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A L A BAMA CO NCR E TE I NDUSTRIES ASSOC IATION M AGAZ IN E | FA L L 2016


FALL 2016

ConcreteWorks is a publication of the Alabama Concrete Industries Association and features articles and photographs pertaining to product applications, educational opportunities, as well as innovative construction techniques impacting the industry. Please email rlindsay@ alconcrete.org with any comments regarding featured articles in ConcreteWorks or to suggest a story idea for a future edition. Rebecca Lindsay,

Art Director & Editor

2

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Towering Feats

Koch Foods, one of the top poultry

16

Upping the Ante

Wind Creek Casinos are widely known

processors in the nation, expands their

throughout the state, and concrete was a

South Alabama facility and enlists one

main component in both the Montgomery

of the Alabama Concrete Association’s

and Wetumpka facilities. (ON THE COVER)

members to supply the material.

6

On Point

Thompson Tractor Company hosted the

22

The Top Block

The Association’s annual award was given

2016 Truck Driver Championship, with

to Nequette Architecture & Design for Fire

cash prizes and many incentives for the

Station No. 10, located in the Ross Bridge

top drivers in the state.

Community of Hoover.

12

26

John Sorrell, Editor

www.alconcrete.org www.mysaferoom.org

Architect Spotlight

Alison Corey knew at an early age she wanted to become an architect, and has quickly made a name for herself with Chapman Sisson Architects in Huntsville.

Fall Calendar


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

T WE R II N NG TO OW ER G F ATS S FE E AT Koch Foods, one of the nation’s top poultry

to send it through a concrete pump so it had

DELIVERY TUNNELS

processors, recently looked to Hodgson

to be a pumpable mix,” says Hodgson.

Concrete to supply material for a major

The project kicked off in early 2016 with

expansion at one of their south Alabama

pours to construct a series of delivery

facilities. The company is in the midst of

tunnels.

a major project to advance its processing

Manager Bill Hodgson says the walls

Next, Hodgson worked with crews utilizing

capabilities and expand its capacity. This

and tunnels eventually became the sub-

a special rig to install auger cast pilings

includes major upgrades to the company’s

basement of the new facility, allowing easy

designed to support the massive silo.

feed mill located just below Montgomery,

access for rail car and truck loading.

“The ground down there is prairie mud.

Hodgson

Concrete

AUGER CAST PILINGS

General

Alabama. Building the updated facility

It’s very plastic and this is one of the

took months of effort and was a four-stage

“The tunnels were mostly just poured walls.

favored methods they use here around

process. Some phases of construction

They did have a floor that was done first.

Montgomery to stabilize the ground under

required continuous product delivery and

Then, a network of tunnels were poured

the foundation,” says Hodgson.

coordination of up to 30 trucks at a time.

with regular 4000 psi concrete. We did have


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

Each pile is cast in place using a hollow

keep up with the fast pace of placement.

stem auger with continuous flights. The

“Central dispatch was here for the pour

auger is drilled into the soil and/or rock

because there were so many trucks

and then slowly extracted, removing the

involved. Those trucks enabled us to be

earthen materials as concrete is pumped

finished shortly after daylight and everything

through the hollow stem. Hodgson says

went

the cementitious material pumped into the

also had great cooperation from our raw

piles is a specialized 12-bag grout that

material suppliers. We went through many

strengthens to 5,000 psi in 28 days.

truckloads of cement, as well as sand and

smoothly,”

says

Hodgson.

“We

gravel. It took a lot of effort.” “The facility is built on that foundation of auger cast piles. A network of piles were

SLIP-FORM SILO

installed down under the earth between 20 and 30 feet deep and filled with grout.”

By early summer, it was time for the final stage of the expansion project: placement

MONOLITHIC FOUNDATION

of a massive slip-form silo. This stage of construction required scheduling almost a

Contractors then moved to lay a large

full week of continuous deliveries. For six

monolithic foundation to tie all the piles

days, crews worked round-the-clock to

together.

incorporated

accommodate the 24-hour a day pours.

about 2000 cubic yards of concrete. “This

“Once we started, we couldn’t stop until it

was a significant challenge as the contractor

got to the very top,” says Hodgson, “so we

required a delivery rate of up to 300 cubic

went for six straight days, 24 hours a day,

yards per hour to the site,” says Hodgson.

never stopping.”

Crews began those deliveries shortly after

When trucks arrived at the project site,

midnight. Roughly 30 trucks were used to

their concrete was poured into a pump

The

foundation

FALL 2016 3


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

“ II C A N ’ T say S AY c an't E NOU Ab BO eno uG gH h a oU uT t T REm ME ND tH hE e T tre en dO oU u sS E F F O RT P O RT H effort pU uT t Ffort h By Y O MP ES b oU uR r Ee m p Ll O oY y Eees T O H Ma AK hE to e Ll Pp m kE e T PR OJE A tH h IisS p roj eC cT t a SU S S . ”" s uC cC cE ess.

"


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

linked to two mini-placing booms on the

Throughout the slow moving week-long

work platform. As the platform was raised,

pour, extra effort was made to keep truck

the mini-placers went up as well. Hodgson

drivers consistent. “We tried to keep the

notes this type of placement was an

same people so that the drivers would

extremely efficient way to reach the entire

know what to expect on the job site,” says

perimeter of the silos.

Hodgson. “Also, the contractor was then familiar with them and comfortable with

While the earlier monolithic foundation pour

them and knew those drivers could take

required 300 yards an hour, the slip-form

care of what needed to be done.”

project was much slower. “They wanted to raise the elevation only a few inches per

IMPRESSIVE RESULT

hour,” says Hodgson, “so the rate of slip was about 24 yards an hour.”

The end result: three impressive 240-foot silos now stand high above the grassy

Day and night crews kept the flow of

pastures surrounding the facility. “It’s a big

concrete coming even throughout crew

silo,” Hodgson notes, “made up of two 70-

changes. Dispatchers were also careful to

foot diameter silos with a 35-foot diameter

keep the pace of concrete steady without

silo in the middle. It is without a doubt the

stacking

biggest slip-form concrete structure around

trucks.

Hodgson

attributes

the success of this complex process to

Montgomery right now.”

constant communication between the plant and job site. “It took a lot of coordination

ABOUT KOCH FOODS

and the contractor kept us well informed as to what was needed; that’s key.”

All phases of the 2016 project were part of Koch Foods investment in new, state-of the-

Keeping the deliveries on track was further

art technology to advance its processing

complicated

temperatures.

capabilities and expand its capacity. Koch

As overnight lows in the 70’s gave way to

by

variable

Foods is a company that prides itself in

daytime highs in the 90’s, Quality Control

leading the innovation curve for the poultry

had to keep up with the fluctuations. “In

industry by investing in regular upgrades to

order to keep up with the variations and

its production facilities. Founded in 1985

keep the slip-form on schedule, they had to

as a one-room, 13-employee chicken de-

make changes on the fly,” says Hodgson.

boning and cutting operation, the company

“Our QC folks worked very hard.”

is now one of the top poultry processors in the U.S.

FALL 2016 5


EVENT SPOTLIGHT


EVENT SPOTLIGHT

N

POINT

THOMPSON TRACTOR HOSTS 2016 TRUCK RODEO On a beautiful Saturday in April, Thompson

including 42 drivers (a new record), their

Tractor Company hosted ACIA’s annual

family members and many volunteers.

Truck

Driver

Championship,

otherwise

known as the “Truck Rodeo.”

Attendees enjoyed Chic Fil-A biscuits and a delicious barbecue lunch following the

Although the morning was brisk, the sunny

competition. GameTruck and Balloons &

skies made for a beautiful day and the event

More were on hand to provide entertainment

was enjoyed by more than 200 people,

for the children.

FALL 2016 7


EVENT SPOTLIGHT

With the support of Thompson and the other sponsors, ACIA was able to award several cash prizes to not only the top 3 competitors but 8 other drivers as well. In addition, Thompson Tractor held a “Front Loader” competition, and the top three winners received tickets to an upcoming race at Talladega Superspeedway. The association would like to thank this year’s sponsors who helped make the event such a success; Beck Industrial, Gulf Coast Trucking, McNeilus Trucks, Nextran Trucks, Sherman Industries, Thompson Tractor and Truckworx.


EVENT SPOTLIGHT

FALL 2016 9


EVENT SPOTLIGHT


EVENT SPOTLIGHT

2

16 TRUCK RODEO

CHAMPIONSHIP PARTICIPANTS 1st place – $750 Jeremy Johnson Ready Mix USA 2nd place – $500 Ashley Gassaway Ready Mix USA 3rd Place – $250 Rex Walters Builders Supply 4th place – $175 Edward Martinez Sherman Industries

TOP: Jeremy Johnson with Ready Mix USA accepts 1st Place Trophy from Bill Warr with Thompson Tractor MIDDLE: Ashley Gassaway with Ready

5th place -$125 Gaylon Lovelace Ready Mix USA

Mix USA accepts 2nd Place Trophy from Warr

6th place – $100 Ron Ramsey Sherman Industries

BOTTOM: Jimmy Williams accepts Team

Team winner of the Truckworx Team Trophy- Ready Mix USA

Trophy for Ready Mix USA

Thank you to all who participated, and we look forward to seeing you again next year!

FALL 2016 11


ARCHITECT SPOTLIGHT

CONCEPT TO CREATION A L ISON COR E Y - C H A PM A N SI SSON A RC H I T EC T S

At just 10 years old, Alison Corey drew her

“As a kid, my family and I would walk

Alison graduated from Ball State University

first set of house plans on a sheet of graph

through houses under construction around

in 2007 with a Bachelor of Science degree

paper. Now 20 years later, she already has

our neighborhood, and I was fascinated

in Architecture. She then continued at

an impressive career as an architect with

with the arrangement of spaces and started

Ball State and received her Master’s of

Chapman Sisson Architects in Huntsville.

drawings house plans on graph paper in 4th

Architecture in 2009. After graduation, she

Grade, she says. “Ever since then I have

relocated to North Alabama and joined the

Growing up in West Chester, Ohio, Alison

been interested in the profession and took

Chapman Sisson team.

recalls her love of architecture developing

engineering and architectural courses that

early in life.

were offered by my high school.”

The firm has many projects that include the


ARCHITECT SPOTLIGHT

“THE ABILITY TO SEE SOMETHING YOU MODELED AND DETAILED ON THE COMPUTER TAKE SHAPE DURING CONSTRUCTION...IS THE MOST REWARDING PART.”

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH FOYER ??????????, AL

FALL 2016 13


ARCHITECT SPOTLIGHT

G ET TO K NOW

A LISON

What are your favorite hobbies? During my personal time I enjoy reading

and

sewing.

Sewing

is

intriguing to me because of how the little parts come together to make a whole finished product, a small scale version of Architecture. What is the one tool you can’t live without? The Computer. Anyone who knows me well know that I have horrendous penmanship.

I

also

have

never

been very fond of sketching beyond diagrams. Thankfully for me, we are in the digital era and I was able to embrace various computer programs, digital modeling, and BIM during school. In fact, a coworker and I head the BIM Department and Revit Standards for our office. What’s the last book you read? James Patterson’s The Beach House. Patterson is my favorite author and I am slowly making it through all this books, which is a huge feat considering how many he has written. Recently, I have been reading baby books to my son.


ARCHITECT SPOTLIGHT

use of concrete under its belt, including a

sea and landscape creating a structural that

project recently featured in ConcreteWorks.

is also a piece of art.

“Whitesburg P8 is my favorite personal

“I also love the innovation used in the

project that used concrete and was

fiber-reinforced concrete lattice on Rudy

Chapman Sisson Architects is a young,

featured in the last issue of the magazine,”

Ricciotti’s MuCEM in Marseille, France,”

dynamic group of talented people who

says Alison. The University of Huntsville

says Alison. “This building shows that

desire to serve our clients through

Nursing building is another of Chapman

concrete can be used to make thin and

outstanding architecture and quality

Sisson’s projects that uses concrete, and

playful elements.”

design work. Our goal is to be the best

the concrete panels on the exterior are

ABOUT CHAPMAN SISSON

at what we do and provide exceptional

white to match the existing building. It is

Not only is she a successful architect,

customer service and build lasting

very striking.”

Alison is the president of the North Alabama

relationships.

Mike

Chapman

and

American Institute of Architects (AIA) and is

Martin Sisson began their architectural

Alison chooses to use concrete in projects

busy being a new mom to her four-month old

careers in the early 1980’s. During this

due to its durability, life cycle cost, minimal

son, Mason and wife to her husband, Filip.

time, they progressed rapidly in project

maintenance, versatility, and optimal energy performance.

management and leadership roles. A when asked what her favorite thing about

Both architects developed a passion

being an architect is, she replies with a smile.

for exceptional customer service and

Some of her favorite (famous) projects that

adjusting the practice of architecture

use concrete include the Cidade das Artes in

“The ability to see something you modeled

around the needs of the client. In

Rio de Janeiro by Christian de Portzamparc is

and detailed on the computer take shape

1997, Chapman Sisson Architects

one of my favorite famous concrete buildings.

during construction and then ultimately walk

was formed from this passion. CSA is

Concrete is used to create an interplay

through the finished project. To me, this

dedicated to generating creative design

between volume and empty space. The

aspect mixed with a happy client is the most

solutions to meet its clients’ needs.

curves in the concrete echo the surrounding

rewarding part.”

FALL 2016 15


F E AT U R E

♦♣♥♠

UPPING THE ANTE Windcreek Casino-Wetumpka


F E AT U R E

Situated on the banks of the Alabama River stands Windcreek Hotel and Casino, a AAA diamond-rated hotel in the heart of

Wetumpka,

Alabama.

Wind

Creek

Hospitality is the principal gaming and hospitality entity for the Poarch Band of Creek Indians. The company operates six properties throughout the state and the Florida Panhandle, with three of the properties in Alabama. When Uzan + Case Structural Engineers and Creative Partners was given the opportunity to be a part of the project, they jumped at the chance, albeit challenging at first. Because the drawings were issued in multiple Work Packages to facilitate the construction schedule, this project was somewhat of a challenge,” says Mary Kay Knight, Principal, P.E. “It was effectively a fast-track project, and we began our early schematic design in September 2011 then issued our foundation package ‘for construction’ the following year.” During the next four months, the firm issued six subsequent packages for the remainder of the structural framing for both the Casino and the Hotel buildings. Construction continued for another year after that. For the lateral analysis and the posttensioned floor plates, the hotel was designed using ETABS and Concept, a

FALL 2016 17


F E AT U R E

“The decision was made to support the structures on a 22-inch thick pre-stressed concrete mat foundation bearing on compacted engineered fill over the in-situ clay soils�


F E AT U R E

program for linear, nonlinear, static and dynamic analysis, and the design of building systems. The casino itself was primarily designed using RAM software, a program used for structural design. “Concrete was the only solution for the areas around the oval-shaped aquarium, a unique feature of the project that sits at the center bar on the casino floor,” she says. “This required a 32 foot, zero inch square concrete pit below the gaming floor to accommodate all of the water filtration and pumping equipment. And due to the saltwater environment, we utilized corrosion inhibiting admixture in the concrete mix.” The hotel’s structural frame is a shear wall lateral system, and the floor plates are post-tensioned concrete flat slabs which provided a simple solution to a typical residential-loaded floor. “The hotel has a high-bay executive suite on the upper floor that overlooks the river with

FALL 2016 19


F E AT U R E

two 30 inch diameter concrete columns that span 25 feet from Level 21 up to the curved steel-framed roof,” says Knight. “The outdoor area on Level 21 is designed for a large hot tub, a working fireplace, and floor pavers. The perimeter has a tall glass guardrail screen wall. All of this on a slab that cantilevers about 9 feet.” When asked why concrete was a good product for this structure, Knight explains that by using concrete for the hotel, the floor system remained very thin, which is reflected in the guest-room balconies. “This was a challenging but really fun project to be a part of,” Knight says. “But my favorite part of the building has to be the aquarium at the center bar. Who doesn’t love to gaze at sharks swimming while

contact pressure of 2000 pounds per

enjoying a cocktail?”

square foot (psf) with a maximum average uniformly distributed contact pressure in the

BB KING’S BLUES C L U B AT W I N D C R E E K CASINO MONTGOMERY

range of 850 to 900 psf. “The decision was made to support the structures on a 22-inch thick pre-stressed concrete mat foundation bearing on

CONCRETE WAS ALSO INCLUDED IN: ♣♣♣♣♣♣♣♣♣♣♣♣ Restaurant and Casino Floors & Roof: Concrete Floor Due to Large Spans and Heavy Mechanical Loading.

At Montgomery’s Windcreek Casino, the

compacted engineered fill over the in-

iconic BB Kings Blues Club on Beale Street

situ clay soils,” says Danny Raines, P.E.,

was recreated right here in Alabama. The

SECB, VP Weatherford & Associates. “The

project consisted of a 2-level restaurant,

pre-stressed mat foundation provided the

swimming pool and spa on the roof of BB

only feasible solution to supporting the

Concrete Slab on Long-Span Composite

King’s. Connected to the restaurant’s

heavy structure while not penetrating the

Deck

native soils.”

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ Hotel Floors & Roof:

♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠

building are a 5-story hotel on one side and a two-story open gaming floor area on the

“Our favorite design aspect of the building

Pool:

other. The design for the structure began

was the unique utilization of pre-stressing

Cast-In-Place Post-Tensioned Wall/Beams

in July of 2014 with the grand opening in December 2015.

to

overcome

the

difficult

foundation

and Slab

conditions and provide an efficient design,”

♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥

The entire structure was supported on pre-

says Danny Raines, P.E., SECB, VP

General:

stressed concrete mat foundation, but due

Weatherford & Associates. “This helped

to archeological considerations the in-situ

reduce the overall amount of materials

soils could not be disturbed. The mat slab

and minimized the weight on the weak

was designed for a maximum localized

foundation soils.”

The total project contained over 30,000 cubic yards of concrete


F E AT U R E

“The hotel has a high-bay executive suite on the upper floor that overlooks the river with two 30 inch diameter concrete columns that span 25 feet from Level 21 up to the curved steel-framed roof�

FALL 2016 21


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

THE

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Alabama Chapter recognized Hoover Fire Station No. 10, designed by Louis Nequette with Nequette Architecture & Design, as the Alabama Concrete Association’s 2016 “Top Block Award” winner at its annual summer

TOP

BLOCK convention in Perdido Key.

The fire station is located in the Ross Bridge community of Hoover, which is traditionally inspired and hearkens back to historic

towns that promote diversity, walkability and great public spaces. “The Ross Bridge Fire Station is designed to fit into the English inspired style of the Village Center,” says Louis Nequette. “We wanted a permanent civic exterior material but wanted to avoid brick. So many of the surrounding homes are brick and we felt the building would get lost in the backdrop of the neighborhood.” For the structure, Nequette decided on a historically appropriate “pebble-dash” stucco finish. For stucco to be a long-term


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

FALL 2016 23


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

ADDITIONAL FEATURES OF

HOOVER FIRE

STATION NO. 10 Proportions of the building are heavier than homes beyond, but details provide the public with visual delight and an inviting experience. The Engine Bays are tucked around the corner from the village’s Market Street, allowing more human-scaled spaces to line public street frontage. The living spaces of the station – the Kitchen, Dining and Day Room – buffer the Engine Bays from the street and leave open a view from the street. The office, guest lobby and bunk rooms line the street edge and spatially define the public space. The

urban

plan

configuration

wraps around a private courtyard and loggia that provides protected comfortable outdoor space.


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

low-maintenance exterior finish, it must be

chose to use a concrete block veneer, laid up

“Concrete is a permanent timeless material,

applied to a solid masonry.

like brick with a drainage cavity between the

and only want authentic durable timeless

CMU and Stud wall. On the taller engine bay

materials on our buildings,” says Nequette.

“The recent application of stucco to wood

we apply the stucco directly to a 12” thick

“As you live, you see how fast twenty years

sheathing leads to cracking, requires ugly

load-bearing CMU wall.”

can go by. Our buildings should look as

control joints everywhere, and usually results

good (or better) as the age.”

in the windows projecting from the face of the

In addition, Nequette appreciates how

finish – there’s a reason you don’t see this on

concrete serves multiple needs – structure,

old buildings,” he explains. “To do it right, we

veneer and walking surface to name a few.

ABOUT NEQUETTE ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN Nequette Architecture & Design started in 1999 as Dungan Nequette Architects. Dungan Nequette operated for 16 years, beginning as Jeff Dungan and Louis Nequette struggled to find that “top-down” design firm that would support their desires to create beautiful timeless buildings. The firm quickly grew, but over time different passions of the men allowed two studios to form so each principal could build a team around their interests. Louis Nequette and his team found reward in both the custom work, which allowed for a very personal and often higher budget design solution, as well as the multi family and mixed use work, which required the leveraging and restraint of design solutions to create buildings and places of beauty at lower budgets. Louis’ team learned that the magic occurs when you lend the knowledge, ideas and tricks from one arena to the other. After enduring a long market recession from 2008-12, the firm began to grow again. This growth precipitated the slow transition of Jeff and Louis’ studios into their own firms.

FALL 2016 25


FALL CALENDAR


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 ACI Field Testing - Birmingham, AL

30 31

 ACI Field Testing - Birmingham, AL  ACIF Sporting Clays Fundraiser Sylacauga, AL  ACI Field Testing - Montgomery, AL

 ACI Field Testing - Montgomery, AL  ACI Field Testing - Mobile, AL

 Butch Wyatt Concrete Cup - Birmingham, AL - Oct. 24, 2016

FALL 2016 27


TTC-139-ConcreteWorksPowerSys_FullPg.indd 1


The demand for reliable power is greater than ever before. Even the slightest disturbance can threaten the integrity of entire power systems. If an outage occurs, irreplaceable data, money, and productivity could be lost. Our sole mission is to prevent that from happening. Thompson provides a range of products and systems to help you avoid everything from voltage sags and spikes to complete loss of power. And keep you on your game.

EVERYONE’S POWER GAME SHOULD BE SO RELIABLE.

5/3/16 12:49 PM


PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

MONTGOMERY, AL PERMIT NO. 456

1745 Platt Place Montgomery, AL 36117 www.alconcrete.org 334.265.0501

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