poem is, for many, a prayer, an ode to America’s past, the promise of the future, and our communal love of nature. As scholar Lynn Sherr wrote, “It is a portrait of America not only as it is, but as it could be.” It was an immediate hit when it was published on July 4, 1895, in The Congregationalist, a popular church publication out of Boston. For Bates, the popularity of the poem was a testament to the goodness and optimism in us all. She wrote, “That the hymn has gained…such a hold as it has upon our people is clearly due to the fact that Americans are at heart idealists, with a fundamental faith in human brotherhood.” FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

55


The largest selection of Marble, Granite, Quartzite & Quartz on Cape Cod KITCHEN & BATH COUNTERTOP, FIREPL ACE, JACUZZI & MORE | FABRICATION & INSTALL ATION

A family business with over 24 years of experience serving Homeowners & Contractors throughout New England, Cape Cod & the Islands. 171 CL AY POND RD, BOURNE

|

508-392-9669

|

AMAZONGRANITE.COM


Summer Cocktails BY VERONICA NE TO

Nothing screams “summer” louder than a refreshing cocktail. From a bracing whiskey garnished with raspberry to a rose-flavored vodka concoction, there’s a drink to slake your thirst at these favorite Falmouth restaurants. As an extra perk, these cocktails are super easy to make at home. FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

57


Blueberry Lemonade

Añejo

Ingredients:

188 Main Street, Falmouth 599 Main Street, Hyannis anejo.cc

• 2 oz reposado Tequila (Añejo uses Casamigos) • 1.5 oz fresh lemon juice (about half a juicy lemon) • 1.5 oz Blueberry Simple Syrup (about 2 tablespoons) • Soda water • Lemon slices, optional

A summer classic at the popular Mexican bistro Añejo, the Blueberry Lemonade has had different variations over the years. After experimenting with vodka and blanco tequila, the restaurant switched to reposado tequila for its balance of sweetness. “We love it because it’s just as tasty without the booze for non-drinkers, so it can be a refreshing party drink for a crowd,” says Añejo’s bar consultant, Anna Hunt.

58

3. Strain the mixture to get all of the

blueberry skins out. The syrup will last in the fridge about a week to 10 days. Instructions: 1. Combine all the ingredients in a pint

glass, adding the soda water last. 2. Gently stir everything with a bar spoon or long straw until the color is uniform. 3. Garnish with a lemon wheel if you’re feeling festive!

Blueberry Simple Syrup recipe: 1. Combine equal parts sugar, water

and whole blueberries in a sauce pot. (Using 1 cup of each will yield 2 cups of syrup.) 2. Simmer until the blueberries are completely soft and the syrup takes on a deep blue/purple color.

Owner: Jamie Surprenant Manager: Beth Dillen Bar Consultant: Anna Hunt

FALMOUTH FALMOUTH LIVING LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Devil’s Foot Margarita

Quicks Hole Tavern

Ingredients:

29 Railroad Avenue, Woods Hole quicksholewickedfresh.com

• Lunazul Blanco tequila • House-made sour mix • Jalapeño syrup • Sliced lime and/or jalapeños

The Devil’s Foot Margarita at Quicks Hole Tavern in Woods Hole has been winning over customers since the restaurant opened in 2014. Taking its name from nearby Devil’s Foot Island, the margarita gets its kick from a hint of jalapeño. Made with Lunazul Blanco tequila, house-made sour mix and jalapeño syrup, it strikes a perfect balance of sweet and sour.

Sour mix recipe:

• 1.5 parts lime juice • 1 part lemon juice • .5 part simple syrup or orange juice to sweeten Jalapeño syrup recipe: 1. B ring one quart water and two

sliced jalapeños to a boil.

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

2. A dd one quart sugar and bring to

a boil again. Let cool. To make the margarita: 1. O nce both the sour mix and jalapeño

syrup are made, fill a cocktail glass with ice. 2. A dd 2 oz tequila, a generous squirt of jalapeño syrup, and top off with sour mix. 3. S hake and serve. 4. G arnish with sliced lime and/or jalapeños. Owner: Beth Colt Bar Manager: Shannon Gallagher

59


Cucumber Collins The Captain Kidd

Ingredients:

77 Water Street, Woods Hole thecaptainkidd.com

• 2 oz Tito’s Handmade Vodka • 2 oz freshly puréed cucumber • 2 oz lemon cordial (fresh squeezed lemon juice and sugar water) • 3 basil leaves • Soda water

Local landmark The Captain Kidd is a must-stop for a summer cocktail by the water on Cape Cod. They never disappoint. The Cucumber Collins has been the top-selling cocktail for seven years straight. A take on the classic Tom Collins, this drink is simple and cool to the taste.

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM 60

Instructions: 1. Pour the vodka, purée and

lemon cordial over ice and shake for 20 seconds. 2. Strain into a highball glass over fresh ice. 3. Top with a splash of soda. 4. Garnish with three basil leaves. Owner: Jamie Crowley

FALMOUTH FALMOUTH LIVING LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021 60


Osteria La Civetta 133 Main Street, Falmouth osterialacivetta.com There’s more than meets the eye in the Lemon Lavender Martini’s purple color. Owner Sara Toselli put it on the menu to honor singer Prince’s passing in 2016. “We wanted to have a purple-colored drink,” she says. “Customers loved it, so we kept it.” Along with the Aperol spritz, it’s Osteria La Civetta’s bestselling cocktail, and can also be made as a mocktail.

Lemon Lavender Martini

Ingredients:

• 3 parts vodka (Osteria La Civetta uses Tito’s) • 1 part fresh-squeezed lemon juice • Splash of lavender simple syrup Lavender syrup recipe and instructions:

• 1 cup water • 1 cup sugar • 1 tablespoon dried lavender buds Bring water and sugar to a boil, stirring until sugar dissolves. Remove from heat, add lavender buds and allow to infuse for 45 minutes. Strain and allow to cool completely. Instructions: 1. Fill a cocktail shaker with ice. 2. Add vodka, lemon juice

and lavender syrup and shake well. 3. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with lemon zest. Owner: Sara Toselli

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

61


Estia 117 Main Street, Falmouth 26 Steeple Street, Mashpee estiacapecod.com Meaning “rose” in Greek, the light and refreshing Triandafilo at Estia appeals to the avid rosé wine drinker who wants something different from their usual. A few years ago, a liquor representative came to Estia’s Mashpee location with a rose-flavored vodka. They grabbed a single rose for the petal garnish from Verde Floral shop, right down the street. “We came up with this concoction and had it as a special, which sold like crazy,” says bar manager Kate Sampson. Even after it was taken off the specials menu, customers kept asking for it, so it was added to the main menu and has been a fan favorite ever since. “The rose petal adds a special touch that completes the drink,” says Sampson. Ingredients

(for a 10-oz cocktail): • 6 oz rose-flavored vodka • 2 oz elderflower liqueur • 1 oz fresh lemon juice • Splash of prosecco • Rose petal

Triandafilo

Instructions: 1. Shake with ice 2. Strain into a martini glass 3. Top off with prosecco 4. Garnish with rose petal

Owner: Nicholas Markantonis Bar Manager: Kate Sampson

62

FALMOUTH FALMOUTH LIVING LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


MASHPEE

FALMOUTH

AT THE COMMONS

ON MAIN


Raspberry Whiskey Smash

Bluefins

Ingredients:

295 Main Street, Falmouth 513 Main Street, Chatham bluefinsfalmouth.com

• 2 oz rye whiskey (Bluefins uses Sazerac) • 1 oz lemon juice • ½ oz simple sugar syrup • 2 oz raspberry purée • Fresh mint for garnish

A cocktail with raspberry always makes a super-refreshing drink in warm weather. The staff of Bluefins Sushi & Saki Bar, which opened a Falmouth location last summer, take pride in the freshness of their fare, including their cocktails. The Raspberry Whiskey Smash promises a hit of sweet and spicy in every sip.

64

Instructions: 1. T ip from Bluefins Bar Manager Michael

Hamilton: In your hand, give the mint a whack to expose the oils, and do not muddle to avoid a bitter taste. 2. C ombine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker. 3. S hake vigorously and pour over fresh ice. 4. G arnish with raspberry and blackberry with a mint sprig and enjoy. Owner: Andy Baler Bar Manager: Michael Hamilton

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


ONE OF THE FINEST LOCAL RESTAURANTS

Where Asian Fusion and Japanese Style Sushi are Taken to the Next Level Downtown Falmouth Chatham

295 Main Street

513 Main Street

|

774-763-6421

| 508-348-1573

bluefinschatham

|

|

|

bluefinsfalmouth.com

bluefinschatham.com

bluefinssushi



Shop local for all your furry family member needs Falmouth Pet Center Established 1989

We specialize in Super Premium dog and cat foods, including Frozen Raw, Gently Cooked and Dehydrated Foods.

SOME OF THE SPECIAL BRANDS WE CARRY: Earthborn Orijen Stella & Chewy’s Fromm

The Honest Kitchen Open Farm NutriSource

Victor Primal Bravo!

508-457-4420 • 12 Davis Straits, Falmouth • falmouthpet.com Located at the intersection of Jones Rd. and Route 28, across from CVS

Fractures Fever

Sore Throats

Minor Burns

Stitches Earaches Sprains Lacerations Colds

Infections

C APE C OD H EALT HCARE Urgent Care Board-certified emergency room physicians. Extended hours. Superior care. capecodhealth.org/urgent-care

Falmouth Harwich Hyannis Orleans – coming 2022 Osterville Sandwich

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

67


68

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


It’s a WOW in

WOODS HOLE

ST YLED BY LISA SUE SMEDBERG & NICOLE PALMER PHOTOGR APHY BY DERRICK ZELLMANN MODEL: BRENNAN PEPPARD HAIR ST YLED BY RYAN L ANGMAN-KIRTLEY OF THE KEEP MAKEUP BY L ACEY STRONG

Venerable Captain Kidd Restaurant and other picturesque spots in Woods Hole are the backdrop for drop-dead spring and summer fashion from story. and Underground Fashion, two popular Falmouth boutiques. Emerald viscose midi dress and Lara B. Designs Italian leather handbag. Both available at story. Above: Brushed finish oyster shell pendant in sterling silver with Diamond & Rose Gold Cape Cod cuff bracelet from The Gilded Oyster

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

69


70

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


A handmade silk brocade jacket with embroidery dresses up a simple white cotton tank and white bootcut jeans. Heather O’Connor Designs necklace and Lara B. Designs gold metallic leather clutch. All available at story.

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

71


StudioM Style imported Italian bamboo scarves paired with white bootcut jeans. Handmade silk brocade and leather embroidered clutch. All from story. On model: My Oasis sterling silver bracelet with gold wave from The Gilded Oyster

72

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

73


74

FALMOUTH FALMOUTH LIVING LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Above: Sterling silver whale cuff bracelet from The Gilded Oyster. Left: Lace-trim ribbed silk-blend tank and wide-legged jeans, topped by a two-tone fleece cardigan. Lara B. Designs distressed leather crossbody bag with adjustable woven strap. All available at story. Tom Kruskal dangle earrings from The Gilded Oyster.

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

75


76

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


From LVIR, this crisp poplin cotton shirtdress has a thick belted waist and oversized cuffed sleeves that bring a masculine proportion to the feminine midi silhouette. Available at Underground Fashion. Tom Kruskal dangle earrings from The Gilded Oyster.

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

77


A Hannoh Wessel 100% cotton red-check relaxedfit shirt is paired with ultrawide-legged stretchwool blend pants from LVIR. Both available at Underground Fashion.

78

FALMOUTH FALMOUTH LIVING LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


EF FO R T L E S S , T I M EL E S S S T Y L E designer clothing | accessories | handbags | footwear | beauty | fragrances | home goods | and more

316 Gifford St, Unit 6, Falmouth | 508-524-1782 | undergroundfashion.co Follow us for all promotion updates

@undergroundfashion_boutique

A COASTAL FINE JEWELRY BOUTIQUE Stop in to The Gilded Oyster today! 155 Main Street, Falmouth • 774.763.5742 thegildedoyster.com

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

79


Printed 100% silk crêpe de chine “Vicki” dress from Saloni. Available at Underground Fashion.

RE SO U RC E S The Gilded Oyster 155 Main Street, Falmouth (774) 763-5742 thegildedoyster.com

80

story. 352 Main Street, Falmouth (774) 763-5451 storyfalmouth.com

Underground Fashion 316 Gifford Street, Unit 6, Falmouth (508) 524-1782 nicolepalmerandco.com

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Fresh & Authentic Artistry B R IDA L LYDIA LECLAIR PHOTOGRAPHY

LESSONS COM M ERCI A L SPECI A L E V EN T S LaceyStrong.com @LaceyStrongMakeup

Bringing You Home FOREVER AGENTS

THERE FOR YOU AT EVERY STAGE OF LIFE

Get to know ours

At Robert Paul Properties it’s all about relationships, expertise and hard work! Luxury service at every price point.

HEATH & HOLLY COKER Agents since 1995 508.548.8888 heath@robertpaul.com holly@roberpaul.com robertpaul.com

I N T E R I O R D E S I G N S T U D I O ~ FA L M O U T H

Call Laurie Leonard for an appointment

508-863-7939 ruralrootsinteriors@aol.com

A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

81


82

FALMOUTH FALMOUTH LIVING LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Great  Outdoors

The

More relevant than ever, how and where we live outside the house has grabbed our attention and sparked the imagination of local builders and landscaping professionals. BY JANICE R ANDALL ROHLF

E

ven before the pandemic forced us to reevaluate how we utilize the space in our homes, a renewed interest in outdoor living had become a trend—not just on the east and west coasts, but throughout the country. In fact, the National Kitchen & Bath Association reports a 65 percent uptick in interest among its membership in outdoor-living projects. The growing popularity of outdoor living areas reflects their appeal to a wide demographic range—from empty-nesters to couples with children—and many more homeowners are beginning to treat this area as an investment in their property. Plus, spending time outside has many health and mood-enhancing benefits arising from increased relaxation, activity, fresh air, sunshine and bonding time spent with family and friends. Here on Cape Cod, summers extended by spring and fall shoulder seasons have ramped up the clamor for bigger porches, fancier patios, outdoor kitchens, more diverse landscaping and even secondary structures like gazebos and pool houses. These three Falmouth properties are typical of the ways in which homeowners are improving and enhancing their outdoor living spaces.

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

83


T H E G R E AT O U T D O O R S

Pretty Yard, Gazebo Gazing

BUILDER: The Valle Group

F

ARCHITECT: Adam Moring

or some people, to live near the ocean but not be able to see it from your house might prove frustrating. But one couple who reside within a minute’s bike ride to Surf Drive actually prefer their huge, beautiful backyard. “We can’t see the water, but that’s okay because we see lots of wildlife—deer, coyotes, really interesting birds,” says the homeowner, who also loves that there is a spiffed-up barn in the backyard where she and other amateur artists, friends of hers, like to gather and exchange ideas. Well-tended flower gardens complete the idyllic setting. The Shingle Style house built in the 1940s was equipped with a bluestone back patio and a deck perched above it, both of which allowed the homeowners to sit and relax outside. Over time, however, these areas succumbed to inevitable wear and tear. “Our back deck got to the point where it was dangerous,” says the homeowner. “I was afraid to let my grandkids play on it.” Time for a change. First the homeowners got in touch with The Valle Group, in East Falmouth. After determining the scope of the project with their clients, The Valle Group recognized the need for architectural plans to obtain a building permit. They introduced the homeowners to Sandwich-based architect Adam

84

Moring, and the collaboration among homeowners, builder and architect began. Not only was the deck in a decrepit state, but the patio and outdoor shower also needed some TLC. Furthermore, notes Moring, it was getting cumbersome for the homeowners to circulate easily between inside and outside. “They wanted to enjoy the fresh air and have a deck that was more efficient and userfriendly.” Fortuitously timed to coincide with the pandemic, the homeowners got a new deck and a lot more as well. Mike Caton, vice president of construction at The Valle Group, explains the scope of the project: “A portion of the deck was removed in order to add stairs that give more accessibility to the backyard, and the deck that remained was upgraded with new ipe, a particularly durable wood that weathers well and looks beautiful. Living room windows, sizable but not big enough to honor the view, were replaced with sliders. At the patio level, a stone bicycle ramp was added, and the ordinarylooking structural posts supporting the deck were bulked up by six inches and wrapped on their lower-third portions with a shingle flare that gives them architectural interest. Remodeling an existing outdoor shower included continuing the bluestone patio into the space, where PVC was added for screening on the side wall and ceiling.” FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


P H OTO S: DA N C U T R O N A ( A L S O P R E V I O U S S P R E A D )

The new gazebo, opposite and above, connects to the deck but not to the house, which allows sweeping views of the backyard from inside either structure. Below: Existing support columns and an outdoor shower were renovated to give them a fresh look.

All these upgrades constitute a substantial transformation, but the coup de grace is a free-standing, two-level gazebo situated in one corner of the yard near the house. “The challenge was to locate the gazebo in a spot that didn’t block the views from either inside the house or from the deck and patio,” explains Moring. Connected to the deck, but not to the house, the gazebo satisfies the homeowners’ desire for a moderately sized, lowprofile structure separate from the main house, i.e., not an attached screen porch. “They wanted something that was interesting but didn’t break the budget,” shares Moring, adding that the hip roof is less obtrusive than a gabled one would have been, and its shape creates a cathedral ceiling inside with exposed timbers. FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

The gazebo’s windows are screened panels with translucent glass below. It’s a perfect space for entertaining, especially since there’s an outdoor cooking area between the gazebo and the inside kitchen. Practically speaking, the lower level of the gazebo is a boon, as the ample space is used for storing bicycles, gardening paraphernalia, outdoor furniture and more. “We wanted to make it consistent with the architecture and scale of the house,” says the homeowner. “The gazebo shape seemed to go well with the house, plus it also gives you that beautiful ceiling to view.” As fond as she is of the new space her family has to enjoy, she laughs at the suggestion that her amateur artists group relocate their meetings there from the small barn. “Oh, no,” she scoffs. “We’re way too messy.”

85


T H E G R E AT O U T D O O R S

Small Space, Big Results

LANDSCAPE DESIGNER: Gardens by Barbara Conolly STONE MASONRY: Blue Claw Associates

B

arbara Conolly’s first love is plant health. Lately, however, the East Falmouth resident, who has degrees in plant science and public garden leadership from Cornell University, has branched out into complete landscape design. One of her recent projects dramatically transformed a compact yard in a conservation zone off Shore Road into space for relaxing and entertaining that the homeowners can use and enjoy year-round. Especially when square footage is limited, it’s important to make the most of every inch available. Conolly’s eye is trained to recognize potential where most people might not. “The homeowners were using the space under their extended second-floor deck as a driveway and a place to store their bikes. It wasn’t very attractive,” she explains. “They had just renovated the inside of the house and built a new one-room

86

BEFORE

The area beneath the upper deck and outside the new addition lent itself to being turned into a patio. The change is dramatic.

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Once used for bike storage, space below the deck was transformed into a dining and grilling area with a comfy swing at one end big enough for afternoon siestas.

P H OTO S: B A R B A R A C O N O L LY

addition, so my goal was to make the exterior reflect the quality of the clean-lined and beautifully decorated interiors.” The area beneath the upper deck and outside the new addition lent itself to being turned into a patio, its desirability punched up by a reedhidden pond at one edge of the property. Conolly immediately thought of using a Tech-Bloc product called Borealis, concrete that looks and feels like wood planks. “The boardwalk look gives the patio a beach-y feeling floor,” Conolly observes. This she complemented with Nantucket fieldstone, which masons from Cape-based Blue Claw Associates crafted into low walls topped with bluestone, a perfect surface for sitting. The same materials were used to make a gas firepit and for steps leading to the sliding glass doors of the house’s new addition. Conolly’s efficient use of space yielded two outdoor rooms, the nook with the firepit encircled by Adirondack chairs, and a dining room, which, given the “roof” created by the underside of the deck, can be used even in inclement weather. Furthermore, there are built-in bar and grill areas. But Conolly’s favorite part of the design is a swing the size of a twin bed that hangs at the far end of the patio, its overstuffed cushions begging to be used for afternoon siestas. “The patio changed the way the homeowners live,” says Conolly. “It feels like another room of the house, and that’s how they’re using it now.” FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

87


T H E G R E AT O U T D O O R S

No Pool, No Worries ARCHITECT: Shaina Pagani, Longfellow Design Build BUILDER: Longfellow Design Build

D

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT: Christopher Buccino

esigning and building a new custom home can be overwhelming. With so many architectural and design decisions to be made, it’s common for homeowners to regret or rethink some of their choices after moving in. But what if you got a do-over? One Falmouth couple had just that opportunity. “The first home we built in Falmouth was just a few houses down the street,” says the homeowner. “As we

were making plans to move in, someone drove up and made us a cash offer we couldn’t refuse.” Armed with the wisdom that comes with designing and building a new home, the couple immediately bought the end lot on the same street and started over from scratch. After all, they had moved to Falmouth to be closer to their grandchildren and enjoy the lifestyle of the town, which they had embraced as vacationers through the years. “With the experience of building their first Cape home so fresh in their minds, they knew exactly what they wanted on the interior of the house, allowing us to explore outdoor-living options to integrate with the inside,” says Longfellow Design Build architect

TEX T AND PHOTOS BY MIKE CIOLINO 88

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


The great room opens to an infrared-heated patio designed to accommodate an entire evening of entertaining, from conversation and dinner to a nightcap under the stars in the backyard fire garden, below.

Shaina Pagani. “Especially here on Cape Cod, we use the landscape as a design element that provides opportunities to appreciate and enjoy the outdoors wherever possible.” The result is a comfortable, livable, modern home where the inside flows nicely into the outside. At every turn, the house delivers the possibility of a peak outdoor experience. A garden patio with a small table is positioned in the front yard as a place to enjoy coffee with the early morning sun. This home is a great example of incorporating outdoor living in very subtle ways. Transom windows bring additional natural light into the interior, and window seats provide a comfy spot to gaze outside on bad weather days. Outdoor speakers and lighting contribute to the ambiance. Often, outdoor living evokes images of a grand pool or tiered decks overlooking the ocean. However, at its best, outdoor living is a philosophy for making the most out of life through small enhancements to your home and yard.

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

89


T H E G R E AT O U T D O O R S

A roof-top deck can gives homeowners access to the sights and sounds of Vineyard Sound — the perfect spot to disappear all day with a book or enjoy an evening sunset. Below: A raised vegetable garden provides a common activity to share with grandchildren. “The kids are so proud when we harvest and serve their tomatoes and cukes for a family dinner,” says the homeowner.

Inside the home, the open-concept great room flows seamlessly out to a bluestone patio. Overhead, radiant heating units stand at the ready when a mist from Vineyard Sound rolls in during dinner, as it often does. For after-dinner socializing, bluestone steps lead to a fire garden with a wood fire pit surrounded by Adirondack chairs. Eventually, stargazing with nightcaps on the roof deck overlooking Falmouth Harbor brings a perfect evening to a close. “We decided against the expense and upkeep of a backyard pool and instead opted for a more casual landscape that supports the activities that are important to us,” says the homeowner. At the far end of the beautifully landscaped yard is a raised-bed vegetable garden. “Our grandkids come over on their bikes to help out with the gardening, and in back we have plenty of room for our famous in-ground lobster bakes. Hopefully, they’ll look back and remember some of the good times we have here.”

90

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

91


THE ART AND SCIENCE of Sustainable Landscapes,

because beautiful isn’t enough anymore. (774) 302-4876 www.gardensbybarbaraconolly.com East Falmouth, MA


AVAILABLE ON NEWSSTANDS AT THESE LOCATIONS: FALMOUTH Kenyon’s Market North Falmouth Cheese Shop West Falmouth Market Windfall Market Woods Hole

MARTHA’S VINEYARD Cronig’s Markets, Vineyard Haven The Corner Store, Oak Bluffs

PLYMOUTH The Market at the Pinehills BARNES & NOBLE THROUGHOUT Massachusetts Rhode Island

Connecticut New Hampshire New Jersey New York Pennsylvania

falmouthlivingmag.com FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

93


Stripe d Bass

Safari 94

FALMOUTH FALMOUTH LIVING LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


The excitement and serenity of fishing off a Falmouth beach are gifts not to be taken for granted. Read on to discover five of the best local beaches for light-tackle or fly fishing. BY JOSEPH HEALY PHOTOGR APHY BY DAN CUTRONA

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

95


I

In springtime and after Labor Day on Cape Cod, days are shorter and ocean waters cooler. You can expect beaches to be less crowded than during summer’s peak, and access to them is more open. Parking is less restricted, too. All of this is good news, especially in this spring of 2021 when many of us are eager to spend time outside in the fresh air. Perhaps no one is more excited than anglers on Cape Cod. This time of year, they have plenty of room to cast from Falmouth beaches. And cast they will because it’s the time of ocean-fish migrations. During the shoulder seasons, ocean fish such as striped bass (and bluefish, false albacore—or “albies”— and Spanish mackerel) make annual migrations to or from the Canadian Maritimes and Down East Maine,

96

Chesapeake Bay and North Carolina’s Outer Banks or points farther south. The near-shore fish attract anglers like bees to honey. Striped bass are the belles of this seasonal ball. Hard-fighting and eager feeders during their migration periods, stripers are protected by conservation-minded regulations stipulating that, in Massachusetts, only fish 28 inches and larger but smaller than 35 inches may be kept. This is called a slot limit, requiring anglers to release young and breeding-age fish, thereby protecting future striper populations. Consider this your year. Take your tackle (fly tackle or light spinning tackle) to one of these Falmouth beaches and cast your way to memories.

FALMOUTH FALMOUTH LIVING LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


In the spring and fall, when striped bass and other ocean fish such as bluefish and false albacore make seasonal migrations along the Atlantic coast, the fish visit the waters of Falmouth to fuel up on baitfish and to rest in salt ponds, Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound. The beaches of Falmouth are interception points where do-it-yourself anglers can catch the fish from shore.

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

The Right Tackle Wind is the enemy of fly fishers. The mechanics of the sport dictate that we cast a fly line coated in PVC that’s dense enough to propel our flies thanks to the energy imparted by our long graphite fly rods. But the force of wind disrupts fly casting, much like trying to fly a kite on a very windy day. Wind is pretty much status quo when fishing the ocean, particularly in spring and fall. It was no surprise last September when my friend Harry Bowen and I plotted our trip to fish Falmouth beaches for striped bass. Behind our family house on Great Pond in East Falmouth, the whitecaps on the pond revealed the force of wind. Our options were to fish weighted flies, which are difficult to cast but cut through the wind, or to fish with spinning tackle, which is easier to cast through the wind. Dedicated to fly fishing, we opted for weighted flies and I put my fly-tying skills to the task, tying a large baitfish-imitating fly in the style of a Clouser Minnow with large lead eyes. Harry named the fly “The Windy Monday” (for the first day we fished), and he proceeded to catch his first striped bass from a Falmouth beach on the fly.

97


MENAUHANT BEACH off Vineyard Street on the west side of the inlet from Vineyard Sound to Green Pond In the summer high season (roughly from late June to Labor Day), this is a membership beach, administered for members by Acapesket Beach Association. In spring and summer, please be respectful of residents (no loud noise or music), leave nothing behind, and steer clear of areas marked “private.” The beach is bordered by a jetty along the outer Green Pond inlet and another on the west end of the beach, after which the shoreline narrows to private-only access. At first light and at dusk in spring and fall, striped bass blitz along the beach, crashing baitfish near the surface. Often, the best fishing occurs along the jetties, where baitfish in the current are trapped against the rocks by striped bass.

98

FALMOUTH FALMOUTH LIVING LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


OUTER MENAUHANT BEACH/BOURNES POND (Keep going if you want to check out Megansett Harbor near Cataumet.) This quiet area off Acapesket Road in East Falmouth has a long, narrow beach along Vineyard Sound and an inlet to Bournes Pond and the pond itself across the road from the beach. The beach is generally not crowded; you can fish the jetties on the Vineyard Sound side or inside the quiet waters of Bournes Pond. On a falling or rising tide, striped bass (and sea robins) congregate in the current and feed near the bottom of the pond inlet—you can fish it like a river. Striped bass also patrol the sound beachfront.

Fishing Falmouth Beaches You can access beaches from the mean high-tide mark to the mean low-tide mark (Massachusetts has “a historical right of access to fish.”), but you will need a saltwater fishing permit. Go here for more info: mass.gov/how-to/get-a-recreationalsaltwater-fishing-permit.

Falmouth’s Menauhant Beach faces Vineyard Sound, and the salt ponds behind the beach— Green Pond and Bournes Pond—attract baitfish seeking warmer water and shelter, which in turn attract hungry striped bass, particularly on a flooding or falling tide when the fish pick off bait trapped in the current.

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

99


P H OTO S: J O S E P H H E A LY

Menauhant Beach harbors striped bass in the spring and fall, as do Falmouth Heights beaches to the west along Vineyard Sound. The sandy beaches make for inviting wading in spring and give way to crowds of swimmers and beach-goers in the summer months. Anglers return in the fall.

100

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


FALMOUTH HEIGHTS (Keep going if you want to check out Truck River/Nobska/Vineyard Sound and Woods Hole.) In summer, this beach is usually packed with swimmers and beachgoing vacationers, but in spring and fall it’s fairly open, and striped bass patrol the shoreline. The shorefront casino is a landmark, and you can fish your way along the sand and jetties near the casino. I’ve caught striped bass and false albacore in the fall from this beach.

The Book For Falmouth Anglers Whether you’re new to ocean fishing or an old salt, East Falmouth angler and scientist Dr. David A. Ross has written a book that can make your fishing more productive and more enjoyable as you begin to better understand tides, currents and related ocean processes. I highly recommend The Fisherman’s Ocean from Stackpole Books as you prepare your own striped bass safari along Falmouth beaches. Many of the anecdotes in the book are based locally— Dr. Ross lives in East Falmouth and spent most of his scientific career at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.— J.H.

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

WOODNECK BEACH/BUZZARDS BAY off Sippewissett Road In the Sippewissett area on the western shore of Falmouth, this sandy beach is backed by seagrass-covered dunes and a salt-pond inlet that on a rising or falling tide has a current like a freshwater river. Striped bass like moving water and the bait trapped in those currents, so the Buzzards Bay beach and the salt pond can be equally productive: You’ll find a narrow, pebbly beachfront with lots of bottom structure such as rocks and shells where fish look for food. Striped bass are also drawn by the current and the warmer waters in the salt pond behind the beach, particularly in springtime, so make a few casts there, too.

101


OLD SILVER BEACH/BUZZARDS BAY off Quaker Road in Falmouth When you get to Old Silver Beach, be mindful of the two parking areas: Residents with beach stickers park in one lot, and the other lot is for the public. The beach is shallow enough to wade and drops off about 25 yards from shore (depending on the tide stage). A jetty to the left of the beach guards an inlet where fish can be found, ambushing baitfish in the current on a moving tide. Another option is to walk the beach and look for feeding seabirds, which signal the presence of striped bass feeding at the surface. Old Silver Beach, with its warm waters from Buzzards Bay, is as beautiful as it is popular—and in spring and fall, you might be surprised to find you have the beach to yourself.

Resources In Falmouth, contact Eastman’s Sport & Tackle (508-548-6900) or Falmouth Bait & Tackle (508-457-0700) to ask about fly patterns or lures, or to get fly-tying materials to tie your own flies (a pleasurable complement to actual fishing). Another well-stocked fishing shop not far from Falmouth is The Bear’s Den Fly Fishing Co. in Taunton (508-977-0700). Or you might check out saltwater fishing tackle, flies and lures available from national retailers such as Orvis or Outdoor World/Bass Pro Shops, or any number of other specialty fly-fishing companies.

102

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Jetties allow on-foot access to deeper water, while the rocky structures attract bait- and gamefish such as striped bass.

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

103


FALMOUTH

FRR, INC.

BY B I L L H I G G I N S

Runners round the bend at Nobska Lighthouse, the one-mile mark of the race.

104

FALMOUTH FALMOUTH LIVING LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


ROAD R ACE

A Long-Running Hit

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

105


T

he ASICS Falmouth Road Race has long been a signature slice of the Cape Cod summer scene, a celebration of camaraderie and competition. Thousands run and thousands more watch along a picturesque seven-mile course from Woods Hole to Falmouth Heights. Falmouth’s rich history has been told often. Irrepressible bartender Tommy Leonard was inspired watching Frank Shorter win the Olympic marathon at the 1972 Munich Games. That triumph sparked a running boom in the U.S., as joggers took to the streets and realized the benefits of cardiovascular exercise. Leonard, who competed in the Boston Marathon more than 20 times, loved running. He enlisted Falmouth High School coach John Carroll and recreation director Rich Sherman to help organize a road race as a fundraiser to support local high school girls traveling to events. T.L.’s wild imagination also allowed him to dream that one day he could somehow get Shorter to run in it. The first Falmouth had fewer than 100 entries. It was a rainy, windy Wednesday, August 15, 1973, Leonard’s 40th birthday, and he finished 13th. David Duba, a runner at Central Michigan University visiting the Cape, won the race. Jenny Tuthill of Cambridge was the women’s champion. Those are the bare facts. But, of course, there is much more to what has always been a premier stop on the international road racing calendar. This summer’s 49th renewal marks a return to the roads after the coronavirus pandemic forced 2020 to a virtual event. With an eye toward the golden anniversary in 2022, let’s travel seven miles down memory lane with some things you may not know about this festival of feet (and feats).

There is always a crowd at the finish line in Falmouth Heights, where 6,000 hot dogs are consumed after the race.

106

FRR, INC.

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Below: Olympic gold medal winner Frank Shorter won the Falmouth Road Race in 1975 and 1976.

Frankly Speaking

Right: Jenny Tuthill placed first among women in the inaugural Falmouth Road Race in 1973.

It took only two years for Leonard’s dream to come true. In 1975 Shorter arrived in Falmouth to challenge defending champion and local favorite William “Boston Billy” Rodgers. Shorter was a Below: Jenny Tuthill marathoner and track racer, and as an Olympic champion, competing and David Duba, winners of the first on the European circuit would bring in appearance money. But Falmouth Road Race, Leonard liked chasing rainbows and asked his friend Rodgers to help together in 2017. persuade Shorter that Falmouth would be a fun alternative. Earlier in 1975, Rodgers won a bronze medal at the world crosscountry championships in Morocco (Shorter was 20th) and then set an American marathon record (previously held by Shorter) by winning at Boston. Those performances piqued Shorter’s interest in the budding rivalry. He had spent time as a teen vacationing on Martha’s Vineyard and told Rodgers he’d consider running Falmouth if acceptable financial arrangements could be made. Leonard went to work, using his bar contacts around Boston and the Cape to satisfy Shorter’s demands: roundtrip airfare from his home in Boulder, Colorado, and $600, the same fee he would command in Europe. For good measure, he also received a television set. The Shorter-Rodgers showdown swelled the field to nearly 900, doubling the size from the year before. Shorter beat Rodgers in 1975 and ’76 and both have returned many times since, pied piper ambassadors of the sport. FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

107


Names and Numbers

In the early years it was a bar-to-bar fun run, from the Captain Kidd in Woods Hole to the Brothers 4 in Falmouth Heights. The first race was billed as the “Falmouth Marathon” (even though it wasn’t 26 miles). The second race was a “mini-marathon” (but not really). “Falmouth Road Race” was first printed on coveted T-shirts in 1975. As for the quirky seven-mile distance, give or take a few tenths, an automobile odometer rudimentarily measured the course at 7.3 miles. Later, another car trip had it at 7.1 miles, the accepted length for many years. It wasn’t until 2003 that the distance was calibrated on a bicycle equipped with a Jones counter and officially certified to USA Track and Field standards at seven miles. Left: The race’s very first T-shirt, framed and hanging at Falmouth Road Race headquarters, proclaimed it a marathon, even though it wasn’t.

Helping Hands

Members of the New Orleans Track Club ran Falmouth in 2005 only a couple of weeks before Hurricane Katrina devastated Louisiana. Race officials pitched in and sent needed clothing to their friends. One runner, while sifting through his damaged home, found his Falmouth bib number encrusted in muck with rusted safety pins still attached. He mailed it to the directors and more funds were raised to aid those who lost so much. Closer to home, the race’s Numbers for Nonprofits program has helped Massachusetts-based organizations raise almost $45 million since 2000. In the last nine years Falmouth Road Race, Inc., has contributed more than $3.69 million to community projects promoting health and wellness.

A generous grant from the Falmouth Road Race helped Teaticket Elementary School pay for its new Elevate Fitness Course, which transformed the school’s playground for students and the local community.

Did You Know?

Six-time champion Joan Benoit Samuelson

108

It takes 125 school buses to shuttle runners to the Woods Hole start. Other logistics include ordering 396 portable toilets; 62,000 water cups for five official water stations; 6,000 hot dogs for the post-race picnic; 10,000 frozen yogurt bars; 8,000 snack bars and 8,000 bags of potato chips. … Falmouth was honored in 1981 by Runner’s World magazine with the Paavo Nurmi Award (think a movie Oscar or musical Grammy) as the best race in the U.S.…World middleweight boxing champion Marvelous Marvin Hagler took a break from training in Provincetown to run the 1980 race in sweats and boots. A few weeks later he went to London and knocked out Alan Minter to win the world title. … Inspired by Falmouth, six-time champion Joan Benoit Samuelson created the Beach to Beacon road race in 1998 in her hometown of Cape Elizabeth, Maine. FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Giles Threadgold, a colorful character around town, ran the first Dave McGillivray, race director since 2012, celebrated his Falmouth, but it was his escapades the next year that have become 45th birthday in 1999 in Falmouth by running 45 miles. He part of the lore. Just past the five-mile mark in 1974, approaching started in the wee hours and finished the final seven with the Falmouth Harbor, Threadgold jumped in, swam across the field of 9,000. channel, climbed out and resumed running up the hill on Grand Avenue to the finish. The 40th race in 2012 included NASA astronaut Sunita Williams running while tethered to a treadmill aboard the International Space Station 240 miles above Falmouth at the same time earth-bound runners were on the course. In the early years Bill Dougherty had the important responsibility of feeding thousands of runners on the ball field after the race. Hot dogs were a staple on the menu, but he quickly realized charcoal grills wouldn’t cook the franks fast enough to satisfy ravenous appetites. Dougherty’s solution was to cut an oil burner in half, treat it with Teflon and add gas jets to heat water. When going full steam, the jumbo cooker could boil about 1,000 hot NASA astronaut Sunita Williams running while tethered to a treadmill aboard the International dogs at a time.

NASA

Fun and Frivolity

Space Station while the 40th race was taking place in 2012.

At Home, Around the World

Because the COVID-19 pandemic kept runners away from Falmouth in 2020, the organizing committee pivoted to an At Home virtual event. Amazingly, nearly 10,000 registered, with 45 states and nine countries represented. Former champions Ben Flanagan and Diane Nukuri participated, along with Olympians Abdi Abdirahman and Molly Seidel. There were also more than 40 wheelchair athletes entered in a virtual ride streamed on Facebook.

Forever Tommy

Race founder Tommy Leonard died in 2019 at the age of 85, but he will always be remembered as the heart and soul of Falmouth. He is memorialized all over town, with a plaque in Woods Hole designating the Tommy Leonard Start Line; a Tommy Leonard bench and finish line garden in Falmouth Heights, and a stone monument at Town Hall Square, across from the Tommy Leonard crosswalk. And Tommy’s Place on Main Street will be a vacation home for families with kids coping with cancer.  FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

Tommy Leonard and the plaque memorializing him at the site in Woods Hole that was for many years the race’s start line.

109


110

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Made By Hand BY SUSAN MOELLER

Two hometown ceramicists share their passion for shaping clay.

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

111


Tessa Morgan Tessa Morgan’s pottery is just part of daily life in Falmouth. Her carving away the surface layer of clay to reveal a different colored ceramic mermaids, fish and turtles swim along her tile wall at clay underneath. To get the effect, she creates the pot, then wipes the Falmouth Public Library. Up the street, her seals and whales it down until all surfaces are smooth. Then she paints colored dance around the meeting room of the First Congregational slip—wet clay about the viscosity of cream—where she wants Church. And each morning, scores of people drink their morning the design to be. After leaving it to dry, she creates a line drawing coffee out of one of the mugs she makes every year as swag for of the figure or fish on the pot. The design is then released by WCAI radio’s annual fund-raiser. As she describes telling her son, “When I die, I’m going to be all over town.” The mutual love affair between Morgan’s Flying Pig Pottery and the Cape has been almost 50 years in the making. Morgan, 61, spent summers on the Cape as a child and then, while in college, got a job waitressing in Woods Hole. She immediately felt at home, even though it was winter. “I was raised in a kind of offbeat family, to put it mildly,” she says. “When I came to Woods Hole, the Fishmonger was basically just the local hangout. Everyone shared tips. It was kind of this hippie hangout. As soon as I came to Woods Hole, that was just like home.” Morgan first discovered pottery as a teenager in Washington, D.C. Her parents had moved from the city to the country and were looking for a way to keep her occupied. “There was a woman down the street who had a teeny, tiny little pottery business at the local gas station,” she recalls. “She sold her pottery and made pots in the kitchen. My mom had her teach me, give me pottery lessons.” In college, Morgan studied ceramics but eventually got a degree in illustration. At one point, she took about 10 years off from ceramics to be a mom and work as an illustrator and graphic artist. But these Several pieces of white stoneware with sgraffito decoration sit ready to unload from the kiln. Opposite, clockwise: Morgan in her studio; clay ornaments with red glaze, a color she uses sparingly; days, you can find her in her studio on large fish jar and signature cylinder mugs; fish tile installation. Woods Hole Road. “If it’s light out, my studio is open and locals know that,” she says. “They’ll come shop and buy carving away the background. gifts and do whatever, if they need a last-minute something. “The nice thing about pottery is that I love to sit down and It’s really this place that people know they can just go grab throw,” she says. “It is getting harder on my body and my hands, something anytime. ... How many places in the world or in the but I just love to do it.” And while she’s less keen on glazing, she country can you do that?” finds joy in the end result. “It never gets old, unloading a kiln,” Her ceramic style is based on sgraffito, a method that requires she says. “It’s like Christmas.” flyingpigpottery.biz

112

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

113


114

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Amy Eldridge

Amy Eldridge is on her second life as a potter. Now 61, she studied ceramics in high school and college, then put it aside. She didn’t get back to pottery until about six years ago after raising three kids and being laid off after 20 years working for an electronic-navigation company. “I’m very excited to have this be my retirement job and just do it for the fun of it,” she says. “Because I still like it. I love doing it.” Eldridge describes her style in two words: “highly functional.” She says, “I like things that people can use. I just think it’s really fun to have something beautiful to look at that you can use every day.” Don’t let her description distract from the grace and whimsy of her mugs, featuring striped bass, speckled trout and red-haired mermaids, or her plates, with their joyously painted carrots, corn and lemons. “You’ll probably notice that I really love color,” she says. Her repertoire includes a variation on a mishima, or wax, technique to make the signature fish mugs. She starts with a slab, forming each piece by hand. When the shape is still soft, she waxes the outside and carves the image of the fish in the wax. She paints a brightly colored underglaze onto the carved sections and gives it a bisque firing, which also melts off the rest of the wax, leaving the contrasting design. She glazes the handle, rim and inside, and fires the mug a second time. Although Eldridge currently is a resident artist with a studio at Meetinghouse Clay Center in Cataumet, she has deep roots in Falmouth. Her father’s family are “old Eldridges,” as she describes them, from Woods Hole. Her mother’s family came to Falmouth “shortly after the Titanic sank.” Eldridge herself grew up spending winters in Connecticut, where her father taught at a boarding school, and summers in Falmouth, always considered the family’s home. She settled in Falmouth as an adult; her three children grew up in town. Now, she babysits for one of her grandchildren who lives here. “I kind of always knew I’d come home,” she says. Looking back at her choice to return to ceramics, she’s pleased at her own evolution. “I just upgraded my family,” she says. “I made them all get new mugs and throw away the mugs that I made four or five years ago—they’re so primitive now. I had to catch up again, but it’s like riding a bicycle. It’s fun, and I enjoy making the progress.” facebook.com/ Eldridge-Ceramics   FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

Amy Eldridge, opposite, creates a variety of colorful and functional wares in her studio at the Clay Pond Ceramics Center in Cataumet. For fun, she also makes sea creatures like hermit crabs and snails.

115


Magical

116

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Moments With a trained eye and good timing, a local photographer captures simple scenes with big impact. PHOTOGR APHY BY MARY CUDDY

At sunrise on a morning in April, a graceful swan preens at the edge of the beach on Surf Drive. Above: A trio of rowboats catch the early morning light at Quissett Harbor Boatyard.

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

117


Above: A great blue heron feeds in a pond on Chapoquoit Road in West Falmouth. Right: “Patriot Too” docked in Falmouth Harbor on an eerily foggy summer morning. Below: Buoys in a nest of tangled rope at Quissett Harbor Boatyard

Right: The early-morning fog lifts to reveal a limesherbet colored H class sailboat in Quissett Harbor.

118

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


A spring ritual: The Woods Hole drawbridge opens for the exodus of houseboats from Eel Pond, headed to dock in Great Harbor for the summer.

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

119


Top: The newly shingled Keeper’s House at Nobska Light is earmarked to become a maritime museum. Above: A lone quahog sits on Quissett Beach as the sun rises over Nantucket Sound. Right: The photographer’s sister basks in the beauty of a September sunset at West Falmouth Harbor.

“ The images I capture of Falmouth are of its striking beauty during sunrise, sunset, blue hour and in the fog. The beauty of Falmouth and the preservation of its open spaces would not be here without the dedication of so many volunteers and environmental organizations. The goal of sharing my photos is to capture a moment in time and leave it exactly as it is for the next person to witness too.” — Mary Cuddy @NobskaOldManandtheSea

120

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Prepping a sailboat on Racing Beach, at the edge of Buzzards Bay

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

121


Shop, dine, live & enjoy the neighborhood.

An open-air shopping, dining and living community set in a charming New England-style village. Find unique dining, one-of-a-kind shops, national favorites and entertainment for all. mashpeecommons.com

Glass Art Studio 2

@MashpeeCommons

Your Single Source For All Things Glass Now offering Classes & Supplies

ARCHITECTUR AL ART GLASS & LIGHTING ~ Design and Fabrication ~ Restoration 360 Main Street, Falmouth ~ 774-289-9222 ~ glassartstudio2.com 122

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


G N I P P SHO E E R P S

Downtown Falmouth offers a quintessential shopping experience,

with an array of boutiques and galleries all withing walking distance of one another. You can shop till you drop and then refuel at one of many neighboring bars and restaurants. A perfect day!

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

123


16

ART GALLERY

rA ve.

1 THE GALLERY ON MAIN

Pa

lme

317 Main Street 508-444-6073 thegalleryonmainfalmouth.com

2 MAIN STREET ART GALLERY

CASUAL APPAREL

4 THE BLACK DOG

W. M

General Store 214 Main Street 508-495-6000 theblackdog.com

5 FATFACE

34

e. Av

114 Palmer Avenue 508-548-2100 osbornandrughgallery.com

N. Main St.

3 OSBORN & RUGH GALLERY

33

er lm Pa

189 Main Street 774-763-5441 mainstreetrealestatefalmouth.com

3 15 35

DOWNTOWN FALMOUTH SHOPPING

ain

St.

BOOKSTORE

245 Main Street 508-388-7288 fatface.com

6 LIVIN’ EZ CASUAL WEAR 266 Main Street 508-540-0115 livinezclothing.com

7 ON THE WATER OUTFITTERS 261 Main Street 508-388-7458 onthewateroutfitters.com

124

8 EIGHT COUSINS 189 Main Street 508-548-5548 eightcousins.com

Eight Cousins is proud to be Falmouth’s local family bookshop, sharing our love and appreciation of books, reading, and community for 35 years. Visit us in store on Main Street, and online at eightcousins.com!

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


SHOPPING SPREE

JEWELRY

9 THE GILDED OYSTER

155 Main Street, 774-763-5742, thegildedoyster.com A coastal fine jewelry boutique that brings together local heritage, timeless elegance and special treasures of the sea. Featuring many Cape Cod and New England designers as well as one-of-kind pieces from family goldsmiths, The Gilded Oyster is an exploration of coastal craftsmanship and artistry. We also showcase beautiful pieces from across the seas, handcrafted by artisans from Ireland and Scotland. Visit us online, thegildedoyster.com. Follow us on Instagram and like us on Facebook @gildedoyster

FASHION

10 STORY.

352 Main Street, 774-763-5451, storyfalmouth.com story. is a chic specialty clothing store offering a tightly curated collection of women’s sought-after contemporary styles inspired and designed by tastemakers from around the globe. Each piece is carefully selected for its contemporary styling and expert craftsmanship. Shop in our plush living room setting during store hours or by appointment. Call or visit our website at storyfalmouth.com for hours and inspiration.

Ka

2

Lee

Aca

Bat es Rd

.

de m

30

8

Ch an cer y

20

24 26

32 19 22 18

Ln .

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

4

y Ln.

6 13 17 25 5 12

Shore St.

9

27 28

rine

Library Ln.

14 11

21

t ha

Main St. 7

10 31 29 23

1

125


SHOPPING SPREE JEWELRY

11 REEL ISLAND CO. 153 Main Street 617-780-4884 Facebook

12 SOFT AS A GRAPE 251 Main Street 508-457-7480 softasagrape.com

13 TOUCHÉ 234 Main Street 508-495-0598

17 FALMOUTH JEWELRY

225 Main Street, 508-548-0487, falmouthjewelryshop.com The Falmouth Jewelry Shop is an independent family-owned jewelry store located in the heart of Falmouth Village on beautiful Cape Cod. Established in 1944 and built on trust, we are one of the longest running businesses in Falmouth. Visit us online, follow us on Instagram @the_falmouth_ jewerly_shop and like us on Facebook @falmouthjewelryshop

CHILDREN’S CLOTHING

14 CALINE FOR KIDS 149 Main Street 508-548-2533 calineforkids.com

FASHION

18 GREEN EYED DAISY 199 Main Street 508-495-0403 greeneyeddaisyboutique.com

CONSIGNMENT SHOP

15 BUYWAY BOUTIQUE

20 MAXWELL & CO.

19 LILLY PULTIZER

Queens Buyway, 47 North Main Street 508-540-4884 buywayboutiques.com

199 Main Street 508-540-0697 lillypulitzer.com

200 Main Street 508-540-8752 maxwellandco.com

21 PORT CARGO 156 Main Street 508-540-4466 Facebook

FASHION

16 UNDERGROUND FASHION BOUTIQUE

316 Gifford Street, Unit 6 508-524-1782 undergroundfashion.co Underground Fashion, a concept boutique bringing you unique, chic and classic styles from global brands! We carry the latest on-trend styles with monthly new arrivals, focusing on simple, yet stylish and easy-towear pieces. Visit us online, follow us on @undergroundfashion_boutique and like us on Facebook @undergroundfashion

126

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Waves of Fine Living

Lifestyle Boutique FASHION ACCESSORIES

|

LOTIONS

|

ORNAMENTS

|

POTTERY

|

ITEMS BY LOCAL ARTISANS

Matouk | John Robshaw | Sferra | April Cornell | Mariposa | Nora Fleming | Vietri Mashpee Commons | 11 Central Square, Mashpee | (508) 681-0072 fabvilla.net


SHOPPING SPREE

22 PURITAN CAPE COD 199 Main Street 508-548-0116 puritancapecod.com

ART GALLERY

29 GLASS ART STUDIO 2 FLORIST

23 THE SALTY FLORIST 362 Main Street 774-255-1793 thesaltyflorist.com

FOR THE HOME

24 LEROUX KITCHEN 208 Main Street 774-763-2081 lerouxkitchen.com

360 Main Street 774-289-9222 glassartstudio2.com Glass Art Studio creates custom stained glass, and offers restoration service with extensive knowledge and years of collaboration in architectural art glass, vintage and antique. Visit us online, follow us on Instagram @glassart_ jeannie and like us on Facebook @ facebook. com/glassartstudio2/

25 SETTING THE SPACE 233 Main Street 508-444-9500 settingthespace.com

GIFT SHOP

26 CELEBRATIONS OF CAPE COD 210 Main Street 508-457-0530 Facebook

27 HOMESPUN GARDEN 174 Main Street 508-457-4441 Facebook

28 SEA BAGS 176 Main Street 774-255-1252 seabags.com

128

30 TWIGS FALMOUTH

33 CORNER CYCLE

178 Main Street 508-540-0767 twigsfalmouth.com

115 Palmer Ave 508-540-4195 cornercycle.com

JEWELRY

SCREEN PRINTING SHOP

31 HANNOUSH JEWELERS

34 HOWLINGBIRD STUDIO

352 Main Street 508-548-9107 hannoush.com

OUTDOOR APPAREL & GEAR

32 BOARD STIFF 193 Main Street 508-540-9555 boardstifffalmouth.com

91 Palmer Avenue 508-540-3787 howlingbird.com

STATIONERY

35 THE PINK POLKA DOT 45 N. Main Street 508-540-3015 thepinkpolkadot.net

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


th

E IGHT COUSINS Your local family Bookshop

We are delighted to celebrate 35 years as Falmouth’s local family bookshop. — Thank You — from all of us at Eight Cousins 189 Main Street • Falmouth, MA • 508.548.5548

www.eightcousins.com Friends of Nobska Light

VILLAGE Trading Company Cataumet

.

Cape Cod

Nantucket Hurricane

We are committed to the preservation and protection of this beloved Falmouth landmark ensuring its future enjoyment for our community and visitors alike.

DONATE TODAY friendsofnobska.org

THIS AD WAS DONATED BY MARY CUDDY, @NOBSKAOLDMANANDTHESEA

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

HOME • BATH & BODY • TABLETOP • CARDS • TOYS Yo u r N e i g h b o r h o o d G i f t S t o r e 1379 Rt.28A, Cataumet

508-356-3093

VillageTradingCompany.com

129


130

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Calendar

Painting by Julia O’Malley Keyes, “Summer Perfection—Quissett Harbor,” oil on canvas, 24"x 40"

Our calendar of events is a roster of possible events and events that usually take place during every normal year. Due to the uncertainties of Covid-19 and fluctuations in restrictions and social distancing guidelines, all events are subject to change or cancellation. Some events may occur in the virtual realm. We recommend that you check with the organization that created an event for guidance, reservations, restrictions and cancellations. WOODS HOLE THEATER COMPANY SEASON Nonprofit, tax-exempt organization, has been in residence in the village of Woods Hole since 1974. Its purpose is to engage in and promote the cultural growth of the community of Woods Hole and vicinity. WHTC operates year-round, producing a wide variety of plays at affordable prices. Its traditional home is the historic Woods Hole Community Hall of 1878. Check schedule for specific dates and performances, woodsholetheater.org SPOHR GARDENS Enjoy the beauty of shrubs and flowers in bloom turning the gardens into a sea of color. Activities for children, Wishing Tree, guided tours, plant sale. spohrgardens.org

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

MUSEUMS ON THE GREEN Anticipating an in-person opening on July 1, Thursday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. When open, leisurely guided strolls of 60 – 90 minutes take you back through time in an exploration of Falmouth’s historic landmarks. Weather permitting. museumsonthegreen.org June – October, Thursdays FALMOUTH FARMERS’ MARKET Every Thursday, local farmers, bakers and culinary artisans sell fresh fruits and vegetables, seafood, cheese, wine, bread and pastries, plants and flowers at Marine Park on Falmouth Harbor in Falmouth center. Noon to 6 p.m. falmouthfarmersmarket.org

June 12 – August 1 (Playoffs August 3 -11) FALMOUTH COMMODORES BASEBALL SEASON The Cape Cod Baseball League, celebrating its 135th season, continues to provide fans with competitive baseball entertainment, where the country’s top college players display their prowess. The Cape League is recognized as one of the best amateur summer leagues in the country by college coaches as well as professional baseball scouts. Players from around the U.S. and all college divisions are recruited to play in the 10-team loop. A record total 257 former Cape Leaguers populate major league rosters. Falmouth Commodores home games are played at Guv Fuller Field, located behind the Gus Canty Recreation Center, 790 Main Street. falmouthcommodores.com

131


CALENDAR June STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL Indulge in fabulous strawberry shortcake and lobster rolls, hot dogs and barbecued chicken under the tent on the St. Barnabas lawn, across the street from the Village Green. Arts & crafts vendors, home baked goods sale, plant sale, face painting, small children’s games. stbarnabasfalmouth.org June – August COLLEGE LIGHT OPERA COMPANY The College Light Opera Company (CLOC) is among the very best of American summer theatre companies! CLOC, an independent nonprofit educational theatre founded in 1969, produces nine fully staged musical productions with full orchestra for Cape Cod summer guests while giving young talent a chance to begin a career in musical theatre. Pirates of Penzance, June 22–26; Very Good Eddie, June 29–July 3; A Gentleman’s Guide, July 6–10; The Pajama Game, July 13–17; Trouble in Tahiti, July 20–24; The Wizard of Oz, July 27–31; Little Women, August 3–7; The Sorcerer, August 10–14, The Danger Year, August 17–21. collegelightoperacompany.com June 16 – October 31 ART EXHIBITION AT HIGHFIELD HALL & GARDENS “SeaChange: Meditations on Sustainability” is a call to action that explores the interconnectedness of all living things: our responsibilities toward our environment, our efforts to recognize the fragility of our Earth, and the need to restore balance to preserve it. Elemental Artists: Debra Claffey, Patricia Gerkin, Donna Hamil Talman and Charyl Weissbach. Elemental is a group of four exhibiting artists who met in New England Wax (NEW), a professional organization of regional artists working in the medium of encaustic. highfieldhallandgardens.org

132

“ SeaChange: Meditations on Sustainability”art exhibition At Highfield Hall & Gardens, June 16 – October 31

July & August LOBSTERS ON THE LAWN AT ST. BARNABAS This popular event is held on Monday nights starting at 4:30 p.m. at St. Barnabas Episcopal Church in Falmouth. Lobster rolls, chips and pie on the big lawn across from the Falmouth Village Green. stbarnabasfalmouth.org July & August, Thursdays FALMOUTH TOWN BAND CONCERTS Concerts take place every Thursday evening at the Music and Arts Pavilion, Marine Park, next to Falmouth Harbor. All concerts are free of charge and open to the public. Bring your chair or blanket for your comfort and enjoyment. falmouthmass.us July & August, Thursdays ARTMARKET The ArtMarket, which includes 12 to 25 artisans selling their handmade items, is expected to be held 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursdays in July and August. This showcase of local creative talent includes visual artists, potters, fiber artists, illustrators, photographers, printmakers, glass blowers, jewelers, authors and poets. To add to the festivities, local musicians

will perform from 2 to 4 p.m. Falmouth Marine Park, 180 Scranton Avenue at the Falmouth Harbor Band Shell. falmouthartmarket.com July CAPE COD’S LARGEST BOOK SALE The Friends of Falmouth Public Library will host its annual Summer Book Sale on the front lawn of the Falmouth Public Library. The Friends sale, one of the largest book sales in New England, features hardcover, paperback, large print fiction and nonfiction, children’s books, games and puzzles, CDs and DVDs. Readers of all ages will enjoy this event. All materials have been donated and all proceeds are used to support the library’s programs and activities. falmouthpubliclibrary.org July 4 FALMOUTH FIREWORKS Voted one of the 10 best fireworks displays in the country by Travel + Leisure magazine, the fireworks are scheduled for dusk at Falmouth Heights Beach, pending approval by the Town of Falmouth. falmouthfireworks.org

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


CALENDAR July BE A PART OF THE CREATIVE PROCESS AT THE CAPE COD THEATRE PROJECT CCTP brings together playwrights of new American plays with professional directors and actors—often straight from Broadway. Join CCTP as they present a newly developed play for the first time, every weekend in July. These live, virtual readings provide playwrights with invaluable information about their as-yetunproduced work. In a Talkback session following each performance, audience members directly engage with the playwrights, directors and cast. Feedback provided can create changes in the next performance. Pre-Registration & Ticket required. Visit: capecodtheatreproject.org/ tickets for more details

dreams are tested with the discovery that their new neighbor has an unsettling past. It’s gripping from start to finish.

Mike Lew

relationship comes to a screeching halt when he suddenly finds himself the new father to a months-premature baby. His guide in the strange purgatory of hospital living, a grizzled, oversharing nurse named Caroline. “Tiny Father” was originally commissioned by Audible as part of the Audible Theatre Emerging Playwrights Fund and is loosely based on the playwright’s own experience with a NICU baby.

Selina Fillinger

July 1 & 3 7 p.m. virtual live-reading “THE COLLAPSE” by Selina Fillinger and directed by Margo Bordelon. Let’s go out with a buzz: Alice is thrilled to land a summer research position with Viola Vauclain, the legendary entomologist specializing in bees. But as the summer goes on, it quickly becomes clear that the apiarian colonies are not the only thing on the verge of collapse. A wild and surprising new MTC/Sloan commission about science, legacy and our own animal selves. July 8 & 10 7 p.m. virtual live-reading “TINY FATHER” by Mike Lew and directed by Moritz von Stuelpnagle. A slice-of-life comedy about parenthood: Daniel’s “friends with benefits” FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

Amy Evans

July 15 & 17 (CCTP’s 100th developed play) 7 p.m. virtual live-reading “ROADKILL” by Amy Evans and directed by Reg Douglas. CCTP’s 100th developed play. “Roadkill” was originally commissioned by Audible as part of the Audible Theatre Emerging Playwrights Fund. It follows thirtysomethings Tequi and Cedric as they move into the Hudson Valley from New York City, following in the footsteps of generations of Black farmers before them. After closing on a small cottage, their

Bill Cain

July 22 & 24 7 p.m. virtual live-reading “GOD’S SPIES” by Bill Cain and directed by CCTP’s artistic director, Hal Brooks. What do you write after you have written the world’s greatest play? Hopefully, not another Timon of Athens. Fortunately for Shakespeare, he is caught in the middle of the pandemic of 1603 and theaters are closed for a year. The plague opens his eyes to the mysteries of life and death when he is quarantined with his pod-companions-in-lockdown—a young Puritan lawyer and a mature streetwise prostitute. Will Shakespeare thrive creatively during quarantine or will he write his next masterpiece? A comedy inspired by the tensions we have all lived with in the past year. CCTP also offers free, weekly STAGETALK PROGRAMS every Monday at 7 p.m. preceding that week’s play. The public is welcome to watch a free, live-streamed discussion between the week’s playwright and/or director to learn about the playwright and the play’s origin, history and path to CCTP. It’s a behind-the-scenes look at the play, playwriting and challenges in the development process. • “ The Collapse” StageTalk: June 28 • “ Tiny Father” StageTalk: July 5 • “ Roadkill” StageTalk: July 12 • “ God’s Spies” StageTalk: July 19 Visit capecodtheatreproject.org/stagetalk for details

133


July FALMOUTH VILLAGE ASSOCIATION ARTS AND CRAFT STREET FAIR Don’t miss the best shopping event of the summer! Falmouth Village Association shuts down Main Street to vehicle traffic and welcomes you to peruse outdoor pop-up shops that will stretch all along the thoroughfare. Get all of your holiday shopping done in July! The fun begins at 10 a.m. falmouthvillageassociation.com July 9 – 18 7TH ANNUAL CAPE COD HYDRANGEA FESTIVAL The Cape Cod Hydrangea Festival is an annual celebration of the region’s blue, pink and white signature flowers and everything gardens on Cape Cod! The main attraction of the 10-day festival is tours of local gardens that are usually kept off-limits and maintained by individual homeowners throughout the year. Ticket proceeds support a variety of local nonprofits. A finalized events schedule will be available in early June and the addresses of all private gardens will be posted. capecodhydrangeafest.com July 14 – October 31 ART EXHIBITION AT HIGHFIELD HALL & GARDENS In collaboration with the Marine Biological Laboratory, “Turn the Tide” explores the delicate beauty of coral reefs through the eyes of Los Angeles-based artist and ocean advocate, Courtney Mattison, who hand-crafts intricately detailed and large-scale ceramic sculptural works, drawing from her background in marine conservation biology and policy. Her glazed stoneware and porcelain wall reliefs and sculptural objects translate concepts from climate science into aesthetically compelling forms, bringing the exuberance and fragility of coral reefs above the surface and into view. In addition to highlighting the humancaused threats faced by coral reefs, “Turn the Tide” celebrates the beauty of these unique marine ecosystems

134

M A R Y C U D DY

CALENDAR

7th Annual Cape Cod Hydrangea Festival, July 9 – 18

and aims to inspire hope and action. highfieldhallandgardens.org July 19 – 25 BARNSTABLE COUNTY FAIR The Barnstable County Fair has been an annual summer tradition on Cape Cod for over 170 years. The fair is affordable, oldfashioned family fun for all ages. Make your memories this year. Group Rates and multi-day passes are available. There are animal shows, 4-H demonstrations, petting zoos, horticulture displays, rides, games, live music, arts and crafts, food and commercial vendors with various items for sale. Cape Cod Fairgrounds, East Falmouth. capecodfairgrounds.com July 31 – August 7 30TH ANNUAL WOODS HOLE FILM FESTIVAL Due to the varying levels of comfort people have about gathering indoors, the 30th Woods Hole Film Festival will feature eight days of both in-person and

virtual screenings of independent films— many with local connections, and as part of the festival’s Film and Science Initiative, ones about science—accompanied by both live and virtual Q&As with filmmakers. A select group of films will be shown in person at either Falmouth Academy or the Cotuit Center for the Arts with limited seating capacity; all films will also be available for viewing online. woodsholefilmfestival.org August FALMOUTH VILLAGE MOVIES UNDER THE STARS Grab some dinner at one of Falmouth Village’s amazing restaurants, BYO blankets or chairs, and enjoy some outdoor family time! Every Wednesday, Falmouth Village will play a movie at Peg Noonan Park starting at dusk, weather permitting. Check FVA Facebook for the movie schedule! falmouthvillageassociation.com

“Turn the Tide” art exhibition At Highfield Hall & Gardens, July 14 – October 31 FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


CALENDAR August 7 11TH ANNUAL DAVID’S OLD SILVER SWIM Join us at 9:30 a.m. for the 11th Annual David’s Old Silver Swim, an open ocean fun swim in front of the Sea Crest Hotel along the beautiful shoreline of Old Silver Beach, in North Falmouth. A fun and festive family event for swimmers of all ages and levels to raise money for Compassionate Care ALS in honor of David Garber and others living with ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease). Silent auction and refreshments followed by a half-mile or mile swim. Fun prizes will be awarded, and official timing provided by Racewire. Sign up at davidsoldsilverswim.com. August ANNUAL BLUEGRASS ON THE LAWN Enjoy outdoor concert with foot‐ stomping entertainment for the entire family. Bring a picnic or enjoy refreshing beverages and food from vendors. 2 to 5 p.m.. Admission free with donation. highfieldhall.org August 12 VIRTUAL KATHARINE LEE BATES POETRY FEST Join our first-ever Virtual Poetry Fest! This year, we will celebrate everyone—6year-olds to seniors—who submitted original, unpublished poems. Many of the poets will read their own works; family members and friends will read others. This annual event is free and open to all. It was established over two decades ago to celebrate literacy, originality and creativity and to remember the Falmouthborn poet who wrote, among many other works, “America the Beautiful.” museumsonthegreen.org August 14 30TH ANNUAL FALMOUTH WALK Join the excitement of our 30th Anniversary, whether in person or virtually! An annual event that raises money for local Falmouth charities, it FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

Arts Alive Festival on the Falmouth Public Library lawn in September

is held in August on the day before the Falmouth Road Race and was founded in 1991 by local celebrities Eddie Doyle and Tommy Leonard. Updates and registration available at falmouthwalk.org August 15 ASICS FALMOUTH ROAD RACE The ASICS® Falmouth Road Race is scheduled to be held August 15, pending approval by the Town of Falmouth. Another option is the At-Home Edition race, where YOU get to choose the course. Be as creative as you’d like to be. Perhaps your course will be a 3.5-mile out-andback, or the one-mile loop around your neighborhood completed over several days, or a 7-mile point-to-point with a loved one waiting at the “finish line” to celebrate you and return you safely to home. The Falmouth Road Race was established in 1973 and has become one of the premier running events of the summer season. Each year the race draws an international field of Olympians, elite and recreational runners out to enjoy the iconic 7-mile seaside course. The nonprofit Falmouth Road Race organization is committed to promoting health and fitness through community programs and philanthropic giving. A Falmouthin-the-Fall race is being planned. Details will be announced in the coming months. falmouthroadrace.com

September ARTS ALIVE FESTIVAL Arts Alive 2021 is free celebration of the arts in Falmouth and the Upper Cape located on the Falmouth Public Library Lawn at 300 Main Street and Peg Noonan Park. Arts Alive features music, theater, dance and spoken word performances, art demonstrations, children’s activities, fitness classes and more. The event takes place rain or shine but due to Covid restrictions will be subject to state and town guidance. It is a wonderful way to celebrate the creativity of the Cape! artsfalmouth.org ROTARY CLUB OF FALMOUTH 21st ANNUAL CRAFT FAIR Don’t miss this great event that occurs alongside Falmouth Harbor and features crafts from all over! There will also be activities for the kids and food grilled to order by the Rotarians’ finest. There is sure to be something for everyone! Falmouth Marine Park, Scranton Avenue. falmouthrotary.com ON THE WATER’S STRIPERFEST To celebrate the closing of the Striper Cup and the end of another striped bass fishing season, StriperFest brings together anglers from throughout the Northeast to toast their favorite game fish. Held at Marine Park, Falmouth Harbor, StriperFest features live music, delicious food, games and attractions for the whole family. onthewater.com

135


NORTH FALMOUTH CHEESE SHOP Specialty Cheeses Gourmet Foods Coffees

Fine Chocolates Charcuterie Breads

and more…

Tue – Sat 10:30 – 6 pm 402 North Falmouth Hwy North Falmouth northfalmouthcheese.com 508-356-3666

FRESH SEAFOOD STEAK & CHOWDER 339 East Falmouth Hwy • East Falmouth 774-255-1178 • joshsatdavisville.com

136

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


R E S TA U R A N T G U I D E

Falmouth Eats

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

137


RESTAURANT GUIDE

When hunger strikes, Falmouth’s restaurants come to the rescue! Whatever you’re craving—from picnic fare to fine dining—you’ll find it here. Check out our listings to discover your perfect meal.

EAST FALMOUTH BAD MARTHA FARMER’S BREWERY 876 E. Falmouth Highway 508-939-0540 Craft beer, sandwiches and brick oven pizza BREWERY badmarthabeer.com/ falmouth-brewery

GOLDEN SAILS CHINESE RESTAURANT 143 E. Falmouth Highway 508-548-3521 Family-owned, serves authentic dishes from family recipes CHINESE

goldensailschinese restaurant.com

GREEN POND FISH MARKET

767 E. Falmouth Highway 508-548-2573 Offering fresh catches, fried clams, seafood specials and platters SEAFOOD greenpondfish.com

JOSH’S AT DAVISVILLE

339 E. Falmouth Highway 774-255-1178 See expanded listing below AMERICAN

joshsatdavisville.com

LE BON JOUR

420 E. Falmouth Highway 774-612-3967 Freshly prepared made-to-order salads, soups, burritos and international bowls INTERNATIONAL lebonjourfalmouth. business.site

PAPA JAKE’S PIZZA

146 Sandwich Road 508-457-7272 Casual sports bar and restaurant with pizza, wings and sandwiches PIZZA

PIZZA 1 & SUB 2

735 E. Falmouth Highway 508-457-1212 A large menu of pizza and subs, known for its standout Steak Bomb PIZZA pizza1subs2.com

PRIME TIME HOUSE OF PIZZA

338 E. Falmouth Highway 508-540-3595 Two Falmouth locations serving quality pizza, subs, calzones and more PIZZA

SMITTY’S HOMEMADE ICE CREAM

326 E. Falmouth Highway 508-457-1060 Homemade ice cream, waffle cones, banana splits, root beer floats and ice cream cakes to order ICE CREAM smittysic.com

FALMOUTH ANCHOR HOUSE

100 Davis Straits 508-299-8200 Classic fried seafood, steaks, burgers and more AMERICAN anchorale.com

ANEJO MEXICAN BISTRO & TEQUILA BAR 188 Main Street 508-388-7631 Contempary Mexician cuisine and select tequilas with an outdoor patio MEXICIAN anejomexicanbistro.com

THAI KITCHEN

BANGKOK CUISINE

258 Teaticket Highway 508-444-6660 Casual eatery with authentic Thai cuisine THAI falmouththaikitchen.com

291 Main Street 508-548-1728 Traditional Thai food made with fresh ingredients THAI bangkokcapecod.com

THE CAPE GRILLE AT THE CAPE CLUB RESORT

BEAN & COD

125 Falmouth Woods Road 508-540-4005 An upscale, fine-dining experience for dinner, featuring steaks, seafood and pasta AMERICAN capeclubresort.com/dining

145 Main Street 508-548-8840 A specialty grocery store featuring quality sandwiches and deli favorites MARKET

Josh’s at Davisville 339 E. Falmouth Highway 774-255-1178 Freshly prepared seafood, steaks, pasta, salads and chowder with a full bar in a relaxed atmosphere with a diverse menu. In addition to customer favorites, come try a new dish: pan-seared sesame encrusted tuna with pickled ginger and wasabi. Reservations and takeout are available through our website at joshsatdavisville.com. Follow and like us on Facebook. AMERICAN

138

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


Join us for our 47th season serving the freshest seafood around!

Kids eat for $7.99 every day!

FALMOUTH

356 Palmer Avenue 508-540-7877

SANDWICH

6 Coast Guard Road 508-888-4629

INDOOR AND OUTDOOR DINING AVAILABLE, OR TAKEOUT SEAFOODSAMS.COM


RESTAURANT GUIDE DOGGZ & HOGGZ

Bluefins Sushi and Sake Bar 291 Main St., Falmouth 774-763-6421 bluefinsfalmouth.com Authentic sushi with a focus on fresh, locally sourced seafood coupled with inspiration from local Cape Cod farm ingredients. We aim to craft sushi and fine cuisine that celebrate and showcase seafood using classically inspired Japanese methods in a modern Asian style. Featuring an upscale atmosphere with a fantastic martini bar vibe. Like us on Facebook @ facebook.com/bluefinssushi and follow us on Instagram @ bluefinsfalmouth SEAFOOD

781 Main Street 508-548-3663 A casual spot for classic burgers as well as meatloaf, turkey and veggie burgers BURGERS doggzhoggz.com

DYNASTY BUFFET

28 Davis Straits 508-548-6689 Cantonese restaurant with favorites like coconut shrimp, General Tso’s chicken and crab ragoons CHINESE

EAT YOUR HEART OUT CAFÉ

587 Main Street 508-388-7911 Freshly prepared sandwiches, salads, soups and much more CAFÉ

eatyourheartoutcafe.com/ market/

BEAR IN BOOTS BURGER BAR

285 Main Street 508-444-8511 Serving scrumptious burgers, full bar and more BURGER BAR bnbburgerbars.com

BEN & BILL’S CHOCOLATE EMPORIUM 209 Main Street 508-548-7878 Handmade chocolates and ice cream available at this sweets shop ICE CREAM benandbills.net

BETSY’S DINER

457 Main Street 508-540-0060 A Falmouth icon, retro-style diner serving breakfast and lunch DINER betsys-diner.business.site

BLUEFINS SUSHI AND SAKE BAR

291 Main Street 774-763-6421 See expanded listing above SEAFOOD

bluefinsfalmouth.com

C SALT WINE BAR & GRILLE

75 Davis Straits 774-763-2954 Modern American cuisine with continental influences, open for dinner and Sunday brunch AMERICAN

csaltfalmouth.com

140

ELI’S AT THE COONAMESSETT INN

CAPE COD BAGEL CAFÉ

CRABAPPLES

CASA VALLARTA MEXICAN RESTAURANT & TEQUILA BAR

DANA’S KITCHEN

419 Palmer Avenue 508-548-8485 Serving fresh bagels, plus a full menu of signature sandwiches and salads CAFÉ

70 Davis Straits 508-299-8177 Traditional Mexican cuisine in a casual dining atmosphere with top-notch margaritas MEXICIAN casavallarta.us

COFFEE OBESSION

110 Palmer Avenue 508-540-2233 Known for excellent coffee, lattes and baked goods COFFEE coffeeobsession.com

CONFERENCE TABLE

205 Worcester Court 508-540-7136 Offering great meals for lunch and dinner AMERICAN theconferencetable falmouth.com

COUNTRY FARE RESTAURANT

319 Main Street 508-548-9020 A cozy spot for breakfast; customers rave about the French toast and sausages BREAKFAST

553 Palmer Avenue 508-548-3355 Casual dining offering breakfast, lunch and dinner AMERICAN crabapplesrestaurant.com 881 Palmer Avenue 508-540-7900 A casual spot serving wraps, sandwiches and salads CAFÉ danas-kitchen.com

DEVOUR EATERY

352 Main Street 508-540-5900 An artisan eatery serving breakfast, creative sandwiches, rice bowls, salads and more. Always fresh CAFÉ devoureatery.com

DILLY’S TAQUERIA

281 Main Street 774-763-2066 Build-it-yourself Mexican fare. Homemade meat marinades, freshly roasted veggies, countless toppings and hot sauces MEXICIAN dillystaqueria.com

DJ’S FAMOUS WINGS

872 Main Street 508-457-9464 Original-style Buffalo wings and much more AMERICAN djsfamouswings.com

311 Gifford Street 508-548-2300 Offers Sunday brunch, daily lunch and dinner with an exceptional wine list AMERICAN elistavernfalmouth.com

ESTIA

117 Main Street 508-548-3300 See expanded listing page 141 GREEK

estiacapecod.com

EUGENE HENRY’S GASTRONOMICAL DELIGHTS

141 Main Street 508-388-7764 A curated collection of curious confections, concoctions and comestibles to tantalize your taste buds. DELIGHTS

FALMOUTH RAW BAR

56 Scranton Avenue 508-548-7729 Fresh seafood, raw bar classics and homemade clam chowder with waterfront views SEAFOOD falmouthrawbar.com

GHELFI’S CANDIES OF CAPE COD

228 Main Street 508-457-1085 A variety of delectable chocolates including fudge and truffles, with gift baskets and wedding favors available SWEETS/CANDY

shipchocolates.net

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


RESTAURANT GUIDE GOLDEN SWAN INDIAN CUISINE

323 Main Street 508-540-6580 Traditional Indian food from channa masala and fish currry to homemade garlic naan INDIAN

GRUMPY’S PUB

29 Locust Street 508-540-3930 Offering traditional pub fare and live music AMERICAN PUB

HOMEPORT SUSHI & KITCHEN

316 Gifford Street 508-540-0886 Fresh, authentic Japanese cuisine for lunch and dinner JAPANESE

homeportsushi.com

ITALIAN GOURMET FOODS – SLICE OF ITALY INC. 890 Main Street 508-495-1106 Serving specialty gluten-free, 100-percent beef hot dogs, pulled pork and St. Louis-style ribs and barbecue options AMERICAN

JACK IN THE BEANSTALK

800 Gifford Street 508-548-1300 Delicious deli sandwiches and homemade soups, produce from local farms, wine, beer and gourmet goods MARKET jackinthebeanstalk.com

JACKS RESTAURANT & BAR

327 Gifford Street 508-540-5225 American-style dinners from burgers to seafood, and live music AMERICAN jacksrestaurantfalmouth.com

JIM’S CLAM SHACK

227 Clinton Avenue 508-540-7758 Classic fried seafood with outdoor dining overlooking Falmouth Harbor SEAFOOD

LIAM MAGUIRE’S IRISH PUB

273 Main Street 508-548-0285 A favorite pub serving traditional Irish fare with a full bar IRISH PUB liammaguire.com

MAISON VILLATTE

267 Main Street 774-255-1855 Authentic French bakery offering fresh croissants, baguettes, tarts, pastries and cakes BAKERY

MARY ELLEN’S PORTUGESE BAKERY

829 Main Street 508-540-9696 A favorite breakfast and brunch spot featuring Portuguese bread and pastries BAKERY

MOLLY’S TEA ROOM

227 Main Street 508-457-1666 A full-service tearoom with a selection of sandwiches, salads and quiche TEA mollystearoom.net

NEW PEKING PALACE 452 Main Street 508-540-8204 Serving Chinese, Thai and Japanese cuisine FUSION newpekingpalace.com

OSTERIA LA CIVETTA

133 Main Street 508-540-1616 Authentic Italian cuisine with homemade fresh pasta, seafood and wine ITALIAN osterialacivetta.com

PAUL’S PIZZA AND SEAFOOD

Estia 117 Main St., Falmouth, 508-548-3300, estiacapecod.com A Greek taverna located in downtown Falmouth that serves authentic and traditional Greek cuisine with a modern twist. Serving popular favorite dishes like coal-fired pizza, spanakopita, pastitsio and moussaka. This sophisticated and lively atmosphere captures the essence of the Cape. Like us on Facebook @ facebook.com/estiacapecod and follow us on Instagram @ instagram.com/estiacapecod/ GREEK

PIER 37 BOATHOUSE

14 Benham Road 508-548-5838 A hometown favorite that has 32 toppings for your pizza PIZZA paulspizzacapecod.com

88 Scranton Avenue 508-388-7573 Popular spot on Falmouth Harbor for lunch, dinner, full bar and live music AMERICAN falmouthpier37.com

PEEL PIZZA COMPANY

QUAHOG REPUBLIC

31 Teaticket Highway 774-763-6603 Thin-crust pizza, calzones, wings and salads PIZZA peelpizzaco.com

PERSY’S PLACE

40 N. Main Street 508-540-3500 Best known for their large breakfast menu BREAKFAST persysplace.com

PICKLE JAR KITCHEN

170 Main Street 508-540-6760 Known for homemade pickles, specialty sandwiches and beverages served in Mason jars CAFÉ picklejarkitchen.com

97 Spring Bars Road 508-540-4111 A self-proclaimed dive bar, known for homemade stuffed quahogs, lobster rolls and clam chowder SEAFOOD quahogrepublic.com

SEAFOOD SAM’S

356 Palmer Avenue 508-540-7877 See expanded listing page 142. SEAFOOD

seafoodsams.com/falmouth

SIMPLY DIVINE PIZZA CO. 272 Main Street 508-548-1222 Enjoy a crative selection of hand-tossed, Neapolitanstyle pizza made with fresh ingredients PIZZA divinepizza.com

STEVE’S PIZZERIA & MORE

164 Main Street 508-548-9900 Serving delicious steak and seafood in a casual setting

374 Main Street 508-457-9636 Pizza, dinner plates, grinders and more for dining in, picking up or delivery PIZZA stevespizzeriaandmore.com

qdfalmouth.com

THE CLAM MAN

QUARTERDECK RESTAURANT

AMERICAN

15 Boxwood Circle 508-548-6044 A retail fish market that offers fresh fish, shellfish and chowder MARKET

theclamman.com

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

141


RESTAURANT GUIDE

Seafood Sam’s 356 Palmer Avenue 508-540-7877 Since 1974 we’ve been serving families the freshest seafood, quality lobster rolls, fried seafood cooked to order and homemade chowder, making Seafood Sam’s a classic on the Cape. Come and enjoy our award-winning Cape Cod fare with indoor and outdoor patio dining. Visit us online seafoodsams.com/falmouth. Follow us on Instagram and Like us on Facebook @ seafoodsamsfalmouth SEAFOOD

THE FLYING BRIDGE RESTAURANT

220 Scranton Avenue 508-548-2700 Waterfront dining on Falmouth Harbor serving fresh seafood and full bar SEAFOOD flyingbridgerestaurant.com

THE GLASS ONION

37 N. Main Street 508-540-3730 Contempary American cuisine featuring Washburn Island oysters with an extensive wine list AMERICAN theglassoniondining.com

WINDFALL MARKET

77 Scranton Avenue 508-548-0099 Fresh bread made from scratch, assortment of cheese, pastries, pizza and deli platters available at the bakery MARKET windfallmarket.com

FALMOUTH HEIGHTS BRITISH BEER COMPANY

263 Grand Avenue 508-540-9600 Right across from the beach and Vineyard Sound, this pub offers craft beer, burgers and seafood AMERICAN PUB

britishbeer.com/falmouth

THE BLACK DOG HEIGHTS CAFÉ

465 Grand Avenue 508-540-4409 Freshly prepared breakfast, sandwiches, salads, burgers, soups and much more CAFÉ theblackdog.com

NORTH FALMOUTH BUCATINO RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR

7 Nathan Ellis Highway 508-566-8960 Authentic Italian cuisine, including pizza and pasta dishes with an extensive wine list ITALIAN bucawinebar.com

EPIC OYSTER

70 County Road 508-563-3742 Housed in an old railcar offering fresh seafood and a variety of oysters shucked to order SEAFOOD eatepicoyster.com

NORTH FALMOUTH CHEESE SHOP

402 N. Falmouth Highway 508-356-3666 See expanded listing below CHEESE SHOP

northfalmouthcheese.com

PRIME TIME HOUSE OF PIZZA

286 Old Main Road 508-563-1900 Two Falmouth locations serving quality pizza, subs, calzones and more PIZZA

RED’S RESTAURANT & LOUNGE AT THE SEA CREST BEACH HOTEL

350 Quaker Road 508-356-2136 Waterfront dining serving fresh local seafood, steaks and much more AMERICAN seacrestbeachhotel.com/ dine/reds

SILVER BEACH PIZZA & SEAFOOD

557 N. Falmouth Highway 508-563-5000 Casual dining with just about everything from pizza to pasta PIZZA

silverbeachpizzacapecod.com

SILVER LOUNGE RESTAURANT

412 N. Falmouth Highway 508-563-2410 Serving seafood, steaks, sandwiches and cocktails AMERICAN silverloungerestaurant.com

North Falmouth Cheese Shop 402 N. Falmouth Highway 508-356-3666 northfalmouthcheese.com North Falmouth Cheese Shop offers domestic and imported cheeses, charcuterie meats, pâté, crackers, olives, oils, jams, sauces and sweet treats. Locally made items include Maison Villatte French breads, Bee Well raw honey, Chequessett craft chocolate bars, Beanstock coffees, Robin’s Toffee & Wicked Walnuts. Gourmet frozens items for easy entertaining include appetizers, stuffed pastas and desserts. Follow and like us on Facebook@ facebook.com/NorthFalmouthCheeseShop: Open Tuesdays – Saturdays, 10:30 a.m.– 6 p.m., Closed Sundays & Mondays. CHEESE SHOP

142

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


RESTAURANT GUIDE TALK OF THE TOWN DINER

362 N. Falmouth Highway 508-563-3041 Hearty comfort food, breakfast omelettes and Belgian waffles; for lunch, wraps and sandwiches DINER

WILD HARBOR GENERAL STORE

200 Old Main Road 508-563-2011 This general store has a bakery, deli, beer, wine, and more MARKET

TEATICKET EAST END TAP

MOTO PIZZA

500 Waquoit Highway 508-388-6888 Pizza, subs, salads and more PIZZA

moto-pizza.com

WEST FALMOUTH CHAPOQUOIT GRILL

410 W. Falmouth Highway 508-540-7794 From Mediterranean-inspired cuisine to wood-fired, brick-oven pizza MEDITERRANEAN chapoquoitgrillwest falmouth.com

EULINDA’S ICE CREAM

734 Teaticket Highway 508-444-8677 A local pub serving lunch and dinner with live entertainment

634 W. Falmouth Highway 508-548-2486 Located right by the Shining Sea Bike Path, this is a great stop for a frozen treat ICE CREAM

eastendtap.com

WEST FALMOUTH MARKET

AMERICAN PUB

FALMOUTH FISH MARKET 157 Teaticket Highway 508-540-0045 A retail fish market that offers fresh fish, chowder, lobster rolls and fried platters to go MARKET

freshfishcapecod.com

PIES A LA MODE

200 Teaticket Highway 508-540-8777 Pies, quiches and pasties, all made from scratch with fresh local ingredients PIES

623 W. Falmouth Highway 508-548-1139 See expanded listing below MARKET

westfalmouthmarket.com

WOODS HOLE CAPTAIN KIDD RESTAURANT

77 Water Street 508-548-8563 Waterfront dining with stellar ocean views, local seafood, steaks and full bar AMERICAN thecaptainkidd.com

COFFEE OBESSION

38 Water Street 508-540-8130 Known for exellent coffee, lattes and baked goods COFFEE coffeeobsession.com

JIMMY’S OF WOODS HOLE 22 Luscombe Avenue 508-540-6823 Directly across from the Martha’s Vineyard ferry, a full menu of burgers and sandwiches along with delectable ice cream CAFÉ jimmysclassiceats.com

LANDFALL RESTAURANT

9 Luscombe Avenue 508-548-1758 Rustic waterfront dining serving fresh local seafood, full bar and much more AMERICAN landfallwoodshole.com

PIE IN THE SKY

10 Water Street 508-540-5475 Handmade baked goods, coffee, fresh sandwiches and more CAFÉ piecoffee.com

QUICKS HOLE TAQUERIA 6 Luscombe Avenue 508-495-0792 Enjoy Baja California-inspired cuisine with outdoor seating while listening to live music MEXICAN

QUICKS HOLE TAVERN

29 Railroad Avenue 508-495-0048 A nautically inspired spot, known for “wicked fresh,” creative farm-to-table dishes AMERICAN

quicksholewickedfresh.com/ tavern

SHUCKERS WORLD FAMOUS RAW BAR & CAFÉ

91 Water Street 508-540-3850 Causal waterfront eatery offering seafood, known for its many ways of preparing and serving lobster SEAFOOD shuckerscapecod.com

WATER STREET KITCHEN

56 Water Street 508-540-5656 Waterfront dining serving inspired home cooking with fresh, local ingredients AMERICAN waterstreetkitchen.com

WOODS HOLE MARKET & PROVISIONS

87 Water Street 508-540-4792 A full-service deli and gourmet bakery, as well as everyday groceries MARKET woodsholemarket.com

quicksholewickedfresh.com/ taqueria

SUPREME PIZZA & SUBS

147 Teaticket Highway 508-548-4200 Friendly service and quality pizzas, subs and salads PIZZA falmouthsupreme.com

SWEET RICE

167 Teaticket Highway 508-444-6616 Southeast Asian cuisine FUSION

sweetricecapecod.com

WAQUOIT MOONAKIS CAFÉ

460 Waquoit Highway 508-457-9630 Favorites for breakfast and lunch, try the burgers, wraps or paninis CAFÉ moonakiscafe.com

FALMOUTHLIVINGMAG.COM

West Falmouth Market 623 W. Falmouth Highway 508-548-1139 A beloved community institution since 1902, West Falmouth Market is so much more than a grocery store. This friendly neighborhood spot offers everything from fresh produce, coffee and scrumptious deli sandwiches or wraps to an old-time butcher shop, pizza, homemade soups, bakery and wine and beer as well as prepared gourmet meals and catering services. Visit us online westfalmouthmarket.com Follow us on Instagram @westfalmouthmarket and like us on Facebook facebook.com/ thewestfalmouthmarket. MARKET

143


LAST WORD

CHARM TO SPARE Citing its laid-back rural charm, earlier this year Travelmag.com selected Falmouth as one of its “30 Most Charming Small Cities in the USA.” Iconic Nobska Lighthouse and conservation area Waquoit Bay got special mentions along with seafood shacks, sandy beaches, wildlife refuges and the islands of Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket, just short ferry rides away. To see who else made the list “beyond the bright lights of LA, Chicago and New York,” go to travelmag.com/articles/small-cities-usa/.

PAINTING BY MINDY REASONOVER 144

FALMOUTH LIVING • SPRING/SUMMER 2021


COME SEE OUR SELECTION! Hardwood Flooring ❖ Tiles ❖ Mosaics Luxury Vinyl ❖ Carpet ❖ And More

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL FULL SERVICE Product Selection ❖ Design Guidance Measuring ❖ Installation

MASHPEE 800 Falmouth Road ❖ 508-477-4080 selectionfloors.com


A R C H I T E C T FOR

CAPE

COD

&

&

B U I L D E R

BOSTON’S

SOUTH

SHORE

SHOWROOMS

FALMOUTH OSTERVILLE

HARWICH PORT SANDWICH

774 255-1709

LONGFELLOWDB.COM