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A L A B A M A CO NCR E TE I NDU STRIES ASSOC IATION M AGAZ IN E | SPR I N G 2018


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

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ConcreteWorks is a publication of the Alabama Concrete Industries Association and features articles and photographs pertaining to product applications, educational opportunities, as well as innovative construction techniques impacting the industry. Please email rlindsay@alconcrete.org with any comments regarding featured articles in ConcreteWorks or to suggest a story idea for a future edition.

Rebecca Lindsay, Art Director & Editor John Sorrell, Editor

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TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

www.alconcrete.org www.mysaferoom.org

2  This Bud's for You

For more than 80 years, Adams Beverage,

a family owned Anheuser-Busch Wholesaler, has been a fixture in the beer distribution market, and in June of 2017 cut the ribbon on their brand new building in Opelika, Alabama.

6  The Architecture of Jennifer Barber

Growing up in

Montgomery, Jennifer Barber’s parents spent time teaching their children about design by showing them art, photography and inspiring architecture. Shortly after starting college, she knew she would follow in her father’s footsteps.

11 Technicle Review

Architect Peter Fortier in New Orleans was faced

with a compressed construction schedule, on a site still at risk from future flooding. Read how masonry has taken a front seat as New Orleans continues to rebuild post-Katrina.

15 Throwing Rocks

The Auburn University Student Chapter of ACI is

dedicated to promoting an interest in concrete in Auburn and in the surrounding community. Each spring, the chapter hosts a luncheon event called ‘Concrete Day,’ and this year a concrete bowling ball challenge was on the agenda.

19 We Have Liftoff

After four years of planning, design and construction,

Huntsville City Schools opened the doors to Virgil I. Grissom High School, named for one of America’s original Mercury astronauts, in the fall of 2017.

24 2018 Spring Calendar

(Cover)


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

For more than 80 years, Adams Beverage, a family owned Anheuser-Busch Wholesaler, has been a fixture in the beer distribution market, and in June of 2017 cut the ribbon on their brand new building in Opelika, Alabama.

THROUGH THE YEARS Under the management of C.C. Bush, the company began as “Bush Distributing Company” with the repeal of Prohibition in 1937. Thirteen years later, Joe Adams joined the company and performed multiple tasks from unloading freight to selling and delivering product. In 1973, the name was changed to Adams Beverages, Inc. and the company was incorporated. During the next several years, the company continued to expand and more family members joined the staff. In 1998, Adams Beverages moved to its new facility in Dothan

Fast-forwarding a few years, Adams

and in June of 2001, Adams Beverages purchased Eagle Budweiser Distributing

Beverages currently services 20 counties

Company in Opelika. Eagle Bud employed 45 people and sold over 1,750,000 cases

in Alabama and eight in North Carolina,

of Anheuser-Busch product, and the acquisition gave Adams Beverages the exclusive

and their passion for beer and commitment

right to distribute Anheuser-Busch product in the counties of Barbour, Lee, Macon,

to the highest standards is evident in all

Russell, and Tallapoosa counties.

that they do.

FROM THE GROUND UP When HDA Architects was given the opportunity to design the new facility, Tom McCormack knew he would use concrete as one of its key components. The schematic design process started in August of 2015, with a groundbreaking ceremony held in September of 2016. The old Chicago style warehouse was completed by June of last yea, and includes brewery style red bring and large windows with awnings. “Design begins from discussions with the owner to get a feel for their interests and style, and it’s a combination of form and function of the spaces,” says Tom. “Concrete is one the most durable and consistent building materials. Behind the red brick office building stands the strong insulated concrete tilt wall warehouse as the backdrop.” Concrete tilt wall construction is a preferred method for beverage distribution facilities. It

SPRING 2018 3


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

speeds up construction and can be poured with integral insulation to provide the perfect wall for both durability and R-Value essential for a temperature-controlled warehouse. Natural plantings and a fire pit are incorporated into the courtyard that joins the buildings, and stained and stamped concrete with multiple colors and textures is also used at the office entrance and throughout the courtyard. “I love the appearance of the office as it


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

demonstrates an old brewery feel but I

design team responds to the needs of its

particularly like the courtyard between the

clients and communities while balancing

office and warehouse,” says Tom. It’s a

internal functions with external demands.

warm outdoor space that spills out from the

They

Hospitality Room and provides a true bond

innovative design solutions that create real

between the two separate structures.

value. Over the last 20 plus years, HDA

pride

themselves

on

providing

has worked with more than 150 Beverage

ABOUT HDA ARCHITECTS

Wholesalers nationwide on facility needs. Being experts on beverage distribution facility design and functionality, they can

HDA’s architectural design solutions result

ensure their client’s facilities are designed

from researching alternatives to solve the

to maximize investment, control costs, and

challenges of our built environment. Its

future-proof the facilities.

SPRING 2018 5


ARCHITECT SPOTLIGHT

THE

ARCHITECTURE

OF

As the saying goes, like father like daughter. Growing up in Montgomery, Jennifer Barber’s parents, especially her architect father, spent time teaching their children about design by showing them art, photography and inspiring architecture close to home and around the world. When she began her college career at Auburn University, she was majoring in International Business. But after visiting a friend in the architecture building, it became clear to her that she should follow in her father’s footsteps.


ARCHITECT SPOTLIGHT

SPRING 2018 7


ARCHITECT SPOTLIGHT

“I looked around I realized that the creative

In the 1980s, her father designed the

design work happening was very familiar to

Alabama Department of Transportation

me,” says Jennifer. “My father, Bill Wible,

Headquarters on Coliseum Boulevard here

is an architect and recently retired from a

in Montgomery. The exterior of the building

Montgomery firm where he was a principal

is clad in precast concrete that was made

for many years. I have been a registered

using

architect since 2000, but together we started

limestone, the same stone used to pave

Wible Barber Architects in September of

many Alabama highways.

exposed

aggregate

of

crushed

2017. From a very early age I learned a lot about design from him, even on a small

“I have also spent a lot of time close to where

scale, and we still have fun designing and

my father grew up in Hayneville, Alabama

problem solving together.”

around a small town called Lowndesboro. “Its antebellum homes are beautiful, two-

Jennifer American

has

always

appreciated

Architecture

and

Early

story homes with double height columns

Southern

and wide, wrap-around porches. There are

American Architecture, especially those that

also raised cottages, with small porches

used concrete in its design. In Montgomery,

and low slope roofs.”

there is a unique concrete structure in Garrett Coliseum designed in 1951 by Sherlock,

During another family trip to Chicago,

Smith and Adams. Since childhood, she has

they visited several houses designed by

observed how this building’s large concrete

renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright.

arches support a thin-shell concrete roof

Jennifer learned that his ‘organic’ style of

structure providing a 12,500-seat arena for

architecture was placed on the site to be

numerous types of events.

in harmony with the landscape in order to blend in with its surroundings. This style


ARCHITECT SPOTLIGHT

of American architecture has connecting rooms with large window-walls that open to the outdoors.

GET

TO

KNOW

Jennifer Barber What are your hobbies? My hobbies

are

art,

photography,

travel and spending time with my daughter, Camilla. What is one tool you can’t live without?

Living

down

south

I

definitely would have trouble living without air-conditioning.

For short

periods of time each summer, I am willing to trade this method of cooling for the balmy breezes blowing in at the Gulf of Mexico beaches. What is the last book you read? I have just started a book by Kayleigh McEnany called “The New American Revolution.” What

is

an

interesting

fact

that most people do not know about you? I am very patriotic and I appreciate our military and our veterans. What is your favorite thing about your profession? I enjoy watching a design go from a sketch to a threedimensional building. Even more so, it is wonderful to see the smiles on people’s faces when they move into their new space and make it their own.

SPRING 2018 9


ARCHITECT SPOTLIGHT

“Falling Water in Mill Run, Pennsylvania

how durable and economical it is. She

and the Rosenbaum House in Florence,

appreciates how it can be formed into

Alabama are two well-known examples of

beautiful shapes and its high compressive

this style, and have certainly influenced the

strength.

architecture of today,” she says. “On several occasions we have used Jennifer has also always loved the elegant

concrete as the finished floor surface

arches designed for concrete bridges, and

because it can be polished and stained for

has had the privilege to see some of the

a beautiful finish, she says. “An example is

beautiful bridges in Paris, London, Holland

the new Prattville High School Lobby. The

and Italy. She also observes that the concrete

broomed concrete entrance plaza outside

bridge to Dauphine Island, Alabama not only

was easily carried inside to the lobby and

provides a tremendous arch for boats to sail

polished to reflect the sunlight pouring

under, but its spectacular height allows a

in through the clearstory windows fifteen

person to experience an amazing view of a

feet above. We were able to position the

beautiful sunset.

score joints needed to control cracking in a pattern that enhanced the design of the

When asked why she chooses to use concrete in her own designs, she credits its versatility as a key factor as well as

building both inside and out.”


TECHNICAL REVIEW

DESIGN PERSPECTIVE Peter Fortier, AIA, EDAC of LACHIN Architects, APC in New Orleans Arlene Meraux Elementary

SPRING 2018 11


TECHNICAL REVIEW

Masonry Plays Lead Role as New Orleans Rebuilds after Katrina Architect Peter Fortier, AIA, EDAC of LACHIN Architects, APC in New Orleans has served on design teams for some of the more notable projects in the city of New Orleans. When designing a new school in Saint Bernard Parish, however, Fortier was faced with a compressed construction schedule, on a site still at risk from future flooding. The resulting school came in on time, on budget, and ready to educate young minds—as well as to withstand another Katrina if necessary.

“ When we first surveyed the postKatrina damage, we took note of construction materials that survived. Glazed concrete block and glazed tile best weathered the inundation and could be cleaned and reused.” PETER FORTIER, AIA, EDAC of LACHIN Architects, APC in New Orleans

Mason Randy Rush, of Rush Masonry in New Orleans, agrees that masonry buildings fared better in Katrina than those constructed with other building materials, and has seen increased use of masonry since 2005. “Since Katrina, we’ve been seeing a lot more glazed CMU, groundface CMU and interior CMU partitions because the materials are better able to withstand flooding and are easier to cleanup afterwards,” he says. When designing Arlene Meraux Elementary, the team designed all interior walls with glazed masonry to a minimum of 10 feet high. They also raised all critical mechanical and electrical systems out of harm’s way to the second level.

ASTRA-GLAZE SW+ Deep Marigold

Peter Fortier, AIA, EDAC of LACHIN Architects, APC in New Orleans


TECHNICAL REVIEW

“With the glazed masonry wall, the elevated slab, and the raised

For aesthetics and practicality, he established a multi-color

mechanical systems, we can weather another Katrina. Once

palette, with a separate color theme created for each wing.

waters recede, we’ll be able to hose everything down and have

“Color-coding is a better way to help K-5 students identify

everything back in working condition quickly,” explains Fortier.

the different areas of the school than signage, which is

Although a typical schedule for a school of this size would be

another benefit of glazed masonry,” he explains.

15 months, this project was completed in 12 months without

Colored terrazzo flooring and trim coordinates with the

incurring serious overages or overtime charges. Of course, the

color themes of the wings, and hexagonal designs tie in with

compressed schedule created a cost-control challenge. Using

the school mascot, the bee. “The finished look of the design

glazed masonry was one of the value-engineering methods

exceeded my expectations,” Fortier notes.

he used. Rush Masonry, working with Gibbs Construction, did an outstanding job of scheduling and installing the work to accommodate the demanding schedule.

“ One of the advantages of glazed masonry is that once the product is in place, no painting is needed. Eliminating that step saves a good deal of time, and when you use a glazed masonry, it not only stands up to natural forces, but student abuse, as well.”

“The masonry on this project is the best-looking aspect of the design,” adds Rush. Arlene Meraux Elementary opened its doors to nearly 550 students in August, in time for the 2017-2018 school year. The 115,000 square feet, newly built, state-of-the-art facility features two courtyards, a large playground, an outdoor classroom, library, gym, music and art classrooms. The school sits on a 14.6-acre plot of land donated by The Arlene and Joseph Meraux Charitable Foundation. Since Joseph Meraux had owned one of the largest collections of rare and novel clocks in the world, the school design includes a clock tower as a nod to this collection.

FORTIER AIA, EDAC of LACHIN Architects, APC in New Orleans

Natalie Albers, Arlene Meraux Elementary School's principal, refers to the facility as "115,000 square feet of sheer perfection." She says parents and students were amazed at the detail and the thoughtful design of the building.

SPRING 2018 13


TECHNICAL REVIEW

LACHIN Architects has done as many as 20 projects for the Saint Bernard Parish School Board, ranging from demolitions and renovations to new construction.

“ Wherever there was new construction, we utilized glazed CMU, and all but one used AstraGlaze. I’ve been very happy with the product. I primarily use it on the interior because it performs well. I also sometimes use it on the exterior as an accent to brick.” FORTIER AIA, EDAC of LACHIN Architects, APC in New Orleans

ASTRA-GLAZE SW+® The colorful beauty of ceramic tile. The unmatched durability of concrete.


F E AT U R E

O R

S K C Auburn Universty's

Student Champter of ACI presents

CONCRETE DAY 2018



SPRING 2018 15


F E AT U R E

The Auburn University Student Chapter of ACI is dedicated to promoting an interest in concrete in Auburn and in the surrounding

community.

Each

spring,

the chapter hosts a luncheon event called ‘Concrete Day,’ where students, faculty, and concrete professionals are invited to hear a prominent speaker from the concrete industry and take part in a professional showcase. The annual event allows for undergraduates, graduate

students,

professors,

young

engineers, experienced P.E.’s, company presidents, and other groups of people to network, learn about state of the art concrete practices, and gain a deeper appreciation for the concrete industry. The idea to organize Concrete Day came up during the first general meeting because the Auburn chapter of ACI had a desire to promote its knowledge of concrete and

network

with

concrete

industry

representatives. The event has taken place since 2015.

STUDENTS WEIGH IN How did the students decide to design concrete bowling balls? Our chapter every year sends a student competition team to national convention of ACI. The next convention is on March 2428 in Salt Lake City, UT, and the student competition is FRC bowling ball. Until last year we were having students working on the concrete competition for about one month before the convention. To motivate them to work early, to prepare them well and to WIN in Salt Lake City, we came up with a brilliant idea: Departmental Trials. We offered student team’s $500 cash prize and the chance to represent AU at the Convention in SLC.


F E AT U R E

Probably

the

most

motivated

were

by ACI such as the ball’s weight and diameter.

students interested in having hands-on

In addition, the students knew that the ball

experience. We had an introductory meet

would exceed the weight capacity if the ball

up with the prospective contestants to

was solid concrete, so both teams included

inspire them by showing the previous year

foam in the center to decrease weight.

competition videos. Our faculty offered

The competitors also made the balls as

students their mentorship which was

soon as they could in order to begin the

also a significant factor when deciding to

curing process and get the most strength

participate in the trials.

possible before the competition. Out of the six categories, the bowling and strength test

CONTEST FACTS

were the most interesting. The competition

The objective of having the contest was

was set up to look like in a real bowling lane.

to choose a team to represent Auburn

The bowling was very exciting, not just for

University in FRC Bowling ball competition

the contestants, but for the audience, too.

at ACI convention in Salt Lake City, UT. After

They played three rounds, there were some

the trials were announced, there were initially

strikes, spares and missed bowls. Both

five teams registered and just two teams

teams performed well, and each team had

showed up on the day of the competition,

their drawbacks. However, at the end of the

which was held on Monday, Feb. 12th.

competition, they had more confidence and learned from their experience.

There were six categories of the competition, which included the real bowling with the

What are some components of concrete

concrete ball the students designed. They

that made it a good product to use for

each had to meet certain criteria prescribed

the bowling ball?



SPRING 2018 17


F E AT U R E

The teams were allowed to use only the

about concrete materials, concrete

materials that were specified and that

design, communicating ideas with

meet

team members, and many other

respective

ASTM

specifications

to use in the contest. Since the contest

valuable skills.

was to design bowling balls using fiber reinforcement,

steel

How many students participated?

fibers, and it was one of the major factors

the

teams

used

In the bowling ball competition

for strength. They were free to use other

teams had 3-4 people were on

types of fibers available on the market

each team, two people per team

unless they meet ASTM specifications.

showed up at the competition.

The winning team used “Dramix 5D 65/60

Overall, forty students participated

BG� steel fibers, sponsored by Bekaert

in Concrete Day.

scompany. The most important outcome is that the students were able to learn


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

W

E

H

A

V

E

After four years of planning, design and construction, Huntsville City Schools opened the doors to Virgil I. Grissom High School, named for one of America’s original Mercury astronauts, in the fall of 2017. The 340,000 square foot building sits on a 61-acre campus, and has a capacity for up to 1900 students with room for expansion. Grissom High School serves the southern areas of the Huntsville City Schools district. The new building relocated the 50-yearold campus about three miles west to a large greenfield site, and will be a catalyst for future economic development along the



SPRING 2018 19


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

South Memorial Parkway corridor. The new

lighting, and piping while also shortening the

school offers state-of-the-art technology,

overall construction schedule.

security, and teaching aides.

Unlike the

previous school, every classroom has a

“The site terrain allowed us to incorporate

window and most circulation corridors

monumental stairs and retaining walls to

terminate with views to the exterior. Though

help emphasize main entrances,” says

the new school represents a new chapter

Mike Sprader, AIA. “We chose to expose

in the schools’ storied existence, the past

the concrete in these areas with a smooth

is also captured and celebrated in the new

architectural natural finish for its clean and

school. As visitors enter the 50-foot tall day-

simple expression.”

lit lobby, they are greeted by a large-scale wall mural of the school’s namesake, Virgil

In light of the horrific school shootings that

‘Gus’ Grissom and can browse through the

have taken place in the last few years, security

‘first 50 years’ timeline.

is now a major element in education design, and Grissom was designed with entrances

In 2013, the team at Chapman Sisson

that

Architects hit the ground running with the

state-of-the-art security technology, and

include

bullet-resistant

materials,

design process, and implemented its plan

secure check points.

to use concrete throughout the facility.

observation is also an important feature

However, internal

for overall building security. All classrooms The building is constructed with load bearing

and student areas include windows to the

CMU walls, which are durable, maintenance-

corridors for observation and the corridors

free and the best material choice for school

are designed without bends and offsets for

construction, as well as precast hollow core

maximum site lines.

planks.

The hollow core planks allowed

for maximum plenum depth for ductwork,

But the second floor ‘perch’ may be the most


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT



SPRING 2018 21


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

"CERTAIN BUILDING TYPES DEMAND LONG LASTING MATERIALS THAT CAN STAND UP TO HIGH ABUSE CONDITIONS AND CONCRETE COMPONENTS PROVIDE A LONG SERVICE LIFE DUE TO THEIR DURABLE AND LOW-MAINTENANCE SURFACES."


PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

valuable security asset.

The second floor

corridor is cantilevered over and open to the first floor circulation below.

allowed for a simplified evacuation plan for staff and students.”

This provides

several observation points on the second floor

The shelter is constructed of 12-inch thick

to monitor both levels during class changes.

steel

If standing on the extended perch, a single

walls and CMU to meet current ICC 500

resource officer has views in four directions on

regulations.

reinforced

cast-in-place

concrete

QUICK FACTS

both levels. Cast-in-place concrete provided the strength to cantilever a high traffic corridor

Grissom is also home to one of the school

 The

over 10 feet, yet also allowed a thinner section

districts redundant data centers.

academies

to achieve a clean edge profile.

equally

important

for

this

It was

equipment

building such

includes as

career

Robotics,

Health Science, Cyber Security,

maintain operation during storms so the

Welding,

3-D

The Storm Shelter, which is now required

room is hardened with filled core CMU and

Advanced

Manufacturing

by a law passed in 2010, is actually a two-

hollow core planks above to protect the

students design and build racecars

level structure housing the Auxiliary Gym

mission critical equipment within.

to compete on the mile-long track

and physical education locker rooms on the

Printing,

and where

that wraps around the site.

main level and athletic locker rooms, weight

“Our firm always considers the life cycle

room, and a large multi-purpose room in the

impacts of a product when considering

 The Auditorium seats 850 and the

basement. Due to the size of the student body,

materials in building designs, and certain

Competition Gym seats 2,000.

the traditional ‘shelter in the gym’ approach

building types demand long lasting materials

wasn’t possible and there was some concern

that can stand up to high abuse conditions

 Sports fields, JROTC challenge

of splitting students and resources in separate

and concrete components provide a long

course, and athletic field houses are

shelters in case of an emergency.

service life due to their durable and low-

located on the southern end of the

maintenance

61-acre campus.

surfaces,”

says

Sprader.

“We found that it was more economical

“Concrete can be utilized in all areas of the

to build a single two-level shelter than

project and its return on investment often

two remote shelters,” Sprader says. “This

outperforms other materials.”

SPRING 2018 23


SPRING CALENDAR

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 ACI Field Testing - Montgomery  ACI Strength - Montgomery  Summer Convention

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SPRING CALENDAR

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 ACI Aggregate - Montgomery  ACI Field Testing - B'ham

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Alabama Concrete Industries Foundation

2018 CONTINENTAL PHEASANT SHOOT Hosted by Big Rig Lodge @ Harrell & Sons Farms; Lowndes County Wednesday, October 17th - 9am & 1pm $2000 per foursome - $500 per individual

*Money raised will be used for two $8,000 scholarships

*To register, please email Rebecca (rlindsay@alconcrete.org) or call (334) 265-0501.

ConcreteWorks-Spring 2018  
ConcreteWorks-Spring 2018