Page 1

The Periodical of the Black Business Initiative

Pauline Patten Also in this Issue • Construction Industry • Halifax Rainmen • Black Business Summit 2008

Winter 2008 u Number 38

“A dynamic and vibrant Black presence within the Nova Scotia Business Community.”


Black to Business

1

Message from the Board of Directors

Message from the Board

1

Message from the Chief Executive Officer

2

Cover Story Pauline Patten

Valerie Rafuse

Cassandra Dorrington, Chair, Black Business Initiative ronment and the evolving needs of our client base. As any one of these items changes, BBI has modified its processes and activities accordingly. And with these many changes, we pride ourselves on not compromising on the quality of our decisions or the ensuing work.

Paul Adams

In this Issue

Making Big Waves in Haircare

3

is Living a Dream

5

BBI Stats

6

Trailblazers New Directions in Health & Education 7

CULTURE BEAT Rainmen

9

YOUTH ON THE MOVE Chelsea Nisbett

11

ANSMA’s 10th Anniversary

12

Black Business Summit 2008

13

Construction Industry

15

Initiative (BBI) has seen a lot of

BBI’s Directory Launch

18

changes and has accomplished a

Nominate Someone

Recognizing Real Results

19

Shotloc

20

People & Businesses on the Move

21

BBI 2008 Training Schedule

23

Triple D’s 24

Business Forum Planning Yor Retirement

25

Supporting your Community Bone Marrow Donor Registry

27

Business & Community Events

29

Regional Reports

Business Development

6

Southern

10

Central

10

Business is Jammin’

12

Cape Breton

19

Training

23

Mailed under Canada Post Publications Mail Sales Agreement no. 0040026687

A

re we there yet?” Having been in existence for 12 years the Black Business

lot during that time. Still, we must always stop and ponder, have we

Making the Shot with

Caters to the Community

Winter 2008

achieved our original goals? And better still, are we where we expected to be at this point in time? I guess the big question is, Where is there? BBI’s vision has been to create or facilitate “A dynamic and vibrant Black presence within the Nova Scotia business community.” We feel that this is a very realistic goal for us as an organization. Like many organizations, BBI has undergone several strategic planning sessions to identify its desired end state. On a regular basis, we have updated our strategic and business plans to reflect the current business environment, the legislative enviBlack to Business is the official periodical of The Black Business Initiative and is published quarterly spring, summer, fall, and winter. Its goal is to support the BBI as it fosters a dynamic and vibrant Black presence within the Nova Scotia Business Community.

For Advertising Information, Rates, Submitting Stories, Notices or Community Events, or for More Information, call: 902-426-2224

A great deal of the credit for this work can be attributed to the talented people who over the years have comprised, and continue to comprise, the BBI staff and Board. We are grateful for the talent and dedication of these individuals. To contribute to BBI’s sustainability strategy, BBI has expanded to include divisions dealing with consulting and construction for example. In this regard we continue to look for talented people. Should you want to contribute your considerable skills and talents to the ongoing growth of BBI throughout the community, we would welcome the opportunity to work with you. We continue to look for strong talent for the various boards. Please consider this to be my personal recruitment call to you. As we enter 2008, many things continue to change. We continue to see ongoing unrest in various pockets of the world. There is talk of an impending recession in the US. Its impacts on our economy are unknown. Canada, itself, is facing a severe labour shortage. While all this should be affecting BBI and its client base, we continue to see business start-ups and, in particular, we continue to see the successes of our business clients. continued on page 6> The Black Business Initiative 1575 Brunswick Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 2G1 Phone: 902-426-2224 Fax: 902-426-6530 Toll Free: 1-800-668-1010 E-Mail: bbi@bbi.ns.ca Web Site: www.bbi.ns.ca Published by: the Black Business Initiative Editor in Chief: Rustum Southwell Design & Layout: Design North Production by: Mirabliss Media Productions Cover Photograph: Peter Marsman


Black to Business

2

Winter 2008

Message From The Chief Executive Officer

Peter Marsman

S. I. Rustum Southwell

D

uring the festive season this past December, a remark made to me by Janet MacMillan, a principal with MT&L Public Relations Ltd., gave me cause to reflect on how we do business. It was at Nova Scotia Business Inc’s Christmas social when she asked me, “How have you been? I have not seen you around for a while.” It was a question which sounded rhetorical, so I dismissed it. Sometime later I reflected on the comment. Might this have happened in 1996 when the Black Business Initiative (BBI) first began? I think not. We will lose ground if we believe that business can succeed in isolation. Our businesses, our efforts and our initiatives will continually struggle to survive until we realize the benefit of strong networks and partnerships. Two things came to my mind in hearing her statement, which just as innocent as it sounded was equally profound. The first is that our vibrant and dynamic presence is now noted in the Nova Scotia business community. The second is, so is our absence. Any successful business person will tell you if your brand is not top of mind you might as well close your shop. It is a warm fuzzy feeling to be missed, however, it is more important to show up in order to become successful.

People like Evan Williams (Regional Business Development Manager), Gordon Doe (Director of Business Development), Bernard Elwin (Director of Client Development) and Gregory Adolphe-Nazaire (RBDM), who deliver services to our clients, community and business partners realize the importance of networking. We will lose ground if we believe that business can succeed in isolation. Our businesses, our efforts and our initiatives will continually struggle to survive until we realize the benefit of strong networks and partnerships.

These managers and directors of the BBI put particular importance on the necessity to be seen as one of the success factors for our clients. Despite all the technological inventions, business is still done face to face, person to person and ultimately with similar-minded people. It is a fact that the average year for each BBI Manager or Director involves, workshops, meetings, presentations and a variety of businessto-business sessions, totaling between 30 to 50 sessions. Each manager or director is in contact with hundreds if not thousands of people over the year. The incremental effect of participating in these activities benefits any business person who takes advantage of these contacts we provide. Some of the more notable networking opportunities always happen every year between September and December. Gordon Doe finalized the setting up of Adepa, a project management construction company, and then took the construction sector strategy concept throughout the province for consultations with the community.

A once in a lifetime moment for me, as a volunteer member of the Board of Governors for the Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC), was to attend the official opening of the new Waterfront Campus. To participate and see the prominent profile given to Paul Adams of Adams Photography and former BBI staff member Jill Provoe now heading the Transition Year Program for African Nova Scotians at NSCC made it special for me. Over and above events like the Board planning retreat, the business expo in small business week, the African Nova Scotia music awards, and ACOA’s twentieth anniversary celebrations, we still have the Christmas season filled with its “networking sessions”. The annual BBI directory launch and Christmas social was a great event this year, made even more special with a performance by “Up and Comer” African Nova Scotian Music award winner Chelsea Nisbett. I had come full circle. A reflective solitary moment in the middle of the festive season, I had a private and personal moment, with the decorative lights and the Christmas carols in the background on the car radio and some fresh new snow on the ground, I thought, “how have you been?’ We have done a lot. From the first board led by Hector Jacques as its chair to Cassandra Dorrington our current leader we have delivered on the plan. In fact, you can see it all around you. Whether in the commercials on Global TV, or our quarterly magazine and the business directory, there is a better class of Black business owners in operation today. What BBI is today is the sum total of the work of many people over the last 12 years. There are the board members who give freely of their continued on page 10>


Black to Business

Winter 2008

3

Pauline Patten

~ Making Big Waves in Haircare ~

P

auline Patten was born in Jamaica

and immigrated to Canada in 1970s on a work permit at the age of 25. She chose to join her brother who had been in Canada working for General Motors in Oshawa.

Juanita Peters Photography by: Peter Marsman

Before coming to Canada she says she was doing domestic work for a woman by the name of Stella Cooper in Kingston, Jamaica, at the age of 16. She says one day Mrs. Cooper asked her what she would really like to do with her life. Pauline told her she wanted to be a hairstylist. At 17, Mrs. Cooper took her to a salon where she paid the owner to train Pauline. She worked there until coming to Canada. When she arrived in Canada she wanted to work in a salon right away but knew she would have to go back to school. She worked at a factory for five years before entering Durham College in Oshawa at the age of 30 to get her grade nine to qualify for hairstyling school. By this time in her life she was married and had four children. She then applied to the Career School of Hairstyling and was accepted. She graduated and started working in a barber shop to build up her clientele.


Black to Business “One day the woman who owned the Career School of Hairstyling called me and said she had a gift for me. She had a small salon on Simcoe Street that she offered to me as a renter. Before long, I bought the shop and named it Pauline’s Beauty Flair. After two years I opened a second salon and let another girl manage it. My third salon opened in Scarborough a few years later.” Eventually, I would like to do a full line of products from treatment, to leave-in conditioners, shampoos, as well as hair and

Winter 2008

4 Hairstyling. She was instrumental in helping the board put together a new curriculum that changed how they work with and describe curly hair. She moved to Halifax in 2000 and opened her first salon in Nova Scotia in 2002. “What is most exciting in my life right now is that I have my own hair products. It is called Bailey Hair Products and people come from all over for it. It is manufactured in California and used by several salons in Canada. Eventually, I would like to do a full line of products from treatment, to leave-inconditioners, shampoos, as well as hair and scalp conditioners.”

scalp conditioners.”

Over the years, Patten has been through many ups and downs – a recession which forced the closure of some of her salons, health problems and, of course, many years of economic uncertainty. But, she went on to serve on the Ontario Board of Education for Apprenticeship for

Her next goal is to franchise her new business, Look Good Hair Design, which is currently in Spryfield at 349-A Herring Cove Road with a staff of three. What is different about this business that the staff are all Caucasians who want to work with curly and super curly hair. All staff gets a salary and at the end of the year they all get a profit from the

share of the business. She says it has never been done before in her industry. Look Good Hair Design offers hair and nail care. Pauline Patten has a doctorate in Cosmetology from National Beauty Culture League in Washington, D.C. She was nominated for the RBC Entrepreneurship Awards in 2007. She can also be seen on doveplay.ca. Patten has four children and 11 grandchildren.

Pauline Patten Full Beauty Care 7211 Quinpool Road Halifax, Nova Scotia

(902) 431-0556 service@fullbeautycare.com saloncanada.com


Black to Business

5

Winter 2008

Valerie Rafuse is Living a Dream Gregory Nazaire, RBDM

Shauntay Grant

“All of a sudden you step away from a steady paycheck and benefits, and (you’re) into debt because of a business loan. But after that passed and the store opened, it’s been wonderful. My husband’s’ been very supportive; my family (and) my friends have been fantastic. My customers are absolutely wonderful and supportive – they want to see me do well.”

Valerie Rafuse - Saucy Strides

I

have a passion for shoes and bags,” says Valerie Rafuse, the owner of Saucy Strides Shoes & Accessories in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. “(Operating my own business) is a dream I’d always had. And my children are grown now so I figured this was my time – I thought if I didn’t do it now I might never do it, and that would be something I would regret.” Anne Klein, Nine West, Michael Kors and Steve Madden are just a few of the designer-brand shoes you’re likely to come across at Saucy Strides.

“I also carry a designer (hand bag) series,” says Rafuse. “Christopher Kahn is a Canadian designer from Montreal. I sell his handbags, wallets and belts.” Saucy Strides Shoes & Accessories opened for business in March 2007. Opening the stores was a major career shift for Rafuse. “I am an Educational Assistant with Central Kings Rural High School in Cambridge. I’ve been an EA for 20

years, and I’ve taken a leave from my job to do my business.” “It’s been almost a year and I’m still in business, so every month that I stay open I’m encouraged...”

Rafuse says she liked the security of a full-time job while she was raising her children. And while she loves her job as an EA, she says owning her own business has its own perks. “You’re your own boss. You make the decisions. You reap the rewards. You suffer the consequences.” “I went through a period of paralyzing fear,” adds Rafuse.

Rafuse has yet to decide whether she will go back to being an EA, or continue operating her business full-time. “My leave is not up until September and I want to see where the business is by that time. But I’ve got a really good network of people. So if I decide to go back then I’ll have someone run the store for me from Monday to Friday, and then I’ll work it on the weekends.” Even though her business is still young, Rafuse is encouraged by what she’s accomplished to date. “It’s been almost a year and I’m still in business, so every month that I stay open I’m encouraged. Financially, if it didn’t work, I would still feel successful … but thank God it’s working!”

902-542-0641

Valerie Rafuse 416 Main Street, Wolfville


Black to Business BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

REPORT

Winter 2008

6 Message from the Board of Directors continued from page 1

Gordon Doe

2008 is a critical moment in BBI’s ongoing journey towards sustainability. Evaluating what we have done so far and implementing what remains to be done will be key. We will continue to place emphasis on our construction sector, raise and invest funds locally, and expand our client services. Construction Strategy We are seeing good signs of success with the BBI-sponsored Construction Management Company, ADEPA. To date, we have had a number of community meetings to present how ADEPA’s partnership with local Black construction businesses will operate, and we have gotten good feedback from participants. Also, we have done a number of actual projects and are quite pleased with the results. The next step is to focus on the training and certification aspect of the strategy. Black Business Community Investment Fund Our aim from the start (2003) was to build a sustainable fund that will support wealth creation in our community through business development. With over 85% of our current $350,000 portfolio invested, the fund is now playing an integral part in assisting Black businesses in Nova Scotia. This year, our objective is to push the fund over the half a million dollar mark. So we are counting on your support to raise at least $150,000 this season (ending February 28, 2008). The benefits from investing are just great: a 30% tax credit upon investment, increasing to a total of 60% over a 15-year holding period. Also, the funds are RRSP-eligible so you can use your RRSP dollars for investment and still receive the tax credit. Finally, over the long term you can expect dividends based on the performance of companies we invest in. Call Gordon Doe at 426-6985. Client Services BBI has partnered with the Greater Halifax Partnership (GHP), and the Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC) to open a satellite office in the Preston Business Mall, 1900 Highway #7, Suite 201. This office will provide local residents with easy access to information sessions, business counseling and advice, training workshops, project and organizational development, and an array of other services. The office main line is 435-3766, the fax number is 435-1077. Currently, a BBI representative is available in the office every Tuesday at 9 am. Finally, I want to congratulate Jessica Bowden for the successful launch of her Teens Now Talk (TNT) magazine at the Forum on December 7, 2007. Visit TNT’s website: www.teensnowtalk.com. Pauline Patten of Pauline’s Beauty Care was nominated as one of the “dove girls” for the Dove soap advertisements. Pauline will be telling her story in the upcoming episode.

So I go back to the question, Are we there yet? Has BBI reached the pinnacle? While we have not reached the pinnacle, we continue to climb and we continue to make great strides in our quest towards our vision. While the BBI vision is still relevant, the road map for getting there continues to change and, as a result, BBI continues to change its strategies and processes to ensure our ability to meet the goals. While we have not reached the pinnacle, we continue to climb and we continue to make great strides in our quest towards our vision. The success of BBI’s changing strategy can be seen by its transition over the years from approving a number of small loans to currently approving a lesser number of loans but for a higher dollar amount. BBI continues to manage a successful CEDIF

fund, and we have implemented our sustainability strategy. All of this has been made possible as a result of our focus on our strategic plan, our improved client assessments, improved intake procedure and ongoing client support program, to name but a few. Overall, the one thing I know for sure is that change is inevitable. BBI, through its sustainability strategy, is well-positioned to not only meet this change but also to thrive in the face of change. While BBI is not “there” yet, we continue to have “there” in our sights as we continue the climb towards ensuring a dominant position for BBI and its client base in the Nova Scotian business community. I leave you with a reminder to mark your calendars for the upcoming 2008 BBI Business Summit in June. Judging by past experiences, it will be an event not to be missed. We look forward to seeing you there.

Cassandra Dorrington, Chair

BBI Stats The BBI has been involved with approximately 1414 clients over the past ten years • Loans

208

• Approved Equity Loans

11

• Approved Development Funds

53

• Withdrawals

34


Black to Business

7

Charla Williams

who are addressing their mis-education, and want to fill in those gaps to prepare for their futures. Williams says that over the years she has developed a lot of training human resource related programs and what she realized was that diversity awareness was not effective because people were already aware that diversity was an issue. She says then what she saw with sensitivity training was that people became sensitive to their own concerns instead of the concerns of others. So she went in the direction of competence training, which requires people to take a close look at themselves and their biases.

Peter Marsman

Diversity Practitioner

C

harla Williams is the fourth of seven children born in New Glasgow to Murray and Aleta Williams “I consider myself a diversity practitioner. I spent over 17 years employed in the diversity field working for the municipal government. I started out with the City of Halifax as an employment equity consultant in the late ‘80s. After that they added multiculturalism and equity to the title and then it became diversity. It was the same job, working with

Winter 2008

different departments who were trying to increase their representation from the employment equity community.” Today, Charla Williams can be found part time at the Nova Scotia Community College (Akerley Campus), where she works with the African Canadian Transition Program. She is also an advisor with Dalhousie University’s Transition Year Program. She says her work is with members of the African Canadian Community

“People were not thinking of us, not because they were trying to keep us out, but because we just didn’t enter their realm of thinking. Huge benefits are gained by diversity in the workplace, but you have to create a place where people are able to function at their best.” Charla Williams attributes her love and understanding of the importance of diversity to being born into a large family. “We are all like snowflakes, no two are alike, and we have come to love and appreciate each others differences.”

Sharon Davis Murdoch contributed

Diversity and Social Inclusion Health Policy Advisor

S

haron Davis Murdoch was born in London, England, and grew up in Bermuda. She came to Nova Scotia to attend university in the late 1970s.

She attended Mount Allison in 197879 and continued on to Dalhousie University, where she achieved her masters in political science in 1986. “I was the first Bermuda Premier of the Bermuda youth parliament, so it was natural for me to pursue a degree

in social and political science. It incorporates all aspects of policy, social justice and I particularly like political philosophy.” Davis-Murdoch is currently holding a position that is the first of its kind in Canada. She is the Diversity and Social Inclusion Health Policy Advisor with the Nova Scotia Department of Health. “I am really excited about this opportunity to take a lead role in establishing, fostering and promoting social inclusion in health.


Black to Business

8

Winter 2008

Juanita Peters

Sylvia Parris

Multicultural Education Consultant Peter Marsman

for the Nova Scotia Board of Education. “It’s work around supporting the development and implementation of policy, and working with people on equity work,” she says. She says within her role, she is researching and recommending resources for teachers in the system.

S

ylvia Paris was born in Mulgrave, Guysborough County. She is one of 15 children born to Viola and Joseph Parris.

Parris did her undergraduate studies at St. Francis Xavier and went on to do her masters in education at St. Mary’s University.

It is challenging but terribly exciting. I developed it because I wanted to influence the primary health care renewal process. I wanted to influence the system to include the needs and voices of diverse people in primary health care renewal.” The work is based on cultural clinical competence, which means the health system takes into consideration the historical and lived realities of the people it serves. This can mean anything from how a patient is assessed, for example African

Today, she continues her education as she studies at Mount St. Vincent University where she is currently doing a Masters in Education with an Afrocentric Focus. She wants to do a doctoral study on African Nova Scotia Women in the position of implementing policy. Her job in the community is that of Multicultural Education Consultant

Canadians are more widely affected by certain types of diseases like sickle cell anemia to the fact that in longterm care homes African Canadians would use different hair products than other patients. Sharon Davis Murdoch says the government deserves credit for supporting this program. She received the Premiers Award of Excellence for her work in June 2007.

“When I am working with teachers and colleagues I feel so blessed. There is so much potential and so many possibilities. I want to continue to work with people who are prospective teachers. My passion is about making educational spaces, places that everyone can enjoy and trying to figure out ways to get people the skills they need so they can move forward.” Parris says she is most happy when she is having energizing conversations with people about how we can impact the world. She continues to do her work, not only with the board of education but also with her work in the Catholic Womens’ League and The Community Justice Society.


Black to Business

Rainmen

bring pro hoops back to Halifax

P

Winter 2008

9

Chad Lucas Photography: Paul Adams

rofessional basketball is back in Halifax, thanks to a Black entrepreneur from Detroit who found his way to Nova Scotia.

“They both said, ‘If you’re serious about bringing a team to Canada, you should really go down to Halifax,” Levingston said.

Businessman Andre Levingston is the majority owner of the Halifax Rainmen, the city’s first pro hoops team since the Windjammers folded in the mid-1990s.

He visited the city and met with Mayor Peter Kelly, and before long he was sold.

Levingston was born in Arkansas and raised in Detroit but moved to Canada to pursue business opportunities. In Toronto he started a limousine company, a telecommunications business, a jazz-themed restaurant, and a highend custom car detailing outfit with NBA player Morris Peterson, then of the Toronto Raptors. But basketball has always been a first love for Levingston, who grew up playing on the playgrounds in Detroit and suited up for the NCAA Division II Chico State Wildcats in university. He was originally part of a group looking to bring an American Basketball Association team to Mississauga, but when that fell through, two of his business partners – Dartmouth native Jad Crnogorac, who played for the Saint Mary’s Huskies, and lawyer Paul Riley, who played at Dalhousie – suggested he look to Halifax.

Andre Levingston (seated) majority owner of the Halifax Rainmen

“I met some beautiful people here and it’s just a nice place to be,” he said. “We’re in the best place for this.” Halifax has quickly established itself as one of the most solid franchises in the ABA, a league known for its high scores and quirky rules – and, on a less positive note, teams that tend to collapse not long after they start. But Levingston has shown his commitment to making the Rainmen work in Halifax. “Like any other business, it takes time to build it,” he said. The Rainmen boast two Nova Scotians on their roster: former St. Francis Xavier All-Canadian Dennie Oliver, of Halifax, and Dartmouth’s Derico Wigginton-Downey, who made the jump to the ABA straight out of Prince Andrew High School. Newfoundland native Peter Benoite, a former AllCanadian with the Memorial

University Sea-Hawks, is the team’s captain. Other key players include point guard Jermaine Anderson, who plays on the Canadian senior national team, and forward Eric Crookshank, the team’s leading scorer and rebounder. The Rainmen made their debut at Halifax Metro Centre on November 15, drawing more than 4,300 fans for a 136-103 victory over the Boston Blizzard. The team has had some growing pains on and off the court, facing a seven-game losing streak early in the season and shrinking crowds once the initial novelty wore off. But the wins have started to come and attendance is on the rise again. “The momentum is shifting now, we’re getting a bigger crowd,” said Levingston. “Once people come in and get the experience, they definitely come back. All we need them to do is tell one person and we’ll double our crowd. We’re on the right path. People are excited, the product is good, the entertainment is good. We’re just going to build every day.” The team’s season continues until mid-March, with home games at the Metro Centre.


Black to Business REGIONAL REPORT Southern Greg Nazaire

The Black Business Initiative managed to establish itself as a well-known respected institution not only in the Black community but also in the whole province and word about its success travelled throughout the country. This is why I consider it a privilege to be part of the team. Having started as the new Regional Business Development Manager for the Southern Region at the end of October, I continued to familiarize myself with procedures, the region and my client portfolio. I consider the transition to be smooth mainly due to the guidance received from my colleagues. In mid November, I travelled to the Southern Region which has some breathtaking scenery and a tremendous potential to develop some sustainable industries, such as tourism and hospitality. I had the opportunity to meet with representatives of several partner agencies (such as the African Nova-Scotians Valley Development and Community Business Development Corporation in Digby) which work with us through a synergistic relationship. This will make every trip there a very pleasant experience. Having said that, we should not ignore the numerous challenges we have ahead. I would like to congratulate Glynis Simms for successfully opening a new day-care facility that serves the Kingston community. With her diverse team, I am confident that she has the potential to succeed. If you need a professional daycare, in the Kingston Area, she can be contacted at (902) 847-4454. You can contact me at (902) 4261625 if you need more information about our mission in the Southern region or to schedule a meeting with me.

10 Message from the Chief Executive Officer continued from page 2

time and expertise to contribute to the Black Community, a professional dedicated staff, our community and private sector partners. Everyone who participated in this initiative is responsible for its successes. Hard work is a necessity, strategic planning is important, mixed in with some success and, of course, you need confidence. Delivering on the economic promise meant we had to treat economic development like a business proposition. It meant we had to study and network and socialize what we were designing to be sure it was robust and could withstand economic shifts. It meant that we were compelled to look at means to diversify our revenue streams and create multiple lines of income, just to retain and grow our assets. During the past year with the help of Starr Francis and Shawn Smith, former staff members and two bright young people, we have gotten closer to our vision. However, we are not there yet. We cannot stop now when what we want to become is now within the grasp of our outstretched and weary hands. We will not stop when we are getting the results we knew were there if we were transparent, strategic and clear. We cannot stop now because the implementation has begun and we are seeing good results. We cannot stop because……… The woods are lovely, dark, and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep. …….. Robert Frost

S.I. Rustum Southwell, CEO

Winter 2008

REGIONAL REPORT Central Evan Williams I would like to commend Donna Gaskin and Jeanie Jones of Juice Eh! on another successful year. Juice Eh! is now offering franchises. The company is the first BBI client to offer this opportunity. To find out visit their webpage www.juiceeh.com , call 444-4200 or visit their Halifax Shopping Centre location. It has been a busy few months for the community development fund. First, I want to congratulate the Cumberland African Nova Scotian Association (CANSA) of Amherst on a successful community development fund application. CANSA has recruited several new board members that will go through board training. Second, I want to congratulate the Valley African Nova Scotian Development Association (VANSDA) of Kentville on a successful community development application. VANSDA has undertaken a tourism project called the Mathieu DaCosta Trail. The project will focus on promoting Black historic sites in the Valley. Finally, congratulations go out to the Ward One Social & Recreation Centre board of directors of New Glasgow on a successful community development fund application. The board has designed a community after school program for the youth of New Glasgow. My focus for the next two quarters will be identifying existing companies that are ready for expansion in the Central region and in HRM. In addition, the months leading to the 2008 Black Business Summit will be busy preparing for the events. For those of you thinking of finally starting or expanding your business this summer, you should be talking to us now. For more information or to book a regional visit please contact me @ (902) 426-6692 or 1-800-668-1010 or by email @ williams.evan@bbi.ns.ca.


Black to Business

Winter 2008

11

The Award Winning

Contributed

Chelsea Nisbett

I

t’s just a few months since the 2007 African Nova Scotian Music Awards, and singer/songwriter Chelsea Nisbett is still excited at receiving the Up and Coming Youth Award. “I was just walking on cloud nine,” says Nisbett. “That was my very first award ever and it was a real encouragement that ‘yes, I can do this; I’m on the right track’.” Nisbett’s album New Beginnings has since been nominated for two East Coast Music Awards in the Gospel Recording of the Year and African Canadian recording of the year categories. At first listen, the 21-year-old artist’s blend of acoustic rock, jazz, soul and

Shauntay Grant R&B might not read as “gospel music” to some. Still, Nisbett says she would definitely consider herself to be a gospel artist.

“Gospel is basically music that expresses a relationship with God,” she says. “There are different styles of gospel. There’s gospel songs based on a piece of scripture, or talking to God about a hard time that you’re going through, or praising God for something that happened. So (gospel music is about) having a relationship with God, specifically through Jesus Christ.” Drawing on a range of musical genres has allowed Nisbett to bring the gospel to unique events and audiences. “I’ve actually heard a lot of people say that my music is crossover music,” says Nisbett. “My next performance I’m doing the same songs I would do at a church, but I’m doing it at The Garrison Brewery. I’m playing in churches, and I’m playing in bars for charity events. The music that I do doesn’t limit me. I’m able to

be who I am wherever, which is pretty nice.” Apart from performing, Nisbett is also booking her own shows and managing her own career. “It’s a lot of work – a lot of paperwork and a lot of phone calls. But at the same time I’m really happy that I’m getting this experience, ’cause when I do get a manager I’ll know how things are supposed to go. I feel like I’ll be more prepared to make smart decisions.” Nisbett is also an undergraduate student at Dalhousie University, majoring in French. “The music industry is kind of unpredictable so I’m trying to be smart about this. I’m pursuing a music career, but I want something to fall back on.”

“I’m gonna be applying to Mount Saint Vincent University to study to be a high school teacher,” says Nisbett. “The music industry is kind of unpredictable so I’m trying to be smart about this. I’m pursuing a music career, but I want something to fall back on.” Even still, Nisbett says she’s in the music game for the long haul. “Even if I end up being a teacher, I’m still going to continue to do music because that’s what I love. That’s what I’m passionate about.”


Black to Business Business is Jammin’

ANSMA’s 10th Anniversary & Awards Show

Report

Bernard Elwin Following the successful completion of the Summer Youth Program, the Business is Jammin’ Society is now feverishly preparing for a number of important programs and activities scheduled for 2008. We have scheduled a Business Camp for March Break. This camp will be run for one week and will target youth between 10 and 15 years old. Other programs such as our ‘Role Models on the Road’ and ‘Lunch and Learn Camps’ will continue to be held on a regular basis throughout the year. A major component of our activity for this year will be the ‘Black Business Youth Summit’. Here, youth take part in interactive workshops that will help them discover their entrepreneurial potential. They also see presentations from dynamic speakers from the Black Business Community during the two day conference. At a recent brainstorming session held by the BBI Board a number of key areas of activity were identified. The Board requested specific attention be given to Fundraising, Promotional Material Development and Dissemination, Website Development, Targeted Training and Corporate Strategy. It is hoped that new areas and programs will be developed and targeted to specific age groups. Further, existing programs will be strengthened. The importance of the development of an after school program was highlighted. The BIJ attended the Junior Achievement Titan Competition held at the World Trade and Convention Centre. Youth Coordinator, Shantia Upshaw along with four (4) young people from our Summer Youth Program attended. The competition is an interactive computer simulation set in the year 2030 that creates a world in which students from across Nova Scotia become CEOs of their own companies. We also participated in the B2B Exhibition and the Wade Job Fair held at the Black Cultural Centre.

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www.ansma.com

Photography: Paul Adams

Up and Coming Youth Award: Galaxie Rising Star Award: Artist/Group Of The Year: BBI Industry Development Award: Music Pioneer Award: Lifetime Achievement Awards: Music Heritage Award:

Chelsea Nisbett Jordan Croucher Trobiz Shauntay Grant MCJ and Cool G Charles Bucky Adams Four The Moment Murleta Williams

l-r: Lou Gannon, Pres., Jason Jackson, VP

Shauntay Grant, receives BBI Industry Award

Murleta Williams and her family

Four the Moment in a rare performance

Bucky Adams Lifetime Achievement Recipient

Jordon Croucher accepts his award

Nevaeh perform at the ANSMA Show

Gary Beals closed the show

In addition, we are currently developing a new Fundraiser/Corporate Flyer to assist in our fundraising efforts. To complement these efforts and provide a platform upon which the Society can project itself, we are hoping to improve our existing Website in conjunction with the development of the BBI’s new website.


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June 18-20, 2008 Casino Nova Scotia

Winter 2008

Ephren Taylor Mogul, Activist, Wealth Engineer

Halifax Nova Scotia

T

his year the Black Business Initiative will once again host its highly successful Black Business Summit.

As in previous years, the packed weekend will include informative workshops and presentations given by local and international industry leaders. The summit will also include the popular social networking events - golf tournament and harbour boat cruise.

Mark your calendars now! The dates are June 18, 19 and 20, 2008. To give you a sample of what to expect this year - one of the keynote speakers is 23-year-old millionaire CEO Ephren Taylor. You will find more information about him below. Additional information about the summit can be found on the BBI website in weeks to come.

We hope you can join us!

Ephren W. Taylor II is the youngest African-American CEO of any publicly traded company ever City Capital Corporation (OTCBB:CCCN). Described as “walking history” by popular radio show host Tom Joyner, Taylor started his first business venture at age 12, when he began making video games. By age 17, he built a multi-million dollar technology company; GoFerretGo.com. In 2007, at City Capital Corporation, Taylor started the Goshen Energy initiative; which focuses on producing alternative energy specializing in biofuels. Taylor’s commitment to green energy is part of his concept of empowering local communities with both profitable and socially-conscious investing and development. Through his action on green energy and philanthropy, Taylor is leading a new wave of CEO’s focusing on corporate social responsibility. Taylor’s diverse business portfolio is quickly transforming him into a household name. He appears weekly on FOX News and has been featured on network shows such as ABC’s 20/20. He also has regular appearances in print and radio media including PBS, Black


Black to Business

Enterprise, and the Miami Herald. Beyond his unprecedented accomplishments at an early age in business, Taylor is an author, inspirational speaker, and real estate mastermind. His first book, “Creating Success from the Inside Out”, is published by the world’s number one business publisher, Wiley, and it recently ranked as the #1 bestseller at CEO Read. The book serves as an expose of the mindset of today’s multi-millionaires while defining success as not only attaining wealth, but how to utilize it. In celebration of their 170th anniversary, Taylor completed a specialized curriculum for high school-aged aspiring entrepreneurs at Cheyney University, America’s oldest historically black college and university. After providing a donation to get the program started, The Ephren Taylor Entrepreneur Academy opened in July 2007. What Warren Buffet is for baby boomers, Taylor is for today’s generation X and Y a rapidly emerging premier financial expert; a true “wealth engineer”.

for more information visit our website www.bbi.ns.ca

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Christopher Gardner

Inspiration for the Film, The Pursuit of Happyness Christopher Gardner is the CEO of Gardner Rich LLC, an institutional brokerage firm specializing in the execution of debt, equity and derivative products transactions. Prior to launching the firm in 1987, Mr. Gardner worked for Dean Witter Reynolds and Bear Stearns & Co. A self-made success story, Gardner gives back to the communities where he conducts business because he has never forgotten his humble beginnings or the odds he has surmounted. Christopher Gardner not only overcame a lack of college and business school degrees, but most astonishing, homelessness. Always hard working and tenacious, in the early 1980’s Gardner became homeless in San Francisco and the sole guardian of his toddler son. Unwilling to give up Chris Jr. or his dream of financial independence, Gardner started at the very bottom of the financial industry ladder and pulled his way up. The Pursuit of Happyness, Chris Gardner’s autobiography, was published in May 2006 (Amistad/Harper Collins). The Pursuit of Happyness was also made into a critically-acclaimed film starring Will Smith, which was released in December 2006. Chris Gardner’s remarkable story of struggle, faith, entrepreneurialism, and fatherly devotion and his inspiring message on how to break the cycles that hold you back, has catapulted him beyond the notoriety he has found on Wall Street. Gardner has been featured on the Evening News with Dan Rather, 20/20, The View, CNN, and CNBC as well as being the subject of profiles in USA Today, The Associated Press, Fortune, Jet and numerous other local and national newspapers and magazines.

www.chrisgardnermedia.com


Black to Business

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Chad Lucas Photography by: Paul Adams

ADEPA helps Black firms get a foot in the door Drive around metro Halifax and it’s obvious that Nova Scotia is enjoying a construction boom. From the huge shopping complex taking shape at Dartmouth Crossing to the apartments constantly springing up in Clayton Park West, there’s no shortage of work for contractors and construction firms.

Blacks in the province and the industry itself is in a growth phase, few Blackowned firms are reaping the full benefits.

Glen Carvery, head of Carvery’s Construction

“It’s unbelievable,” says Glen Carvery, head of Carvery’s Construction. “We’re probably going to double our sales this year. The work is so plentiful out there.” But Carvery’s established company seems to be an exception to what the Black Business Initiative (BBI) finds is a troubling rule: while construction is a major employer for

“We feel that the Black companies are not getting the recognition they deserve,” says Gordon Doe, the BBI’s director of business development. “We want to assure that the Black presence in the construction sector is visible and Black contractors are receiving their fair share in this booming business.”

With that in mind, the BBI is taking a handson approach to the industry with its new initiative. It’s called ADEPA, which is a Ghanaian word meaning “work of such a quality that it is selfdistinguishing”. It is a certified project-management company that bids on large-scale projects and sub-contracts work to qualified Black firms. Headed by Gordon Tynes, a former BBI chairperson and professional engineer who has 30 years experience


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in the industry, ADEPA is designed to help more Black companies get a foot in the door of the industry.

Gordon Tynes, ADEPA Management

“We’re probably going to double our sales this year. The work is so plentiful out there.”

– Glen Carvery

“Bigger companies already have a list of sub-contractors established, and it’s very hard to break into that market,” says Tynes. “There are a number of Black contractors that want to bid as sub-contractors and don’t have the necessary certification or working capital. ADEPA would work at assisting them at being able to participate on those jobs.” One big issue for smaller construction firms is bonding. Companies must be bonded to work on larger projects, but meeting those requirements takes either a lot of capital or a high-profile résumé. So, many find themselves in a Catch-22. “To get bonding, you either have to have one big bank account or you have to have work history,” says Gordon Tynes. “If you’re a new company you probably don’t have work history or a huge bank account, so how do you do it?” With ADEPA’s help, Clark Wilkins has been able to take on more and bigger projects than ever. Wilkins founded C.A. Wilkins Construction in 1990 as an extension of his electrical business. He began by buying residential homes, renovating them and selling them for a profit. Partnering with ADEPA over the past year, Wilkins’ firm took on a $500,000 residential project in Colby Village and a $1.5-million apartment project in Lower Sackville.

“There are a number of Black contractors that want to bid as subcontractors and don’t have the necessary certification or working capital. – Gordon Tynes

“The foundation of deposit money (from ADEPA) has been huge,” says Wilkins. “There are a lot of great people, Black and White, with good ideas, but you need that foundation to get started. To have the financing behind you and the knowledge of

Gordon Tynes, it’s a big help.” Garnet Wright is using ADEPA’s project management to oversee the construction of a new showroom for his Stone Gallery, a company that installs everything from patios and veneers on houses to interior stonework. He’s moving the business from Bayers Lake to the Herring Cove Road, near where he grew up. “I’m really excited,” Wright says. “I feel like I’m coming home.”

Wright has seen Stone Gallery become a million-dollar business since he founded it in 2002. He says he sees ADEPA as a good step for helping others in the construction sector to grow. To this point, ADEPA has worked mostly with established firms to build a solid reputation in the industry. “It helps to have that credibility in the tendering process,” Wright says. “It should help us to break into some of the larger contracts with some of the smaller businesses.” But the new initiative isn’t a quickfix or a shortcut, cautions Carvery – companies still have to pay their dues the way he did. Started 21 years ago as a painting company, Carvery’s has grown into a broader firm that has taken on big projects from washroom and kitchen continued on next page>


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the right steps, ADEPA can help them grow. “It’s a shot in the arm for Black contractors to have ADEPA on their side,” he says. “There are opportunities out there for the little guys and the big guys. It’s a win-win situation.”

Featured Companies ADEPA Management Gordon Tynes, 468-8686 C.A. Wilkins Inc. Clark Wilkins, 209-5511

Garnet Wright, Stone Gallery upgrades at Windsor Park to a $1-million retrofit job at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography. “When I started business, we were just a small crew. We went from three people to 10, then 10 to 15, and it’s just grown from there,” says Carvery, who employs about 30 people through the winter and 38 in peak season. “You’re going to have your struggles as a Black contractor. You’ve got to be strongwilled, overlook a lot of obstacles and just go straight ahead.” Whether you’re Black or White, success in construction requires building a reputation and taking the necessary steps to become qualified, Carvery says. He worries that one reason some Black companies haven’t succeeded is because they haven’t followed the process that the industry requires, such as certification. “I find in our communities that if it’s not easy, with some they don’t want to bother with it,” he says. “It’s not an easy process of taking one course and getting certified. It’s a process of three or four

years, and some don’t seem to make the effort to go out and do that. We’re not going to get it handed to us. We have to work at it.” Doe says he’s seen some of the same issues in the Black construction sector. “It’s a known fact that Black construction companies are skilled, but because of the way they operate … (some) haven’t found the need to be certified,” he says. “They haven’t taken advantage of what getting the right qualification would provide them.” But Wilkins says that if companies are willing to work hard and follow

Stone Gallery Garnet Wright, 209-3777 Carvery’s Construction Glen Carvery, 463-2513

Clark Wilkins, C.A. Wilkins Inc.


Black to Business

BBI’s Directory Launch & Christmas Social

year and 2007 Nova Scotia Music Award Inspirational Artist of the Year winner Chelsea Nisbett. Ms Nisbett’s amazing music made the evening fly by. Have a look at her webpage (www.chelseanisbett.com) to hear samples of her music and to purchase albums.

Dave Borque, RBC

O

n December 6, 2007, at the Waterfront Warehouse in Halifax, more than 200 members of the Nova Scotia Black community and guests representing the business sector and supporting agencies met to receive the 2008 BBI Business Directory and to kick off and celebrate the Christmas season. The event was a complete success. The master of ceremonies was BBI Chief Executive Officer Rustum Southwell. BBI Chair Cassandra Dorrington brought greetings on behalf of the Board of Directors and staff. Greetings were brought on behalf of BBI-funding agencies by Brian Watson of the Nova Scotia Department of Economic Development and Paul Joudrey of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA). The evening also spotlighted the 2007 African Nova Scotia Music Award Up & Coming Artist of the

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BBI Chairperson, Cassandra Dorrington took this opportunity during the traditional season of giving to highlight two important initiatives. The first one is the Black Business Community Investment Fund (BBCIF) and the second is the Business is Jammin’ (BIJ) Youth Charitable Society. She said both programs are important to BBI’s future and will require support and participation from everyone. The investment “Fund’ (BBCIF) invests in stable Black owned companies and is campaigning to raise its total assets to half a million dollars from the current level of $350,000. Just as important is the BIJ Charity which requires resources to continue in entrepreneurial, development and education among our aspiring youth. The Directory Launch and Christmas Social is always a great opportunity to network and meet new people and also to reacquaint with old friends. If you are interested in having a copy of the 2008 Black Business Directory call 426-2224 or 1-800-668-1010.

Evan Williams Photography: Paul Adams

Cassandra Dorrington, BBI Chair

Networking at the directory launch

Rustum Southwell, BBI CEO

Chelsea Nisbett

Mahoganey Marcial, Event Specialists


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Nominate Someone

Bonnie Bobryk

Recognizing Real Results The Black Business Initiative Society’s Entrepreneur of the Year Award is awarded

annually by the Board of Directors of the Black Business Initiative to recognize demonstrated business excellence of a small company or individual within the Nova Scotia Black Business community.

Who is eligible?

Paul Adams

Any established SMALL business (minimum 3 years in business) in Nova Scotia with at least 30% Black ownership that has demonstrated a strong business acumen and support for the community. The award may also be made to an individual business owner. Small business is defined as a business that has less than a million dollars in sales annually.

The Black Business Initiative Society’s Hector Jacques Award of Business Excellence is awarded annually by the Board of Directors of the Black Business Initiative to recognize demonstrated business excellence of a company or individual within the Nova Scotia Black Business Community.

Who is eligible?

Any established business (minimum 3 years in business) in Nova Scotia with at least 30% Black ownership that has demonstrated a strong business acumen and support for the community. The award may also be made to an individual business owner. The Black Business Initiative’s goal is to foster a dynamic and vibrant Black presence within the Nova Scotia Business Community. The Hector Jacques and the Entrepreneur of the Year Awards of Business Excellence serve to strengthen this goal by recognizing the best in our Business community.

Get your nominations in today! Nomination forms were mailed out in 2007 but you can obtain a copy by calling 426-2224. Nominations have to be received by the BBI on or before March 31, 2008 to be considered. Mail to: Director, Client Development, 2101 Gottingen Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3K 3B2. Winners will be announced at the 2008 Gala to be held at Casino Nova Scotia on 20th June 2008.

Winter 2008

REGIONAL REPORT Cape Breton Bernard Elwin The last quarter saw a reduction in the size of the area under my direct supervision. As a result of additional duties within the BBI, the areas of New Glasgow, Guysborough, Truro and other northern mainland areas were assigned to another Regional Business Development Manager, Mr. Evan Williams. The Cape Breton area remains under my supervision. I also continue with the supervision of a number of clients in the Metro area. Over the last several months there has been a general reduction in new client activity in my assigned area. Notwithstanding my regular visits, there appears to be a general slowdown in interest from the region. I continue to make regular visits to our partners in the region including the Office of African Nova Scotian Affairs-Sydney and the African Nova Scotian Employment Partnership office. Additional efforts will need to be made to attract potential clients from the area. One way is through workshops and courses. With the assistance of our Training Department we expect to have a number of courses and workshops held in the Northern Region. The clients assisted by the BBI all continue to operate. One has moved his operations to Halifax from Sydney. Among my clients in the Metro Region three (3) have been having some difficulty in meeting their projections. We continue working with these clients with the hope that there is improvement in their overall project performance. In keeping with our objective of assisting our communities while working with our partners, we have assisted (through sponsorship) the Office of African Nova Scotian Affairs – Sydney with their African Heritage Month Celebration Gala. If you have identified relevant courses and workshops that could be held in your region please let us know. We would be happy to run these courses in your area providing there is ample demand. For more information or to arrange a regional visit please contact me at 902 426-8688 or 1-800-668-1010 or by email: elwin.bernard@bbi.ns.ca


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Winter 2008

Making the Shot with

Shotloc

Chad Lucas

contributed

Ffrench got the message. He formed a partnership with Mansfield, a basketball coach and entrepreneur The ShotLoc is a small device who coached Ffrench’s son Ellis on the Nova Scotia provincial team, in that slides onto a player’s shooting hand and keeps their 2006. The pair also teamed up with Benny Fong, a Halifax marketing fingers spread, helping them maintain the correct form and and design expert, and Tony Staffiere, a coach at Mercy College in New follow-through for shooting. The idea first came to Ffrench York, which led to inroads with other in 1997 while he was with his American universities. Robert Ffrench and Paul Mansfield, daughter at a basketball camp. of Hoops Innovation “Kansas State ordered 1,000 units, and we didn’t have 1,000 to give When he returned home to the aul Mansfield says evthem yet,” says Mansfield. “It forced Annapolis Valley, he worked with eryone has the same us into overtime to get this up and a professor at Acadia University reaction when they pick started.” to come up with a prototype made up the ShotLoc, a product out of foam. He went through designed to help basketball Since then, orders have come in several designs and even sent out players with their shooting from schools across the U.S., as test models to friends in the U.S. skills. “Everybody that comes well as teams in Europe and Africa. and Canada, but when he took an in contact with the device has A former college player gave assistant coaching position with the the same story,” says Mansone to Mike Miller of the NBA’s Acadia men’s team his pet project field. “They say, ‘It can’t be Memphis Grizzlies, and Miller was was put on hold. that simple and this can’t posso impressed he asked for 20 units sibly work.’ But then they try it and agreed to be a spokesman for the “The finished product was pretty and boom, they’re sold on it.” ShotLoc. much done by the year 2000, but I packed it up on a shelf in the Of course, that was Mansfield’s “As we keep opening more doors and basement,” Ffrench says. “I was reaction too when Robert Ffrench getting it out there to more groups, coaching university basketball and showed him a prototype he’d didn’t have time to mess around with more and more people want to get dreamed up almost a decade a pseudo-home business at the time.” involved with the company,” says earlier to help his daughter Mansfield. “People really believe in Whitney become a better shooter. the future of this project.” But Robert’s daughter, Whitney, But after giving one to his niece Ffrench and Mansfield see big things kept her model, and when she was and watching her form improve for Hoops Innovation this year, as a junior playing with the NCAA dramatically in just an hour, “I was they look to set up staff and an office Division I St. Joseph’s Hawks in converted,” Mansfield says. in their push to go global. Philadelphia, Hawks men’s coach Phil Martelli watched her using it That was the beginning of Hoops “So far it’s been four guys who all work during a practice and approached Innovation, a company Mansfield full-time jobs and coach basketball as Robert in the stands. French recalls and Ffrench started to market the well,” Mansfield says. “We’re at this his exact words: “I don’t know you ShotLoc across North America and road now where we’re going to take the very well, Mr. Ffrench, but if you around the world. “It was a passion next step. It’s going to be really exciting. don’t bring this to market, you are a for business as well as a passion We’re ready to roll out in 2008.” damn fool.”

P

for basketball that led to the partnership,” says Mansfield.


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Winter 2008

People & Businesses on the Move

Neville (Puddie) Provo is the latest star of the Halifax Rainmen. He’s taking to the court during their games to show off his dancing prowess and his snazzy wardrobe... to the crowd’s delight. Congratulations to Barbara Miller Manning and Jessica Bowden for making Atlantic Business’ ‘20 to Watch’ list published in the January-February 2008 edition of the magazine. There was an East Coast connection to the memorial service for legendary performer Oscar Peterson in Toronto on January 12. Fredericton’s Measha Bruggergosman was a member of a stellar cast, including Quincy Jones and the Right Hon. Michaelle Jean, honouring the jazz great at a memorial service that was broadcast nation-wide on CBC. On January 18, 1958, Fredericton’s Willie O’Ree stepped onto the ice as a team member of the Boston Bruins for a game against the Montreal Canadians. The Fredericton native was the first Black player in the NHL. The 50th anniversary of this game is being marked in a number of places including a profile on the CBC’s Maritime Magazine, with the Northside Arena in Fredericton being renamed “Willie O’Ree Place”, and at a special luncheon at the Peachtree Marriott in Atlanta Georgia. The ‘Diversity Luncheon”, on January 25, 2008, is part of the NHL’s 2008 All-Star Weekend. At the luncheon, highlights of George and Darril Fosty’s documentary, Black Ice: The Lost History of the Colored

Hockey League will be screened. O’Ree is also the guest of honour at a special reception during the festivities. The film Black Ice: The Lost History of the Colored Hockey League chronicles the 190 year history of blacks in hockey in North America, including the story of runaway American slaves using the Underground Railroad to escape to Halifax, covering the formation of the Colored Hockey League, and capturing the contributions African-Americans and Canadians have made to hockey. Shortly before Christmas, Harold and Hazel Brooks moved into their new home on Lower Partridge River Road. The Brooks’ lost their home and belongings to a fire in 2005. Thanks to the organizing efforts of their neighbour, Nelson Grosse, and a dedicated team of volunteers from the community, a new home was built for the senior couple. Enterprising Women of Faith Association held a Black Beauty and Business Micro Expo on November 17, 2007 at the North Preston Community Center. This group held its official fundraising launch at the Black Cultural Centre for Nova Scotia on June 9, 2007. The group’s vision is to “embolden our community and to become more enterprising, encouraging spiritual, physical, emotional, intellectual and financial empowerment”. Congratulations to Rev. Donald Fairfax and Walter Borden, who received honourary Doctorate of Civil Law degrees during Saint Mary’s University’s fall convocation on October 28.

The Greater Halifax Partnership, the Black Business Initiative, and the Nova Scotia Community College have joined together to open a satellite office in North Preston. The office, which is located in the Preston Business Mall was officially opened on November 8. Wayne Adams raised $2016 in this year’s Salvation Army Great Stocking Stuffer Scramble campaign. He was pitted against a number of local celebrities and business leaders in this on-line contest to raise money for the Salvation Army’s Christmas campaign. He came in seven out of ten, beating Gloria McCluskey, John Gracie, and Valerie Payn. The Portia White Gala Concert was held at Halifax’s Faith Tabernacle on December 8. A few days earlier, on December 5, Sylvia Hamilton’s documentary, “Portia White, Think on Me”, was screened at the Church on North Street. Chelsea Nisbett is making a name for herself on the Nova Scotian music scene. She received a Music Nova Scotia award for “Inspirational Artist/Recording of the Year” during the annual Nova Scotia Music Week festivities in Liverpool for her recording “New Beginnings”. She followed that up with winning the “Up and Coming Youth Award at the 10th African Nova Scotia Music Association Awards, a performance at the Black Business Initiative’s Directory Launch and a featured appearance on CTV’s “Breakfast Television” in January. Spesh K was one of the nominees for the Urban Artist/Recording Artist of the Year


Black to Business

at the same awards. Others in that category included Classified (winner), J-Bru, Markit, and Jordan Croucher. During the festivities, an all-ages show was held at the Liverpool High School, featuring the hip-hop super trio of Trobiz, Ghetto Socks, and Tacktishion. Dartmouth native Derice WiggingtonDowney (18) is the youngest member of the Halifax Rainmen, and one of two Nova Scotians playing with the team. Constable Tamu Bracken has been holding a law enforcement co-op program to improve relations between high school students and members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in a classroom at Dartmouth High. Participants in her class come from Dartmouth High, C.P. Allen, Halifax West, Millwood, Prince Andrew, and Sackville High Schools. One of the guest speakers in the class has been Cpl. Craig Smith, who spoke to the group in December on the topic of “Diversity in Policing”. Kwame Osei, a native of Ghana, led the Cape Breton Capers to its first appearance in the CIS men’s soccer championship in Vancouver. Despite Tropical Storm Noel, the African Nova Scotia Music Association Awards held a successful 10th anniversary celebration in Casino Nova Scotia’s Schooner Room on November 3. During the ceremony, lifetime achievement awards were presented to Bucky Adams and Four the Moment, who reunited for the awards show. Shauntay Grant won the BBI Industry Development Award and the CBC Galaxie Rising Star Award went to Jordan Croucher. Congratulations to everyone who was nominated and who won. George Borden premiered his threeact contemporary account of the first Christmas at the Cornwallis Street United Baptist Church at the evening service on December 23. During a session of public consultations by

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the Halifax Regional School Board entitled “Imagine Our Schools”, participants in the session at the Black Cultural Centre said that the HRM’s education system should add a fourth ‘R’ – Respect, to the traditional 3-Rs. One of those espousing the concept was Dr. Henry Bishop, who was one of the participants attending the forum discussing the future of metro’s African Nova Scotian students and the schools in which they learn.

Her Honour, Lieutenant Governor Mayann Francis hosted her annual New Year’s Levee at Province House, in the Red Room, on January 1st.

Readers of the Halifax “Daily News” are being invited to participate in the “Marry Me Halifax” contest, which has a grand prize of $20,000. The winning couple will win their wedding plans, as organized by Mahogany Marcial. She Lori Seale-Irving is now the RCMP’s highest will work with the couple from February 24 until their wedding day of May 17. commissioned Black officer. Inspector Seale-Irving has had a varied career with the force, including serving as a bodyguard Members of the community in Shelburne were invited to donate bulbs to the for former Prime Minister Jean Chretien, Black Loyalist Heritage Society in doing general duty in Burnaby, B.C., and October. As part of a ‘community serving in the force’s war crimes section. She is now in charge of the RCMP’s marine thank you’ project, students from the Shelburne campus of the Nova Scotia security operations centre in Ottawa. Community College would be spending a day at the Birchtown site, landscaping Make Way for YOUth, an exciting and planting bulbs for next spring. initiative that connects young people to business and employment opportunities in rural HRM and suburban communities hosted a festive Networking Event on December 20th at Cole Harbour Place. Asia was one of the featured performers on this year’s BT New Year’s Gala on ASN. She and Nu Gruv were also the headliners at the Casino on New Year’s Eve and at the African Heritage Month Celebration Gala held in Sydney’s Membertou Convention Centre in early February. The “Nova Scotia Come to Life” campaign featured the Black Business Initiative in a series of articles showcasing this province as a great place to live and work. The article, written by Michelle Lucas, highlighted the “Business is Jammin’” program and the support the BBI provides to Black entrepreneurs. Congratulations are in order for BBI Board Member Rose Davidson, a member of the Small Craft Pleasure Craft Licensing Servicing Team, on being awarded the Public Service Award of Excellence.

Jessica Bowden’s TNT magazine, the first magazine for Atlantic Canada’s teens, was launched in December. It follows the Teens Now Talk website Bowden set up in February 2007, which has successfully created a forum for teens to express themselves and receive information on topics which are of interest to their age bracket. Calling all MEN! April 18th and 19th is the time to “UNITE FOR THE FIGHT”. Join us at Emmanuel Baptist Church for the first ever Men’s Conference. Topics will include spiritual leadership, sexual purity, healthy living and much more. Register now! Cost is $45 (meals included). Visit www.ebchurch.ca or call (902) 835-2472.

In Memoriam The sympathies of the Black Business Initiative are extended to the family of Eugene Williams, who passed away on December 21, 2007. Mr Williams was a community leader, a leading social worker, a committed community organizer and volunteer... and the first Black member of Ashburn Golf Club.


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Black Business Initiative

2008 Training Schedule for Metro Courses:

Day

Date

Time

Marketing Your Business

Tuesday

Feb 5, 12, 19, 26

6-9pm

Website Design for Your Business

Tuesday

Mar 4, 11, 18, 25

6-9pm

Creating A Winning Business Plan

Tuesday

Apr 1, 8, 15, 22

6-9pm

Bookkeeping I

Tuesday

May 6, 13, 20, 27

6-9pm

Bookkeeping II

Tuesday

June 3, 10, 17, 24

6-9pm

Simply Accounting-Essentials of Computerised Bookkeeping

Tuesday

July 8, 15, 22, 29

6-9pm

Website Design for Your Business

Tuesday

Aug 5, 12, 19, 26

6-9pm

Microsoft Word I, II, III

Tuesday

Sept 9, 16, 23

6-9pm

Microsoft Excel I, II, III

Tuesday

Oct 7, 14, 21

6-9pm

Microsoft PowerPoint I, II

Tuesday

Nov 18, 25

6-9pm

Computer Basics I, II, III

Tuesday

Dec 2, 9, 16

6-9pm

Workshops:

Day

Date

Time

Canada’s Paper Money – Security Features & Detection Methods

Wednesday

Feb 13

6-9pm

Entrepreneurship 101

Wednesday

Feb 27

2-4pm

Understanding, Keeping and retaining Credit

Wednesday

Mar 12

6-9pm

Submitting to Revenue Canada

Wednesday

Mar 26

6-9pm

The Ins and Outs of Import/Export

Wednesday

Apr 16

6-9pm

Human Resource Management

Wednesday

Apr 30

6-9pm

The Art of Negotiations

Wednesday

May 14

6-9pm

Intellectual Property: Is your Business protected

Wednesday

May 28

6-9pm

Basic Communications

Wednesday

June 11

6-9pm

Entrepreneurship 101 (Sydney)

Wednesday

June 25

2-4pm

Entrepreneurship 101(Yarmouth)

Wednesday

July 16

2-4pm

Entrepreneurship 101 (Amherst)

Wednesday

July 30

2-4pm

Entrepreneurship 101(Guysborough)

Wednesday

Aug 13

2-4pm

Personal Financial Management

Wednesday

Aug 27

6-9pm

Website Marketing

Wednesday

Sept 10

6-9pm

Search Engine Marketing

Wednesday

Sept 24

6-9pm

Market Yourself: aspiring musicians, artists

Wednesday

Oct 15

6-9pm

Advanced Searching & Internet Tools

Wednesday

Oct 29

6-9pm

Personal Financial Management

Wednesday

Nov 12

6-9pm

Email & Instant Messaging

Wednesday

Nov 26

6-9pm

Franchising

Wednesday

Dec 03

6-9pm

Understanding Outlook

Wednesday

Dec 10

6-9pm

Course Fee: Clients - $20.00, Non Clients : $40.00 Workshop Fee: Clients and Non Clients : $5.00 Registration is open to everyone. To register for any session, please call 426-8683 Note: Course and Workshop delivery times are subject to change.

Training

Report Bernard Elwin

During the period April to December 2007, as a major component of its mandate, the Training Division continued the provision of entrepreneurial and business development training both to its clients and members of the community. These courses and workshops are delivered at the significantly reduced cost to participants of $5.00 for workshops and $20.00 for our modular courses. In addition to workshops and courses the division serves as the primary contact point for prospective clients hoping to access the BBI’s services. Over the nine-month period there were 31 intake sessions (group presentations outlining BBI’s services), 66 potential clients attended with 16 of these completing the application process. A total of sixteen (16) courses/workshops were held, of which seven (7) were held free of charge. Although the majority of these courses and workshops were held in Halifax, courses were also held in New Glasgow and Amherst. You will find a copy of our 2008 Training Schedule in this magazine covering a broad range of courses and workshops. Along with the usual listings we have included several courses centred on Computer Basics. These include Microsoft Excel, Word, Power Point and Outlook, plus Website/Search Engine Marketing. As we move forward more courses and workshops will be held in the regions, including Sydney, Yarmouth and Guysborough. Along with our partners the Nova Scotia Community College and the Greater Halifax Partnership, a satellite office has been established in Preston. Through this facility we expect to provide courses and workshops that would normally be held in Halifax, to clients and potential clients in the Dartmouth/Preston area. We will endeavour to provide training in any area of the province where the need for such training is identified and requested by the people in these communities. Should you need to discuss training in your region you may contact me at Tel: 902-426-8688 email: elwin.bernard@bbi.ns.ca


Black to Business

Winter 2008

24

Triple D’s Caters to the Community

Taryn Della

Paul Adams

Scotia without much to offer in the line of beauty and hair supplies,” she states. “I’m here to bring something that is affordable to our people, and provide a service from someone who understands their needs. As a Nadine Sparks, owner, Triple D’s Hair Black woman, I understand firsthand what those needs are.” s Nadine Sparks surveys

A

her shop to take note of what needs restocking, she’s adamant about the power of faith and staying focused on your dream. “A year ago, I never thought I would be where I am today, owning my own business,” she says. “Now I see this as someplace where I am ‘supposed’ to be.” Just over a year ago, with her own savings, Sparks opened Triple D’s Hair and Beauty Supplies. Nestled in Dartmouth’s north end next to the apartment complex known as Jelly Bean Square, this single mom admits the location was as deliberate as the business itself. “Growing up there, I saw little to encourage me to think big,” she says. “That’s why I wanted my business to be around there, to bring something back to the area.” Sparks says she started Triple D’s (named after her two daughters, Deidre and Desiree, and her own nickname, Deenie) because she saw a gaping need. “We have such a large community of Black people here throughout Nova

And Triple D’s has it all, from flat irons to wigs, weaves and kinky extensions to hair relaxers, shampoos and moisturizing lotions to bump patrol products, curl texturizers to fade creams. “Anything anyone would need to beautify or accessorize,” assures Sparks. Sparks might still be juggling odd jobs, were it not for a near-fatal car accident a few years back. Left in a coma and partially paralyzed, Sparks says, “My whole outlook on life changed.” Determined to achieve her dream of owning a business, Sparks started small. “I’d go to the States and bring stuff back. I did door- to-door sales, and moved to selling my stuff out of a barber shop.” In 2003 Sparks took a business course, which she says changed everything. “Many of my classmates already owned businesses and I often felt like they were speaking over my head,” says Sparks. “It compelled me to want to get a higher education. The truth was I did not even have my high school diploma at that point.”

Sparks returned to school eventually receiving her high school diploma in June 2006. “This journey went beyond lessons in academics,” she says. “It was about having my daughters look at me and see where I came from and understand the value of education and life.” Sparks admits that owning a business is not without its challenges. “Staying on top of customers’ needs and wants is not always easy, especially with the products that are popular,” she says. “Suppliers run out quickly.” As she looks to expand, Sparks says she is starting mail orders to build a stronger customer base in the Cape Breton, New Glasgow and Truro areas and will soon have a website up and running. “Right now, I’m trying to get a loan to expand products and relocate to a place with more foot traffic,” she says. In the long term, Sparks’ goal is to “think big and to have a couple of stores in and beyond Halifax.” “It’s really about setting a standard for other children to follow, to believe they can do it because they see me doing it and continuing to do it even when things look impossible.” Sparks says.

Triple D’s Hair & Beauty Supplies

h Nadine Sparks 196 Wyse Road, Dartmouth, NS

406 3337/830 7872


Black to Business

Business Forum

Winter 2008

25

Planning Your Retirement? Myths May Be Getting In The Way.

W

e’ve all seen advertisements over the years that tell us what a successful retirement should look like. And with a myriad of messages, it’s no surprise that many people have misconceptions about what lies ahead. Even the experiences of our parents and grandparents have left us with preconceived notions about retirement that can limit our own vision of the future.

Myth #1: Money is the most important factor to a successful retirement. Health is a factor many pre-retirees overlook. That is not to say that financial security is not important, but to live a long and enjoyable retired life, your health is critical. And that means more than just physical conditioning; it means maintaining mental health as well. Myth #2: To have a comfortable retirement you’ll need over $1million. The idea of a “comfortable retirement” is very much dependent on the individual and their financial situation. Financial comfort is an emotional issue based on how we view our money rather than a calculation of what we have. Success has a lot to do

Business Forum

with our own perception of what money is supposed to do for us and how we choose to spend our money. “Your financial comfort is not a numbers-based idea,” says White. “Being financially comfortable assumes you can do the things you want to do given the lifestyle you’re used to, all while being able to handle unexpected challenges to your financial situation.”

found that only 38 per cent of retired Canadians who work listed financial need as the primary reason for doing so, while 55 per cent listed other reasons. Other research conducted by Ipsos-Reid found that 71 per cent of working retirees said they do so to stay mentally active, and 61 per cent cited the desire to “keep in touch with people” as a reason to work.

Myth #3 Retirement is automatic at age 65. Retirement at age 65 is a yardstick that has been handed down from previous generations and imbedded into rules such as those affecting many company pension plans. Today’s 65-year olds are far more active and involved than their parents. Nor are they subject to mandatory retirement laws of yesteryear.

RBC Royal Bank is one of Canada’s largest banks. This article is part of a series of publications produced and distributed by RBC Royal Bank. Used by permission.

Myth #4 Most Canadians will leave the work force when they retire. This may have been true for previous generations, but many studies now suggest work will be an important element of retirement for most baby boomers. This may take the form of graduated retirement such as part-time work, job sharing, or consulting. Volunteerism and selfemployment are also viable work options for many. Myth #5 The number one reason why people return to work after retirement is financial necessity. In a recent study, Statistics Canada

CORRECTION Please see the following corrections to a story on the company DIME Dynamic Integrated Marketing Enterprises, titled DIME - digital signage solutions featured in the Fall 2007 / Issue 37 edition of Black to Business. The correct contact phone number is (902) 404-3463. The credit union mentioned in the article was incorrectly listed as Heritage Credit Union. The correct entity is called Community Credit Union. In the story Steve Morrison was referred to as an employee of Lensmart, an online contact lens retailer, but he is one of the owners/founders of this business. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused DIME.


The Greater Halifax Partnership leads economic growth in Greater Halifax. We focus on business, our people, and our community. The Partnership brings together all three levels of government, more than 150 private sector investors and many different community groups to drive the economic growth of our region.

INVESTORS

The organizations named below, along with our lead investor the Halifax Regional Municipality, are driving the smart growth of Greater Halifax. They are investing in the success of our business community and creating opportunities for all of us. We applaud our investors for their business leadership and commitment to the economic growth of our community.

INVESTOR LEVEL

PARTNER LEVEL 97.9 Halifax Information Radio Air Canada Jazz Airfire Telephone & Data Inc. Aliant Inc. Atlantic Business Magazine Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency BMO Financial Group CBS Outdoor CTV The Chronicle Herald Chum Radio Clearwater Seafood Limited Partnership Colour Corporate Express Corporate Research Associates Cox & Palmer Credit Union Atlantic Cresco Cushman & Wakefield LePage Dalhousie University Deloitte Delta Hotels Barrington & Halifax Ergoworks Atlantic Export Development Canada Extreme Group Floors Plus Gerald Walsh Associates Inc. Global Maritimes The Globe and Mail Halifax International Airport Authority Halifax Marriott Harbourfront Halifax Port Authority Halifax Regional Municipality Helly Hansen Canada Ltd. IBM Canada Ltd. ING Insurance Company of Canada ISL IT Interactive Services Inc. IWK Health Centre

immediaC Worldwide Inc. Integrated People Solutions International Trade Canada Ledgehill, The Corporate Learning Centre Inc. Linx Strategies MT&L Public Relations Limited Manulife Financial Maple Trade Finance Metro Guide Publishing Mount Saint Vincent University NRC Institute for Marine Biosciences Newcap Radio/Kool 96.5 News 95.7 Nova Scotia Community College Nova Scotia Gaming Corporation Nova Scotia Power Inc., An Emera Company NovaScotian Crystal Ocean Resources Office Interiors PHI Pattison Outdoor Advertising Progress Province of Nova Scotia Purdy’s Wharf/GWL Realty Advisors RBC Financial Group Saint Mary’s University Sandler Sales Institute Scotiabank ShiftCentral Stewart McKelvey Tiger Lily Coaching Services Inc. Trade Centre Limited Transcontinental Inc. The Westin Nova Scotian The Yellowpage Group xwave

AML Communications AVW-TELAV Advanced Systems Aecon Atlantic Group Agenda Managers Inc. The Armour Group Limited Ashburn Golf Club Atlantic Digital Reproductions Inc. Atlantic Film Festival Black Business Initiative Bluteau DeVenney & Company Boyne Clarke Bristol Burgess Transfer & Storage Limited Business Development Bank of Canada CGI Group Inc. CIBC Certified General Accountants Association of Nova Scotia Clear Picture Corporation Colliers International (Atlantic) Inc. Convergys DownEast Communications East Port Properties Limited Enterprise Rent-A-Car Ernst & Young LLP ExxonMobil Canada Four Points by Sheraton Halifax Fraser & Hoyt Insurance Ltd. Grant Thornton LLP Halifax Business Parks Halifax Chamber of Commerce Halifax Mooseheads Hockey Club Hoyt’s Moving & Storage Ltd. i.e. design inc. InNOVAcorp Jacques Whitford Junior Achievement of Nova Scotia KPMG LLP Kerr & Nadeau

Kim Squared MariNova Consulting Ltd. Maritime Digital Colour Inc. Maritime Museum of the Atlantic Maritime Travel Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline McInnes Cooper Medavie Blue Cross Membertou Corporate Division Municipal Group Neocon International Neptune Theatre Nova Scotia Business Inc. Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation NSCAD University PCL Constructors Canada Inc. Peapell & Associates/Supertemp Pier 21 Society The People Bank The Prince George Hotel Purolator Courier RCR Hospitality Group Robertson Surrette Scanwood Canada Limited Secunda Marine Services Limited The Shaw Group SolutionInc Limited Southwest Properties Symphony Nova Scotia TD Bank Financial Group Terrain Group Inc. Time & Space Media Limited WBLI Chartered Accountants Waterfront Development Corporation Limited Workers’ Compensation Board of Nova Scotia

To find out how your company can play a leadership role in the Smart Growth of our community, contact Peter Moorhouse, Director, Investor Relations at 902.490.6460 or pmoorhouse@greaterhalifax.com.

www.greaterhalifax.com


Black to Business

Winter 2008

27

Supporting your Community Unrelated Bone Marrow Donor Registry becomes OneMatch Stem Cell and Marrow Network

T

here is a critical shortage of ethnic Canadians registered to donate their stem cells and marrow for patients in Canada. Finding an unrelated match is like looking for a needle in a haystack. Knowing that fewer than 30 per cent of patients will find a compatible donor from a family member and 70 per cent rely on the generosity of strangers for a stem cell transplant, Canadian Blood Services has embarked on a journey to help raise awareness about the need for stem cell donors. An important part of that work is a re-brand, transitioning the Unrelated Bone Marrow Donor Registry to OneMatch Stem Cell and Marrow Network. Through extensive research by Ipsos Reid, Canadian Blood Services realized that growing OneMatch with more ethnic registrants required a major repositioning of the brand. The previous bone marrow registry identity had very low public recall, and felt very institutional. Also, with the addition of umbilical cord blood banking to the not-for-profit’s business lines in the near future, the program had to position itself as offering much more than stem cells collected from bone marrow only. “If we are to succeed in inspiring Canadians to register and potentially save a life, they need to know who we are, what we’re about and how to join,” states Sue Smith, Executive Director of OneMatch Stem Cell and Marrow Network at Canadian Blood Services. When it comes to stem cells, a patient in need of a transplant must rely on finding a perfect match – the “one match” that can save their life. Because ethnic representation on OneMatch is low, ethnic patients are at a major disadvantage in finding their match.

At any given time, hundreds of Canadians are depending on Canadian Blood Services to find them a matching stem cell donor. For these patients, a stem cell transplant may be the last and best hope for recovery from a serious illness, such as leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma and diseases such as aplastic anemia, immune dysfunctions and genetic disorders.

based on extensive research throughout the year that included focus group testing across the country and online surveying. The new brand ranked highest for representing an organization that: matches donors with patients/recipients; helps save lives; is professional, national and trustworthy; and would cause Canadians to seek more information about the organization.

Stem cells have been in the news a lot over the past few years. For the purposes of OneMatch, stem cells are immature cells that can become either red blood cells (which carry oxygen), white blood cells (which fight infection) or platelets (which help to stop bleeding). Bone marrow is a rich source of stem cells but stem cells can also be found in umbilical cord blood and our circulating (peripheral) blood. OneMatch donors may be asked to donate either stem cells from bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells depending on which product the patient requires.

In addition to the rebrand, Canadian Blood Services recently launched a new ad campaign including a 60 second TV commercial, a radio spot, print ads and transit shelter ads. The campaign was developed to attract new donors, specifically young donors from ethnically diverse backgrounds.

When it comes to stem cells, ethnicity and age of a donor are important Why is the ethnicity or age of a donor important? The markers used to match donors to patients occur with different frequencies in different ethnic groups. For this reason, a person’s best chance of finding a matching donor is within his or her own ethnic group. Therefore, donors from as many ethnic communities as possible are needed to develop a database with a broad ethnic representation that reflects the needs of all patients. And raising the awareness for the need for stem cell registrants within the Black community is essential as only 0.5% of current OneMatch registrants have identified themselves as being Black. “We need to inspire more Canadians to join OneMatch to help people in their communities and to even the odds for all patients looking for a match,” states Sue Smith. The development of the OneMatch Stem Cell and Marrow Network name was

In conjunction with the ad campaign, OneMatch also partnered with HipHopCanada to help gain the support of the hip-hop community. The collaborating team hosted two events in November – one in Toronto and one in Vancouver – with some of Canada’s biggest names in the music industry coming out to support the OneMatch movement. OneMatch encourages all members of the Black community to register and has established eligibility criteria to ensure that stem cell donation is a safe procedure for both donors and recipients. To join you must be aged 17 to 50, healthy, and willing to donate stem cells to anyone in need. Registering is quick and easy. All it takes is a little bit of your time, a simple test and willingness to donate stem cells to any patient in need of a transplant. To register online visit www.onematch.ca today. More than 220,000 Canadians have already made this generous commitment. Many people are alive today thanks to these individuals and to the millions of potential donors on other registries around the world.

Contributed by: Angela Reid, OneMatch Stem Cell and Marrow Network


Black to Business

Winter 2008

29

Business and Community Events Feb. 16

Feb. 18

Feb. 23

Community Justice & The Warrior Method - workshop A program for rearing healthy Black youth Community Justice Society of HRM Guest: Dr. Raymond A. Winbush, Ph.D East Preston Community Centre 24 Brooks Dr., East Preston, NS 9am -4pm Contact: C.E. Fowler, 832-1055

Sistahs Speak: A Night of Visioning African Nova Scotian women meet to discuss issues affecting their lives today NOTE: Event is by invitation only Contact: sisspeak@gmail.com for details and to register

Reunion of Ruddick Family – concert CANSA & Canadian Heritage Dr. Carson & Marion Community Centre Springhill, NS 6:30 pm Cost: $8 / $10 at door Contacts: Leah Killen 597 3479 / Elizabeth Cooke-Sumbu. 661 1509

Breakfast Glace Bay UNIA Cultural Museum 25 Jessome St., Glace Bay, NS 8am – 12pm Cost: $4 / person Contact: 902-842-5389 Manmba Drum/Dance Workshop 10am– 4pm Location TBD Cost: $40 per person Contact: Mufaro at 225 9267 Celebration in Song Valley African Nova Scotian Development Association (VANSDA) Atlantic Theatre Festival Building Acadia University Campus, Wolfville, NS Time: 630 - 9pm Cost: $20 For tickets & info: 902 678-7410 Web: www.Vansda.ca Youth Celebrating Africa African Diaspora Association of the Maritimes St. James Church Hall 2668 Joseph Howe Dr., Halifax, NS 1 – 8pm Cost: Free For info: Joesph Nyemah 445-1900 Out of Africa – fashion show Amherst Regional High School Theatre Amherst, NS 6pm Cost: $5 / $8 at door Contacts: Elizabeth Cooke-Sumbu. 661 1509 / Lisette Sumbu 667 0065

Feb. 17 African Heritage Celebration Guests: Pastor Clarence Armstrong Beechville Worship Warriors, Inspirational Singers, The ‘Sisters’ of Sydney and more St. Philip’s African Orthodox Church 34 Hankard St., Sydney, NS 3pm Cost: Free will offering For info.: Isabelle Waterman, 902-567-1220 Keeping It Alive with Awakening Souls Negro spirituals & Gospels 11am – 3pm Monastery, NS Cost: Free will offering For info.: Mary Desmond, 232 2036

Feb. 20 – 21 Black Art Display CANSA office 24 Crescent Ave., Amherst 10 am – 3 pm For info.: Elizabeth Cooke-Sumbu. 661 1509

Feb. 21 Viewing the World Through My Lens: Experiences of a New Black Female 7 pm Cole Harbour Public Library Director (Tara Taylor Cain) Film: ANSMA Presents the 10th Anniversary African Nova Scotian Music Awards 7 pm Halifax North Branch

Feb. 22 Roots to Rhythm - concert CANSA & Canadian Heritage Trinity St. Stephens United Church, Amherst, NS 6:30pm Cost: $8 / $10 at door Contacts: David Cooke 667 0907 / Elizabeth Cooke-Sumbu. 661 1509 African Bazaar BBI, Greater Halifax Partnership World Trade & Convention Centre 5 – 9 pm Contact: Carolann Wright Parks, cparks@greaterhalifax.com

Feb. 23 African Heritage Month Gala Dinner/Dance Black Student Advising Centre & African Nova Scotian Affairs McInnes Room, Dalhousie University Student Union Bldg, 6136 University Ave, Hfx, NS 6 pm – 1 am Cost: $30 Entertainment: Universal Soul & Chelsea Nisbett For tickets and info: 902-494-6648 / Keslyn.Adams@dal.ca Web: Dal Black Student Adv. Ctr.

Feb. 25-28 Colour Me Free Exhibit/Tour CANSA office 24 Crescent Ave., Amherst 10 am – 3 pm For info: Darlene Strong, 661 0284

Feb. 26 Freedom to read: An African Nova Scotian Perspective with Craig M. Smith 7 pm Spring Garden Public Library, Halifax

Feb. 26 Anthony Robbins – The Power Within Halifax Metro Centre For tickets: 1-866-769-3704. www.powerwithin.com

Feb. 27 Black History Month Association Luncheon World Trade and Convention Centre Argyle St., Halifax, NS 11am - 1pm Contact: (902) 425-1866

Feb. 28 Creative Responses to Racism: Using Spoken Word Dal School of Social Work 6:30 - 8:30 pm North Branch Memorial Public Library Gottingen St., Halifax, NS Cost: Free CONTACTS: Dr. Wanda Thomas Bernard; 494-1190; Alfred Saunders, alfred.saunders@dal.ca

Feb. 29 DanceGlace Bay UNIA Cultural Museum 25 Jessome St., Glace Bay, NS 9 pm – 1 am Cost: Silver collection Contact: 902-842-5389


Bin Doctor

“Your investment in our business helped us open our new recycling storefront and create composting solutions for offices and businesses. We’re now expanding into the Toronto market. Thank you, for helping us grow.” www.bindoctor.com

C.A. Wilkins Construction Ltd

“As an electrical contractor, my greatest need is cash flow in order to profitably execute projects. The BBCIFL was willing to invest in me. My business is now beginning to flourish.” www.cawilkins.com

Caution to Investor – This advertisement is not to be construed as an exempt offering to the public in Nova Scotia unless a simplified offering document relating thereto has been filed with and its use has not been objected to by the Nova Scotia Securities Commission. The offering is made by the simplified offering document only and copies thereof may be obtained from such sales agents and promoters as may lawfully offer these securities in Nova Scotia.

Thank you for investing in us. For information on how the Fund works and to become an investor, call Gordon Doe at (902) 426-6985

Business and Community Events Feb. 29

March 2

March 7-10

Celebrating African Heritage Month - Dinner/Dance Antigonish Guysborough Black Development Ass’n (AGBDA) Meal & Entertainment 5 pm – 1 am Rare Bird Pub, Guysborough, NS Cost: Free For info: Tonya Pelley, 902-533-3397 ; Pat Skinner 863-3358

Harlem Gospel Choir Cunard Centre, 961 Marginal Rd, Halifax 7 p.m. Tickets: $35 in advance; $40 at door Dalhousie Arts Centre box office, 494-3820 or (1-800-874-1669) Online at www.sonicconcerts.com www.harlemgospelchoir.com

Write Here! Write Now! March Break Young Writers’ Program for ages 12-18 Fri. 5pm– Mon. 1pm Leadership: Shauntay Grant (spoken word), Joanne Jefferson (poetry/zines), Ken Ward (poetry and short stories Bursaries and day rates available Tatamagouche Centre Tatamagouche NS B0K 1V0 1-800-218-2220 or (902) 657-2231 tatacent@tatacentre.ca, www.tatacentre.ca


#OMETOTHE3UMMIT JUNE 18–20, 2008 Casino Nova Scotia, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Ephren Taylor

Chris Gardner

Cassandra Dorrington

Youngest African American CEO

Inspiration for the film, The Pursuit of Happyness

Conference Chair

3USTAINING"USINESS%XCELLENCE The Black Business Initiative is proud to host the 6th Black Business Summit  Workshops  Boat Cruise  Golf Tournament  Biz Show  Networking  Keynote Speakers  AGM Dinner & Dance 

For more information, please call 426-2224 or visit our web site at www.bbi.ns.ca

If undeliverable return to: The Black Business Initiative 1575 Brunswick Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 2G1 Publications Mail Agreement No.

Poste-publications

numéro de convention

0040026687 0040026687

Black to Business – Issue 38 – Winter 2008  
Black to Business – Issue 38 – Winter 2008