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The official mission magazine of the Seventh-day Adventist® Church VOLUME 7 • NUMBER 1

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Picture (Almost) Perfect

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The Girl No One Wanted

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Friends Do Diapers

18 The Empty Bar Stool 26 Pint-sized Persistence


EDITORIAL

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ave you seen the videos of Tokyo’s professional pushers at rush hour—stuffing, squashing, mashing people into overflowing train cars? If you haven’t, YouTube awaits you. Given the suffocating nature of such a commuter experience, this is probably more fun to take in online than in person. Transporting more than 3 billion riders annually, Tokyo vies with Beijing and Shanghai for the title of world’s busiest subway system.1 New York City, by comparison, provided just 1.72 billion rides,2 but its claim to fame is that it has the most stations of any city metro in the world. 3 For better or for worse, the New York City system has also been given the title “most complex metropolitan system in the world.”4 Just glance at a Tokyo subway map, and try to imagine anything more complex. Thankfully, no matter what city you’re in, you can usually count on some kind of map to guide you through the maze of metropolitan burrows and boroughs. A map can make all the difference in whether you reach a destination. With that in mind, this month’s issue of Mission 360˚ shares a map designed to help us, as a church, reach people in the world’s 570 cities of a million

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people or more (see pages 16 and 17). It’s a guide to help us pray for these cities, including those we might have otherwise never even known to pray for. For example, whether or not you’ve heard of Chongqing, it’s home to as many as 20 or 30 million people,5 most of whom don’t know Jesus. Your prayers for them now could make all the difference in eternity. If God was concerned about what He called “the great city of Nineveh,” which had only 120,000 residents (Jonah 4:11), how must His heart yearn for cities of a million people or for those like Guangzhou and Tokyo—each of which is home to roughly 40 million people!6 If you share God’s concern for the people in these great cities, one way to answer His call is through your daily prayers. Even if you can’t go and personally share Jesus in these urban centers, you can help reach them through regular prayer. We invite you to pull out the map and keep it with your Bible or post it at your church. Then check off the cities as you or your church members pray for them. We also invite you to pray for the workers and new believers whose stories are shared in this magazine. In these ways, you join us as a true partner in mission, and by

God’s grace, we’ll reach our final destination together with those for whom we’ve prayed.

Karen Suvankham Communication Specialist Global Mission Centers, Mission to the Cities

1. CityMetric Staff, “What Is the Largest Metro System in the World?,” CityMetric, September 5, 2015, https://www. citymetric.com/transport/what-largestmetro-system-world-1361. 2. “Introduction to Subway Ridership,” Metropolitan Transportation Authority, accessed Oct. 25, 2018, http://web.mta. info/nyct/facts/ridership/. 3. Niall McCarthy, “The Subway Systems With the Most Stations,” Statista, July 9, 2018, https://www.statista.com/ chart/14604/the-subway-systemswith-the-most-stations/. 4. Eric Jaffe, “The World’s 15 Most Complex Subway Maps,” Citylab, Feb. 25, 2016, https://www.citylab.com/transportation/2016/02/most-complex-transitsubway-maps-world-tokyo-new-yorkparis/470565/. 5. Xue Yufei, “In 2015, Chongqing’s Permanent Resident Population of 30,165,500 People Continued to Grow,” Hualong Network, Jan. 28, 2016, http:// cq.cqnews.net/html/2016-01/28/content_36292655.htm. 6. Thomas Brinkhoff, “Major Agglomerations of the World,” City Population, last modified Jan. 1, 2018, https://www. citypopulation.de/world/Agglomerations.html.


CONTENTS The official mission magazine of the Seventh-day Adventist® Church

4 Picture (Almost) Perfect 6 The Girl No One Wanted

Chairman: G. T. Ng Editor in Chief: Gary Krause Editor: Laurie Falvo Contributing Editors: Cheryl Doss, Kayla

8 Friends Do Diapers

Ewert, Karen Glassford, Rick Kajiura, Nancy Kyte, Andrew McChesney, Rick McEdward, Hensley Moorooven, Teen Nielsen, Ricky

11 The Long Necks

Oliveras, Karen J. Porter, Claude Richli, Jeff Scoggins, Gerson Santos, Earley Simon, Karen Suvankham, John Thomas, Homer Trecartin, David Trim

13 Led for a Definite Purpose 16 Mission to the Cities Prayer Map

Editorial Assistant: Chelsy Tyler Editorial Advisors: Petras Bahadur, Paolo Benini, Edison Choque, Jose Cortes Jr., Daniel Duda, Richard Elofer, Kleber Gonçalves, Graeme Humble, MinHo Joo, Zakari Kassoule, Wayne Krause, Samuel

18 The Empty Bar Stool 20 Youth Set Church on Fire 22 Walk-ins Welcome

Lumwe, Silas Muabsa, Paul Muasya, Umesh Nag, Shekar Phillips, Denis Sand, Clifmond Shameerudeen, Wesley Szamko, Samuel Telemaque, Doug Venn, Amy Whitsett, Gregory Whitsett, Dmitry Zubkov Design: 316 Creative Production and Digital Media: Donna Rodill

Mission 360° is a quarterly magazine produced and copyrighted ©2019 by the General

24 Global Neighborhood

Conference of Seventh-day Adventists®. All rights reserved. The contents may not be reproduced in whole or in part without written

26 Pint-sized Persistence

permission from the publisher. 12501 Old Columbia Pike Silver Spring, MD 20904-6601, USA

28 The Little Streams

Telephone: (301) 680-6005 Questions? Comments? Email us at

30 Television Wars

Questions@adventistmission.org.

VOLUME 7, NUMBER 1 Adventist® and Seventh-day Adventist® are the registered trademarks of the General

ABOUT OUR COVER PHOTO . . . Photo by Ricky Oliveras

Conference of Seventh-day Adventists®. Unless otherwise noted, Bible verses are quoted from the King James Version.

On a recent filming trip to Armenia, I went to see Mount Ararat. As I walked around the site, I met this visitor whose unique mustache captured my attention. 3


THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA UNION MISSION

Y

ou would have to be an artist to understand how proud I felt to announce to Ahmad* and his brothers and their families that I had completed a portrait of their father. The family stood politely around the painting, expressing their surprise at my gift. But I noticed a reserve that I hadn’t expected as they studied the scene I had created around their father. Something was missing in their response, but I couldn’t determine what it was.

were married. We sat down to a mid-morning spread fresh from their family garden, livestock, and kitchen: cheese, cream, tomatoes, cucumbers, olive, omelets, fresh bread, and fig jam. We enjoyed a lively conversation that lasted far beyond the time it usually takes me to eat breakfast. That’s how my friendship with Ahmad was born. We ate breakfast together almost every day for the month I was in his country. In my

a setting where I might pose him in the portrait. I returned home with my project in mind. Over the next few months, I developed a painting of the elderly man dressed in his formal, traditional clothing. After thoughtfully considering a special message I wanted to express, I painted in a simple porcelain teapot and one teacup on a small table between the elderly man and the viewer. I included only one teacup because I wanted to

free time, I sketched portraits of him, of each of his brothers, and of several young nieces and nephews. The mothers were delighted to receive what I considered simple drawings of their children. Perhaps that’s why, toward the end of our time together that summer, I decided to paint a formal portrait of Ahmad’s father, the patriarch of them all. I had grown to respect him; his quiet manner and hardworking ways endeared him to me, and I wanted to honor him. Before I left, I sketched him and studied their living room for

demonstrate my appreciation for his singular hospitality: he would serve his guest but not provide for his own comfort or refreshment. I was proud of the painting as a special expression of my gratitude and the honor of being included so warmly in their family. So I pressed Ahmad privately after watching his family’s polite response to my gift. What did they really think of the painting? Was it appropriate? “It was so nice; we are greatly honored,” he replied, picking his words carefully. I decided to listen longer.

Picture (Almost) Perfect Later that day when Ahmad and I were alone, I asked him whether the gift was appropriate, whether it was well received. He expressed deep appreciation, but he hesitated, as if not wanting to hurt my feelings. I remember the first time Ahmad invited me to his home. Everything about it was typical of rural Arab culture: the olive groves surrounding the small, cement, flat-roofed house; fig and pomegranate trees with fruit in varying stages of ripeness; and chickens foraging for food in the courtyard. I met Ahmad’s father, who was a shepherd, and learned that Ahmad had six older brothers who 4


“I think the modern teapot is not of my father’s world. We have traditional Arab coffee pots that are very meaningful to us.” He wasn’t comfortable sharing his critique. My artist eyes suddenly pictured the incongruence of the little porcelain teapot and its matching teacup. I apologized profusely and assured him I could correct the painting. Within a few days, I brought out my paints and inquired for a traditional coffee pot. Within the hour, Ahmad had picked up an elegant antique pot from a cousin nearby. It wasn’t what they used, but it was what they valued. In a few strokes of the brush, the modern teapot and the single dainty cup disappeared into the canvas. In its place, I painted an old coffeepot with two traditional teacups, following Ahmad's further suggestion: "We must always have two cups, for a guest is always welcome." Once more, the family gathered, and I humbly brought out the corrected painting. This time, they responded with relief and great appreciation. The painting was ceremoniously hung next to one of the only other decorations in the home—a verse from the Qur’an etched in white plaster. It was one of my first and clearest lessons in contextualizing. As I paint, I have learned to ask myself difficult, self-inspecting questions: Am I faithful to the assumptions and expectations of my host country, their culture, and the way they see life? Am I careful to use the visual vocabulary they use and the pictures that best express their world? When so much of culture is visual, those details can serve as a catalyst for saying, “I see what you see; I notice what’s meaningful to you.” That’s the kind of expression that builds long-term relationships for the glory of God. To this day, the ongoing relationship I

enjoy with Ahmad and his family is filled with many discussions about faith, and Ahmad and I experience wonderful seasons of prayer together. The painting still hangs alongside the verse from the Qur’an. And I’m still praying that God will

lead Ahmad, his six brothers and their families, and his parents to a deeper knowledge of God. * Name has been changed. The author, whose name we have withheld, is the coordinator for the MENA Total Employment initiative.

TENTMAKER [tɛntˈmeɪkə] noun

1. A missionary with a regular job who bypasses the barriers of restricted access countries to quietly spread the gospel. Examples: Entrepreneurs, computer technicians, graphic designers, engineers, teachers, and health care professionals. To learn more about Tentmakers or to support their ministry, visit TotalEmployment.org.

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THAILAND

The Girl No One Wanted M Kimi-Roux James is a communications specialist for ADRA International.

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ore than two years ago, a bright-eyed, slender nine-year-old girl named Malee* was offered refuge at Keep Girls Safe (KGS), a shelter in Chiang Rai, Thailand, that partners with the Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA). “Her mom didn’t want her, and local villagers couldn’t keep her,” said Sunita, KGS project coordinator. Since 2004, KGS has served as a temporary means of protection for females ages 8 to 18 who have been abused, orphaned, or abandoned, or are at risk for human trafficking. During their stay, the girls are assigned household chores, given fun projects to work on, and encouraged to attend school. Malee keeps busy sweeping floors, washing dishes, and gardening. She also goes to school and especially enjoys its Japanese club. Before coming to KGS, Malee’s life was difficult and unsettling. Her mother had no money and no home in which to live. To ensure her daughter’s survival, she resorted to prostitution until she eventually moved in with a boyfriend. “When Malee and her mother moved in with the man, he was disgusted by Malee and demanded she be kicked out,” said Titi, a

KGS social worker. “The mother would leave Malee outside, even in the rain. Malee had developed a habit of wetting the bed and was beaten for something she had no control over.” When Malee’s mother became pregnant, she asked an older couple in a local village to take care of Malee. She promised to send them money, but she was never heard from again. The couple had seven children and didn’t have enough food to feed Malee, so she often resorted to digging for food in trash cans, stealing food from temple sacrifices, and begging. During this time, Malee became friends with a boy whose father was an alcoholic and drug addict. “The more time she spent with the boy, the more bad habits she picked up,” said Titi. “She often looked dirty and smelled, and after living with four families in a few short months, no one wanted to keep her.” Realizing Malee’s misfortune, the village leaders pleaded with KGS to take her in. KGS gave her a home, but initially she was very unhappy to be there. “When Malee first arrived, she hit the staff and other girls, wouldn’t take baths, refused to clean her room, and kept dead bugs in her drawers until they rotted and smelled,” recalled Sunita. KGS staff worked tirelessly to understand Malee and show her love. “After months of counseling, doing chores at the shelter, attending school, and going to church, Malee has improved,” Titi shared. The once disheveled girl whom no one wanted now sings, draws, and reads. She also practices playing the violin. Today, Malee is well-behaved, has grown attached to KGS, and

Free from a painful past, Malee is a reborn child now filled with hope.

looks up to her school teachers. Missing from her life, however, is her mom. “While many of the other girls receive visits from their family, Malee remains alone,” said Titi. “Her mother has never visited nor called.” The people at the shelter, the school, and the local Adventist church make sure that Malee receives a good education, care, and love. “For all the girls at KGS, the destructive cycle they are caught in changes for the better because their new environment is safe, and their upbringing is wholesome,” remarked Sunita. ADRA Thailand is training caregivers at KGS to help meet the physiological needs of girls such as Malee. Additionally, plans are under development for KGS to establish educational scholarships so that more at-risk youth can receive an education. “Like Malee, there are many children who are exposed to disrupted and unsafe households, putting them at risk of being trafficked, which is a growing concern in the country,” said Sunita. “ADRA Thailand is considering anti-trafficking training sessions at girls’ clubs and community youth activities to address human trafficking, but funds are really needed to help keep KGS operating.” Much work needs to be done, but, for now, KGS continues to provide a safe environment for vulnerable children and has proven to be a strong shoulder for girls like Malee to lean on. “I really thank my project coordinator and social worker,” Malee acknowledged. “They are like my favorite song,” she says before humming the tune to “You Raise Me Up.” * Name has been changed.


The Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) is the global humanitarian organization of the Seventhday Adventist Church. Through an international network, ADRA delivers relief and development assistance to individuals in more than 130 countries— regardless of their ethnicity, political affiliation, or religious association. By partnering with communities, organizations, and governments, ADRA can improve the quality of life of millions through nine impact areas: social justice; disaster response; economic growth; children’s needs; gender equity; community health; water, sanitation, and hygiene issues; hunger and nutrition; and livelihoods and agriculture. Thank you for supporting ADRA through your World Budget offerings! To watch ADRA mission stories, visit m360.tv/adra. 7


NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS Miss Sai leading us on a follow-theleader adventure to the jungle.

Friends Do Diapers J Meghann Heinrich volunteered as a teacher at Saipan Seventhday Adventist School. She is earning a degree in journalism and public relations at Walla Walla University in Washington, United States.

ust a few days before the school year officially started, I arrived on the approximately 45-square-mile island of Saipan and was already deep in the throes of homesickness. It’s funny; I never expected that would be the biggest challenge I’d face abroad. With my assignment as an assistant teacher at Saipan Seventh-day Adventist School, I guess I thought my biggest challenge would be the rowdy children or the long hours. I remember waking up those first few weeks with tears already pooling in my eyes. I routinely called home for a tiny grasp of the familiar, but those conversations often left me more upset because they were a glaring reminder of how far away from home I had wandered. Initially, I was assigned to the prekindergarten classroom at the school’s Child Development Center (CDC), where I would work alongside the head teacher, Miss Vangie. I spent my first day of

If you’re interested in being a volunteer, visit AdventistVolunteers.org.

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work cleaning and organizing the classroom and doing my best to keep from crying in front of the other volunteers and teachers. On the second day of preparation, I was called into the principal’s office. I remember taking my time walking down to the office; this was completely new territory for me. I hesitantly sat down, wondering what I could have possibly done wrong on the first day to warrant a talk with the principal. He looked at me and smiled, and the first words out of his mouth were, “How do you feel about diapers?” I laughed nervously and admitted that I wasn’t really the person to ask because I had never successfully changed a diaper in my life. My, how that was about to change! Due to the lack of teachers and volunteers, I was being transferred to the toddler room where I would be in charge of 14 children ages 18 months to 3 years old. In short, I'd get plenty of practice changing diapers. After that conversation, I was asked to spend some time in my new classroom, not just to sanitize all of the things that would inevitably be slobbered on (or worse) but also to take intentional time praying for God’s blessing on each person, big or small, who would walk through those doors in the coming weeks. I walked into the toddler classroom in a

daze, trying my best to focus on the present moment and not let my mind wander to how much I missed home, or how unsure I was of this new age group, or how terrified I was to begin the school year. In the back of the classroom, a woman sat cleaning toys. I had been told she was going to be my partner in the chaos of the toddler class. Though I knew I needed to get acquainted with her, I was already on the brink of tears, overwhelmed with the sheer magnitude of time and distance that separated me from my family and everything familiar to me. I could hardly trust myself to speak, let alone hold a conversation. Taking a deep breath, I shakily introduced myself. The woman smiled and said that her name was Miss Sai. She was originally from Pohnpei and had eight kids of her own. I didn’t know what else to say, and Miss Sai seemed to be the shy type, so we worked the rest of the time in silence. But the kindness and compassion in her eyes were unmistakable. I had this feeling wash over me that, as long as Miss Sai was around, I would be all right. When it came time for us to pray together, we pulled two little toddler-sized chairs together and bowed our heads. I went first, awkwardly asking for guidance


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and blessings in the coming year. Then Miss Sai spoke to the Lord. It was a short, simple, but earnest prayer, the kind that leaves the listener without a doubt that the one praying knows her heavenly Father and trusts Him with her whole heart. When I opened my eyes, tears slid down my cheeks because I knew deep down that God had arranged this meeting and that Miss Sai was going to be exactly the friend I needed. In the coming months, I relied on Miss Sai for everything, and sooner than later (mostly out of necessity), I was a diaper-changing machine. Miss Sai had a gift with babies; she knew when they needed to be held and when they needed to play on their own. She knew how to teach them, how 10

to discipline them, and most importantly, how to love them. My homesickness softened as my love for those babies and my new friends grew. Throughout the year and the many adventures we had in that little classroom, I found a new calling: to serve and connect with each little rascal while their parents had to work. Sometimes I struggled to find that connection to meaningful service, but each time I felt especially low, there would be some reminder that God was going to bless me whether I felt it or not. I’d get a glimpse of this when my students’ parents told me their children insisted on praying before meals or singing endless loops of our little worship songs. Slowly, I realized that the work I was doing

1

Playtime in the toddler room.

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Saying goodbye to Miss Sai at the airport. Photo credit: John Vega

was merely planting seeds that I hope will someday flourish into kinder, gentler, and loving hearts. When it came time for me to leave, Miss Sai came to the airport along with some other dear friends to say goodbye. I was very excited to go home, but now my heart was torn because a part of it thought I was already there. I hugged Miss Sai and, through the security line, waved as long as I could. As I sat at my gate waiting for the first of many flights, I was struck with how far God had led me in the past 10 months and how blessed I was to have had friends like Miss Sai who helped me grow along the way.


Muo became a Seventh-day Adventist because of what her children learned at Central Myanmar Adventist Seminary.

PIONEER POSTCARD

Myanmar

The Long Necks I Joshua Sagala is the Media Ministry video production specialist at the Southern Asia-Pacific Division.

n a village in Myanmar called Kone Thar, Global M ission pioneers Salai and his wife, Kukupaw, are sparking hope among a tribal group called the Kayan, also known locally as “the Long Necks.” Traditional ways of sharing the gospel are rarely effective in these communities. Perhaps that’s why Christ focused on people and their needs first. This is the example Salai follows. He visits each family in their home, gets to know them, and eventually becomes friends with them. Kukupaw has a nursing background. Together, she and Salai provide basic education for the children of this village and look after the sick. In an area such as this, education is one of the best ways to introduce Christ’s principles and teachings. However, it’s not always easy to convince the Kayan parents to send their children to school

Watch this story in action at m360.tv/s1839.

because they need their children to help work the fields. Only after Salai and Kukupaw spend time earning the parents’ trust and explaining the benefits of education for their children’s future do the parents allow their children to attend school. The couple knew they would need to nurture their relationships with these parents. “As we render the services to the people,” Salai says, “we build their confidence and their trust in us in what we are doing.” This involves listening to the community’s concerns and being aware of their feelings. Since enrollment costs can be challenging for the parents to pay, the Global Mission pioneer couple ensures that education is available to every family. The parents appreciate this and have noticed that their children return home with much better attitudes. Over time, a number of parents have wanted to know more

about the power that lies behind this amazing, life-changing school. One such parent was Muo. “The Adventist school taught my children many good things, like the truth of Scripture and the

THE NEED:

MYANMAR POPULATION

54 Billion 78%

BUDDHIST

8%

CHRISTIAN

7%

ETHNIC RELIGION

5%

MUSLIM

2%

OTHER

“Myanmar (Burma),” Joshua Project, last modified 2019, https:// joshuaproject.net/ countries/BM#Religions.

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love of God,” Muo shares. “As I learned from my children, I became convinced that I should become an Adventist like them, and now I am.” Seemingly small but vitally important beginnings like this encourage Salai and Kukupaw and other Global Mission pioneers like them to continue their work. “The only reason I’m here is to share the love of God and the truth of His Word with the Kayan people,” says Salai. “Please pray for the Holy Spirit to soften their hearts so they will be receptive. And thank you so much for supporting our work here in Kone Thar village.”

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Global Mission pioneers Salai, right, and his wife, Kukupaw, have been serving among the Kayan tribe for three years.

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Kukupaw teaches a preschool class for the Kayan children.

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Students learning math at Central Myanmar Adventist Seminary.

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Salai preaching on a Sabbath morning.

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Global Mission pioneers Global Mission supports thousands of local missionaries, called pioneers, in starting new groups of believers among people groups where there is no Adventist presence. Their ministry wouldn’t be possible without your donations and prayers. Thank you for your support!

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Ways to Give Online Visit Global-Mission.org/giving to make a secure donation quickly. Phone Call 800-648-5824. Mail In the United States: Global Mission, General Conference 12501 Old Columbia Pike Silver Spring, MD 20904-6601 In Canada: Global Mission SDA Church in Canada 1148 King Street East Oshawa, ON L1H 1H8

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PERU

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Led for a Definite Purpose Richard and Georgiana Hayden, missionaries on the front line in the Amazon and the Andes

S Born to missionary parents in India, David Trim is the director of the Office of Archives, Statistics, and Research.

eventh-day Adventists today probably take for granted t heir memb ership o f a worldwide movement. It is easy to forget that this outcome is built on extraordinary levels of commitment by many missionaries who forsook family and friends in order to add to the family of God. Richard (Dick) and Georgiana Hayden illustrate that commitment well. Dick Hayden was born on May 31, 1903, in Los Angeles, California, but grew up in Eugene, Oregon, where the possibility of a career as a professional football player opened up for the strapping sixfoot-tall young man. As a result, he attended the University of Oregon for a year, but then, influenced by his older sister, Lottie, who died of cancer when she was just 33 years old, he transferred to Walla Walla College. There, in his last

year, college president W. I. Smith ended the Week of Prayer with a call for students to embrace missionary service. Dick told a friend: “I have been led here for a definite purpose.” Having some years earlier heard Floyd Bresee, a missionary to Peru, at a Missionary Volunteer Society meeting, Dick resolved, “If God is willing, I will go to South America when I finish my college training.” After evangelistic work in Washington State in 1929, Dick and Georgiana (known to family and friends as “Jo”), accepted a call to missionary service in the Inca Union of the South American Division. They sailed for Peru in September 1930. Dick was 27, Jo just 21. For their first three years, Dick served as a local pastor in the Amazon Mission, working under

the inspirational leadership of Ferdinand and Ana Stahl. Dick and Jo were based in the remote village of Iquitos, deep in the jungles of Peru’s Amazonian region. Their first child, Richard Dean (later a missionary to Nicaragua), was born there in 1932. 2

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In 1933, the Haydens moved 800 miles south to the Andes Mountains to serve in the Lake Titicaca Training School in Juliaca, where Dick became principal. But after 16 months, he was appointed secretary (director, as we would say now) of the Missionary Volunteer and Education departments of the Lake Titicaca Mission, which had its headquarters in Peru’s second city, Arequipa. Dick and Jo’s second son was born there in 1935. A third child, Carolyn, was born in Spokane, Washington, while they were on furlough in 1936, but all three children were raised in South America. In 1937, the family left Peru for the Bolivian Mission, where Dick served three years as Education and Missionary Volunteer secretary. In 1940, Dick was elected “director” (president, in today’s terms) of the Amazon Mission, and so the Haydens returned to the jungle. Dick led the Amazon Mission for eight years. In 1948–49, he briefly worked in education again as a Bible professor at Inca Union College in Peru’s capital

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and largest city, Lima. But in 1949, he was called to the Inca Union Mission headquarters, also in Lima, as Home Missionary and Sabbath School secretary, a post he held for 10 years. In 1959, Dick and Jo moved to Ecuador, where he had been elected president of the Ecuador Mission, but after not quite two years, they returned to Peru. Dick became the first president of the newly established North Peru Mission. He served in that capacity for nearly four years, to the end of 1963, before stepping down to the position of departmental director so that an indigenous leader could become president. For the Haydens’ last four and a half years in Peru, Dick remained in the North Peru Mission, leading the Lay Activities, Sabbath School, and Radio and Television departments. Dick and Jo Hayden left Peru for what they perhaps no longer thought of as home, the United States, in July 1968. They had served as missionaries in Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador for a remarkable 37 years and 9 months. Except for 11 years at the Inca Union and its college, they always worked at the local level; they spent 26 years in real frontline mission work. Their spirit comes out in a letter Dick wrote to the General Conference on April 30, 1968, confirming their retirement. He wrote: “Mrs. Hayden and I have been laboring here in the Inca Union since 1930, and it is hard for us to leave our many friends here. We are glad however to see these younger Peruvian men take over.” His career was not marked by pride nor craving for promotion in the hierarchy; his only passion was pushing the work forward to reach the day when local leaders were able to take over so that missionaries could, as Dick did in North Peru, stand aside. Dick and Jo Hayden stand for many missionaries whose labors bore rich fruit in today’s thriving,

vibrant church in South America. Instead of receiving missionaries, it now sends them around the globe. This reflects the fact that, in many parts of the world, cross-cultural missionaries are still needed, as

are the funds to support their work. As you read this, perhaps you, your brother or sister, your son or daughter, niece, nephew, or grandchildren are also being “led for a definite purpose.”

Your weekly mission offerings and world budget offerings help support the ministry of more than 400 missionary families. Thank you!

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The Haydens’ first baptismal class contained 25 candidates.

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Hayden family, circa 1936.

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Richard A. Hayden, circa 1928.

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Carufa Indian students at the church school in Metraro, Peru.

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Pomata Mission Station on Lake Titicaca, 1920.

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These Indians carried their sick companion for miles to meet Hayden.

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This woman's balsa leg was created by Hayden. 15


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PRAYER MAP PRAYERPRAYER MAP NAD

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LEGEND Cities with 1,000,000+

o a iw du ae ab Ta Ch m ng nd dlae g ü a n T r Y a Sã l u laai Sin Ho Ür B Ba Su ck dKe o ng y u i i ot A A Cit iag i mq hh om ur lo Hlíno u inh anti Fuj rü e k ey ille Ma mp a r Ü au r S o e e r o r w k nug s o u ng pe iM gu Lu i ay e p i i r o g u t e del zho oP d a Y a h n ag n Ch ga nd Ta rab ala Yiw om Sã jiT lan M La Me Yang Ba nti Mo t Sin Ho Ba Su Kruey Fu ima t ck ín Ma kouu Sa ell Au qi L on ho ore ng iw licu ter d g y h h e n L o a üm Yi Y e on a l Ca M L H a l f i i a i u M Ür ou c o e ut o n h im ing rse gk u ur z g W e a L l a n lic a o g p i a i om n h M j im Y V z nti Ca e y ola Ya els Fu sh Mdaur Sa ng llín n rre r re wu Sh ont n e s e i iro o u z u d T i Y l pu ho nte us g Ly m ar jHara zho or Me La Jul Berifan ola Mo aldeur cia ala n to ng H ma arwnte íklioau ich ut h n S o a s i d o r e g l W e u a a l T lic S lun t ua Zu ain an o ar L Be -Dh riz rain im jar Va Ca zho Jul lem sh res G soa rw lia bli Ho B Y Hu S ming ala els Sa Su r ha rasí Hu elo u es u ad o rth iro cha nto ss á o u pu H o u a e u t D a B G S P r zh zhoo P li-D B Bnu ng Br ogo ola te i so iko du ub ng SuJoã micih Sh on at es B Ha a Te ina a lun H ar DZour gre riz uh P jar st g ua Jul lem s n n HoGa João alli rw tilia g H Ale n ala o a are o t e n h l Salean o d e p t l t r ha hasí n a a r n r vil ch rto az uVi tá i Be soa iraApleg -D au ra ou Gu Na shu Sa ingo Pe ns O SeBu Fuy go Paong bli G B pall zh iko hir zh u es uchto lea ew Bo p om az Hu Su y le one Ha Sch ky l D r r i Or N i a o P Tir Por ira a o v nguni n rFgu w ezh Sh ch Kit ati Joã fiaenn V la re son nto M aso Ne s ary nto ville falo uh Tirlui ron llen rrisbu vil SoVi bane Na hu rt z legrg i l n f Vo Ga n alg o lP cAn ack Se mo ibyin g i A v u n a s o J s u r d C i Y e b p M z as E aalno nto nta lea E ia ato kyu ttgaabr in a cks B Br nich ap lga All ortoris ufHfya ira Or El P Ya mo hir rizgin Ca Sar Kita Stu T ov Yib ndeoz Ja w Mc PHar a ezh Sh Ed a BFu Mu d aVb ir ach ng rat ruc e ll on nia ofi e Ne le z i T a i n r i l d a n e e e S i o T o v l M g S n v B oy Vo sa ai baor y urg ntonysoernd lo n tsu on Lil gart so d m Vir each Lu qia Nash rristf lle e sb ks n ma ille gar des Yant isbon irut t rd o M M ffa tsu ibin Pa mon Rich a B ala Su cA sor arri HBa u v El Jac ia a shv an al riz ss tfo u a ustut O dm h C n o Y q e r M m w S b t b B E a t d i m n nLg Be zho My H SHua NaTai Ric Ha Sara ala e iru oza ama ainan usTa O le gin lum jra Liu m Luoya ris nd nw vill Be Lil d mb Co Vir each T Gu rd ar on y Per ille lle is jra on a u Me uH re a lu n b u i v m o B o u o u w a r i r o x sh hm isv Lo ats ou P Lisydne oto ess C ys rtf ha t Pe a u uq Na ilaak G hawa Ba a Od s Ric Lou Ha Pes eau uzh ana S an x iru arh mam inan l M ko S bu nnwgaj s au av na Be m ord Li Ad is a H a ora ligarh Alig Ha Ta angjia r l B le lum u Zhjraa r Pe yi rde Ad ay ey Pa vil ora pe C rm e Co A Gu Bo r oto d Zh dn n Ok C Pe u is cif i wao na Ba a Syusti Zun Lo pe Ca d aba cife kou hvaad or Re ny u a va in ux u d a l s t d a a n o i y e m A rh aba j a l Z e Ca a s e a a é h l H g r a a i d u v z s P S o l i n r e o A Ad lig ro ad ly R ng ay ral a a o a a r J l g M p i T a h S B n n Zh Co boro nAsbo Mor Ok g p nte arfee Sa Yic r B yi a ha e t y i pe c a n t B g un t i i c o i u a ns ee ad n tin do n z r ou e t Y t K y Z Ca s a ich ee Gr adab n ngpu zia sé g sC izh Ga fur k Au Cit l’yan R Ko Saplvur njia Tama g Grro jirau g Ga an Jo ansa or ty’a fen a u ars Frank Ta ng as Traeiil a an sk m anTi en Zha bo ty M Ci ai S ns aKma Tir Kagi ana oro om luc Ba u ich t ang yar da tep noy Zh aif a a r n d p a k o ns a Ci ma T n n o s t Y n M K y d o K a p s T d r a g ich Kog ur ee na ng Ma ad da Pe KrasRn otteGaziamsk haam Sa Cit tger n p olis nkfu Kirlla Gr hom laho i’an anb Ommbur Ta o Pe ng k lis ams bnbu hanjia a ng uaont O inagm Difehng la ty k a chbeu Tiru ua a nap Fra nqu araspo gnhsa an hse nhga m hR or luc g g n a D Z a a n h H e i r i n a f Ok Ci O is T m s K nhci an a da Qin o inh Ka r pap To d an noyan e r p a i r Y g r h a f n U a k m i m a a s o n r n M Q a e d B adB s l I r A S B s om enmgY mp Pe Bir nb KraIn zU o or B buent anlgiod ott nom aam uil lio hrmno nto es n io oli h u a n O i e l d o q m a a M n R e n a ka r P lah b n o n m a p a n a d Me he rez ap Ph Neaninhhgh a Ginhwua Dh r uGiwlin ah ng n Ok ilin is nc JúaSa nto iksuo lva Pream aina h rgh Na S ntsha úa an ma alv Hra am rra e g c s n n N A a i r o P h f a n J i m a i s r a a c n Q d A z a S d A Gu ur om Sa ledsina ttsbu ali G LoFuu n mp eY Bir ezres dad alpIun Paonr y ento an S Sa TerneUtsbuio iuda ne B PKaaz ityB t. LSouan a Ka alp Phn nh g pe i Tre Gw d it Me S h in ha St. gsha ok urn bour C Sina CiuJmaab SaPitnton C n ilin ing Jab NaM P lva C ram úa ku l g nin s erl Na Pe na u J lbo n i i i d r a a c a A r B G u X a n z S Xin g ou n Ta Me a Fu a n Mee res dad Me San n lpu i sb i Pa ity iSan S na ón . L ia r g na Ka Sa an zhou y itt Leó urn g nci losnha lin ua ch an souar aba ur hiad Theou Ciu Stnc C lh an Le saian ur ch ad ua h a i n P e r l e a n n p j t e y j g u l u i g l t i J lbo J De aw Xini g Xinx i Ran AmXrinitx JodhpRa llahb AZmhurzi g J Jodh llDaehb Zhuz g Cit m OBrea T an Ci Va BarTcan ou ne/ rf so Va an aíso m Tia taw a Me A u A CLhakeu r na da raí ón r Ot Ott c n r S poaan r y tesri ran Lake erda i on on gzh log elidsoi ian nchi l a pu i bad zho tsa ho lhi lpa Le ste jua ter len l hon o t t Dlu t s li ab el i x t c o D l i i J c e O r e a h b n Rnagta Amri Jodh gtlalah Zhu a / an Co uTsbsil Va nche am T Ams Vaanso ns so taw Sa Ams Xin Sal anzh anc -oVn knecCh T g Na g D nA ne rf -on Ch uD B i sa aí r D g r Ot i N s n n L a r n b e r a n A i o X o t A u u i ogam ldo ov erd bi si tov La A u l M r i h i X t t o e t r D a n l o p a s Jin s s aldpp es d h t a h Jinsol aM bil os u a d nc C z h s d n o V i n e w a a D gta T S d n an d Am uil hdo Na ing sh hanaciaba iha i La wad Milaana t eswkap Du Rodaasrai sv-hoe nes aba Rnasi Xin wa il nabu an As optuor oto luaizn i am eMi ng sto ba ng ya qu hia rAai rtl t nam sik an ha aq ura jwkoatr Jaom We Jin amai ardan an gra jaya ou dh bie orHt ng ijayad ud du Po jko at Naa ub is ay ad R hu ra daara as ahmed ad J Wura b s p o u V V h i g l i h u a r P A B A a s i o a r z a s L M i m a i is A V nRe B V uil o i Gu wa V ana Vuaan L a to um ih ka g h e a R h k M x l u M K d i ele a i o G t z u o o h K i a s b ya r aq haura g ot We Hu et ha Jam an an z r a d i d a ng u r i y r gaeible s R am j i g a b u i h a u G a g ad anajk Na Pgo ng R R e n ng A V V m n A V B V o g d a ao e i a Gu ut M ngR ngt L n hrg ya h e g x r l Ku d t a o n u yu lsan g hang any enejirau an yung san nge Ru eneg Riz osjia Ga ang ang rlot ny yoott ian dUe t n C g N gMa Ul tte MZh angn Lian Ch osulCha Na ZhMen ngnan aPrl un lsan L ang anya njian n gy eru o ar ny ka C Ch h on a M Me Lo

Cities with 30,000,00 Cities with 40,000,000+

Gaza

Cities with 30,000,000+

SUD Tel Aviv-Jaffa

Cities with 10,000,000+

Mumbai

Cities with 20,000,000+ Cities with 1,00

Mumbai Tel Aviv-Jaffa

Cities with 1,000,000+

Mumbai

• Pray for families and marria • Pray SUD for healthSouthern Asia • Pray for education Trans-Europea TED • Pray for the17 homeless • Pray WAD for GlobalWest-Central Mission pio

P20

LEGENDLEGEND

MAP MAP RRR MAP

SUD

NAD

Jinzhou

There are 570+ cities worldwide. There cities ofofof a amillion or or more worldwide. Thereare are570+ 570+ cities amillion million ormore more worldwide. Pray day, and pray your way around thethe world! Pray for one each day, and pray your way around world! Prayfor forone oneeach each day, and pray your way around the world!


PHILIPPINES

The Empty Bar Stool O Brandan Monnett lives in Arizona, United States, with his wife, Naomi, and their two children.

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nly 18 months earlier, I was in a bar getting drunk, and now I was on my way to be a missionary! As I sat on a plane flying to the Philippines, I couldn’t believe how drastically my life had been changed by God’s grace. I was going to a town called Pagudpud, where I would help renovate an Adventist wellness clinic and visit the homes of the sick and the poor with the local chaplain. It was the first time I’d flown over the Asian continent, and the names of the countries I passed over were places I’d only heard about in the news or on the internet. Knowing that I was heading to one of those countries alone was both exciting and a little scary. But I knew God would be with me. In fact, He’d had His hand in the adventure long before I knew anything about it. Months before, I’d felt impressed to renew my passport and save a thousand dollars. I had no idea why, but I knew God had a plan. When I eventually learned about the opportunity to serve in the Philippines, I had almost enough money to buy my ticket! The long flight finally ended, and after grabbing my luggage and meeting my host, I stepped out into the heaviest air I’d ever breathed. I’d been warned about the humidity, but no one said I’d feel like I was being wrapped in a hot, wet blanket! As we drove to the clinic about two hours away, I tried to soak in

all the new sights, sounds, and smells. I’d never seen so many people in one place. It seemed like they were in every nook and cranny of the city. Cars, motorcycles, and buses wove in and out of traffic, their horns constantly honking. Merchants were on every street corner, selling dragon fruit, huge avocados, chicken feet, bananas, and many kinds of soup. But as we continued to the clinic, my excitement began to fade. I’d been warned about the poverty, but nothing could have prepared me for the degree of poverty I saw. When I looked down one street, I saw a mother changing her baby’s diaper on a dirty piece of cardboard on the sidewalk. It looked like they lived in an old car parked nearby. When I arrived in Pagudpud, I learned that there were no nice hospitals there to treat the people’s sickness or welfare programs to care for their needs. Many of them lived in homes without windows or doors, and they had no air conditioning, stoves, or refrigerators. They slept in makeshift beds, sick and dying. But to my surprise, I found the people to be very hospitable when we came to pray with them, treat their ailments, and share encouraging promises from God’s Word. They had so little, yet they wanted to share with me. I saw many sad sights while visiting the sick, the orphans, and the widows in Pagudpud. Yet I felt such joy and happiness there. I’m very grateful that God called

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Bringing fruits and vegetables to a woman who suffered a stroke and has difficulty walking.

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These three boys are members of a family who are fish net menders by trade and are very poor. I had an extra bag of food with me, so I gave it to them.

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The man on the right was one of the first people in the community to become an Adventist. His son, middle, suffered a head injury and is now mentally handicapped. The other man is his nephew who was dropped when he was a baby, which caused him to experience stunted growth. We brought them food, prayed with them, and offered words of encouragement.

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This little girl’s name is Ghea. She is the daughter of a man I made close friends with who worked on the clinic’s construction crew.

me to share my time, hope, and resources with those in need. For those of you who may want to travel abroad and share your faith but feel something holding you back, I encourage you to trust in Christ, and He will remove your fear or doubt. Take it from me, a former atheist and a former addict, who was depressed, anxiety-stricken, selfish, lonely, and suicidal since the age of 15. But then God spoke to me in a dream when I was 27 years old and sleeping in a cave in the Arizona desert. My old self was crucified that night, and I was born again by the power and grace of Jesus. Now I can’t help but share my faith. What God did for me, He can do for anyone, including you!

Hear from other volunteers at m360.tv/avs.


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Adventist Volunteer Service facilitates church members’ volunteer missionary service around the world. Volunteers ages 18 to 80 may serve as pastors, teachers, medical professionals, computer technicians, orphanage workers, farmers, and more. To learn more, visit AdventistVolunteers.org.

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JA PA N

Youth Set Church on Fire “G Ricky Oliveras, Office of Adventist Mission

od placed this burden on me,” Daniel says, gazing out at the Tokyo cityscape. “For the past few years, I’ve had this burden because less than one percent of the people are Christian in Japan.” He grew more animated as he spoke, stressing his concerns with emphatic gestures. “It’s a big country with lots of people, but for some reason, the everlasting gospel isn’t being communicated.” His concerns aren’t unfounded. Tokyo is the world’s second largest metropolitan area, with almost 40 million people.* Reaching a city of this size might seem impossible, but God can use anyone, even someone on the other side of the world, to spark change. Daniel grew up in California, United States, as a third-generation Japanese-American. His parents encouraged him to retain the Japanese language, helping him learn to read, write, and speak it. As Daniel grew older, he always

told himself he would be open to God’s plans for his life. After much prayer, he felt that God was calling him to move across the globe and use his language skills to serve in Tokyo, Japan. When he arrived to work alongside the pastor of the Setagaya Adventist Church, he learned that the church was about ready to shut down; fewer than 10 people were attending each week. Daniel knew that God had bigger plans for this congregation, so he began working to once again make the church a pillar in the community. He chose to begin by nurturing relationships. “Here in Japan, there are a lot of lonely people,” Daniel shares. “They just commit to work or school, and a lot of them are lonely, so they want fellowship. I think that’s what the Japanese people need. We just need to mingle with them.” Keeping this first step in Christ’s method in mind, Daniel decided to try to reignite this church’s mission spirit with a

Get a glimpse of this story at m360.tv/s18312.

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fresh approach. He invited young people from across Tokyo and held evangelism training for them in the church. High-school-aged youth and college-aged young adults came together for three weeks. Together, they bonded, worshiped, studied the Bible, and learned how to reach out to people, whether by praying with them or by knocking on doors. “It’s been a blessing,” declares Daniel. “The students really grow a lot. They have this identity as Seventh-day Adventists and have the mission spirit.” This once dwindling church transformed into a youth training center. As the young members reached out to their local community through prayer and faceto-face interaction, attendance quickly grew fivefold! And word is spreading throughout the community. Pastor Yasuki Aoki of the Setagaya church sees God’s hand moving in the young people’s efforts. “When we go out to this community, sometimes we can’t meet the people around this area, but sometimes God sends people to our church. When people come to our church, I feel that Jesus is working for this church.” The church is now essentially run by young people who are eager to share Jesus with all of Tokyo. Yoriko, one young Setagaya church member, says, “It’s great to see how the young people are getting excited about God and the Bible.” For young adults like Takahashi Toru, being a part of the Setagaya church community has meant a lot to them personally. “In my experience, I’ve developed a stronger prayer life,” he shares. “I have direct communication with God as I reach out to


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people. I learned the joy of communicating with God.” With the success the church has experienced so far, Daniel decided to expand its programs to include youth from all over Tokyo. One of these is a monthly social night where 50 to 70 young people stay in sleeping bags at the church, study the Bible, sing songs, and fellowship together. The Setagaya church’s mission spirit has been reignited, and this group continues to grow. Daniel feels that a large part of this was thanks to sparking the youth’s own desire for mission. “When young people get on fire for Jesus, I believe the entire church gets on fire for Jesus,” he says. “That’s why working with the young people is such an honor and privilege.” Setagaya church members are exploring new ways to break down barriers and show the love of God to the people of Tokyo. Please pray

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for them as they spread His love throughout the second largest city on earth. Your prayers and support of the mission offerings go a long way to rekindle mission in Japan and around the world! * Thomas Brinkhoff, “Major Agglomerations of the World,” City Population, last modified January 1, 2018, https://www.citypopulation. de/world/Agglomerations.html.

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Daniel, who came from the other side of the world with a desire to reach Tokyo, Japan, leads a Bible study.

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This group of Setagaya church young people plans how best to distribute literature to their community.

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Yoriko, one young Setagaya church member.

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Takahashi Toru (right) practices selling spiritual literature with Daniel.

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Sabbath morning worship at Setagaya church is often full of youth and young adults.

Mission to the Cities is a world initiative that seeks to plant new congregations in every city with a population of 1 million people or more. This initiative challenges “the way we’ve always done it,” calling for church planters to take unconventional routes to reach urban areas while still building on Christ’s method of ministry. It’s time to reach the cities. How will you be a part? Explore Mission to the Cities projects around the world at MissionToTheCities.org.

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PIONEER POSTCARD

India

Walk-ins Welcome A Earley Simon, Office of Adventist Mission

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boy rushes into the home of Prem, a Global Mission pioneer. His hand is covered in a white paste, a traditional remedy his family used to reduce pain, but it hasn’t worked. Prem quickly examines the boy and promises to treat him after lunch. Today is Sabbath, and he has other patients to help before starting the church service. A man then comes in with his sick wife, who has been suffering from severe stomachaches. Drawing from his basic medical training, Prem listens to the couple and counsels them in his unusual living room. The unique space has been transformed to welcome visitors in need of medical attention. In this small town in Uttar Pradesh, India, quality health care isn’t easily accessible. Most of the people who live here can’t afford to drive to the nearest hospital, which is hours away. So pioneer Prem uses the talents God has given him to serve the town’s sick. This much-needed service

is a lifeline for the people who fill Prem’s schedule each week. Prem’s patients receive more than just physical care. They learn about a wholistic lifestyle and the importance of a healthy mind, body, and spirit. They also receive love and compassion as they speak with Prem. Many of the treatments offered here are

natural medicines, including herbs, plants, and charcoal pills. Prem gives this couple medication and inspirational literature. And at the end of each visit, he asks the heavenly Physician to heal and bless his patients. Prem believes it’s his duty to tell others about the source of all healing, and the people appreciate learning about the God who heals. Prem has one last patient this morning: a young boy who first came here in critical condition.

Through your support of Global Mission, churches like this are planted in areas or among people groups where there’s no Adventist presence. to share the good news of Jesus through wholistic ministry, such as providing medical care, teaching agricultural skills, offering literacy programs, holding evangelistic meetings, and giving Bible studies. To donate, visit Global-Mission.org/giving.

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THE NEED: After seeing many local healers, the family’s only hope was Prem. He prayed for and treated the boy, and in time, he was healed! Today, the parents believe Prem’s God healed their son, and they continue to see Prem for their medical needs. Pioneer Prem finally gets a chance to finish getting dressed for church. At last, he rushes upstairs, where many of his former patients await him. Even from the bottom of the steps, he can hear their singing. They aren’t disturbed by the delay. The extra time has given them an opportunity to praise the wonderful God of healing they’ve come to know. Prem speaks to the group about Jesus. It’s easy for them to

picture a heavenly Physician who healed, preached to, and cared for those around him. They’ve come to see a glimpse of Jesus in Prem. This church plant is the only Seventh-day Adventist congregation in the region. Before Prem arrived, this was considered an unentered area. Now, the members pray to officially establish the first Adventist church here. They also give financially to support the mission here and abroad. They know their humble tithes and offerings receive God’s blessing and are multiplied. Please pray for this church and for pioneers all around the world who labor on the front lines of mission work.

Watch this story in action coming soon— March 16, 2019—at m360.tv/s19111.

INDIA

POPULATION

1.3 Billion

80% HINDU

2% CHRISTIAN

13% 5% OTHER

MUSLIM

“India,” Joshua Project, last modified 2019, https://joshuaproject.net/countries/IN.

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A boy’s family seeks Global Mission pioneer Prem’s help after a home remedy didn’t ease his pain.

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Prem counsels this couple with wholistic lifestyle principles and offers natural medicine to ease the wife’s stomachaches.

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This boy first came to Prem in critical condition, but after Prem’s treatments and prayers, he was healed.

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The church plant members give what they can to support mission work locally and abroad.

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As this church plant continues to grow, the members dream of and pray for building a church of their own.

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GLOBAL NEIGHBORHOOD

Italy

La Dolce Vita—The Sweet Life With a reputation for being passionate about everything from exquisite art and ancient architecture to opera and breathtaking scenic coastlines, Italians have much to say about enjoying “the sweet life.” This is especially true when it comes to sharing a good meal with friends.

Build your recipe repertoire at m360.tv/recipes.

Tomato Mashed Potatoes (Serves 6 to 8) This rustic mashed potato recipe is so unusual, you probably haven’t tried it before. The combination of tomato puree and mashed potatoes is a delightful variation of two of the most popular vegetables in the world.

INGREDIENTS • • • • • •

4 medium waxy potatoes, such as Yukon Gold 2 cups tomato puree 2 tablespoons olive oil 1/2 teaspoon paprika 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper

PREPARATION

1. Place the potatoes in a large sauce pan and cover with cold water. Cover and bring the water to a boil. Reduce the heat, and simmer for 20 to 25 minutes or until the potatoes are very tender when pierced with a knife. Drain and set aside to cool slightly. 2. In a large pan, heat the tomato puree, olive oil, paprika, salt, and red pepper over medium heat for 15 minutes, or until the sauce has thickened slightly. 3. Peel the potatoes, and place them in a bowl. Mash them with a potato masher, and then use an electric mixer to blend until the texture is smooth with no lumps. 4. Stir the mashed potatoes into the tomato mixture until blended. Serve hot.

VARIATION

For a dramatic presentation, press the mixture into an oiled pie plate or medium-size bowl. Invert the mixture onto a serving platter and cut into wedges.

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Fresh Berry Salad (Serves 4 to 6) This refreshing salad dessert pleases the eye and the palate, a worthy grand finale to any meal.

INGREDIENTS

• 3 tablespoons apricot jam (may substitute

Roasted Cauliflower With Capers and Raisins (Serves 4 to 6) Roasting the cauliflower adds a slightly crisp and caramelized texture to this sweet and savory dish.

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any kind of jam) 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 2 tablespoons orange juice 1/4 teaspoon vanilla, optional 1 1/2 cups strawberries, sliced 1/2 cup raspberries 1/4 cup blackberries 1/2 cup blueberries

PREPARATION

1. In a medium bowl, whisk together jam, lemon juice, orange juice, and vanilla (if using). 2. Add the berries and stir gently to coat the fruit. Let stand for 30 minutes before serving. May be served chilled or at room temperature.

INGREDIENTS

• 1 medium head of cauliflower, trimmed and • • • • • • •

cut into small florets 1 medium red onion, cut into 8 wedges 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup golden raisins 2 tablespoons capers, rinsed and drained 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice 2 tablespoons honey

PREPARATION

1. Preheat oven to 425 °F. In a large roasting pan, toss together the cauliflower, onion, olive oil, and salt. Roast for 20 to 30 minutes, turning the vegetables at least twice until they are nicely browned. 2. While the cauliflower is roasting, cover the raisins with warm water and soak them until they are plump. Drain. 3. Add the raisins and capers to the cauliflower, and roast for 5 more minutes. 4. Mix the lemon juice with the honey. Drizzle over the cauliflower, and toss lightly. Serve hot or at room temperature.

Now retired, Nancy Kyte served for 10 years as the marketing director of the Office of Adventist Mission.

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RWA N DA

Pint-sized Persistence W A dentist from Bolivia, Sinercio Jonatan Nina Yupanqui serves at Kigali Adventist Dental Clinic in Rwanda through Adventist Volunteer Service.

hen I was a child, I watched a documentary at school about medical missionaries in Africa. That night, I knelt by my bed to talk to God. “Dear Lord,” I prayed, “please help me go to Africa someday so I can wear a white coat like the doctor in the film and help needy children.” I forgot about that prayer until many years later when I volunteered to serve as a dentist in Rwanda. Rwanda is a country in central Africa with a painful past. In 1994, hundreds of thousands of people were murdered by their countrymen, and much of the country was destroyed. There was heartache everywhere. Fortunately, Rwanda is amazingly different now. The country has been rebuilt, and the people have learned how to forgive and respect each other. Best of all, they’re hungry for the Word of God! I’m very grateful that God called me to share Him in Rwanda and has given me the opportunity to make a difference in people’s lives through meeting their needs. One Sunday, the clinic staff went to a Total Member Involvement evangelism and health campaign in a small town called Nyamata to provide free medical and dental care to those who

couldn’t afford it. So many came that we didn’t even have time for lunch! But we didn’t feel fatigued because we were passionate about helping them. One of my colleagues introduced me to a woman who had come to the campaign after experiencing intense tooth pain for a week. We treated her, and she

If you’re interested in being a volunteer, visit AdventistVolunteers.org. 1 26

went home that night completely free from pain. The next day, she brought a lot of people to our campaign! I heard her telling them, “These Adventist brothers are good. I came with severe pain, and they didn’t ask me whether I belonged to their church or whether I had been attending the meetings. They just helped me, so


let’s go to the meetings!” More than 200 people were baptized as a result of God’s leading during the program. On another occasion, I had temporarily been put in charge of the clinic, and I was very worried because some things weren’t going well. As I walked to a local restaurant for lunch, I met a boy who frequently asks me for coins. He had always behaved respectfully toward me, even when I had no money to give him. However, this time, he grabbed me and said, “Friend, I’m hungry! Please give me food!” I told him that I had no coins and would give him some the next day, but he wouldn’t leave. Instead, he defiantly stopped me from continuing down the road. I was struck by the way this 10-year-old boy asserted himself. “I’m not asking you for money this time,” he insisted. “I’m really hungry. Please let me eat with you.” I took him along to the restaurant, and while we ate our meal, his behavior made me think. If this child stood in front of me and got what he needed, why don’t I stand before God and ask Him to help me in this work? I had invited the boy to eat, not realizing that through him, God would minister to my own needs. I rushed back to my office and knelt down to pray with a faith I had never had before. I surrendered to Him all the problems that were weighing on me so heavily, and He resolved them one by one! The boy on the street reminded me that when God sends you to do something for Him, He doesn’t send you alone. He sends His Spirit with you to help in every challenge. Once again, I found comfort in the promise of Deuteronomy 31:6: “Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid or terrified because of them, for the Lord your God goes with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you” (NIV).

2

3

1

The street boy who taught me a lesson on persistence.

2

Visiting with guests at the Total Member Involvement evangelism and health campaign in Nyamata.

3

We had to pull many teeth from the children at the health campaign in Nyamata. When this picture was taken, they were still feeling the sensation of anesthesia, but I’m sure they’ll be happy not to have any more pain!

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THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA UNION

The Little Streams 28


T Originally from the United States, Rosemary McKenzie served as a missionary in the Middle East with her husband Marshall and their children.

he early morning mist filled the valleys and ascended the hills toward our house as I heard the first call to prayer from the mosque below. Five times a day, thousands of believers in the community stopped whatever they were doing to pray. I, too, made a habit of praying when I heard the mournful call. I prayed that these people would come to have a deeper knowledge of God and that the Adventist workers in the region would have a burning desire to share Him. More than five years ago, our family, including three children all less than eight years old, traded the cold winters of Wisconsin, United States, for the sunny Mediterranean. After three flights and 30 hours of travel, we arrived at our new home, where we would stay for the next three years. We were excited to join an international team of missionaries and tentmakers who were working to spread the gospel among the millions of people living in the Middle East. One of our jobs was to provide Adventist books and other printed materials for each of the 20 countries in our assigned territory. This area included four major languages along with a multitude of dialects. Additionally, in the more than 30 years since the Adventist Church had published books in the region, publishing methods had changed drastically from analog to digital. There were no digital files and very few hard copies of books that had been translated and printed in the past. One of our first projects was to create the digital files so that books and tracts could be published, but neither Marshall nor I knew the language. He prayed about how to get this project started and felt compelled to employ local Adventist young people to create the digital files. It was the answer we needed! These young people made it possible for books to be produced quickly and made available for literature evangelists to sell in local communities.

Our region had its share of unrest, and the possible need to evacuate was always in the back of our minds. We prayed for wisdom to know when it was best to leave the area and when it was best to stay. Every time we left our home, we knew we might never be able to return. By God’s grace, we never faced this reality, but other missionaries in the region, unfortunately, did. Conflict in Syria filled our country with refugees. A simple idea, the courage of young people, and the vision of administrators laid the foundation for reaching these families with the gospel. While on vacation, we encouraged a group of college students to come on a short-term mission trip to share health principles with the local refugee community. We also helped facilitate translators and transportation for the students. In less than 10 days, this small group served 800 people and connected with key contacts in the refugee community. One opportunity sometimes led to another. Once, our team held health screening services specifically for Syrian refugees. The contacts they made later led to the establishment of a school that provides basic education to refugee children, ministry to their families, and church services that their parents attend. Although we weren’t as directly involved with helping the refugees as others in our team, we visited their homes, listened to their stories, and continued to pray for them. Our work included traveling to many countries in the Middle East to encourage local believers and provide support for outreach initiatives. Every trip brought new inspiration as we met to train and inspire other expatriates and local believers who were working in countries where it was difficult to share the gospel. Often, it seemed as if our efforts were very small in the face of the challenges of multiple languages, limited resources, and

millions of unreached people. Our work seemed like one drop in a huge bucket. But we continued to be encouraged by the pen of Inspiration: “But the little rill that makes its noiseless way through grove and meadow, bearing health and fertility and beauty, is as useful in its way as the broad river. And in contributing to the river’s life, it helps achieve that which alone it could never have accomplished.” * Wherever you are, you can support the work in the Middle East with your prayers, your funds, and as the Lord opens the way, your hands and feet. Ellen G. White, Education (Mountain View, CA: Pacific Press®, 1903), 117. *

Your weekly mission offerings help support the ministry of the Adventist Church in the Middle East and North Africa. Thank you! The Adventist Learning Center (ALC)

Learn more about the school for refugee children that Rosemary’s team helped establish in Lebanon.

Explore the ALC’s ministry at m360.tv/i17041.

Read how the ALC’s impact extends beyond its walls in “ The Refugees’ Mite” at am.adventistmission.org/ v5n2-14. 29


SÃO TOMÉ AND PRÍNCIPE

Anselmo wanted to attend the International Adventist College—Cosme Mota when he saw the school’s TV commercial.

Television Wars T By Andrew McChesney, Office of Adventist Mission.

30

he big fight for the television started when Anselmo wanted to watch a cartoon about superheroes on channel 24 in his home in São Tomé, capital of the island nation of São Tomé and Príncipe off the West African coast. His older sister, Eliene, wanted to switch the channel to watch a program about princesses. “I was watching first,” Anselmo told his sister. “Well, I’m older,” Eliene replied. That annoyed Anselmo. He couldn’t argue because his sister was older, so he did the next best thing. He slapped her on the arm. “Why did you hit me?” Eliene growled. She didn’t like being slapped, and she slapped him back. That made Anselmo even angrier, and he slapped her again. The two children slapped each other back and forth, their voices growing louder and louder as they howled in protest of the other’s actions. The commotion drew Mother to the room. “Stop!” she commanded angrily. “Don’t fight because one day

you will hurt each other.” Mother told the children to take turns watching television. Anselmo could finish watching the cartoon, and then Eliene could watch her program. Anselmo didn’t like arguing with his sister, and he really wanted to obey Mother and stop. But not too much time passed, and Eliene said something annoying. Before he knew it, he had slapped her on the arm again. Then one day, Anselmo saw a commercial for a Seventh-day Adventist school on television. He liked the commercial, and he thought he could make good friends at the school. So he told his parents that he wanted to study there. “We’ll send you there if we can find the money,” said Father, who worked for an oil company.

When Father had enough money, the family sent Anselmo to the school for the third grade. Anselmo found the school was different from his old public school. His former teachers sometimes struck him when he misbehaved. The new teachers, however, were missionaries and never hit him. He found two neighborhood friends were already studying at the school, and that helped him feel more comfortable. Every morning, the teacher read a story from the Bible before lessons started. Anselmo had never heard about Jesus or read the Bible, but he loved to listen to the stories. He remembered his arguments with his sister when the teacher read about Joseph’s quarrels with his older brothers. He heard how the brothers grew so angry that they sold Joseph into

More Children’s Mission Stories This story and others like it can be found in the Children’s Mission magazine at AdventistMission.org/mission-quarterlies.


slavery in Egypt. He rejoiced when Joseph later forgave his brothers. “My favorite part of the story is when Joseph became prime minister and invited his brothers to the meal and forgave them,” Anselmo said. When he returned home that day, he told his sister about Joseph.

“From that day, she hasn’t hit me, and I haven’t hit her,” he said. Part of this quarter’s Thirteenth Sabbath Offering will help Anselmo’s school, International Adventist College - Cosme Mota, build an auditorium where all the children can attend morning worship to learn more about God.

“Before, I didn’t know anything about God, and I didn’t know whether He existed,” said Anselmo, who is now eight and in the fourth grade. “But the school taught me that He is love and that He is important in my life.” Thank you for your mission offering.

Children’s Offering Bank Coloring Page You can help kids like Anselmo learn about Jesus, too, by collecting mission offerings! 1. Tear or cut out this coloring page. 2. Color it. 3. Wrap your coloring page around a tin can or similar container and use sticky tape to make it stay. Ask an adult to help you make sure the can has no sharp edges! 4. Put your offering in the can. Ask others to help you raise mission offerings to help children around the world learn about Jesus!

5. When your can is full, count the money with an adult, and then ask the adult to mail a check for that amount to Adventist Mission: Office of Adventist Mission General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists 12501 Old Columbia Pike Silver Spring, MD 20904-6601 UNITED STATES Find out more about the mission offering bank at AdventistMission.org/mission-offering-bank.

Watch the story behind page coming on February 23, 2019, Find each quarter’s printable mission bank forthis kidscoloring at adventistmission.org/offering-bank

AdventistMission.org

This is my 13th Sabbath Offering for Jesus

at m360.tv/s1918. Find other great children’s stories at m360.tv/kids.

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Non Profit Organization U. S. Postage

General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists 12501 Old Columbia Pike Silver Spring, MD 20904

PAID

Nampa, ID Permit No. 66

It almost took her life. But it couldn't take her faith.

Watch “Blinded by a Bullet� at m360.tv/s18411

Profile for Adventist Mission

Mission 360˚ Magazine by Adventist Mission - February 2019