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69th AALAS National Meeting Preliminary Program

69th AALAS NATIONAL MEETING | OCTOBER 28–NOVEMBER 1, 2018

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

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69th AALAS National Meeting Preliminary Program

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CONTENTS AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

WELCOME

PROGRAM COMMITTEE

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Chair: Jodi A Scholz Vice Chair: Trinka W Adamson

Program Chair’s Message President’s Message Exhibitor Advisory Council Chair’s Message

EXHIBITORS & SPONSORS 16-19

Exhibitors & Sponsors

EDUCATION PROGRAM & MEETING SCHEDULE 5 Committee Meetings & Events 12 Opening General Session and General Membership Meeting 8 Program Overview 20 Sunday 25 Monday 36 Tuesday 45 Wednesday 54 Thursday

MEETING NEWS & EVENTS 60 61 61 62 62 64

Registration & Travel Info Technicians Branch & District Events Set Sail with Lab Animal Science Public Outreach District Map & Branch Listings

FORMS & MAPS 66 67 69 71

Hotel Map Registration Instructions & Form Workshop Application Form Facilitators Sign-Up Form

ADVERTISER INDEX Allentown Inc 1, 3 Alpha Genesis Inc 63 Animal Resource Management 21 Bio-Serv 33 E-Z Systems/ Euthanex Corp 35 Hilltop Lab Animals Inc 39 Lab Products Inc 72, Cover 4 Marshall BioResources 43 Massachusetts General Hospital 19 NuAire Inc 53 PMI LabDiet Cover 2 Priority One Services Inc 55 Sol Del Mar, Inc. 59 Tecniplast Cover 3

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Seminars Chair: Rachel R Strittmatter Vice Chair: Natasha J Melfi Special Topic Lectures Chair: Misty J Williams-Fritze Vice Chair: Jennifer S Wood Panel Discussions Chair: Jennifer L Asher Vice Chair: Kristin D Evans Workshops Chair: Brian J Ebert Vice Chair: Sean Cody Adams Facilitators Chair: Temeri D Wilder-Kofie Vice Chair: Chris A Manuel Local Arrangements Chair: Molly L Romick BOT Liaison, President, ex officio Paige A Ebert Abstract Review Subcommittee Chair: Denise M Molk Platform Sessions: Karen Lencioni Poster Sessions: Kari L Koszdin Maggie Behnke, James B Finlay, Eric Georgelos, Tanya L Herzog, Sharoll L’Italien, Karuna Patil, Karen Strait, Dana E Weir, Wanda West

EXHIBITOR ADVISORY COUNCIL Chair: Carrie Schultz Vice Chair: John Park Donald Basil, Deborah Benner, Andrea Gay, Pat Guider, Neil Weigle, Jodi Scholz Past President: Paige Ebert BOT Liaison: Laura Mistretta

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Ann Turner


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JOIN US IN BALTIMORE! It is with great enthusiasm that I invite you to attend the 69th AALAS National Meeting, which will be held in Baltimore, MD. Thanks to the many fantastic Topic and Abstract submissions, the National Meeting Program Committee put together a well-rounded educational program full of timely, relevant, and interesting content. From the microbiome to laboratory animal public policy advocacy, you’re sure to find it challenging to decide which sessions to attend! Don’t miss the Opening General Session on Sunday, which will provide a unique and inspiring look into how AALAS has been focusing on its mission and its members – a theme that you’ll see throughout the week. To get the most out of the meeting, be sure to download the AALAS Mobile App, which you can use to plan your schedule, locate rooms, scan posters, evaluate meeting content, interact with other attendees, and compete for prizes! Sunday’s Technical Trade presentations will again have two tracks, allowing attendees to learn about new and innovative technology and products in our industry. Don’t forget to check out the AALAS Learning Library, visit with the Exhibitors, and stop by the AALAS Foundation booth to “vote” on your favorite wooden boat! In your spare time, there is so much to see and do in the “Charm City,” much of it near the Convention Center. I’d like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who submitted topics and abstracts – your quality submissions make the job of the Program Committee difficult and exciting.Thanks also to the AALAS staff members who work hard to assemble an outstanding meeting year after year, to my fellow Program Committee members for their time and dedication, to the Exbibitors, the Local Arrangements and other Committees and individuals who make our meeting a success. I look forward to seeing you in Baltimore!

Jodi A. Scholz, DVM 2018 Program Committee Chair

READY FOR MORE? The 69th AALAS National Meeting is quickly approaching, and I want to invite each of you to join us in Baltimore.  With this enchanting city as a backdrop, we are looking forward to a great meeting that features the very best our industry has to offer. With quality sessions, platform talks and posters, hands-on workshops, and an amazing vendor hall, you are sure to come away from this meeting energized, informed, and ready to take your laboratory animal career to the next level.  The meeting kicks off on Sunday evening with the Opening General Session which will highlight our AALAS members in a unique way that you won’t want to miss. A reception will follow, which is always an excellent opportunity to catch up with old friends and network with new ones.  Thanks to this year’s National Program Committee, the scientific program has been carefully designed to optimize your learning experience. And thanks to the participation of our AALAS exhibitors, the exhibit hall will be filled with the latest technology and services. Our association is so fortunate to be supported by our outstanding commercial members, and this year’s exhibit hall will not disappoint. Rounding out the meeting is the annual AALAS Foundation Reception and Auction on Wednesday night. This fun event allows all AALAS members the chance to socialize while supporting the vital work of the AALAS Foundation. And speaking of the AALAS Foundation, you won’t want to miss the 2018 Celebrate the Mouse pin, decorated sailboat competition, and silent auction items. Putting a meeting like this together is a huge undertaking. I want to thank this year’s National Program Committee, led by Dr. Jodi Scholz, along with the Local Arrangements Committee, led by Ms. Molly Romick. I also want to thank the many volunteers who have given countless hours of service to make this meeting possible. These volunteer members, along with the outstanding AALAS staff, have put together a robust education program and association meeting that is proud to be the largest gathering in the world of professionals concerned with the production, care, and use of laboratory animals.  I encourage you to take a moment today to register for this year’s meeting and book your hotel room. And most importantly, I look forward to seeing you in Baltimore!

Jennifer C. Smith, DVM 2018 AALAS President

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COMMITTEES & EVENTS AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

FRIDAY

OCTOBER 26 2018 AALAS Board of Trustees Annual Business Meeting 3:00 PM-6:00 PM, Hilton AALAS Executive Committee Meeting 9:00 AM-2:00 PM, Hilton

SATURDAY OCTOBER 27

Academy of Laboratory Animal Veterinary Technicians and Nurses’ Veterinary Technician Specialist Examination 9:00 AM-1:00 PM, CC ACLAM Board of Directors 7:30 AM-4:00 PM, Hilton ACLAM Exam Committee 1:00 PM-3:00 PM, Hilton ACLAM Foundation Committee 11:00 AM-1:00 PM, Hilton ACLAM GRAC 2:00 PM-5:00 PM, Hilton

2018 AALAS Board of Trustees Annual Business Meeting 8:30 AM-12:00 PM, Hilton

ACLAM Publications Committee 9:00 AM-12:00 PM, Hilton

AALAS Foundation Board of Directors 2:00 PM-5:00 PM, Hilton

ACLAM Training Program Directors 2:00 PM-4:00 PM, Hilton

AALAS Learning Library 2:00 PM-6:00 PM, CC

Allied Trade Association (ATA) Membership Meeting/Breakfast (Invitation only; RSVP required) 8:30 AM-10:30 AM, CC

Allied Trade Association (ATA) Board Meeting 3:00 PM-5:00 PM, CC Allied Trade Association (ATA) New Product Showcase set-up 2:00 PM-6:00 PM, CC ASLAP Board of Directors Meeting 12:00 PM-4:00 PM, CC Branch Information 2:00 PM-6:00 PM, CC Exhibit Hall Exhibitor Set-Up 10:00 AM-6:00 PM, CC Exhibitor Advisory Council - Exhibitor Reception (Invitation only; RSVP required) 5:30 PM-6:30 PM, CC

Allied Trade Association (ATA) New Product Showcase 7:30 AM-7:00 PM, CC ASLAP CE Seminar 8:00 AM-4:00 PM, CC ASLAP Foundation Meeting 12:00 PM-1:00 PM, Hilton ASLAP General Membership Meeting 4:00 PM-5:00 PM, CC Branch Information 7:30 AM-7:00 PM, CC Camp ACLAM 8:00 AM-4:00 PM, Hilton

LAMA Board Meeting 11:00 AM-5:00 PM, Hilton

Career Center 8:00 AM-5:00 PM, CC

Registration 2:00 PM-6:00 PM, CC

Certification Exams - ALAT, LAT & LATG 8:00 AM-12:00 PM, Hilton

SUNDAY

OCTOBER 28 AALAS Foundation Silent Auction & “Set Sail Boat” Contest 9:00 AM-5:00 PM, CC AALAS Learning Library 7:30 AM-7:00 PM, CC

CMAR Committee 1:00 PM-4:00 PM, CC District 8 Council 2:00 PM-5:00 PM, CC Educational Resources Committee 8:00 AM-12:00 PM, CC Exhibit Hall Exhibitor Set-Up 7:30 AM-7:00 PM, CC

Facilitators Meeting 3:00 PM-3:30 PM, CC Facility Directors-Yale University 8:30 AM-1:00 PM, Hilton Leadership Academy (Branch Training) (Invitation only; RSVP required) 7:00 AM-4:30 PM, Hilton Leadership Academy Luncheon (Invitation only; RSVP required) 12:00 PM-1:00 PM, Hilton National Meeting Orientation (first time attendees, new members, international attendees) 2:00 PM-3:00 PM, CC Nominations Committee 10:00 AM-12:00 PM, CC Online Learning Committee 1:00 PM-4:00 PM, CC Opening General Session / General Membership Meeting 5:00 PM-6:30 PM, CC Poster Sessions set-up by presenting author 2:00 PM-5:00 PM, CC Program Committee Walk Thru 4:00 PM-5:00 PM, CC Registration 7:30 AM-7:00 PM, CC Scientific Advisory Committee 3:00 PM-5:00 PM, CC Speaker Ready Room 12:00 PM-5:00 PM, CC Technical Trade Presentations - Track II Developments in Facility Management - Moderator: John Park 1:00 PM-4:00 PM, CC Technical Trade Presentations - Track Innovations & Technical Advancements - Moderator: Carrie Schultz 1:00 PM-4:00 PM, CC Technician Fun Fair 1:00 PM-5:00 PM, CC Tecniplast Welcome Breakfast 9:00 AM-1:00 PM, CC Vivarium Operational Excellence Network 8:00 AM-3:00 PM, Hilton Welcome Reception 6:30 PM-8:00 PM, Hilton

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COMMITTEES & EVENTS AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

MONDAY

OCTOBER 29 AAALAC International Emeritus/Council Networking Reception (Invitation only; RSVP required) 6:00 PM-8:00 PM, Hilton AALAS Foundation Celebrate the Mouse “photo booth” sponsored by Envigo 9:00 AM-5:00 PM, CC AALAS Foundation Silent Auction & “Set Sail Boat” Contest 8:00 AM-5:00 PM, CC AALAS Learning Library 7:30 AM-5:00 PM, CC ACLAM COC Committee 8:00 AM-10:30 AM, Hilton ACLAM Forum Program Committee 10:00 AM-12:00 PM, Hilton ACLAM IT Management Committee 8:00 AM-12:00 PM, Hilton ACLAM Mentoring Committee 3:00 PM-5:00 PM, Hilton ACLAM New Diplomates Welcoming Committee 1:00 PM-3:00 PM, Hilton ACLAM Outreach Committee 3:00 PM-5:00 PM, Hilton ACLAM Task Force Meeting 1:00 PM-3:00 PM, Hilton ACLAM TBD 3:00 PM-5:00 PM, Hilton ACLAM Training Program Oversight Committee 3:00 PM-5:00 PM, Hilton Allied Trade Association (ATA) New Product Showcase 8:30 AM-5:00 PM, CC ASLAP Animal Welfare Committee 4:00 PM-5:00 PM, Hilton ASLAP Annual Luncheon 12:00 PM-2:00 PM, CC ASLAP LARC Meeting 12:00 PM-1:30 PM, Hilton ASLAP Vet Student Liaison Committee 5:00 PM-6:00 PM, Hilton

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Awards - Poster Judging Coordination 9:30 AM-12:00 PM, CC

Poster Sessions 8:30 AM-5:00 PM, CC

Bookstore 7:30 AM-5:00 PM, CC

Poster Sessions set-up by presenting author 7:30 AM-8:30 AM, CC

Branch Information 7:30 AM-5:00 PM, CC

Registration 7:30 AM-5:00 PM, CC

Branch Leadership Meeting 4:00 PM-5:00 PM, CC

Speaker Ready Room 7:30 AM-4:00 PM, CC

Career Center 8:00 AM-5:00 PM, CC

Technician Fun Fair 8:30 AM-5:00 PM, CC

Certification & Registry Board 2:00 PM-4:00 PM, CC

Technician Lunch & Learn 12:30 PM-2:00 PM, CC

District 1 Membership Meeting 5:15 PM-6:15 PM, CC

Veterinary Tech Student Program 9:00 AM-11:00 AM, CC

District 2 Membership Meeting 5:15 PM-6:15 PM, CC

World Courier Lunch n Learn 12:00 PM-1:30 PM, CC

District 3 Membership Meeting 5:15 PM-6:15 PM, CC District 4 Membership Meeting 5:15 PM-6:15 PM, CC District 5 Council 2:45 PM-4:45 PM, CC District 5 Membership Meeting 5:15 PM-6:15 PM, CC District 6 Membership Meeting 5:15 PM-6:15 PM, CC District 7 Membership Meeting 5:15 PM-6:15 PM, CC District 8 Membership Meeting 5:15 PM-6:15 PM, CC Exhibit Hall 8:30 AM-5:00 PM, CC Exhibit Hall (opening ceremony w/ribbon cutting 8:30 a.m.) 8:30 AM-5:00 PM, CC Government Relations Network Meeting 3:00 PM-4:00 PM, CC ICLAS ARC Open Meeting 1:00 PM-2:00 PM, CC ICLAS Int’l Consortium 10:00 AM-12:00 PM, CC LAWTE General Membership Meeting 3:00 PM-5:00 PM, CC

TUESDAY

OCTOBER 30 AAALAC Consultant/Specialist Orientation 8:00 AM-10:30 AM, Hilton AALAS Affiliates Roundtable Conference/ Breakfast (Invitation only; RSVP required) 7:30 AM-9:30 AM, Hilton AALAS Foundation Celebrate the Mouse “photo booth” sponsored by Envigo 9:00 AM-5:00 PM, CC AALAS Foundation Silent Auction & “Set Sail Boat” Contest 8:00 AM-5:00 PM, CC AALAS Learning Library 7:30 AM-5:00 PM, CC AALAS/FELASA Executive Meeting 10:30 AM-11:30 AM, CC ACLAM General Business Meeting 5:00 PM-7:00 PM, Hilton ACLAM Mentoring Social 3:30 PM-5:00 PM, Hilton ACLAM New Diplomate Orientation 9:00 AM-11:00 AM, Hilton Allied Trade Association (ATA) New Product Showcase 9:00 AM-5:00 PM, CC


COMMITTEES & EVENTS AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

AREA Teachers Program (Invitation only; RSVP required) 9:30 AM-1:30 PM, CC

VAVMO & VMU Supervisors Business Meeting/Luncheon 12:00 PM-2:00 PM, Hilton

Awards Selection Committee 12:00 AM-1:30 PM, CC

World Courier Lunch n Learn 12:00 PM-1:30 PM, CC

Bookstore 7:30 AM-5:00 PM, CC Branch Information 7:30 AM-5:00 PM, CC

Exhibitor Advisory Council 3:30 PM-5:00 PM, CC Poster Sessions 9:00 AM-1:00 PM, CC Poster Sessions - dismantle 1:00 PM-3:00 PM, CC

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 31

President’s Reception (Invitation only; RSPV required) 5:30 PM-6:30 PM, Hilton

Career Center 8:00 AM-5:00 PM, CC

AAALAC/AALAS/ICLAS International Luncheon (Invitation only; RSPV required) 12:00 PM-2:00 PM, Hilton

RBL/NBL Animal Care Meeting 4:00 PM-6:00 PM, CC

CLATR Trainee Luncheon 12:00 PM-2:00 PM, Hilton

AALAS Foundation Appreciation Reception 6:30 PM-8:30 PM, CC

Registration 7:30 AM-5:00 PM, CC

Editorial Review Board Meeting 10:00 AM-11:00 AM, CC

AALAS Foundation Silent Auction & “Set Sail Boat” Contest 8:00 AM-1:00 PM, CC

Society of Lab Animal Vet Techs (SLAVT) Membership Meeting 5:00 PM-6:00 PM, Hilton

AALAS Foundation Silent Auction & “Set Sail Boat” Contest 8:00 AM-11:00 AM, CC

Speaker Ready Room 7:30 AM-4:00 PM, CC

Editorial Staff Meeting 8:00 AM-10:00 AM, CC Exhibit Hall 9:00 AM-5:00 PM, CC Government Relations Committee 10:00 AM-11:00 AM, CC ILAM Committee 1:30 PM-4:30 PM, CC Lab Animal Breeders Meeting 8:30 AM-10:00 AM, Hilton LAS Pro Editorial Advisory Board 3:00 PM-5:00 PM, CC Past President’s Luncheon 12:00 PM-2:00 PM, Hilton Poster Sessions 9:00 AM-5:00 PM, CC Poster Sessions Reception w/poster award winners announced at 2:30pm 2:00 PM-4:00 PM, CC

AALAS Learning Library 7:30 AM-1:00 PM, CC ACLAM TBD 1:30 PM-4:00 PM, Hilton ACLAM/ASLAP Program Committee 8:00 AM-12:00 PM, Hilton Allied Trade Association (ATA) New Product Showcase 9:00 AM-1:00 PM, CC Allied Trade Association (ATA) New Product Showcase take down 1:00 PM-5:00 PM, CC Bookstore 7:30 AM-1:00 PM, CC Branch Information 7:30 AM-5:00 PM, CC

Registration 7:30 AM-5:00 PM, CC

Career Center 8:00 AM-5:00 PM, CC

Society of Lab Animal Vet Techs (SLAVT) Reception 5:30 PM-6:30 PM, Hilton

Charles River Veterinary Consultants Breakfast 7:00 AM-8:30 AM, Hilton

Speaker Ready Room 7:30 AM-4:00 PM, CC

Committee on Technician Awareness & Development 2:30 PM-4:30 PM, CC

Technician Fun Fair 8:00 AM-5:00 PM, CC

Exhibit Hall 9:00 AM-1:00 PM, CC Exhibit Hall Exhibitor Dismantle 1:00 PM-10:00 PM, CC

Technician Fun Fair - Winner Announced 2:00 PM, CC

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 1

2018/2019 AALAS Program Committee 2:15 PM-5:00 PM, Hilton AALAS Executive Committee Meeting 9:00 AM-11:00 AM, Hilton Branch Information 7:30 AM-2:00 PM, CC Career Center 8:00 AM-2:00 PM, CC CMAR Animal Resources Exam 8:00 AM-12:00 PM, CC Registration 7:30 AM-12:00 PM, CC Speaker Ready Room 7:30 AM-1:00 PM, CC

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PROGRAM OVERVIEW AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

SUNDAY

OCTOBER 28, 2018

Are Your Studies Reproducible?: P Leonhardt. Room: 341. 1:20 PM–1:40 PM (TTP)

W-03A Microsurgery Skills Training Using Surgical Loupes: R Hoyt. Room: 347. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM (W)

Operating Next-Generation Animal Facilities in the Age of Big Data: TR Coley. Room: 341. 1:40 PM–2:00 PM (TTP)

W-04 Technician to Supervisor: Management 101: The Ups and Downs of Managing People: S Baker. Room: 349. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM (W)

Afternoon Track I: Innovations and Technical Advancements Patient Monitoring in the Palm of Your Hand: D Brunson. Room: 343. 1:00 PM–1:20 PM (TTP) Oxygen Concentrators: A Good Idea for Inhalation Anesthesia?: R Schrock. Room: 343. 1:20 PM–1:40 PM (TTP) Can I Really Deliver Isoflurane Without Using Compressed Gas?: D FitzMiller. Room: 343. 1:40 PM–2:00 PM (TTP) The Janet Wood Innovation Award—A Global Initiative to Invent and Introduce Novel Enrichment: N Windows. Room: 343. 2:00 PM–2:20 PM (TTP) Leveraging the Power of Video Technology and Computer Vision to Improve in Vivo Studies: L Schaevitz. Room: 343. 2:20 PM–2:40 PM (TTP) Using 3D Scanning to Standardise the Measurement of Subcutaneous Tumours: A Smith. Room: 343. 2:40 PM–3:00 PM (TTP) A New Tool for Oncology Researchers: The Rag2/IL2RG (R2G2) Knockout Mouse: S J Wildt. Room: 343. 3:00 PM–3:20 PM (TTP) Use of Automated Sampling to Get Better Data from Fewer Animals: C Rohde-Johnson. Room: 343. 3:20 PM–3:40 PM (TTP) Impact of Extrusion on Bioburden in Laboratory Animal Diets: L Tracey. Room: 343. 3:40 PM–4:00 PM (TTP)

Track II: Developments in Facility Management An IVC for Environmentally Conscious Facilities: L Kramer. Room: 341. 1:00 PM–1:20 PM (TTP)

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Digitalization in the Animal House—How to Bridge the Gap into the Animal Room: SE Hammelbacher. Room: 341. 2:00 PM–2:20 PM (TTP)

A Day in the Life with Our “Funny Little Creatures”: S Gografe. Room: Ballroom I. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM (S)

Internet of Things Technologies Improve Animal Laboratory Management and Research: C Donnelly. Room: 341. 2:20 PM–2:40 PM (TTP)

Are Times Changing in the Animal Research Oversight Environment?: BT Bennett. Room: Ballroom II. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM (S)

Solving the Pain of Facility Scheduling Using Industry-Specific Software Solution: M Fontes. Room: 341. 2:40 PM–3:00 PM (TTP)

Reproducibility: From the Tank/Cage Side for Better Research and > 3Rs: J Hasenau. Room: Ballroom III. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM (S)

How to Incorporate Environmental Diagnostics into Animal Health Monitoring Programs: CL Besch-Williford. Room: 341. 3:00 PM–3:20 PM (TTP) Lab and Animal Transfer Station Decontamination in One Simple Step: F Grinstead. Room: 341. 3:20 PM–3:40 PM (TTP) Principles of Chemical Surface Disinfectant Formulation—What the Laboratory Animal Scientist Needs to Know: J Ramirez. Room: 341. 3:40 PM–4:00 PM (TTP) Dry Heat Sterilization for Vivarium Use: RC Davis. Room: 341. 4:00 PM–4:20 PM (TTP)

MONDAY

OCTOBER 29, 2018

Morning W-01 Anesthetic Monitoring 101—Back to Basics: C Pacharinsak. Room: 345. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM (W) W-02 CMAR/Animal Resource Exam Prep Class: D Baumann. Room: 346. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM (W)

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

Tours of Animal Research Facilities as Opportunities for Public Engagement: S Allison. Room: Ballroom IV. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM (S) Buzzed Dancing: Honey Bees as Bioindicators of Habitat Quality: M Couvillon. Room: Ballroom III. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM (STL) Charles C Hunter Lecture: “Lions, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!”: C Driscoll. Room: Ballroom I. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM (STL) Lessons and Insights Through the Story of Elizabeth R Griffin: C Russell. Room: Ballroom II. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM (STL) Listening to Your Inner Goddess: A Spontaneous SCID Pig as an Emerging Model for Cancer and Regenerative Medicine Research: C Tuggle. Room: Ballroom IV. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM (STL)

Monday Afternoon

An Outdoor Play Area for Laboratory Beagles - A Whole New Level of Enrichment: C Allen. Room: 337. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM (P)

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


PROGRAM OVERVIEW AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

Optimizing Rodent Survival Surgery Outcomes: K Jen. Room: 339. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM (P) Pathology Quiz Bowl: C Besch-Williford. Room: 341. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM (P) Sharing Our Message: Tips & Tools for Reaching Out: E Slocum. Room: 343. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM (P) W-05 Essentials of IACUC Administration: E Kim. Room: 348. 1:00 PM–5:00 PM (W) W-06 How to Deal with Anesthetic Complications: C Pacharinsak. Room: 345. 1:00 PM–5:00 PM (W) W-07 Managing the Gap: Working and Leading in Multigenerational Teams: J Mueller. Room: 349. 1:00 PM–5:00 PM (W)

TUESDAY

Wallace P Rowe Lecture: TBN. Room: Ballroom II. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM (STL)

Morning

W-02 CMAR /Animal Resource Exam Prep Class: D Baumann. Room: 346. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM (W)

Efforts to Increase Research Transparency in the U.S.: P Clifford. Room: 337. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM (P)

W-05 Essentials of IACUC Administration: E Kim. Room: 348. 1:00 PM–5:00 PM (W)

Is Biological Materials Testing Included in Your Animal Resources Biosecurity Program?: C Besch-Williford. Room: 339. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM (P)

OCTOBER 30, 2018

W-10 Leading the Self and Others with Emotional Intelligence: J Mueller. Room: 349. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM (W) W-08 Teaching Monkeys to Cooperate with Restraint: Using Positive Reinforcement Training and Temperament Testing Methods: J Perlman. Room: 346. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM (W)

W-03B Microsurgery Skills Training Using Surgical Loupes: R Hoyt. Room: 347. 1:00 PM–5:00 PM (W)

Comparative Approaches to Monitoring Rodent Colonies for Infectious Agents: R Livingston. Room: Ballroom I. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM (S)

W-08 Teaching Monkeys to Cooperate with Restraint: Using Positive Reinforcement Training and Temperament Testing Methods: J Perlman. Room: 346. 1:00 PM–5:00 PM (W)

Current Research on Mouse Home Cage Aggression: B Gaskill. Room: Ballroom II. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM (S)

W-09 Would You Like to Improve Your Suturing and Rodent Surgery Aseptic Technique?: M Perret-Gentil. Room: 350. 1:00 PM–5:00 PM (W) An Infiltrator in the Lab: Why Do Some Accusations of Animal Cruelty Make Headlines While Others Avoid Media Attention?: W Jarrett. Room: Ballroom I. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM (S) Back to the Basics: Practical Biomethodology for Minature Swine Users: D Brocksmith. Room: Ballroom II. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM (S) Integrated Strategies to Enhance the Welfare of Primates in Research: G Poirier. Room: Ballroom III. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM (S) Rat Tickling: A Technique for Improving Rat Welfare: M LaFollette. Room: Ballroom IV. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM (S)

Microbiome Research Developments Using Mouse Models: B Theriault. Room: Ballroom III. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM (S) Treating Wounds and Using Antibiotics Appropriately: Practical Tips and Case Examples: J Fortman. Room: Ballroom IV. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM (S) America’s Wild Horses: Living Legends or Faded Legacy?: B Smith. Room: Ballroom III. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM (STL) Charles River Ethics and Animal Welfare Lecture: Assessing Laboratory Animal Wellbeing: The Study of Animal Affect: M Mendl. Room: Ballroom I. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM (STL) Developing a Meaningful Health Monitoring Program for the Aquatics Facility: J Collins. Room: Ballroom IV. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM (STL)

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

Tuesday Afternoon

Preparing and Supporting Veterinary Technicians for Leadership and Regulatory Roles: Establishing High Industry Standards: C Montgomery. Room: 341. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM (P) Vivarium Ergonomics: Practical Improvement Ideas that Work: M Hostrander. Room: 343. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM (P) Easing the Transition for Animals Entering the Vivarium and Reducing Stress During Transportation: N Navratil. Room: Ballroom I. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM (S) Microbiota in Rodent Models: Reproducibility, Translation, and Discovery: J Moskowitz. Room: Ballroom II. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM (S) The Use of Humanized Animals in Biomedical Research: J Villano. Room: Ballroom III. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM (S) Updates on Rodent Anesthesia and Postoperative Analgesia: J Marx. Room: Ballroom IV. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM (S)

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 31, 2018

Morning W-11 Introduction to GI Endoscopy in Laboratory Animals: K Rice. Room: 345. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM (W) W-12 LAS Pro Article Writing Boot Camp: L Rozanski. Room: 348. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM (W)

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PROGRAM OVERVIEW AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

W-13 Successful Operation of a Gnotobiotic Facility: B Theriault. Room: 349. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM (W) W-14 Understanding the Roles of Animal Care and Facility Design Staffs in Planning a Research Animal Facility: R Nalls. Room: 346. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM (W) Building an Inclusive Workforce in the Laboratory Animal Facility: M Watson. Room: Ballroom I. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM (S) Don’t Just Survive: Nontechnical Skills to Thrive in Your Laboratory Animal Science Career: S Kirchain. Room: Ballroom II. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM (S) Geriatric Mouse Medicine, Management, and Welfare: T Meade. Room: Ballroom III. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM (S) Understanding Public Policy Advocacy: A Primer for the Next Generation of Leadership: T Leach. Room: Ballroom IV. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM (S) Climbing the Hill: Getting Involved in Biomedical Research Advocacy and Public Policy: L France. Room: Ballroom IV. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM (STL) Effective Teaching Strategies Through Consideration of Adult Cognitive Developmental Theories: L Kelly. Room: Ballroom III. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM (STL) Nathan E Brewer Lecture: TBN. Room: Ballroom I. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM (STL) What Could Possibly Go Wrong? Everything You Never Wanted to Know About the Microbiome: V Hale. Room: Ballroom II. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM (STL)

Wednesday Afternoon

Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Planning: W Greer. Room: 339. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM (P) Supporting Researchers and Protecting Science: The Importance of Institutional Collaboration in Outreach Efforts: J Newman. Room: 337. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM (P)

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The Human Variable: Essential Consideration for Promoting Excellence in Animal Welfare: C Bauer. Room: 341. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM (P)

The Laboratory Animal Medical Professional’s Guide to How the 3Rs Enhance Rigor and Reproducibility: K Herrmann. Room: Ballroom III. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM (S)

Working Smarter, Not Harder—The Latest Management Tools Proven to Make Vivarium Operations Easier: J Nichol. Room: 343. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM (P)

Trapped in a Bubble: In Managing Gnotobiotics, One Size Does Not Fit All: C Kraly Freed. Room: Ballroom IV. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM (S)

W-15 Animal Facility, Design, Processes, Decisions, and Technology: M Corey. Room: 345. 1:00 PM–5:00 PM (W)

Animal Law and the Animal Research Community: What You Need to Know, What Your Need to Do: J Tannenbaum. Room: Ballroom II. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM (STL)

W-16 IACUC Protocol Review Challenges: M Brown. Room: 348. 1:00 PM–5:00 PM (W) W-17 Vivarium Ergonomics: Working Safer and Smarter: T Snyder. Room: 346. 1:00 PM–5:00 PM (W) Effective and Efficient Semiannual Inspections How to Get the Most Out of Your IACUC Inspections: J Hickman-Davis. Room: Ballroom I. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM (S) Improving Clinical Translation: Identifying Potential Confounding Factors and Sources of Bias in Animal Study Design: W Feeney. Room: Ballroom II. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM (S)

Exploring Acupuncture in Laboratory Animal Medicine: J Yang. Room: Ballroom III. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM (STL) Gene Editing as a Path to More Informative Preclinical Research: D. Carlson. Room: Ballroom I. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM (STL) The Acheonomics—New Sports Medicine: T Kaczowski. Room: Ballroom IV. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM (STL)

Thursday Afternoon

Journey to the Center of the Mouse: N Peterson. Room: Ballroom III. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM (S)

In Pursuit of Better Research Outcomes: Influence of Veterinary Nurses on Patient Care, Reducing Animal Numbers, and Institutional Compliance: C Montgomery. Room: 337. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM (P)

You Created a Compassion Fatigue Program—What’s Next?: J Van Hooser. Room: Ballroom IV. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM (S)

Joining Forces to Drive Laboratory Animal Science Harmonization: S Mischler. Room: 339. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM (P)

THURSDAY

Preparing for the Real World as a Laboratory Animal Vet: What We Know Now That We Wish We Knew Then: V Baxter. Room: 343. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM (P)

NOVEMBER 1, 2018

Morning From the FDA Trenches: So You Think You Can Design a GLP Animal Study?: A Crusan. Room: Ballroom II. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM (S)

The Modern Vivarium—Digitally Enabled and Energy Efficient: Mike R Evans. Room: 341. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM (P)

Passive Electronic Data Collection Using RFID Technology: Improving Animal Welfare and Study Documentation Efficiency and Accuracy: B Gien. Room: Ballroom I. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM (S)

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


WELCOME TO BALTIMORE FROM THE EXHIBITOR ADVISORY COUNCIL! The 69th AALAS National Meeting is quickly approaching with lots of behind-the-scenes work in progress to make it an excellent meeting for all attendees. Situated in the center of Baltimore’s downtown, the convention center’s location is close to public transportation and a short 20 minute drive from BWI Airport. The center encompasses over 1 million square feet with 300,000 square feet devoted to exhibit halls. It is surrounded by several major hotels and tourist attractions, all within walking distance. The center is connected by skywalk to several major hotels and shopping facilities.

Carrie Schultz, PhD Chair, 2018 Exhibitor Advisory Council

One of the responsibilities of the Exhibitor Advisory Council (EAC) is to coordinate the Technical Trade Presentations (TTPs), which kick off the presentation portion of the meeting on Sunday. TTPs are informal talks given by representatives of exhibiting companies within the laboratory animal industry. We have two tracks of presentations: one entitled “Innovations and Technical Achievements” and one entitled “Developments in Facility Management.” Attendees can benefit from the presentations by learning about these new technologies, the companies presenting them, and any other potential supporting literature around these products, technologies, and systems. Please join us Monday at 8:30 a.m. for the Ribbon Cutting Ceremony to open the AALAS National Meeting Exhibit Hall. On behalf of the Exhibitor Advisory Council and our more than 1,250 commercial members, we look forward to hosting you in Baltimore!

Carrie Schultz, PhD Chair, 2018 Exhibitor Advisory Council

DON’T MISS THE AALAS NATIONAL MEETING EXHIBIT HALL!

Approximately 300 companies (more than 650 booths) exhibit at the AALAS National Meeting. Exhibitors interact with people from the academic community, research institutions, government organizations, and commercial companies. Visit the Exhibitors section of nationalmeeting.aalas.org for a prospectus, a list of previous exhibitors, sponsorship opportunities, and other information. RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONY

Monday, October 29, 8:30 a.m.

COMMERCIAL COMPANY BOOTHS

Learn about the latest products and services offered by vendors in the field.

Visit with our affiliate members and check out their public outreach and AFFILIATE BOOTHS educational materials. CHARGING STATIONS Located in the Exhibit Hall and the Registration Lobby (sponsored by IDEXX, Mispro Biotech Services, Animal Research Consulting, and Tecniplast USA) REFRESHMENT BREAKS (Located in the Exhibit Hall Lounge)

Monday:

8:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m. (sponsored by NEPCO) 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. sponsorship available

Tuesday:

9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m. (sponsored by Priority One) 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. sponsorship available

Wednesday: 9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m. (sponsored by The Jackson Lab)

Come view this year’s poster sessions, and don’t miss the Poster POSTER SESSIONS Reception on Tuesday from 2:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Meet the authors, enjoy some refreshments, and see who won this year’s Poster Awards.

EXHIBIT HALL HOURS

Monday, October 29: 8:30 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 30: 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Wednesday, October 31: 9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m. BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

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OPENING GENERAL SESSION/ GENERAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING Baltimore Convention Center | Sunday, October 28, 2018 5:00-6:30 PM | Ballroom III • • • •

Welcome from AALAS President, Jennifer C. Smith AALAS Awards presentations Recognition of guests and Board of Trustees members Branch Challenge Award presentation

WIN $200 12

Drawings will be held during the General Membership Meeting. Must be present to win. Badges must be printed by 5:00 p.m. on Sunday to be entered into the drawing.

• • • •

Gavel ceremony introducing the new president Introduction of new trustees Incoming president, Morag Mackay’s address Welcome Reception from 6:30-8:00 PM, Hilton Baltimore Hotel, Key Ballroom


Dr. Arthur T. Benjamin Featured at Welcome Reception Dr. Arthur T. Benjamin is a professor of mathematics at Harvey Mudd College. However, he is better known as a math-magician! His “mathemagics” performances have been featured in newspapers, magazines, at TED Talks, and on the “Colbert Report.” Called “America’s Best Math Whiz” by Reader’s Digest, Benjamin will present a high-energy talk and demonstrate and explain his secrets for performing rapid mental calculations faster than a calculator. “He talks like a performer, acts like a magician, and multiplies faster than a calculator.” – The Los Angeles Times “Someone you can count on!” – People Magazine

Welcome Reception, Hilton Baltimore Hotel, Key Ballroom | Sunday, October 28, 2018 District membership meetings will be held on Monday, October 29 at 5:15 PM. See the mobile app for room numbers.

13


PROGRAM SPONSORS AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

Better products. Better science.

14


Essential online training for investigators, technicians, veterinarians, managers, and IACUC members in the laboratory animal science field.

Animal Biosafety Training Program Certificate – 16 courses 240+ courses on animal research and compliance – courses customizable Translatable instantly to 100+ languages – website and courses Training documentation

https://aalaslearninglibrary.org American Association for Laboratory Animal Science | 9190 Crestwyn Hills Drive, Memphis, TN 38125-8538 (901) 754-8620 | (901) 753-0046 | www.aalas.org | info@aalas.org

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EXHIBITORS & SPONSORS AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

AABC Testing & Certification ABC ACTINI LLC Access Technologies Acorn Industrial Products Co

Allentown Inc Notebook Sponsor Tote Bag Sponsor Alpha Genesis Inc

Alternative Design Manufacturing & Supply Inc Silver Level Sponsor

ALZET Osmotic Pumps/Durect Corp ®

Ancare Corp

Bronze Level Sponsor Andersen Products Inc Animal Care Systems Inc Animal Identification & Marking Systems Inc Animal Resource Management Animal Specialties and Provisions LLC Animal Welfare Institute Aquaneering Inc Arcoplast Inc Art’s-Way Scientific Inc A-Tune Software Inc AVID Identification Systems Inc BASF Corporation BASi (Bioanalytical Systems Inc) Beta Star Life Science Equipment BetterBuilt Bio Medic Data Systems Inc bioBUBBLE Inc Biofresh Lab BioInfoRx Inc Bio-Serv Bluemed BMT USA LLC BootieButler

16

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

Brainbits Braintree Scientific Inc Britz & Company BSI Software BZ Sales & Support LLC Carter 2 Systems Inc Cayuse Charles River Chem-Pruf CITI Program, A Division of BRANY

ClearH2O Inc Gold Level Sponsor

ClorDiSys Solutions Inc Colonial Medical Supply Consolidated Sterilizer Systems Contec Inc

Continental Equipment Company Inc Bronze Level Sponsor Mobile App Sponsor

Covance Research Products Inc CRB CRC Press - Taylor & Francis Group LLC CURIS® System Cyagen Biosciences DarvallVet - A Division of Advanced Anesthesia Specialists Datesand Ltd DRE Scientific, A Division of DRE Veterinary Drexel University College of Medicine Dustcontrol Inc Dycem Corp. Eastern Virginia Medical School

Edstrom Industries, LLC Bronze Level Sponsor

Elm Hill Labs Elsevier Envigo Esco Technologies Inc

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


EXHIBITORS & SPONSORS AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

ETC Sterilization Systems Exemplar Genetics E-Z Systems/Euthanex Corp FEFA FiberCore LLC Fine Science Tools First Veterinary Supply Frames Animal Transportation Fuel3d Galilei Software GmbH

Lab Supply Inc LABEX of MA LBS (Serving Biotechnology) Ltd Lenderking Caging Products LGL Animal Care Products Inc Life Science Products Inc Lighthouse Life Sciences Lithgow Laboratory Services Locus Technology Inc

Getinge

President’s Sponsor

Bronze Level Sponsor Girton Manufacturing Co Inc Gruenberg TPS Hazard Technology Henry Schein Animal Health

Hilltop Lab Animals Inc Notebook Sponsor

Hot Dog Patient Warming Huron Consulting Group

IDEXX BioResearch

Bronze Level Sponsor Mobile Device Charging Station Mobile App Sponsor

Lomir Biomedical Inc LYNX Product Group Marshall BioResources Matachana USA Corp Medline Industries Inc Metropolitan Acoustics, LLC MILA International

Mispro Biotech Services Corporation Mobile Device Charging Station

Mopec Mosaic Vivarium (Virtual Chemistry, Inc.) Mouse Specifics Inc MWI Animal Health NC3Rs NorayBio Software

iMedRIS Data Corporation Innovive Instech Laboratories Inc IWAKI Aquatic Jorgensen Laboratories JRS

Northeastern Products Corporation (NEPCO)

Kent Scientific Corporation

NuAire Inc

Mobile App Sponsor Ketchum Manufacturing Inc Key Solutions Inc Lab Animal Lab Products Inc

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

Refreshment Break Sponsor

NTM Consulting Services, Inc. (eSirius)

Silver Level Sponsor Technician Lunch & Learn Sponsor Oak Hill Genetics Otto Environmental LLC P & H Casters Patterson Scientific

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EXHIBITORS & SPONSORS AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

Peroxigard Pharmacal Research Labs Inc PJ Murphy Forest Products Corp Plas-Labs Inc

Siemens Industry Inc

PMI LabDiet

Tote Bag Sponsor

Gold Level Sponsor Neck Cord Sponsor Technician Lunch & Learn Sponsor Notebook Sponsor

PreLabs

Tote Bag Sponsor Primate Products Inc PRIMUS Sterilizer Company LLC

Priority One Services Inc Refreshment Break Sponsor Silver Level Sponsor

PVS Process Equipment Quip Laboratories Inc Rad Source Technologies Inc ReCathCo LLC Rees Scientific Corporation Research Diets Inc Research Supply Company Res-Tek Inc RICA Surgical Products Inc Ridglan Animal Care Systems Ridglan Farms Inc RMS Omega Technologies RockStep Solutions RWD Life Science Co Ltd S&S Farms SAI Infusion Technologies Sanitation Strategies LLC Sarstedt Inc SCANBUR Scientek Technology Corporation SENTIER Shepherd Specialty Papers Shoe Inn LLC

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ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

Mobile App Sponsor

Sinclair BioResources LLC

SoBran Inc

SOMNI Scientific Sound Spray Master Technologies SR Veterinary Technologies LLC ssniff Spezialdiaten GmbH STARR Life Sciences Steelco-USA Inc Sterilizing Systems STERIS Corporation Stoelting Co Stonhard Strahman Valves Inc Studylog Systems Inc Suburban Surgical Co Inc Systems Engineering Taconic Biosciences Tandem Products/Tenderfoot Flooring TBJ Inc Technical Safety Services Inc

Tecniplast USA

Bronze Level Sponsor Mobile Device Charging Station Notebook Sponsor The Andersons Bedding Products The Baker Company

The Jackson Laboratory Refreshment Break Sponsor ThermoCare

Thoren Caging Systems Inc Bronze Level Sponsor

TOMI Environmental Solutions TOPAZ Technologies LLC FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


EXHIBITORS & SPONSORS AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

Total MRO LLC Transnetyx Inc Turner Scientific Tuttnauer USA Co Ltd UID Identification Solutions UNO Roestvaststaal B.V. Valumax International Verona Safety Supply Inc

Americans for Medical Progress (AMP)

VetEquip Inc

Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR)

Tote Bag Sponsor

Association For Gnotobiotics, Inc Association of Primate Veterinarians (APV) European Society of Laboratory Animal Veterinarians (ESLAV) Federacion De Sociedades Y Asoc Hispanas De Amer Del Norte Foundation for Biomedical Research (FBR) Institute of Animal Technology (IAT) International Council For Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS)

Viking Medical LLC ViraTek Inc Visron Design Inc Vium Inc VRL Laboratories W F Fisher and Son World Courier Inc Worldwide Primates Inc WuXi AppTec XpressBio

International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) Laboratory Animal Welfare Training Exchange (LAWTE) Laboratory Animals Limited (LAL) National Association for Biomedical Research (NABR) Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIM&R) Scientists Center for Animal Welfare (SCAW) Society for Laboratory Animal Veterinary Technicians (SLAVT) Thai Association For Laboratory Animal Science (TALAS)

Zeigler Bros Inc Bronze Level Sponsor

NONEXHIBITING SPONSORS Animal Research Consulting Mobile Device Charging Station

Merck

Gold Level Sponsor

Pfizer

AREA Program Sponsor

AFFILIATES AAALAC International American College of Lab Animal Medicine (ACLAM) American Physiological Society (APS) American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners (ASLAP) BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

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SUNDAY AFTERNOON AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

TRACK I TECHNICAL TRADE PRESENTATIONS

(Innovations and Technical Advancements)

VETCORDER: PATIENT MONITORING IN THE PALM OF YOUR HAND 1:00 PM - 1:20 PM/Room: 343 Speaker: David B Brunson Moderator: Keith Jasinski

The Vetcorder is a Bluetooth-enabled vital signs monitor for physiologic animal assessment, especially useful in the perianesthetic or perioperative period. The novel Vetcorder enables heart rate monitoring, electrocardiography (ECG), and pulse oximetry (SpO2) via a small instrument the size of a deck of cards. The Vetcorder can transmit the vital organ information via Bluetooth to a remote (nonattached) display to enable assessment of the animal remotely. Monitor measures can be used to assess cardiac rhythm and heart rate, pulse rate, hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO2), and temperature. These indices may provide professionals with insights into the patient’s depth of anesthesia and adequacy of analgesia, as well as cardiac and respiratory function. The device and uniquely adapted needle electrodes have been used successfully in many species, including primates, rodents, lagomorphs, canids, felids, swine, and horses and cattle, among others. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Sentier Connect LLC.

OXYGEN CONCENTRATORS: A GOOD IDEA FOR INHALATION ANESTHESIA? 1:20 PM - 1:40 PM/Room: 343 Speaker: Robert “Bob” Schrock Moderator: Carrie Schultz

Inhalation anesthesia systems have traditionally been used with 100% oxygen being delivered from tanks or central supplies. Recent advances have led to the use of oxygen concentrators instead. We will explore the nature of these units and determine if it may be

20

a good fit for your lab or your facility. We will discuss how such a device is possible, how it may or may not be compatible with your anesthesia system, and most importantly, how it might affect your research studies. Tangential benefits include significant cost savings; elimination for the need to change, order, and store tanks; plus the greatest advantage of all, the elimination of potential pathogens making their way into your facility on a rented O2 tank. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by VetEquip Inc.

CAN I REALLY DELIVER ISOFLURANE WITHOUT USING COMPRESSED GAS?  1:40 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 343 Speaker: Dave FitzMiller Moderator: Carrie Schultz

Yes, the most common method for delivering inhalant anesthesia, such as isoflurane, employs traditional canisterstyle instruments that use a mechanical vaporizer to mix the liquid anesthetic chemical with compressed oxygen at a prescribed ratio to produce the proper anesthetic gas mixture. In recent years, technical improvements on how we deliver inhalant anesthetics have been made, and alternative systems provide researchers with more options, one of which is the ability to deliver isoflurane without the need for using compressed gas. In this presentation, you will learn about how you and your lab can deliver isoflurane without compressed gas, use less isoflurane, and improve researcher safety. If you work with rodents and isoflurane, you will not want to miss this presentation. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Kent Scientific Corporation.

THE JANET WOOD INNOVATION AWARD—A GLOBAL INITIATIVE TO INVENT AND INTRODUCE NOVEL ENRICHMENT 

Since it’s conception in 2016, the Janet Wood Innovation Award has successfully launched more than 6 products into the global marketplace. These products were designed by animal technicians. From entering a competition with a concept product, the winners are selected by a panel of judges and the winning entries are taken from concept to marketplace with the help of the Datesand team. Entering a design can be a daunting prospect, but this presentation aims to dampen any fears and show how a sketched concept can be turned into a commercially available product which can then have a positive impact on animal welfare around the world. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Datesand Ltd.

LEVERAGING THE POWER OF VIDEO TECHNOLOGY AND COMPUTER VISION TO IMPROVE IN VIVO STUDIES 2:20 PM - 2:40 PM/Room: 343 Speaker: Laura Schaevitz Moderator: Carrie Schultz

The use of video technology inside the vivarium to monitor in vivo studies is one of the most rapidly growing areas of innovation in animal model research. Specifically, the ability to record subject video 24/7 in a noninvasive, homecage specific manner has created the possibilities for a wide variety of new retrospective, real-time, and predictive analyses. When combined with the rapid advances in computer vision technology across wide-ranging industries outside of pharma, subject video is proving to quickly become the basis for how all study analysis and data insight will be generated in the future. This session will examine some of the groundbreaking ways video and computer vision is being utilized in traditional and experimental animal models to provide new, more accurate, and more translational study results. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Vium.

2:00 PM - 2:20 PM/Room: 343 Speaker: Nicky Windows Moderator: Carrie Schultz

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


USING 3D SCANNING TO STANDARDIZE THE MEASUREMENT OF SUBCUTANEOUS TUMORS 2:40 PM - 3:00 PM/Room: 343 Speaker: Andrew Smith Moderator: Juan Delgado

For decades handheld calipers have been used to measure the volume of subcutaneous tumors in mice in preclinical oncology research. Yet research shows their use can result in operator and inter-operator bias and more mice being used for repeat studies due to data inaccuracies. Ultimately, this increases the cost and slows down the development of drug therapies. With pressure increasing from regulatory bodies to improve research standards and animal welfare, pharmaceutical companies, CROs, and academic institutions are turning to 3D scanning to deliver improved results in tumor measurement and to advance global oncology research. This presentation looks at why calipers are not the optimum tool to carry out tumor measurements and the benefits of using 3D scanning instead, including more precise and consistent measurements, full transparency and traceability, greater welfare in adherence with the 3Rs, and workflow optimization. We will showcase the improved results already being achieved by laboratories in the EU and USA using the BioVolume highprecision 3D scanning and measurement system. This session is ideally suited to laboratory animal scientists, veterinarians, technicians, and managers working in preclinical oncology research. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Fuel3D.

A NEW TOOL FOR ONCOLOGY RESEARCHERS THE RAG2/IL2RG (R2G2) KNOCKOUT MOUSE 3:00 PM - 3:20 PM/Room: 343 Speaker: Sheri J Wildt Moderator: Jamie Naden

Immunodeficient mouse models have been instrumental in the advancement

of oncology research in the past several decades. The R2G2 mouse model, developed at Fox Chase Cancer Center, is one of the newest commercially available double-knockout mouse models with an ultra immunodeficient phenotype. This model was created by backcrossing the IL2RG (common gamma chain) mutation on to mouse with a mutation in Rag2. The recombination activating gene 2 (Rag2) knockout causes a deficiency in T and B cells. The common gamma chain gene (IL2RG) interruption results in a lack of functional receptors for IL-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, and IL-15. R2G2 mice have several unique features that translate into unique benefits as compared to other immunodeficient models, including higher tolerability to radiation, estrogen pellet supplementation, and some chemotherapeutic agents. We will present the unique characteristic of this new mouse model and how to use them to leverage your oncology or immunology research program. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by ENVIGO. 

USE OF AUTOMATED SAMPLING TO GET BETTER DATA FROM FEWER ANIMALS  3:20 PM - 3:40 PM/Room: 343 Speaker: Candace Rohde-Johnson Moderator: Shelly Carballo

More than 70% of researchers have tried and failed to reproduce another scientist’s experiments, and more than half have failed to reproduce their own experiments. In this session, we’ll review some potential causes of these issues, and examine both the things you can see: staff, material, and technique differences, as well as the things we can’t always see: stress, individual animal variability, and the effects of dosing and sampling method on results. We’ll further explore the application of automated dosing and sampling as a means to improve animal welfare and data integrity while reducing human intervention. There is a surprising effect of stress on drug absorption and distribution; automation has the potential to reduce these confounding effects, reduce animal usage and ultimately to

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SUNDAY AFTERNOON AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

reduce re-work and repeats. This session will be most beneficial for researchers performing compound dosing studies for PK/PD, but will have relevance to any animal researchers interested in the effects of humans on animal studies. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by BASi.

IMPACT OF EXTRUSION ON BIOBURDEN IN LABORATORY ANIMAL DIETS

3:40 PM - 4:00 PM/Room: 343 Speaker: Laura N Tracey Moderator: Carrie Schultz

Extrusion has historically been the manufacturing method of choice for diets for many species in biomedical research, including nonhuman primates, cats, and dogs. Originally, extrusion was used mostly for digestion benefits of these species; however, over the last decade, extruded products have become increasingly popular choices for other species (rodents) for other reasons. Reduction of bioburden is one sometimes purported advantage of extrusion over pelleting, based on the fact that the extrusion process involves steam and temperature levels great enough to kill many microorganisms. This talk will discuss the steps of the extrusion process, including common temperatures reached and time at those temperatures. Also discussed will be post-extrusion steps that may impact the overall microbial load on the finished product. This information may be used by facility managers and researchers to determine if using extruded product without irradiation might be an appropriate option for your facility. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by PMI Nutrition International (LabDiet®).

TRACK II TECHNICAL TRADE

ARE YOUR STUDIES REPRODUCIBLE?

1:20 PM - 1:40 PM/Room: 341 Speaker: Preben Leonhardt Moderator: John A Park

PRESENTATIONS

(Developments in Facility Management)

AN IVC FOR ENVIRONMENTALLY CONSCIOUS FACILITIES

1:00 PM - 1:20 PM/Room: 341 Speaker: Liz Kramer Moderator: John A Park

Research operations come at an incredible environmental cost from things such as sterilization, disposable PPE, equipment power demands, waste streams, and even recyclable products. Can we as a research community reduce the stress our industry places on the environment? It is possible to make environmental considerations a priority, and this presentation will demonstrate the economic advantages of doing so. Even when using ventilated caging, you can reduce the carbon footprint of your facility while making the best use of your equipment, people, and budgets. Certain innovations in caging and sensor technologies can deliver ideal environments for your animals and improved working conditions for your personnel, while saving enormous amounts of money and reducing the environmental impact of daily operations. We all breathe the same air, drink the same water, and live on the same planet. It is time to prioritize our common global resources and as a scientific research community, we can lead the way. The speaker was a full-time environmental activist before joining Lenderking. Her talk will include framing the environmental challenge through her time as a pick-up artist on the nonprofit project Pick Up America, which walked across the country and picked up 100 tons of roadside litter. She is passionate about good science and creating a greener future. She joined the Lenderking team because it allows her to do both. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Lenderking Caging Products.

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ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

Yearly, $28,000,000,000 are wasted on nonreproducible animal studies in the U.S. This presentation will estimate the cost for a single university/vivarium for studies which might be spent in vain. One important parameter which might not always be in full control is the relative air humidity, which is well known to have an influence on animal welfare. During this presentation we will discuss how it may also affect reproducibility of animal research. We ask the question, “is compliance with guidelines specifying 30-70% relative humidity good enough, or would a much more accurate adjustment of relative humidity be required to enhance reproducibility of research?” Studies looking at water intake, food consumption, and activity level at different humidity levels will be presented and experiences on how it may affect studies on metabolism, diabetes, respiratory systems, sensory organs, mental disorders, behavior, or even breeding will be shared. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Scanbur A/S.

OPERATING NEXTGENERATION ANIMAL FACILITIES IN THE AGE OF BIG DATA 

1:40 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 341 Speaker: Terry R Coley Moderator: John A Park

Leading institutions are taking a top-down view of core facilities to understand how to operate most efficiently and best serve the needs of researchers. Using examples from the City of Hope and the University of British Columbia, we will show provosts, facility managers, directors of operations, and veterinary directors concrete examples of how real-time animal facility data collection, combined with key human resources, can create continuous improvement in the animal facility. As expected, part

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


SUNDAY AFTERNOON AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

of the solution involves using software to replace paper-based processes. Achieving further improvement requires facilities to consider human resources and software that goes beyond traditional point-solutions for cage cost recovery and IACUC document management. By implementing real-time data collection software, animal facilities generate a treasure trove of operational data that serves as fuel for improving efficiency. If data is the fuel, then the facility data analyst (a role often missing) is the engine needed to drive improvement. Transparent access to appropriate facility data also provides a rich, value-added service for research groups. Researcher/ facility communication is improved, confidence in data integrity is heightened, and researchers can easily see how to optimize their lab animal resources. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Virtual Chemistry Inc.

DIGITALIZATION IN THE ANIMAL HOUSE—HOW TO BRIDGE THE GAP INTO THE ANIMAL ROOM

2:00 PM - 2:20 PM/Room: 341 Speaker: Stephan E Hammelbacher Moderator: John A Park

This talk will cover the status of digitalization in the animal house and analyze the blank areas in the animal room. The Internet of Things (IoT) is an important means to control data and to support the daily work in the animal room. The participants will learn the benefits of integrating the IoT into the animal room by the means of electronic cage cards. Electronic cage cards are electronic cage labels replacing cage cards written or printed on paper. These allow the automated tracking of cages through the animal facility. Once assigned to the cage number of the animal management system and to the cage itself they permit touchless updates of cage information normally protocolled on paper cage cards. This presentation addresses the designers of animal houses, IT process analyzers, and workflow specialists of the animal house. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Galilei Software GmbH.

INTERNET OF THINGS TECHNOLOGIES IMPROVE ANIMAL LABORATORY MANAGEMENT AND RESEARCH

2:20 PM - 2:40 PM/Room: 341 Speaker: Charles Donnelly Moderator: Julie Morrison

New approaches to improve laboratory animal welfare, as well as more capable and cost-effective husbandry techniques and data management, are high priorities to the NIH. The technology revolution is changing how humans interact with and analyze the physical world. Computer controlled automation, robotics, sensors, and artificial intelligence are disrupting how work is conducted in all industries. The rate of new technology inventions capable of driving operational efficiencies, reducing research animal use, and increasing experimental reproducibility in research labs continues to accelerate. The Internet of Things (IoT) is one of the key components of the technology revolution. Interacting with the physical world and communicating with the cloud, IoT devices can monitor anything that can be measured from environmental conditions to animal physiology, and they can make real-time decisions that control machines and robots. For animal sciences, IoT devices are emerging as powerful tools for reducing animal stress and research costs while improving experimental reproducibility and accelerating discovery. New energy efficient IoT sensor devices can run for years on a single battery streaming information to the cloud where artificial intelligence algorithms can analyze data and trigger alerts. Researchers can now use these data to correlate IoT measurements with scientific results and facility managers can improve operations with data-driven vivarium workflows. IoT devices that measure light, noise, temperature, humidity, and ammonia levels connected to IoT enabled data management platforms are now commercially available. Here we discuss how scalable cloud IoT solutions for researchers and facility managers are poised to have a transformative impact on both lab animal science and operations. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by RockStep Solutions.

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

SOLVING THE PAIN OF FACILITY SCHEDULING USING INDUSTRY-SPECIFIC SOFTWARE SOLUTION 

2:40 PM - 3:00 PM/Room: 341 Speaker: Miki Fontes Moderator: John A Park

Managing animal facility resources effectively and efficiently can be a challenge. NTM’s strategic planning group conducted extensive research and interviews with private organizations and academic institutions. Based on findings, schedulers are spending an inordinate amount of time manually producing daily staff schedules and reviewing daily progress. Husbandry staff relies on room sheets for daily work assignments. Reacting to daily events such as callouts and understanding resource availability is challenging. This process is typically paper-driven, assisted with tools such as Excel spreadsheets or commercial systems not designed for animal facilities. Participants will gain insights on the benefits of automating the entire workflow of their facility staff scheduling, and will come away with understanding 1) the advantages of using a web-based staff scheduling solution to improve process efficiency, create transparency, and provide management with overall status reporting, resulting in cost savings and better animal care and 2) the benefits of implementing industryspecific staff scheduling solutions versus adapting scheduling systems designed for other industries. The target audience includes facility directors, research facility managers, operations managers, and facility supervisors. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by NTM Consulting Services Inc.

HOW TO INCORPORATE ENVIRONMENTAL DIAGNOSTICS INTO ANIMAL HEALTH MONITORING PROGRAMS

3:00 PM - 3:20 PM/Room: 341 Speaker: Cindy L Besch-Williford Moderator: Matthew H Myles

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SUNDAY AFTERNOON AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

Use of environmental diagnostics (EDx) complements the breadth of testing approaches used to screen for infectious diseases in research rodent colonies. Environmental monitoring involves sampling at the cage, rack, and occasionally room level, and provides information complementary to that collected by other monitoring practices used in quarantine and colony animal surveillance programs. In this presentation, we’ll discuss the various types of EDx sample types and application of EDx monitoring with comparisons to other animal-based sampling approaches. Additionally, examples of how to interpret and confirm results will be provided to facilitate adaptation of these methods to institutional health monitoring programs. The target audience includes veterinarians, facility managers, and technical personnel who manage health monitoring programs. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by IDEXX BioResearch.

LAB AND ANIMAL TRANSFER STATION DECONTAMINATION IN ONE SIMPLE STEP

3:20 PM - 3:40 PM/Room: 341 Speaker: Frances M Grinstead Moderator: Rich Mullen

Laboratory and animal transfer station (ATS) decontamination pose many challenges. When these areas are decontaminated separately, crosscontamination from one space to the other may occur. Caustic chemical systems are typically used when treating these areas, potentially exposing staff and sensitive equipment to dangerous concentrations of these solutions. While lower concentration aerosols are well-documented to achieve spore sterilization in sealed spaces, their efficacy within the HEPA filters of an ATS were unknown and therefore prompted further examination. Is there a safer, yet effective method of simultaneous decontamination? ”CURIS® System recently collaborated with The Baker Company, a manufacturer of

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biological safety cabinets, to study the effectiveness of enhanced aerosolized hydrogen peroxide (AHP) technology. Test results showed that AHP via CURIS® Pulse technology is a safe and effective solution to the challenge of simultaneous decontamination with repeatable results over 6 tests and 184 spore carriers. Participants will learn about the Micron Mist™ Technology used in the study, and how the advanced features, including primary injection phase and secondary Pulse injection phase, maximize efficacy and maintain optimal hydrogen peroxide concentration. We will examine the perceived challenges and the results of performing simultaneous decontamination in the presence of an ATS filter. Participants will understand processes that lead to successful 6-log reduction of a spore in the most challenging locations within each environment. Discover how the CURIS® dual injection phases are key to achieving spore inactivation with CURoxide™, a low concentration 7% hydrogen peroxide. This presentation is helpful for lab/facility/operations managers, health and safety managers, and study/research directors.

matrix, it is possible to enhance desired properties of an antimicrobial compound while minimizing other unfavorable traits. We will cover the basics of CSD formulation and how this affects the evaluation, testing, and selection process. We will review the different biocidal actives and classes of chemically functional materials that are employed in commercial formulations. Since the regulatory environment may lag behind the needs and expectations of animal research facilities, many animal scientists perform their own product testing and evaluations. We examine how a better understanding of the chemistry of formulations helps the laboratory animal scientist improve the design of testing and evaluation protocols. Participants will learn about the different biocidal actives; why some are preferred over others in a given situation; the basic concepts in formulation of CSDs, including the types and roles of different functional chemicals; understand how the type of formulation affects its testing and evaluation prior to adoption; and how chemical formulations interact with application methods and protocols to impact efficacy, safety, effect on animals and other key performance characteristics.

This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by CURIS® System.

This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Lighthouse Healthcare Partners.

PRINCIPLES OF CHEMICAL SURFACE DISINFECTANT FORMULATION—WHAT THE LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENTIST NEEDS TO KNOW

3:40 PM - 4:00 PM/Room: 341 Speaker: Jose A Ramirez Moderator: John A Park

Chemical surface disinfectants (CSD) are a key element of the biosecurity program in animal research labs and breeding facilities. While biocidal efficacy and spectrum of activity are arguably the main factors in CSD selection, other factors are being increasingly taken into consideration. These factors include safety profile, effects on animals, compatibility with surface materials, simplicity and ease of use, environmental profile, and ease of disposal. By incorporating well-known biocidal actives into a multi-component

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

DRY HEAT STERILIZATION FOR VIVARIUM USE

4:00 PM - 4:20 PM/Room: 341 Speaker: Robert Davis Moderator: Denny Mendler

The use of dry heat sterilizers to sterilize laboratory animal cages is becoming more and more prevalent. The purpose of this talk is to educate attendees on use of dry heat in laboratory animal facilities. Topics covered include the origins of dry heat sterilization and its application in lab animal sciences, such as how it works with laboratory animal cages and IVC racks, as well as how the dry heat sterilizer is configured and validated. Additionally, the benefits of dry heat sterilization and how it compares to steam sterilization will be discussed, along with recent case studies. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Gruenberg-TPS.

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


MONDAY MORNING AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

OCTOBER 29, 2018 MONDAY MORNING

WORKSHOPS

W-01 ANESTHETIC MONITORING 101—BACK TO BASICS

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 345 Leader: Cholawat Pacharinsak Faculty: Tyler Long Facilitator: Sean C Adams Workshop Fee: $140      Workshop Limit: 25

Attendees will become familiar with anesthetic monitoring during peri- and post-operative periods which alert anesthetists to potential complications before they become irreversible, thus reducing morbidity or mortality. During peri-operative period, many parameters should be monitored, including central nervous system, cardiovascular, and respiratory functions. The workshop will focus on the basic understanding and importance of commonly used anesthetic monitoring equipment (ECG, blood pressure, %SpO2, ETCO2, and body temperature) for indications, implementations, and interpretations during large animal anesthesia. The workshop will be conducted in an easy-to-understand manner. This dry lab workshop is appropriate for veterinarians, laboratory animal technicians, scientists, laboratory managers, and IACUC members who are not familiar with basic anesthetic monitoring techniques. This Workshop is sponsored in part by Kent Scientific and VetEquip Inc.

W-02 CMAR/ANIMAL RESOURCE EXAM PREP CLASS (8-hour workshop continued Tuesday 8:00 AM)

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 346 Leader: Diana P Baumann Faculty: Diana P Baumann, Camellia M Symonowicz Facilitator: TBD Workshop Fee: $140      Workshop Limit: 50 We are heroes to millions of people and animals, and our work makes a profound

difference in this world. As leaders, we have a responsibility to support and drive our employees and operations effectively, efficiently, and compassionately. CMAR certification provides us with a unique set of knowledge and tools. The Laboratory Animal Management Association (LAMA) has developed a workshop for the CMAR exams, designed for your success. Please join us for our preparatory workshop for the Animal Resource (AR) exam. Topics covered include effective management styles and motivating the workforce, training and education for laboratory animal professionals, managing physical resources, policy development, managing budgets, veterinary care, IACUC, and managing compliance. This prep course alone will not prepare you for the AR exam, but provides a refresher and review of your existing studies.

W-03A MICROSURGERY SKILLS TRAINING USING SURGICAL LOUPES (offered twice, also Monday 1:00 PM)

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 347 Leader: Robert F Hoyt Jr Faculty: Tannia S Clark, Randall R Clevenger, Tanya L Herzog, Kenneth R Jeffries, Karen J Keeran, Elena Kuznetsova, Audrey Noguchi, Gayle Z Nugent, Tom L Thomas Facilitator: Misty J Williams-Fritze Workshop Fee: $250      Workshop Limit: 20 Performing surgical procedures with the aid of magnification has gained widespread use in human medicine over the past 30 years. Using surgical loupes, surgeons can now routinely perform procedures on very small structures that were considered impossible a few decades ago. Within the past 15 years, using magnification to perform microsurgical techniques has also quickly spread to other health care disciplines, including dental specialties and dermatology, to increase surgical precision. Using them is now considered standard of care. The use of microsurgery and its value to biomedical research has, unfortunately, only just begun to be realized. Because

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

of their small body structures, laboratory animals, such as rats and mice, have generally not been considered as animal models for many types of surgical procedures routinely performed in biomedical research. Investigators have rather elected to use larger species such as dogs, pigs, sheep, rabbits, or nonhuman primates for such modeling because both surgical support equipment is more readily available, and the surgical techniques are more familiar to the support personnel. The recent shift to using genetically engineered rodents, especially mice, has now resulted in increased researcher desires to use these animals in more sophisticated modeling procedures, especially surgery. Rather than being limited to only simple procedures such as IM, IP, or IV injections, researchers using microsurgery can now perform complex surgical procedures on many rodent organ systems, such as the heart, lungs, and the gastrointestinal tract. This workshop will provide an introduction to the basic techniques, equipment, and general applications of microsurgery using surgical loupes. Hands-on training will be conducted in two phases: 1) teaching students to develop technical skills by performing exercises using surgical loupes and 2) applying these skills to perform simple surgical procedures using rodent and organ surrogates. To enhance student success, we have greatly enhanced the teacher: student ratio. Targeted audience is veterinarians, investigators, technicians. This Workshop is sponsored in part by Midwest Veterinary Supply, Q-Optics Surgical Loupes, SurgiReal Products Inc, Supramid Suture and RICA Surgical Products.

W-04 TECHNICIAN TO SUPERVISOR: MANAGEMENT 101: THE UPS AND DOWNS OF MANAGING PEOPLE

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 349 Leader/Faculty: Stephen T Baker Facilitator: Leah Curtin Workshop Fee: $140      Workshop Limit: 50

When you excel at a technical skill or provide superior husbandry/study

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MONDAY MORNING AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

support, individuals are often rewarded with a promotion that expands their role and responsibility to include managing others. Individuals whose primary focus/expertise is animals are asked to change gears and channel their soft skills. This workshop will provide a high level overview/introduction of key concepts to support a successful transition. Topics will include performance management, effective interviewing skills, hiring and firing, how to handle conflict, coaching versus delegating, and how to communicate effectively. This interactive workshop will take participants through various exercises, role plays, and what-if scenarios to provide take-aways which can be applied back at their place of employment. The targeted audience includes new supervisors or first-level managers. If you are new to the world of managing others or contemplating getting into management, you do not want to miss this workshop. This Workshop is sponsored in part by Pfizer, Inc.

SEMINARS A DAY IN THE LIFE WITH OUR “FUNNY LITTLE CREATURES”

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answered such as why are they called tree shrews if they don’t live in trees, they’re not shrews, and they’re not “Scrat” from the movie Ice Age, but they are developing into one of the most sought after research models; why an odd-looking Egyptian rodent emerged as an attractive alternate model for Leishmania research; how food-caching birds, such as wild-caught black-capped chickadees and the tufted titmouse make useful models for studying memory; and in which way regulation EU Directive 2010/63 now covering cephalopods incited the development of Best Practices for husbandry of these highly intelligent critters and their caregivers’ training. The speakers will not only focus on husbandry, care, and health but also safety and regulatory challenges, the often-unconventional solutions, and of course the exciting research topics involving these species. As everyone can imagine, solving the aforementioned problems can be time-consuming; however, nontraditional species catch our attention and reward us for our efforts. So please join us on our journey and enjoy the stories, pictures, and presentations about our funny little creatures. 8:00

Speakers/Topics: Sylvia I Gografe

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom I Leader/Moderator: Sylvia I Gografe Facilitator: Carrie S List

8:10

Susan Freling

This seminar will appeal to a broad audience as we take you on a journey through our world of working with nontraditional species, or as we like to call them, our funny little creatures. It’s not only interesting and informative, it’s exciting, fun, and there is rarely a dull moment. No matter what your role is at your specific institute you will be surprised at the ideas and inspirations these models can provide. We will get those creative juices flowing and help you implement some of the presented work solutions in your job and learn that nothing is impossible when providing the best care for our animals! Interesting questions will be

8:40

Stephen Felt

9:10

Viola Galligioni and Graziano Fiorito

9:40

Christina L Winnicker

Welcome and Introductions I Didn’t Pick the Shrew Life, the Shrew Life Picked Me Fat-tailed Jirds (Pachyuromys duprasi): Fantastic Beasts and How to Care for Them

Pursuits on Cephalopod Care and Proper Personnel Training

Wild Feathers: Working with Black-capped Chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) and the Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor)

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

ARE TIMES CHANGING IN THE ANIMAL RESEARCH OVERSIGHT ENVIRONMENT? 

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom II Leader/Moderator: B Taylor Bennett Facilitator: William S Stokes

Section 2034 of the 21st Century Cures Act (Cures), signed into law on December 13, 2016, directs leadership of NIH, USDA, and the FDA to “complete a review of applicable regulations and policies for the care and use of laboratory animals and make revisions, as appropriate, to reduce administrative burden on investigators while maintaining the integrity and credibility of research findings and protection of research animals.” The review is to be completed within two years of the bill’s enactment. On July 17, 2017, the Department of Agriculture issued a Request for Information (RFI) entitled “Identifying Regulatory Reform Initiatives” and on January 22, 2018, an announcement entitled “ThirdParty Inspection Programs Under the Animal Welfare Act; Public Meetings.” These events could lead to changes in the current oversight environment that impact how animal care and use programs are managed. This seminar will provide the attendees with an opportunity to hear from representatives of the USDA, OLAW, AAALAC, and NABR regarding possible changes, as well as other ongoing issues, within their organization and to discuss with those representatives how their organization’s activities impact the environment in which we work and what changes to expect in the future. Questions for the panelists can be submitted to btbdvm@ yahoo.com. The target audience will be those who need to keep current with the regulations and requirements for conducting animal-based biomedical research. 8:00

Speakers/Topics:

8:10

Elizabeth Goldentyer

8:30

Patricia Brown

B Taylor Bennett Welcome and Introduction USDA Update

OLAW Update

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8:50

Kathryn Bayne

9:00

Matthew Bailey

9:30

B Taylor Bennett

AAALAC Updatge NABR Update

Discussion This Seminar is sponsored in part by National Association for Biomedical Research (NABR), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), APHIS Animal Care and National Institutes of Health Office of Animal Care, and AAALAC International.

REPRODUCIBILITY: FROM THE TANK/CAGE SIDE FOR BETTER RESEARCH AND > 3RS

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom III Leader/Moderator: John J Hasenau Facilitator: Stephanie J Murphy This seminar will consider practical options to achieve better research reporting and reproducibility. Participants will learn about reporting of environmental conditions for animal research models and next steps to ensure more rigorous reporting. We will review historical concerns and contemporary issues going forward. Last year’s AALAS meeting included much discussion on research reproducibility and opportunities for improvements. We will review developments and usage of reporting guidance and update a 2017 survey on the use of these guidelines. An area with minimal reporting has been laboratory fish housing, husbandry practices, and environmental parameters, which are highly variable and are under-reported. Environmental factors are under-recognized as contributors to experimental variation, and this information is rarely shared or requested. The problem was addressed by 1) developing a summary environmental report for research fish facilities, and 2) disseminating these data by depositing this document into an accessible web-based platform for data sharing called protocol.io. In addition, pharmaceutical companies and CROs contend with regulatory requirements that involve extensive QA QC and documentation that includes macro- and micro-environmental data collection and reporting. We will present examples of the practical

application of digital information within a unit, and across a global organization, and its effects on study reproducibility. Husbandry impact on reproducibility and data consistency is addressed by the last speaker. While “meets Guide standards” is the company line, the details of daily care vary among institutions. Differences in cage components, housing density, cage changing frequency, and practices are all recognized to impact animal development, physiology, and behavior. Suggestions to improve reproducibility of rodent research will be presented. A discussion based on audience questions will end the session. The target audience includes all individuals engaged in research involving animal models including animal facility managers, lab animal and research technicians, staff, veterinarians, IACUC members, scientists, and editors, reviewers, and authors. 8:00

Speakers/Topics:

8:05

John J Hasenau

8:15

Cory F Brayton

8:40

Christian Lawerence

9:05

Szczepan Baran

9:30

Samuel C Cartner

9:55

John J Hasenau

John J Hasenau Welcome and Introduction

Study Reproducibility Overview Guidelines for Reporting: What, Where, When? Environmental Summary Reporting: A Tool for Improving the Reproducibility of Zebrafish Studies Innovation and Quality Initiatives for Reproducibility of Studies Cage Side Care that Impacts Consistency and Reproducibility of Rodent Research Discussion

TOURS OF ANIMAL RESEARCH FACILITIES AS OPPORTUNITIES FOR PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom IV Leader: Sarah O Allison Moderator: Paula A Clifford Facilitator: Jim Newman Some research organizations have successfully established tour programs

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

at their animal research facilities and maintained these efforts for many years. Others are now considering the possibility of incorporating this form of increased transparency into their organizations as an effort to proactively engage the public about why, when, and how animals are needed in research. At organizations where visitors are allowed, the experience—both for tour providers and tour participants—is almost always very positive. Tour attendees were able to gain both knowledge about why animals are essential in research and how these animals are cared for. The experience also provided research and/or animal care staff the chance to proudly discuss their work. Best of all, tour participants gained the intangible, long lasting benefit of seeing first-hand the extent in which the laboratory animal community ensures compassionate care and the best environment possible for the animals. Participants will learn perspectives on how tour programs were launched and maintained at two academic facilities, a biopharmaceutical company, and a contract research organization. They will also learn how each manages their tour programs and how they sought and obtained institutional and administrative approval. In addition, participants will engage in a discussion to gain practical advice and recommendations on hosting animal research facility tours at their own institutions. The target audience is anyone interested in, or charged with, institutional outreach efforts, those considering providing tours as part of internal or external outreach, and those who are looking to improve or share their experience with providing animal research facility tours. 8:00

Speakers/Topics:

8:15

Sarah O Allison

8:45

Paige A Ebert

Paula A Clifford Welcome and Introduction

Students as new PIs: An Innovative Format for Animal Research Facility Tours Outstanding Outreach: To Tour or Not? A Biopharmaceutical Perspective

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MONDAY MORNING AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

9:15

Jessica L Hendricks

9:45

Tiffany L Whitcomb

Hosting Animal Research Facility Tours at a Contract Research Organization

Student-Centered Approach to Facility Tours at an Academic Research Institution This Seminar is sponsored in part by Americans for Medical Progress (AMP) and AbbVie.

PLATFORM SESSIONS

8:00 AM-10:45 AM Platform Session abstracts will be available on www.aalas.org in July. They will also be included in both the mobile app and the National Meeting Final Program.

EXHIBIT HALL LOUNGE REFRESHMENT BREAK Refuel, Refresh & Recharge!

8:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m. Sponsored by NEPCO

SPECIAL TOPIC LECTURES BUZZED DANCING: HONEY BEES AS BIOINDICATORS OF HABITAT QUALITY 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom III Speaker: Maggie Couvillon Moderator: Jennifer L Asher Facilitator: TBN

The recent pollinator crisis exemplifies how public interest in scientific issues can be a mixed blessing, simultaneously raising awareness of pollinator decline, while generating rallying cries for untested solutions. Lack of forage is a factor contributing to bee declines. This stressor can act directly, where bees are unable to meet nutritional needs, or indirectly, where nutritional stress

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reduces the bees’ ability to cope with stressors like diseases and pesticides. Coverage has been wide: everyone wants to feed hungry bees. Such help is offered with best intentions, but efficacy is undermined by two crucial knowledge gaps: first, we do not know when and where bees lack forage. Providing flowers indiscriminately is common practice because current methods of surveying and cataloging floral abundance at landscape-scale are intensely time-consuming. Second, nutritional stress is often studied either in honey bees (Apis mellifera spp.) or non-honey bees, creating a dichotomy that limits the usefulness of results. There is a critical need to develop new methods to survey Apis forage on a landscape scale and to determine if non-Apis bees also prefer these areas. Without these data, it is not possible to implement a best management strategy for improving availability of forage that would benefit overall pollinator health. Here we explore how waggle dance, a behavior in which a honey bee forager communicates to her nestmates the vector from the hive to an important resource, usually food, may also be a powerful tool for ecology. Because honey bees perform dances only for the most profitable resources, these data provide spatial information about the availability of good quality forage for any given time. We argue that waggle dance decoding may inform on a range of ecological, conservation, and land management issues. Thus, one species and methodology gives a novel measure of a landscape’s profitability that may be relevant not just for honey bees, but also for other flower-visiting insects. The audience will learn the background on the honeybee waggle dance; how we know what we know with the waggle dance and using waggle dances in research; and what we can still find out, the current state of the field, and future directions. The target audience is anyone with a minimum science background, but expertise in bee behavior is not necessary. This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by American College of Lab Animal Medicine/American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners Program Committee (ACLAM/ASLAP). 

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

CHARLES C HUNTER LECTURE: “LIONS, TIGERS, AND BEARS, OH MY!”

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom I Speaker: Cindy P Driscoll Moderator: Leah J Schmidt Facilitator: TBN Lions, tigers, and bears, indeed! Just add fish, deer, birds, whales, snakes, and bats and you’ll what it is like to be a wildlife veterinarian. Why would anyone want to be in the frozen mountains in winter and the steamy Chesapeake Bay Islands in heat of summer? To be outside, working with a wide variety of Maryland species, the great Maryland Department of National Resources biologists, and fellow veterinarians from all around the world is the best job anyone could experience. The speaker has taught wildlife diseases at the University of Maryland and also teaches aquatics in veterinary medicine via short courses. This lecture could be of interest to anyone attending the meeting, including technicians, researchers, and veterinarians. This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by Committee for Technician Awareness and Development (CTAD). 

LESSONS AND INSIGHTS THROUGH THE STORY OF ELIZABETH R GRIFFIN 

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom II Speaker: Caryl Griffin Russell Moderator: Jason S Villano Facilitator: TBN The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 was promulgated to protect employees from hazards in the workplace. The Guide for the Care and Use of Animals also emphasizes that an animal research institution must establish an occupational health and safety program (OHSP). In 1997, a young woman named Elizabeth R. Griffin, contracted Macacine herpesvirus 1 while working with rhesus macaques. Her incident and eventual death highlighted vulnerable areas in OHSPs, including practices which potentially impacted work safety and effective emergency response to hazard exposures. In this

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MONDAY MORNING AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

talk, Caryl Griffin, mother of Beth and founder of the Elizabeth R. Griffin Foundation, will share Beth’s story and how it impacted laboratory animal science, especially as it pertains to biosafety/biosecurity policies and practices. The audience will hear Beth’s story and how this can provide a springboard for reviewing current safety practices integral to an animal care and use program. Applying lessons learned and putting ideas into action to address safety will also be reviewed as cornerstones to build a culture of care and responsibility in laboratory animal science and research. This lecture is appropriate for all attendees, including individuals from the animal care and use program management, veterinarians, IACUC members, compliance and biosafety officers, animal care staff, and researchers. This lecture is sponsored by the Georgetown University Center for Global Health Science and Security, and the Association of Primate Veterinarians. This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by Georgetown University Center for Global Health Science and Security and the Association of Primate Veterinarians (APV).

LISTENING TO YOUR INNER GODDESS: A SPONTANEOUS SCID PIG AS AN EMERGING MODEL FOR CANCER AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE RESEARCH

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/ Room: Ballroom IV Speaker: Christopher K Tuggle Moderator: Jodi A Scholz Facilitator: Nicholas J Rindels

Severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice have been used for many years in xenograft research because the lack of an adaptive immune system permits the growth and subsequent study of human cells in an in vivo environment. However, rodents are an imperfect model for several aspects of human biology and applied medical research. On the other hand, the domestic pig has anatomical, physiological, and genomic similarities to humans that provide significant value as an alternative to rodent models. Further, SCID pigs have been reported, including the spontaneous SCID pig at Iowa

State University (ISU). This special topic lecture will describe the serendipitous discovery and characterization of the ISU SCID pig, which has been shown to contain mutations in the Artemis gene, named for the Greek goddess of the hunt, childbirth, and the protector of small children. Artemis is required for normal DNA repair, including somatic recombination necessary for B and T lymphocyte production, and thus Artemis mutations cause this severe immunodeficiency. The presentation will also cover new research studies and husbandry protocols for maintaining these highly disease-susceptible animals in strict biocontainment. These methods have been used to successfully maintain specific pathogen-free SCID pigs for up to 6 months (>100 kg). The ISU SCID pig has been successfully used to study both zoonotic pathogens as well as those that cannot be propagated in rodents, grow several types of human cancers, and study engraftment of human skin. These studies and accompanying animal protocols have established SCID pigs as a valuable large animal xenograft model.

CINDY P. DRISCOLL HUNTER LECTURE

Dr. Cindy P Driscoll is the State Fish and Wildlife Veterinarian/Director for the Fish and Wildlife Health Program at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Cooperative Oxford Laboratory in Oxford, Maryland. She is an aquatic and wildlife veterinarian working in natural resources policy/management, pathology, forensics, and diseases in wild animal populations. She consults with local, state and federal agency officials on matters of wildlife and aquatic animal health. After receiving her DVM at the VA-MD College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, VA, she returned to Maryland and worked for NOAA/ Department of Commerce during the 1990s as the first marine mammal veterinarian for the U.S. In 1999 she accepted the position as the first State Fish and Wildlife Veterinarian for Maryland. For 30 years she provided emergency and relief veterinary services for endangered species and migratory birds at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Ctr., Laurel MD. She also is an advisor for the federal government on national security issues involving wildlife and aquatic veterinary issues. She is a champion for the One Health concept emphasizing the interconnection of humans, animals, and the environment. Dr. Driscoll trains biologists regarding the biology of marine mammals and sea turtles for National Park Service, US Coast Guard, Ocean City Beach Patrol, MD DNR fisheries and wildlife biologists, and Ocean City Beach Patrol. She also serves as the IACUC veterinarian for a corporate research facility.

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

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MONDAY AFTERNOON AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

MONDAY AFTERNOON

PANEL DISCUSSIONS  AN OUTDOOR PLAY AREA FOR LABORATORY BEAGLES—A WHOLE NEW LEVEL OF ENRICHMENT

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 337 Leaders/Panelist: Carolyn M Allen, Brian J Ebert, Chris L Medina Moderator: TBN Facilitator: TBN AbbVie maintains a sizeable population of chronically housed beagles, many of which reach retirement age around ~4.25 years, which then become candidates for our adoption program. In early 2017, we began having casual conversations around the possibility of creating an outdoor exercise/play area for our dogs. Casual conversations quickly turned into regularly scheduled meetings and the official planning began. Since dedicated outdoor canine play areas are not common practice in the pharmaceutical industry, we anticipated some resistance. We felt moving forward with this idea not only served in the best interest of our dogs and animal welfare, but could have some benefit to both our staff and overall transparency for the company. The proposal was drafted and presented to upper management and we received immediate support. In rapid fashion, the outdoor area was completed and ready for use in late 2017. Many meetings were held and a multitude of questions were asked before and during the project, with the process being closely monitored by key personnel from facilities, veterinary and behavioral staff, and our animal welfare group. This panel will be compromised of these key personnel involved in the planning, decision making, and implementation of our newly christened outdoor play area.

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OPTIMIZING

RODENT SURVIVAL SURGERY OUTCOMES

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 339 Leader: Allison Williams, Kimberly Y Jen Moderator: Allison Williams Facilitator: TBN Panelist: Melissa C Dyson, Velu Karicheti, Steven C Kreuser, Rachel Rubino Successful surgery requires careful, detailed planning; skilled, attentive personnel; and appropriate facilities and equipment. The objective of this panel is to share varied approaches to optimize surgical outcomes in rodents. The content is suitable for rodent surgery novices, experienced rodent surgeons desiring a review, and program directors wishing to improve the success of their surgical program. The panel will feature brief presentations describing how each organization implements vital components of a rodent surgical program with successful outcomes. Program participants will include experienced professionals from a contract research organization, a pharmaceutical company, a nonprofit organization, and academia. Panel discussion will include the development and implementation of a comprehensive training program, including systems to ensure personnel are competent and proficient. Methods to maintain certification levels will also be shared. Gentle tissue handling and firm understanding of basic anatomy, physiology of wound healing, strict adherence to aseptic principles, and attentive postprocedural care are all key to ensuring successful surgical outcomes, optimal animal welfare, and ultimately, good science. Training and effective approaches for common models, including catheterized and non-catheterized models, will be discussed. Panelists will share how the following topics are accomplished at their respective institutions: 1) development and implementation of a comprehensive training program; 2) procedures for pre- and post-operative care; and 3) best practices for aseptic rodent surgery. Finally, the session will conclude with an interactive session

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

on surgical complications, encouraging participation with audience members. Case scenarios will be presented and volunteers from the audience will be given an opportunity to troubleshoot the challenges presented. The panelists will offer insight into the discussions as all work to identify the root cause, as well as present potential corrective actions. The attendees will be encouraged to share experiences and/or practices observed at their home institutions.

PATHOLOGY QUIZ BOWL

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 341 Leader: Cindy L Besch-Williford Moderator: Craig L Franklin Facilitator: TBN Panelist: Cindy L Besch-Williford, Angela K Brice, Craig L Franklin This panel discussion will consist of an informal review of the pathology of laboratory animals in the form of an image-based quiz. Topics will include lesions of well-described infectious and noninfectious diseases, pathological manifestations of emerging diseases, and selected phenotypic characteristics of important genetically engineered animal models. The images will be educational and challenging to laboratory animal specialists at all levels of pathology expertise. Targeted audience is comparative medicine trainees, laboratory animal veterinarians, pathologists, and scientists. Participants from comparative medicine training programs have the opportunity to receive a fabulous cash prize for the highest score. A participation cash prize is also provided. The comparative medicine trainee with the highest score will be recognized at the Committee for Laboratory Animal Training and Research (CLATR) luncheon on Tuesday. Participants will learn gross and histologic pathology of laboratory animals. This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by CLATR and IDEXX BioResearch. 

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


MONDAY AFTERNOON AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

SHARING

OUR MESSAGE: TIPS AND TOOLS FOR REACHING OUT

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 343 Leader: Emily C Slocum Moderator: Pamela A Straeter Facilitator: Sarah J Gilliam Panelist: Keely McGrew, Julie E Roller, Emily C Slocum, Terri A Swanson

Whether your outreach is formal or informal, we hope to give you the tips and tools to help with getting your message out there. Content will range from targeted presentations to success stories. Our discussion will give you the connections and resources you need to be successful in your own outreach efforts. The panel will discuss Public Outreach: The Why and How; The Importance of Education: The UT Southwestern Medical Center Outreach Team, as well as the Pfizer Drug Discovery Game, both of which are used in outreach efforts for everyone from kids to Congress. This session will also explain the importance of putting animal research into the context for public and Celebrate the Mouse: What’s Happening In Research Outreach Program opportunities. This panel discussion targets anyone in our field interested in public outreach. This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by AALAS Foundation.

EXHIBIT HALL LOUNGE REFRESHMENT BREAK Refuel, Refresh & Recharge!

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. Sponsorship Available

WORKSHOPS W-05 ESSENTIALS OF IACUC ADMINISTRATION (8-

hour workshop continued Tuesday 8:00 AM) 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: 348 Leader/Faculty: Elaine K Kim, Stacy L Pritt, Trina Smith Facilitator: Ashley Savannah Workshop Fee: $250      Workshop Limit: 50

This workshop will provide attendees with knowledge and tools to effectively manage an animal care and use program through informational presentations, as well as opportunities to engage in smallgroup activities using active learning methodologies; troubleshoot real-life examples; and debate topics such as reduction of administrative burden. This course covers approximately 8 hours in two sessions. The participants will be able to 1) list key components of an IACUC program; 2) understand the responsibilities of IACUC administrators; 3) discuss strategies for creating a culture of research and teaching success; 4) operationalize policy and regulations; and 5) implement best practices to ensure that all animal care and use program personnel have the support they need to strengthen the IACUC and the animal care and use program. The target audience comprises experienced IACUC administrators and support staff, as well as training and compliance personnel who are familiar with basic IACUC functions. Participants should plan to attend both workshop sessions. Part 1 features an IACUC administration overview; information on managing submissions; semiannual activities; small group activities; and a current topics discussion. Part 2 features training and occupational health; postapproval monitoring; allegations and noncompliance; small group activities; current topics discussion; and a question and answer session. This Workshop is sponsored in part by Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIM&R).

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

W-06 HOW TO DEAL WITH ANESTHETIC COMPLICATIONS

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: 345 Leader: Cholawat Pacharinsak Faculty: Cholawat Pacharinsak, Samuel W Baker Facilitator: TBD Workshop Fee: $140     Workshop Limit: 25 In this advanced workshop, attendees will learn to recognize and troubleshoot anesthetic complications. To increase anesthetic safety, continuous monitoring is essential to identify these complications. Anesthetists must know how to interpret these monitoring parameters and identify the causes of these complications to respond appropriately. The workshop will cover the general anesthetic periods of premedication, induction, maintenance, and recovery for large animal species. Although a large animal workshop, questions from other species are encouraged. It’s not mandatory to previously take a basic anesthetic monitoring workshop, but it is highly recommended. This workshop is suited for veterinarians, veterinary technicians, IACUC members, and researchers.

This Workshop is sponsored in part by Kent Scientific and VetEquip Inc.

W-07 MANAGING THE GAP: WORKING AND LEADING IN MULTIGENERATIONAL TEAMS

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: 349 Leader/Faculty: Jamie Mueller Facilitator: Temeri Wilder-Kofie Workshop Fee: $140      Workshop Limit: 50 This workshop will increase your awareness and understanding in managing and reducing generational gaps to improve your work and leadership across generational cultures, including a focus on working with millennials. Participants will increase their overall generational awareness and understanding of issues, such as why millennials work differently than

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MONDAY AFTERNOON AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

previous generations. Participants will also develop effective strategies for communicating across generations, learn how to adapt style in generationally diverse situations, learn the skills necessary to do so for organizational and team effectiveness, and learn strategies to resolve conflict and build trust and sustainable relationships across generations. The workshop is targeted to directors and managers who manage team members from different generations and team members who work and collaborate with a variety of different generations.

W-03B MICROSURGERY SKILLS TRAINING USING SURGICAL LOUPES (offered twice, also Monday 8:00 AM)

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: 347 Leader: Robert F Hoyt Jr Faculty: Tannia S Clark, Randall R Clevenger, Tanya L Herzog, Kenneth R Jeffries, Karen J Keeran, Elena Kuznetsova, Audrey Noguchi, Gayle Z Nugent, Tom L Thomas Facilitator: Jennifer L Asher Workshop Fee: $250      Workshop Limit: 20 See Monday AM for description. This Workshop is sponsored in part by Midwest Veterinary Supply, Q-Optics Surgical Loupes, SurgiReal Products Inc, Supramid Suture and RICA Surgical Products.

W-08 TEACHING MONKEYS TO COOPERATE WITH RESTRAINT: USING POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT TRAINING AND TEMPERAMENT TESTING METHODS 

(8-hour workshop continued Tuesday 8:00 AM) 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: 346 Leader: Jaine E Perlman Faculty: Mollie A Bloomsmith, Kristine Coleman, Jennifer L McMillan Facilitator: Mark J Prescott Workshop Fee: $250      Workshop Limit: 50 The workshop includes 8 hours of instruction on using positive reinforce-

32

ment training (PRT) to teach monkeys to cooperate with various restraint procedures, as well as provide information about using temperament testing to assist in selection of subjects and planning for their training. Participants will learn approaches to training laboratory primates to cooperate with restraint for sample collection (e.g., blood), administration (e.g., injections), and chair restraint. RT is an important refinement in the care of nonhuman primates and an effective means of improving their welfare. However, animals respond differently to restraint and measuring temperament provides insight into how individuals might respond to these procedures, allowing for individualized and more effective training plans. The goals are to 1) introduce participants to animal training terminology and techniques; 2) teach PRT techniques as they apply to restraint procedures, such as the use of the cage squeeze back mechanism and chair restraint; and 3) teach methods to assess and quantify temperament in monkeys and to use this information to develop individualized training plans. Participants will learn how to establish a strong foundation for successful restraint training using PRT techniques, and how to incorporate alternative techniques such as negative reinforcement to meet research timelines. They will learn to identify monkeys who are engaged in the training process and how to increase the involvement of monkeys who seem uninterested in training. Participants will learn how to shape behavior and apply desensitization techniques, how to maintain trained behaviors over time, and how to transfer trained behaviors among multiple staff members. Participants will learn how temperament can impact training approaches and the anticipated timelines for training to cooperate with restraint. Understanding the intersection of individual differences in temperament and animal training will aid in the design of more efficient animal training programs. This workshop is designed for those experienced in working with primates, including behavior specialists, animal caregivers, research technicians, animal managers, veterinarians, and investigators.

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

This Workshop is sponsored in part by NC3Rs, Lomir Biomedical Inc, Carter 2 Systems and HYBEX Innovations Inc.

W-09 WOULD YOU LIKE TO IMPROVE YOUR SUTURING AND RODENT SURGERY ASEPTIC TECHNIQUE? 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: 350 Leader: Marcel I Perret-Gentil Faculty: Szczepan Baran, Luke Brinkman, Marcel Perret-Gentil, Miguel Torres Facilitator: Rebecca A LaFleur Workshop Fee: $140      Workshop Limit: 30

You may feel proficient, even confident, in performing rodent surgery. However, you may be surprised how small improvements can have a huge impact on your animal’s recovery and data. Participants will learn and refine commonly used suture and knot-tying techniques. The workshop will focus on appropriate hand-eye coordination to improve suturing skills. A state-of-theart inanimate model will be introduced and used during the suture practice. Additionally, easy to apply hands-on exercises will be put into practice that have been shown to significantly improve aseptic technique. Common errors and complications will be discussed and addressed. This workshop is designed for individuals who have minimal or no suturing skills, but is also a great opportunity for those with considerable experience wanting to upgrade their skills and teach others enhanced technique. Target audience includes veterinarians, trainers, research staff, veterinary technicians, and others. This Workshop is sponsored in part by Kent Scientific, Atramat, and SurgiReal Products Inc. 

PLATFORM SESSIONS

2:15 PM-5:00 PM Platform Session abstracts will be available on www.aalas.org in July. They will also be included in both the mobile app and the National Meeting Final Program.

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


â„¢


MONDAY AFTERNOON AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

SEMINARS AN

INFILTRATOR IN THE LAB: WHY DO SOME ACCUSATIONS OF ANIMAL CRUELTY MAKE HEADLINES WHILE OTHERS AVOID MEDIA ATTENTION? 2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom I Leader: Wendy Jarrett, Kirk Leech Moderator: Ana I Santos Facilitator: TBN

Animal rights activists have long used the tactics of undercover filming and exaggerated claims to accuse animal researchers of malpractice. Prescreening and other security measures can help to stop an infiltrator gaining access to the lab, but these measures do not always work. In this seminar, we will explore the strategies that you and your colleagues can employ to make sure that an infiltration scenario or accusation scenario does not cause your institution lasting reputational damage. By studying past examples of infiltrations and accusations in the UK and Europe, the steps taken by the organizations involved, the media coverage that followed them, and the results of official investigations into the claims made, we will help participants to understand what makes a successful media and communications response. Participants will also learn how to prepare robust mechanisms in advance of potential crisis situations and how openness and proactive communications can help to lessen the chances of negative publicity. The target audience for this seminar is animal care staff, facility managers, researchers, and those with a communications role. 2:45

Speakers/Topics:

2:50

Wendy Jarrett

3:10

Kirk Leech

3:40

Wendy Jarrett

34

Ana I Santos Welcome and Introduction What Is a Crisis?

Uncover Filming and Accusations— How Should Institutions Respond?

4:10

Kirk Leech

4:30

Ana I Santos

Examples of Openness Across the EU Questions and Answers

BACK TO THE BASICS: PRACTICAL BIOMETHODOLOGY FOR MINIATURE SWINE USERS

INTEGRATED STRATEGIES TO ENHANCE THE WELFARE OF PRIMATES IN RESEARCH  2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom III Leader/Moderator: Ghislaine Poirier Facilitator: Margaret S McTighe

Despite growing efforts to develop nonanimal alternative research methods, nonhuman primates (NHP) remain critical species for increasing our understanding 2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom II of biological mechanisms and for Leader: Derek Brocksmith the development of new medicines. Moderator: Ian Stewart Because they have not evolved as Facilitator: Vikki Wehmeier domesticated species, and because Miniature swine presence in biomedical of their complex social structure and research continues to expand and gain communication characteristics, NHPs traction. Practical biomethodology is a require special attention to help them commonly requested topic by researchadapt and maintain good health and ers. Biomethodology, including best welfare whilst in our care, at all stages of practices for surgical modeling, behavioral their lives. New strategies and methods modification, stress minimization, and are continuously being developed and care during life stages, will be highlighted trialed in various settings, from the time in this seminar. Miniature swine applicaNHPs are bred to the time they are tions in toxicology, pharmacology, and used in experimental studies, to refine training resources will be other areas of practices and help enhance their welfare. emphasis. We expect a broad audience Sharing experiences and disseminating will benefit from these presentations, practices that are associated with including laboratory animal veterinarians, welfare benefits and how to measure attending veterinarians, veterinary and them are key to accelerate progress. animal technicians, facility managers, The seminar will offer opportunities to graduate students, and scientists interestshare novel approaches for NHP housing ed in miniswine model research and use. and care from the perspective of animal breeding, the research setting, and a Speakers/Topics: 3Rs organization; learn and discuss behavioral program managements in 2:45 Derek Brocksmith Welcome and Introductions the country of origin and on arrival at a research establishment to facilitate 2:55 Guy Bouchard Stress-Free Blood Collection and acclimation to the environment and Common Vascular Access procedures; discuss the development 3:20 Michael Swindle and implementation of NHP Surgery, Anesthesia, and Common performance-based standards across Peri/Postoperative Complications organizations; and learn about housing 3:45 Paul Sherman designs that respond to NHP behavioral Miniature Swine as a Model for needs and the needs of research. Human Brain Development Animal technicians, study technicians, 4:10 Derek Brocksmith veterinarians, facility managers and Grade School Training: Behavior supervisors, animal welfare officers, Enhancement to Improve Animal IACUC members, breeders, and animal Handling and Welfare research organizations will benefit from 4:30 Alain Stricker-Krongrad this seminar. Miniature Swine Lineages for Toxicology and Pharmacology This Seminar is sponsored in part by Sinclair BioResources, LLC.

How Communication Helps Prevent Negative Publicity

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

2:45

Speakers/Topics: Ghislaine Poirier Welcome and Introduction

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


TUESDAY MORNING AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

2:55

Sandra R Lefin

4:20

3:25

Ghislaine Poirier

OCTOBER 30, 2018 TUESDAY MORNING

3:55

Gina Wilkerson

4:25

Mark J Prescott

A Successful Behavior Management Strategy in the Breeder’s Country of Origin to Prepare Macaques for Laboratory Conditions

Holistic Approach to Facilitate NHP Acclimation at a CRO

Industry Collaborations to Implement Performance Based Housing Standards with CRO Partners Supporting the NHP Research Community to Improve Animal Welfare and Scientific Outcomes

RAT

TICKLING: A TECHNIQUE FOR IMPROVING RAT WELFARE

Monday, October 29, 2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom IV Leader: Megan R LaFollette Moderator: Brianna N Gaskill Facilitator: TBN

Rats initially fear handling by laboratory personnel, which can lead to several negative effects such as increased stress, decreased welfare, and resistance to handling. These outcomes can be mitigated by using rat tickling, a human-animal interaction technique that mimics aspects of rat rough-and-tumble play. Rat tickling can result in positive outcomes, such as increased positive affect, improved handling procedures, and social enrichment. Participants will learn the background of the development of rat tickling, how and why to implement it, its minimum effective dosage, and barriers to its implementation. The target audience for this presentation is research staff, animal care staff, veterinarians, and vivarium managers who work with rats. 2:45

Speakers/Topics:

2:55

Brianna N Gaskill

3:25

Sylvie Cloutier

3:55

Melissa P Swan

36

Megan LaFollette Welcome and Introductions

Introduction to Rat Tickling: A Systematic Review Applications of Rat Tickling: Injections and Blood Sampling Rat Tickling and Experimental Effects: Cage Color

Megan LaFollette

Rat Tickling Implementation: Dosage and Survey

WORKSHOPS

W-02 CMAR/ANIMAL RESOURCE EXAM PREP CLASS CONTINUED (8-hour

workshop continued from Monday 8:00 AM) 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 346 Leader: Diana P Baumann Faculty: Diana P Baumann, Camellia M Symonowicz Facilitator: TBD

See Monday 8:00 AM for pricing and description. W-05 ESSENTIALS OF IACUC ADMINISTRATION CONTINUED (8-hour workshop

continued from Monday 1:00 PM)

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 348 Leaders/Faculty: Elaine K Kim, Stacy L Pritt, Trina Smith Facilitator: Ashley Savannah See Monday 1:00 PM for pricing and description. This Workshop is sponsored in part by Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIM&R). 

W-10 LEADING THE SELF AND OTHERS WITH EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 349 Leader/Faculty: Jamie Mueller Facilitator: Temeri Wilder-Kofie Workshop Fee: $140      Workshop Limit: 50

The first person you lead is yourself. We know that meaningful and sustainable leadership works through emotions. This workshop will increase participants awareness and understanding of emotional intelligence (based on the Goleman model), explore the leadership competencies of

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

emotional intelligence, and provide insight on how leaders handle themselves and their relationships with EQ. Specifically, participants will develop their awareness around emotional intelligence skills, specifically around self-awareness, selfmanagement, social awareness, and relationship management and define their own leadership strengths and style and understand alignment between their values and leadership behavior. The workshop is targeted to leaders, directors, and managers who are in an existing leadership role or will be in the future and wish to better understand the key competencies necessary to lead in today’s fast-paced and ever-changing environment. W-08 TEACHING MONKEYS TO COOPERATE WITH RESTRAINT: USING POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT TRAINING AND TEMPERAMENT TESTING METHODS (8-hour

workshop continued from Monday 1:00 PM)

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 345 Leader: Jaine E Perlman Faculty: Mollie A Bloomsmith, Kristine Coleman, Jennifer L McMillan Facilitator: Mark J Prescott See Monday 1:00 PM for pricing and description. This Workshop is sponsored in part by NC3Rs, Lomir Biomedical Inc, Carter 2 Systems and HYBEX Innovations Inc. 

SEMINARS COMPARATIVE APPROACHES TO MONITORING RODENT COLONIES FOR INFECTIOUS AGENTS

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom I Leader/Moderator: Robert S Livingston Facilitator: Sharon Byras Monitoring rodent colonies for infectious agents is continuing to evolve along with the increased use of individually ventilated caging (IVC) systems, the availability of highly sensitive PCR testing methods,

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


TUESDAY MORNING AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

and the desire to reduce the use of sentinels exposed to soiled bedding. In this seminar, participants will be shown data from recent real-life and experimental studies comparing the diagnostic sensitivity of detecting viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections of mouse or rat colonies by testing IVC plenum debris, filters exposed to composite soiled bedding, colony animals, and soiled bedding sentinels. Pros and cons of these different approaches will be discussed, and how to incorporate some novel monitoring methods into your own health surveillance programs. This seminar will be of interest to individuals managing or participating in monitoring the health of mouse and rat colonies. 8:00

Speakers/Topics:

8:10

Patricia Foley

Matthew H Myles

Welcome and Introduction

PCR Testing of Filter Paper from IVC Cage Lids for Microbial Monitoring of Mouse Colonies

8:35

Cynthia L Besch-Williford

Detection of Mouse Pathogens in Exhaust Debris Samples from Individually Ventilated Caging Systems

9:00

Aurore Dodelet-Devillers External Validation of Exhaust Air Dust Testing by Comparison with Traditional Soiled Bedding Sentinels

9:25

Robert S Livingston

Novel Approaches to Cage Level Monitoring

CURRENT

RESEARCH ON MOUSE HOME CAGE AGGRESSION

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom II Leader/Moderator: Brianna N Gaskill Facilitator: TBN Aggression is the second most common reason for veterinary clinical care in laboratory mice and can lead to severe injury and death. Aggression accounts for 15% of clinical cases, meaning that the potential for injury and suffering affects millions of mice every year. High levels of aggression can induce immune suppression, resulting in poor welfare and unwanted variation in scientific models. Along with replacement of

dead or euthanized animals, this leads to increased overall animal use. This session will share the results of a series of studies performed to identify environmental triggers, evaluate best practices, and further understand mouse behavior. Participants in this session will learn about the biology of aggression in mice, the characterization of aggression in various strains of mice, and the effectiveness of current best practices. This information will be useful for research staff, animal care staff, veterinarians and vivarium managers that work with mice. 8:00

Speakers/Topics: Brianna N Gaskill Welcome and Introduction

8:15

Brianna N Gaskill Evaluation of Housing Suggestions in a Simulated Tox Environment

8:45

Joseph Garner and Jacob Theil

9:15

Jamie Ahloy Dallaire

9:45

Amanda Barabas

An Epidemiological Approach to Mouse Aggression

How Should We Split Cages of Mice with Severe Aggression? Olfaction and Aggression in the Laboratory

MICROBIOME RESEARCH DEVELOPMENTS USING MOUSE MODELS

progression and development of a mouse model of food allergy and the associated mucosal immunology will be reviewed as an example of validation of existing mouse models. Description of the value and limitations of refinements in the model as well as the success in the translatability of a human fecal microbial transplant model in ex-germ free mice will be mentioned. Further, challenges and opportunities faced by the laboratory animal community in support of microbiome research will be explored. The challenges of existing facility design and equipment require consideration of associated biocontainment and biosecurity concerns when using (human) microbiota. The integration of flexible film and semi-rigid isolator housing with biocontainment and bio-exclusion ventilated rack technologies for the demand of high throughput studies will be discussed. The session will close with a presentation of technical experiences in managing a gnotobiotic facility with the current technologies for germ-free and gnotobiotic research. A discussion will close out the seminar. This seminar session is insightful for all individuals at all levels in laboratory animal care programs. This session is a must for anyone interested in microbiota and rodent modeling, including recent advances in humanizing rodent microbiota.

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom III Leader/Moderator: Betty R Theriault Facilitator: John J Hasenau

8:00

Speakers/Topics:

Emerging research investigating the role of the host microbiome in health and disease has provided revolutionary insight into the complexity of microbiome influence on host immunologic, metabolic, and physiologic pathways. However, microbiome research remains in its infancy. Interrogation of the complex intersection of host microbiome and system response has led to the revalidation of existing mouse models of human disease and to the development of novel animal models. We will explore both the science and the technology of this emerging field. The complexity of traditional specific pathogenfree mouse models and the influence of the microbiome on disease modeling and reproducibility will be explained. The

8:05

Betty R Theriault

8:15

Craig L Franklin

8:40

Cathryn Nagler

9:25

Betty R Theriault

9:45

Jessica K Lang

10:05

John J Hasenau

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

Betty R Theriault Welcome and Introductions

Gnotobiology, History, and Evolving Omics

Complex Gnotobiology: What Are Our Current Mouse Models Telling Us A Researcher’s Use of Mouse Models for Human Microbiome Modeling

Programatic and Biosafety Concerns in Development of Mouse Models of Human Microbiomes Technical Components of Managing a Gnotobiology Facility Discussion

37


TUESDAY MORNING AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

TREATING WOUNDS AND USING ANTIBIOTICS APPROPRIATELY: PRACTICAL TIPS AND CASE EXAMPLES 8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom IV Leader: Jeffrey D Fortman Moderator: Joseph Sciurba Facilitator: Tracy E Latalladi

This seminar will include three subtopics. The first will provide a brief history of wound care and antibiotic discovery. The second will review practical wound management techniques, including topics such as how to identify the different stages of wound healing, how to assess and care for acute wounds, and how to deal with nonhealing wounds. The final lecture will cover how to choose and use antibiotics appropriately. It will also highlight different classes of antibiotics, types of bacteria associated with common infections, and the related concepts of antimicrobial resistance and antibiotic stewardship. The target audience includes animal health technicians, veterinary technicians, and junior level veterinarians. Participants will learn a history of where and how antibiotics originated, the development of wound management through time, practical management techniques for common wounds, and when and how to use antibiotics properly. The seminar will end with interactive case examples that allow participants to apply newly acquired knowledge to real-life scenarios. 8:00

Speakers/Topics:

8:10

Jeffrey Fortman

8:40

9:05

38

Jeffrey Fortman Welcome and Introductions

When Life Gives You Mold, Make Penicillin: A Short History of Antibiotic Discovery and Unusual Approaches to Wound Care

Alexandria A Smith

Time Heals All: Strategies and Techniques to Manage Commonly Encountered Wounds

Kathleen Coda

Before You Grab that Antibiotic, Listen to This!

PLATFORM SESSIONS

8:00 AM-10:45 AM Platform Session abstracts will be available on www.aalas.org in July. They will also be included in both the mobile app and the National Meeting Final Program.

EXHIBIT HALL LOUNGE REFRESHMENT BREAK Refuel, Refresh & Recharge!

9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Sponsored by Priority One

SPECIAL TOPIC LECTURES AMERICA’S WILD HORSES: LIVING LEGENDS OR FADED LEGACY? 

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom III Speaker: Brian Smith Moderator: Allison M Williams Facilitator: Kimberly Y Jen

Wild horses and burros are defined as unbranded, unclaimed, free-roaming animals found on public lands in the U.S. Most are descendants of animals released or escaped from Spanish explorers, ranchers, miners, the U.S. Cavalry and Native Americans. In the 1940-50s, mustangers caught wild horses using planes and trucks; some sold to ranchers or rodeos. However, most were shipped to processing plants and canned as pet or fur-farm food. Velma B. Johnston (Wild Horse Annie), campaigned against the brutal and inhumane roundup, sell, and slaughter of wild horses which led to a series of legislation. The first, in 1959, prohibited the use of motorized vehicles to hunt wild horses and burros on public lands. The Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971 was passed, providing management, protection, and control of wild horses and burros

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

on public lands. Congress declared, in part, “wild free-roaming horses and burro are living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the West; that they contribute to the diversity of life forms within the Nation and enrich the lives of the American people.” The management of these animals has always been a political issue. These animals ultimately become part of roundups, called “gathers” conducted by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). These gathers are an effort to keep the herds to manageable levels. The speaker, who retired from the US Army in 2003 and is currently a Las Vegas police officer, founded a nonprofit organization called Funny Farms Mustangs. This organization works closely with the Mustang Heritage Foundation (MHF) to benefit horses/ burros. His organization’s mission is to train these wild horses and burros using a unique technique, known as gentling, to prepare them for adoption. Aside from trail riding and competition, these horses are also used in the workforce to support the Border Patrol and the Mounted Police units throughout the country. The target audience includes anyone supporting the use, training, education, or research of equine with an emphasis on feral horses and burros that live in the wild of the U.S. This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners/American College of Lab Animal Medicine Program Committee (ASLAP/ACLAM). 

CHARLES RIVER ETHICS AND ANIMAL WELFARE LECTURE: ASSESSING LABORATORY ANIMAL WELLBEING: THE STUDY OF ANIMAL AFFECT 

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom I Speaker: Michael T Mendl Moderator: Patricia V Turner Facilitator: TBN The wellbeing or welfare of laboratory animals is a concern for all who work with them, as well as for wider society. For many people, this concern reflects an assumption that animals are capable of suffering; that is experiencing negative emotional or affective states—the animal

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


TUESDAY MORNING AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

equivalent of feelings that we label with words like “fear,” “anxiety,” “sadness,” and “depression.” In contrast, although we readily accept that plants can malfunction and be diseased, we rarely speak about their welfare because most of us do not believe that they are able to suffer. If affective states are the key determinant of animal wellbeing, then we need to be able to assess these states in order to monitor laboratory animal welfare and detect when welfare problems arise and how effectively they are ameliorated by refinements to housing and management. But this is a challenging enterprise. Although we can use language to communicate our own emotional feelings to each other, they remain essentially private subjective experiences, so how can we hope to assess the emotions of other nonlinguistic species? In this talk, the following topics will be introduced: a scientific approach to the assessment of animal affect and an outline of the assumptions that need to be made; an operational definition of animal emotion that provides a grounding for

experimental studies; and the theoretical and empirical underpinnings of an approach that we have developed and the work on laboratory rodents that has been done using this approach. The talk will end by briefly considering whether the affective states that we may infer in other species are consciously experienced. Although most methods for assessing animal affect sidestep this question, new developments in the cognitive and neurosciences may bring us closer to an answer. The targeted audience includes all AALAS attendees. This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by Charles River.

DEVELOPING A MEANINGFUL HEALTH MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE AQUATICS FACILITY 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom IV Speaker: William R Shek Moderator: TBN Facilitator: TBN An aquatics facility health monitoring program should utilize disease

surveillance and screening of discrete populations based on statistical sampling models to catch potential gaps in biosecurity protocols, as well as provide evidence as the foundation for biosecurity decisions. This lecture will address the big questions to consider when developing a health monitoring program: how many fish to sample, what do I check, where to sample from, what is my biosecure unit, and how frequently should I test?

WALLACE P ROWE LECTURE

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom II Speaker: Cory F Brayton Moderator: Lon Kendall Facilitator: TBN Speaker and description will be available after the Award Selection Committee selects the Bhatt Award Recipient. This session information will be available in the mobile app and in the Final Program. This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by Committee for Laboratory Animal Training and Research (CLATR). 

MIKE MENDL CHARLES RIVER LECTURE

Mike Mendl, PhD, is Professor of Animal Behavior and Welfare and Head of the Bristol Animal Welfare & Behavior Group at Bristol University Vet School. He is also leads the UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council Animal Welfare Research Network. His current research interests are in the study of cognition, emotion, and social behavior in domestic animals, with a view to using this information to improve animal welfare. Together with Dr. Liz Paul, he developed a novel cognitive bias approach to the assessment of animal emotions which draws on theory and findings from human psychology and cognitive neuroscience. This work earned the 2013 inaugural International Society for Applied Ethology Creativity Award, and the Alice Richie Trust Memorial Fund Award. Mike was awarded the UFAW Medal in 2014 for his contributions to animal welfare science and the RSPCA/BSAS Award for Innovative Developments in Animal Welfare in 2015. Mike also works on more applied animal welfare issues, with current interests in the relationship between housing and husbandry procedures and the health and welfare of farm, laboratory and zoo animals, and chronic pain conditions in domestic dogs. He obtained his PhD in animal behavior at Cambridge University. He continued his work on behavioral development at Groningen University in the Netherlands on a Royal Society European Research Fellowship, before returning to work at Cambridge University Vet School where he moved into the field of applied animal behavior and welfare.

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ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


TUESDAY AFTERNOON AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

PANEL DISCUSSIONS

EFFORTS TO INCREASE RESEARCH TRANSPARENCY IN THE U.S. 

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 337 Leader/Moderator: Paula A Clifford Facilitator: Carrie Gibson Panelist: Cindy A Buckmaster, Chris Barncard, Lisa Newbern, Jim Newman Research involving animals contributes to scientific and medical progress benefitting humans and animals alike. Because of these significant impacts to public health, many U.S. institutions, scientists, and organizations are already committed to increased transparency about their research and are interacting with the public regularly to help expand understanding of the benefits of animal research. However, these efforts are not as widespread as needed. According to recent public opinion surveys, approximately half or fewer Americans support health research involving animals. In addition, the tactics used by activist groups are evolving and recent lobbying efforts are starting to result in restrictions on research. Several initiatives are currently taking place in the U.S. to increase transparency around animal studies. A grassroots campaign is underway to build both individual and institutional support for a U.S. openness agreement. If successful, such an agreement would demonstrate a shared understanding for the need to increase communications and transparency about the role of animals in research. Participants in an openness agreement would also pledge to take certain steps to help increase public knowledge and understanding. The ongoing efforts in the U.S. are based on and influenced by similar openness initiatives in the UK and other European countries. Session participants will learn why increased transparency is essential. They will find out which U.S. institutions can serve as models for proactive engagement with the public. Audience members will engage in discussion with the panelists to learn how

various openness models work and how they can be applied to their own institutions as well as how they can to join the emerging U.S. effort, either as individuals or as entire institutions. This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by Americans for Medical Progress and National Primate Research Center.

IS BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS TESTING INCLUDED IN YOUR ANIMAL RESOURCES BIOSECURITY PROGRAM?

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 339 Leader/Moderator: Cindy L BeschWilliford Facilitator: Sharon Byras Panelist: Beth A Bauer, Cindy L BeschWilliford, Melinda Hollingshead, Lois A Zitzow

Immunocompromised rodent models engrafted with transplantable cells and tissues are valuable preclinical models to study human cancer, degenerative, and infectious diseases. Model development involves the use of various biological materials derived from man or animals, such as patient-derived xenografts, human blood cells, and cell lines for tumor formation. These important research reagents can complicate and nullify in vivo studies if contaminated with infectious agents or with cells from another species or cell line. The possible negative outcomes of using contaminated biological materials include infectious disease outbreaks if the biological material contains rodent pathogens, risk of exposure of laboratory and vivarium personnel to human infectious agents if the biological material is of human origin, and the loss of animals and resources if the biological material was misidentified or contaminated with other cells. This panel discussion will overview the contribution of contaminated biological materials to the reproducibility crisis in preclinical research and provide real-life examples of biological material contamination and the screening methods that can be instituted as part of a comprehensive biosecurity program. The targeted audience is laboratory animal veterinarians, facility managers, and animal welfare policy and compliance personnel.

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

PREPARING AND SUPPORTING VETERINARY TECHNICIANS FOR LEADERSHIP AND REGULATORY ROLES: ESTABLISHING HIGH INDUSTRY STANDARDS 

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 341 Leader: Chrystal L Montgomery Moderator: Summer M Boyd Facilitator: Vicki Elam Panelist: Chrystal L Montgomery, Ann L Murray, Phillip N Sullivan, Mark T Sharpless Veterinary technicians are often expected to perform a variety of critical roles, ranging from providing nursing care and assisting with staff training and development to participating in regulatory oversight. An experienced veterinary technician is an ideal candidate for many leadership roles within an animal care and use program. Knowledge, skills, and experience will enable well-qualified technicians to create health monitoring programs, assist with sophisticated and complex surgeries and anesthesia, provide guidance and mentorship to new or less experienced technicians, help to establish professional career tracks, assist in architectural designs, and to successfully navigate regulatory and compliance requirements. These are just a few examples of the many key roles which veterinary technicians fill. This panel discussion will explore pathways and examine resources specific to veterinary technicians to guide them to a leadership or regulatory position. Personal insight and suggestions on how to position themselves for these types of roles will come from industry professionals working in academia and industry. These individuals have experience in various roles including, IACUC, training, facility management, and GLP environments. The discussion will also cover educational requirements, as well as licensure and certification which will aid in finding a career in management or in the regulatory capacity. The target audience includes veterinary technicians, animal care technicians, research technicians, vivarium managers, and administrative staff.

This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by Society for Laboratory Animal Veterinary Technicians/Academy of Laboratory Animal Veterinary Technicians (SLAVT/ALAVTN).

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TUESDAY AFTERNOON AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

VIVARIUM ERGONOMICS PRACTICAL IMPROVEMENT IDEAS THAT WORK

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 343 Leader: Melissa A Hostrander Moderator: Pamela A Straeter Facilitator: Joanne C Drew Panelist: Denise A DiFrancesco, Melissa A Hostrander, Terry Snyder Employers are responsible for providing a safe and healthy workplace for their workers. Whether the job involves working at a desk or moving large equipment in the lab, ergonomics plays a key factor in safer day-to-day activities. Ergonomics is the science of fitting the job to the worker and make the job easier to perform. Good ergonomic design and practices reduce fatigue, discomfort, and injury, including musculoskeletal injuries that can lead to work disability. Productivity and work quality are often improved, as the jobs get easier. When ergonomic aspects are ignored, significant negative consequences can occur. The goal of this panel is to help the participant understand common musculoskeletal risk factors and practical ideas to address these problems regardless of the size, budget, or complexity of their vivarium. Using examples of specific job task, panel speakers will review the musculoskeletal risk factors and show practical ideas for improvements. Strategies to overcome obstacles to making these changes will also be discussed. Time will be available for attendees to share their ergonomic success stories and challenges.

THE TRANSITION FOR ANIMALS ENTERING THE VIVARIUM AND REDUCING STRESS DURING TRANSPORTATION

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom I Leader: Nicole Navratil Moderator: Derek Brocksmith, Michelle L Salerno Facilitator: Jeffrey DiMayo

Transport and transition from the breeding facility to the laboratory can be a source of stress for laboratory animals, particularly for disease models and juvenile animals. It is valuable for laboratory staff to understand the differences between the laboratory environment and the breeding environment that the animals originate from to help develop effective acclimation programs. This seminar will bring together veterinarians and animal care experts from several major breeding facilities. Presentations will address recurring concerns related to transportation stress, maintaining animal welfare during transportation and post-arrival acclimation, housing, and husbandry. The goal of the session is to discuss ways to identify and reduce stress associated with transportation and acclimation and to improve the overall well-being of the animals. This session will cover minipigs, dogs, rabbits and rodents. The target audience includes those involved with the procurement, transportation, and post-arrival acclimation and care of laboratory animals. This includes technicians, behavioral specialists, facility managers, veterinary staff, transportation coordinators, drivers, and procurement specialists. 2:45

Speakers/Topics:

Welcome and Introduction

EXHIBIT HALL LOUNGE REFRESHMENT BREAK

3:00

Derek Brocksmith

Special Considerations for Shipping and Acclimation of Diabetic and Atherosclerotic Minipigs

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

3:20

Michelle Salerno

Shipping Concerns and Acclimation of Juvenile Minipigs and Dogs

Refuel, Refresh & Recharge! Sponsorship Available

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EASING

Nicole Navratil

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

3:40

Rick VanDomelen

Preparing for the Transition and Mitigating Shipping Stress in Laboratory Canines

4:00

Paul Knepley

Shipping and Acclimation of Rabbits

4:20

Guy B Mulder

Shipping and Post-arrival Considerations for Rodents

4:40

Krishnan Kolappaswamy

Application of Lean Six Sigma Principles in Improving Animal Welfare During Transportation This Seminar is sponsored in part by The North America Laboratory Animal Breeders Association (LABA).

MICROBIOTA IN RODENT MODELS: REPRODUCIBILITY, TRANSLATION, AND DISCOVERY

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom II Leader: Jacob E Moskowitz Moderator: Cindy L Besch-Williford Facilitator: Nick Harrison

The gut microbiota (GM) is the complex community of commensal, symbiotic microorganisms that occupy the intestinal tracts of animal species. The GM has emerged as a critical homeostatic regulator of host physiology with implications in a surprisingly diverse range of physiological processes. Given the variable environmental exposure and genetics of human populations, rodent models emerged as effective systems to manipulate these complex ecosystems to elucidate microbiological contributions to health and disease. Here we consider how our growing understanding of the GM can address key issues in laboratory animal research, including reproducibility, translatability, and discovery. It is evident that a number of different environmental and husbandry-related factors affect the microbiota. Of importance to the biomedical research community is the growing wealth of data showing that differences in complex GM are associated with model phenotype variability, which may significantly impact model reproducibility and translation to human disease. This seminar will address a range of factors known to influence

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


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TUESDAY AFTERNOON AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

the GM with the aim of fostering increased awareness of these variables in both academic and industry settings. The emerging microbiota field has provided several tools for manipulating the GM in animal models, ranging from classic gnotobiology strategies such as reconstituting axenic mice with defined flora or human microbiota to exploiting existing GM differences in contemporary rodent colonies through procedures such as complex microbiota targeted rederivation. We will discuss the use of these techniques to enhance reproducibility and translatability and demonstrate the integration of GM data to further facilitate discovery in animal research, covering specific examples of both intestinal and neurodevelopmental diseases. This seminar is suited for a broad range of audience members, including veterinarians and animal care staff aiming to facilitate reproducible and translatable animal research through increased understanding of the microbiota, and research scientists with interests in a broad range of pathological processes. 2:45

Speakers/Topics:

2:50

Craig L Franklin

3:15

Irka Redelsperger

3:40

Aaron Ericsson

4:05

4:30

Craig L Franklin Welcome and Introduction

An Introduction to Microbiota: Considerations in Contemporary Rodent Research Colonies The Laboratory Mouse Microbiome—A Commercial Vendor’s Perspective Lost in Translation: Modeling Human Disease Via the Gut Microbiota

Marcia L Hart

Assessing the Influence of Gut Microbiota on Rodent Model Phenotype

Jacob E Moskowitz

Integrating the Gut Microbiota: A System’s Approach to Colorectal Cancer

THE USE OF HUMANIZED ANIMALS IN BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom III Leader: Jason S Villano Moderator: Patrick E Sharp Facilitator: TBD Research using laboratory animals has been revolutionized by the development of humanized animal models, which are immunodeficient animals engrafted with human cells, tissues, or organs. These animal models provide the research community a promising opportunity to mimic a wide variety of disease conditions in humans, from infectious disease to oncology research. A vast majority of these models are humanized mice like those injected with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and patient-derived xenografts. With the increasing use of these animals in biomedical research, the laboratory animal science community needs to understand these models and their care and use. This seminar includes talks on ethical and safety considerations in creating and using humanized animal models and common small and large animal models and the unique challenges for veterinary and husbandry care of these animals. We will conclude the seminar with a talk on future directions involving this technology. This seminar is appropriate for all attendees, including those in management, veterinarians, IACUC members, compliance and biosafety officers, researchers, and animal care staff. 2:45

Speakers/Topics:

2:55

Patrick Lester

3:20

Stephen Felt

3:45

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom IV Leader/Moderator: James O Marx Facilitator: TBN Anesthesia and postoperative analgesia are very common procedures in rodents in biomedical research and both have profound impact on both the quality of the experimental data collected and the welfare of the animals. In the past few years, over 50 publications have come out in JAALAS alone with new information to improve both anesthesia and postoperative analgesia in rodents. Based on this, we believe it is time to present some of the new updates on rodent anesthesia and postoperative analgesia. There are many important aspects of these topics. The initial anesthetic protocol needs to consider the depth of anesthesia required for the procedure, the duration of the procedure, and the potential impact of the anesthetics on dependent variables. Many recent publications have presented new anesthetic drugs and protocols to meet these needs in rodents. Frequently, some procedures require more time of anesthesia than is provided by the initial dose, requiring the redosing of anesthetics. Lastly, postoperative care, including both analgesia and monitoring, is critical to the welfare of the animals. This seminar will present an update on the newest recommendations for these topics. The intended audience is scientists, veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and IACUC members. 2:45

Speakers/Topics:

2:50

James O Marx

Humanized Large Animal Models

Allison R Rogala

3:25

Cholawat Pacharinsak

4:10

Jason Villano

4:10

Jennifer C Smith

4:35

Michelle Creamer-Hente

4:40

James O Marx

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UPDATES ON RODENT ANESTHESIA AND POSTOPERATIVE ANALGESIA 

Patrick E Sharp Welcome and Introduction

Humanized Small Animal Models

Ethical and Philosophical Considerations

Safety Considerations in the Use of Humanized Animals Future Directions: Humanized Animals

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

James O Marx

Welcome and Introduction

The Newest in Anesthetic Protocols in Rodents After the Initial Dose: Redosing Injectable Anesthetics After the Surgery: Postoperative Analgesics and Monitoring Group Discussion

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


WEDNESDAY MORNING AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

OCTOBER 31, 2018 WEDNESDAY MORNING

WORKSHOPS

W-11 INTRODUCTION TO GI ENDOSCOPY IN LABORATORY ANIMALS

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 345 Leader: Eric K Hutchinson, Kelly A Rice Faculty: Patrick McElwee, Karl Storz, Joshua A Kramer, Tom L Thomas Facilitator: Jodi A Scholz Workshop Fee: $140      Workshop Limit: 20 This workshop is targeted towards laboratory animal veterinarians with a large animal focus. Flexible GI endoscopy represents an important diagnostic and research support tool for the practicing laboratory veterinarian. It is a specialized skill, but provides a virtually pain-free, minimally invasive approach to evaluating GI health and obtaining tissue samples for definitive diagnosis. As researchers continue to pursue treatments and vaccines for HIV-related disease in nonhuman primate models, the laboratory veterinarian is increasingly called upon to assist with experimental endoscopic biopsies. Further, nonspecific gastrointestinal signs are not an uncommon presentation for large laboratory animals with spontaneous disease. This introductory workshop aims to provide a foundation for laboratory veterinarians with a focus on endoscopic equipment, diagnosis, and integration of flexible endoscopy in the laboratory setting. Techniques for nasopharyngoscopy, esophacoscopy, gastroscopy, enteroscopy, colonoscopy, and tissue biopsy therein will be discussed. This half-day workshop will consist of lecture- and video-based learning and discussion followed by a hands-on laboratory to familiarize participants with the endoscopy equipment and allow for technical instruction and practice using nonanimal teaching models.

This Workshop is sponsored in part by Karl Storz Endoscopy and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Research Animal Resources.

W-12 LAS PRO ARTICLE WRITING BOOT CAMP

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 348 Leaders: John Farrar, Liz Rozanski Faculty: Bob Dauchy, Elizabeth Nunamaker, Penny Devlin, Jamie Naden, Robin Tucker Facilitator: TBN Workshop Fee: free      Workshop Limit: 50 Laboratory Animal Science Professional (LAS Pro), the flagship AALAS publication, features articles highlighting the latest developments and strategies in management, professional development, occupational health and safety, as well as technician tips and feature stories on the diverse professionals who work in our field. Do you want to be a part of your association’s magazine? Bring your concepts or an article outline and we will help you get started down the road to publication! The magazine’s Editorial Advisory Board will be on hand to offer encouragement and expert advice. The targeted audience for this workshop is any AALAS member looking to publish, particularly those who have not published previously. Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptops to the session. This is a free workshop and limited to 50 participants.

This Workshop is sponsored in part by American Association for Laboratory Animal Science (AALAS).

W-13 SUCCESSFUL OPERATION OF A GNOTOBIOTIC FACILITY

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 349 Leaders: Betty R Theriault, Alton G Swennes, Stephanie Fowler, Jessica K Lang, Carrie Murczek Faculty: Stephanie W Fowler, Jessica K Lang, Carrie Murczek, Alton G Swennes Facilitator: Julia Krout Workshop Fee: $140      Workshop Limit: 50 This workshop is designed to provide guidance to those in the early stages of developing a gnotobiotics facility. The workshop will provide background on facility design and requirements,

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

sterilization techniques and their limitations, and the effective use of common equipment. Discussion will focus on the use of flexible film isolators (sterilization cylinder packing and port entry), use of semi-rigid isolators and positive-pressure sealed IVC systems, including key procedural aspects that enable the maintenance of germ-free or gnotobiotic animals. Participants will gain perspective from workshop faculty that have developed research investigator facilities and large academic centrally managed programs. The targeted audience includes managers, veterinarians, research scientists, and program administrators. The workshop will introduce attendees to the variety of equipment options available and the current standards in the field of gnotobiology. This Workshop is sponsored in part by Allentown, CBC, Charles River, ENVIGO, Taconic, and Tecniplast.

W-14 UNDERSTANDING THE ROLES OF ANIMAL CARE AND FACILITY DESIGN STAFFS IN PLANNING A RESEARCH ANIMAL FACILITY

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 346 Leader: Robert E Nalls Faculty: Jeffrey M Polo, Bruce A Scharf Facilitator: Misty J Williams-Fritz Workshop Fee: $140      Workshop Limit: 50

The complexity of requirements for facilities supporting animal models for research is a direct result of their scientific necessity, biosecurity, and sophistication of techniques. This session reviews the challenges faced by both animal care staff and the design team in supporting the planning and construction of a research animal facility. Topics include regulatory standards, space allocations, as well as architectural, engineering, and operational requirements. Case studies will be used to illustrate some of the challenges and opportunities from several recent projects. Despite the fact that animal care is directly impacted by the design and detailing of facilities, animal care staff often gain an understanding of the design process and performance

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WEDNESDAY MORNING AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

criteria only through the “battlefield experience” of being thrust into participation in a construction project, or by struggling to effectively operate a poorly planned or obsolete facility. This teamtaught workshop by a laboratory animal program director, a laboratory architect, and a science facility engineer will endeavor to give animal care staff the tools to effectively identify needs in their current facility or to be more effective in the planning and construction process for a new or renovated facility. Concepts will be aimed at facilitating their role in supporting the planning, design, and construction effort.This workshop will illustrate the appropriate role of animal care staff in the facility planning process and their impact on facility design. Planning and functional issues, as well as approaches to solving them, will be presented from both an animal care and facility design perspective. The planning/ design/construction process as well as tools that can be used will be illustrated and distributed. Anticipated attendees include institutional representatives who are involved with the operation or funding of animal facilities, particularly those who anticipate renovation or construction projects.

SEMINARS BUILDING AN INCLUSIVE WORKFORCE IN THE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITY

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom I Leader/Moderator: Marilyn M Watson Facilitator: Darin McNeill Individuals with disabilities can provide staffing solutions to add diversity to laboratory animal facilities. People with disabilities are often an untapped market. In 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor statistics noted labor force participation rate for people with disabilities is 20.4% (68.4% for those w/o disabilities) and the unemployment rate for individuals with disabilities is 10.2% (4.7% for people w/o disabilities). Leveraging the strengths of each individual offers the unique opportunity to develop strategic advantages for

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the team to accelerate innovation, kindle problem solving, enhance productivity and job satisfaction, improve quality, and, most importantly, find better ways to meet needs within our animal facilities. In this seminar, attendees will hear multiple perspectives from employees in institutions that are building an inclusive workforce in the laboratory animal vivarium. The session will cover strategies that an institution or work unit can use to recruit and support individuals with disabilities. Participants will learn about Project SEARCH, which is a transition-to-work program for young people with intellectual and development disabilities, and how incorporation of this program has had positive impacts not only on the students but also on the vivarium staff. An animal care technician, who is a person with autism, will provide her experience working in a vivarium. This perspective forms a better understanding of neurodiversity and how to build bridges across your work units. A discussion of how facilities can support individuals with sensory disabilities will also be provided, including how an institution has successfully incorporated an interpreter system to facilitate communication amongst a staff where a high proportion are deaf or hearing impaired, as well as steps that can be made to support individuals with visual disabilities. Studies have shown that inclusive work environments boost morale, productivity, and profitability. This session would be of interest to any individual interested in supporting an inclusive work environment. 8:00 8:05

Speakers/Topics: Marilyn M Watson

Welcome and Introductions

Dawn M Kirchner Diversity Recruitment

8:20

Douglas J Jazdzewski

Integration of Project SEARCH into a Vivarium

8:50

Francie Dahlin

9:20

Jennifer C Smith

Understanding Neurodiversity

DON’T JUST SURVIVE: NONTECHNICAL SKILLS TO THRIVE IN YOUR LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE CAREER

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom II Leader: Sharron M Kirchain Moderator: Robin M Kramer Facilitator: Mia T Lieberman This seminar will explore several challenging issues in today’s workplace culture. The importance of women in leadership will be discussed in the context of the laboratory animal science industry, as will gender stereotypes, disparities in leadership and salary earnings, and what challenges exist for women in leadership roles. Elements of work-life balance will be explored, why it is important, what the obstacles are, and how to achieve it. Finally, we will look at workplace culture and how workplace assessment tools can help navigate it. Selected tools that may be helpful in the laboratory animal science setting will be reviewed. Live smartphone polling will be used to survey the audience and foster discussion points. Participants will learn non-technical job skills such as interacting with diverse groups/cultures in the workplace; awareness of gender bias and unconscious bias in society and work; how to approach issues of work and personal life to achieve both productivity and personal satisfaction; and information about several individual and team assessment tools to assist in fostering positive workplace culture. Men and women leaders, managers, and anyone interested in gender, diversity, workplace culture, or work-life balance should attend this seminar. 8:00

Working with Hearing Impaired Staff in a Lab Animal Program

9:50

Chandra D Williams 8:45 Working with Individuals with Low Vision

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

Robin M Kramer

Welcome and Introduction: Background, Demographics, and Workplace Statistics

8:15 Stacy Pritt Challenges for Women in Leadership

Speakers/Topics:

Gary L Borkowski

You Work Hard, Don’t Forget to Play Hard: Strategies for Achieving Work-life Balance

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


WEDNESDAY MORNING AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

8:00

Speakers/Topics:

8:45

Ross A McDevitt

9:15

Heather D Smith

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom III Leader/Moderator: Kathy A Perdue Facilitator: Sheba Edmonds

9:30

Francesca Macchiarini

In recent years, greater emphasis has been placed on healthy aging due to the lengthening of the human lifespan. As a result, aged rodent models, particularly mice, have become increasingly prevalent in research facilities. Aged mice present a nuanced challenge for veterinary and husbandry staff as well as IACUC and research staff given their potential increased longevity and age-related physiology. This seminar will provide an overview of the current practices in caring for, managing, and incorporating aged mice into research studies. A brief historical perspective on the use of aged mice will initiate the discussion. Next, clinical assessment of aged mice and the challenges associated with their care and treatment will be considered. A discussion on behavioral assessment will provide further insight into biological change over the course of the lifespan. This will be followed by a discussion of IACUC involvement in studies using aged mice, namely estimating necessary animal numbers and the development of humane and experimental endpoints. The final speaker will address resources currently available to the research community for obtaining aged mice. The seminar will conclude with a discussion to allow audience questions and conversation about others’ experiences with these challenging models. We encourage scientists, veterinarians, facility management, and animal care staff to attend to discover and incorporate new insight into their programs using aged mouse models with the goal of providing better management and care for this unique rodent population.

9:50

Kathy A Perdue

9:15

Sharron M Kirchain

9:45

Kathy A Perdue Introduction and Historical Perspectives Robin M Kramer 8:20 Theresa M Meade Group Discussion with Clinical Assessment and Care of Live Smartphone Polling Aged Mice

The Workplace Culture: How Workplace Skills Assessment Tools Can Help

GERIATRIC MOUSE MEDICINE, MANAGEMENT, AND WELFARE

Behavioral Assessment IACUC Perspectives

Resources Available to the Aging Research Community Group Discussion

UNDERSTANDING PUBLIC POLICY ADVOCACY: A PRIMER FOR THE NEXT GENERATION OF LEADERSHIP 

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom IV Leader: Laura A Conour Moderator: Donna J Clemons Facilitator: Logan France The advocacy needs of the animal research community is changing rapidly. Groups opposing research have skillfully moved from campaigns focused on protests, infiltrations and, at times, criminal activity to vocally seeking to influence research operations through public policy and the court system. An increasing number of legislative initiatives are introduced each year that seek to impact and, in some instances, outright ban laboratory animal research. We are seeing more sophisticated approaches to hindering animal research by activist groups in city hall, the courts, and legislative bodies. The laboratory animal community has many dedicated, skilled public policy advocates; however, many of these individuals hold senior leadership positions and are nearing retirement. We must engage our next generation of laboratory animal professionals now to ensure the important role of animals in biomedical research continues to be heard by our public officials. The under 35 workforce has a demonstrable interest in public policy and a willingness to speak out on issues of importance that exceeds the level of prior generations. While all AALAS members who seek to engage in

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

public policy advocacy will benefit from participation, this seminar will primarily empower our younger professionals to become passionate public policy advocates for biomedical research. The session will include an introduction to the legislative and regulatory process, an overview of the key public policy issues affecting biomedical research at the state and national levels, and case studies reviewing both successful and unsuccessful advocacy efforts. Careful attention will also be paid to ensuring advocacy efforts comport with institutional policies. Participants will learn about ways to be effective in meetings with public officials, how to develop an effective advocacy strategy and process, as well as review communications and advocacy tools to maximize outreach influence. 8:00

Speakers/Topics: Laura A Conour Introduction and Welcome

8:15

Thomas Leach Laying the Groundwork: Public Policy Issues Affecting Biomedical Research Today—State-Level Issues 8:45

Matthew Bailey

9:15

James O’Reilly

9:45

Anita T Richert

Laying the Groundwork: Public Policy Issues Affecting Biomedical Research Today—Federal Issues

Demystifying and Making the Most of Constituent Meetings/Advocacy Process and Strategies: They Work For You Training Module for Young Professionals/Peers to Talk with Legislators

PLATFORM SESSIONS

8:00 AM-10:45 AM Platform Session abstracts will be available on www.aalas.org in July. They will also be included in both the mobile app and the National Meeting Final Program.

47


WEDNESDAY MORNING AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

EXHIBIT HALL LOUNGE REFRESHMENT BREAK Refuel, Refresh & Recharge!

9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Sponsored by The Jackson Lab

SPECIAL TOPIC LECTURES CLIMBING THE HILL: GETTING INVOLVED IN BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH ADVOCACY AND PUBLIC POLICY 

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom IV Speaker: Logan K France Moderator: Dawn C Fitzhugh Facilitator: Donna J Clemons Animal rights activists are becoming increasingly involved in promoting legislation that would adversely impact or possibly halt animal research. Now more than ever, strong voices are needed from the biomedical research community to communicate the truth about animal care in research and combat the harmful agenda of activists that could negatively affect medical progress. Many members of research support teams, including veterinarians, laboratory animal technicians, and others do not appreciate the significant impact they can have on public policy. This session will provide an overview of the current legislative landscape regarding the use of animals in biomedical research, including recent legislation targeting animal research, and a preview of legislation likely to be proposed in the next session. Participants will learn the many ways to advocate for biomedical research and how they can influence public policy, from social media posts to writing a senator or providing personal testimony at a legislative hearing. Tips and tricks for effectively communicating your message

48

and developing a compelling argument will be also discussed. While this session will focus on informing young professionals of the legislative process and how to break into the public policy scene, all attendees will gain a better understanding of current challenges and opportunities and ways in which their voice can be heard. This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by AALAS Government Relations Committee (GRC).

EFFECTIVE TEACHING STRATEGIES THROUGH CONSIDERATION OF ADULT COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENTAL THEORIES  11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom III Speaker: Lisa M Kelly Moderator: Natasha J Melfi Facilitator: TBN

Robert Kegan, famed Harvard developmental psychologist, proposed that adults develop their own individualized perception of reality and that this perception is continuously evolving throughout their lifespan. This constructive-developmental theory was further expanded to include “orders of consciousness” that Kegan believes directly impact a person’s epistemology, or way of knowing. Based on Kegan’s theories, adults are often expected to handle situations or issues that are beyond the capacity of their mental development. The difference between this expectation and capacity can result in stress and create barriers to learning. This session will explain Kegan’s theories and propose ways in which trainers can evaluate the orders of consciousness of their learners and can construct effective holding environments that facilitate mental capacity development. Increased capacity will allow learners to make the cognitive leaps necessary to handle challenging expectations. The session will explore theoretical ideas on why learners are often resistant to change and how trainers can help them through tough transitions. It will also explore the necessary components for transformational leadership and learning that can successfully influence

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

culture change. The session is ideal for anyone that would like to develop a deeper understanding of the psychology behind adult learning and ways in which theoretical principles can be applied to create effective educational curricula.

NATHAN E BREWER LECTURE

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom I Speaker: TBN Moderator: Christopher T Southern Facilitator: Steven L Leary Speaker and description will be available after the Award Selection Committee selects the Nathan Brewer Award recipient. This session information will be available in the mobile app and in the Final Program. This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by AALAS Awards Selection Committee (ASC). 

WHAT COULD POSSIBLY GO WRONG? EVERYTHING YOU NEVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT THE MICROBIOME

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom II Speaker: Vanessa L Hale Moderator: Thomas R Meier Facilitator: TBN The microbiome and its relationship to health and behavior are rapidly growing areas of research. Recent work in laboratory animals has demonstrated how unintentional alterations of the gut microbiota can dramatically and unexpectedly change host phenotype. Changes in bedding, caging, diet, cage location, and experimenter, amongst other variables, can alter gut microbial communities in lab animals, which can subsequently alter host metabolism, disease susceptibility, and behavior. Identical strains of mice from the same vendors or from different vendors can also exhibit significant differences in gut microbial diversity and composition, resulting in differing responses to the same stimuli or conditions. Careful consideration and monitoring of laboratory animal gut

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

microbial communities can help establish more reproducible results. The goal of this presentation is to introduce the microbiome, its role in animal health, and highlight current studies focused on the microbial communities of laboratory animals. Participants will learn important factors to consider in designing experiments or maintaining laboratory animals involved in experiments. This session would be of interest to anyone working with laboratory animals including health and care technicians, veterinarians, researchers, and vivarium managers.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

PANEL DISCUSSIONS EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AND DISASTER PLANNING 

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 339 Leaders: William (Bill) G Greer and Ron E Banks Moderator: William (Bill) G Greer Facilitator: TBN Panelist: Ron Banks, Carol L Clarke, Julie Marshall, Ann McCann, Evan Shukan, Catherine M Vogelweid The session is a continuation of last year’s discussion on nonregulatory practices for emergency management and disaster planning for research facilities in the context of harmonization with the local, state, and federal response to adverse events. This session will further educate the community on topics that include elements of the Federal Emergency Response Plan, the existing model of best practices established by zoos, and recommendations from IACUC Administrator Association’s (IAA) Best Practice meetings. A summary of the results and recommendations from a recently released report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine,

“Strengthening the Disaster Resilience of the Academic Biomedical Research Community: Protecting the Nation’s Investment” will also be presented. The report identifies common problems that occurred at research institutions during past disasters and proposes ideas that will increase resiliency to better protect institutions against future losses. Each member of the animal care and use research community is responsible for the health and well-being of animals used in research, testing, and teaching animals during emergencies, adverse events, and disasters. Our goal is to encourage open communication and dialog amongst peers and response partners to encourage the use of more inclusive planning approaches that will yield enhanced protection for research animals during adverse events and disasters. This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by The IACUC Administrators Association.

SUPPORTING RESEARCHERS AND PROTECTING SCIENCE: THE IMPORTANCE OF INSTITUTIONAL COLLABORATION IN OUTREACH EFFORTS 

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 337 Leader: Jim Newman Moderator: Jennifer L Asher Facilitator: Paula A Clifford Panelist: Jim Newman, Amy Puffenberger, Charles E (Chuck) Roselli Proactive communication about the importance of animal research is essential in today’s environment where the need to increase public trust continues to grow. Partnerships between individuals leading outreach efforts, an institution’s communications office, and other offices and individuals within an organization are critical for many reasons. These include ensuring that activities align with institutional policies, making certain that messaging remains uniform across all the offices that communicate with the public, and guaranteeing that those conducting research are effectively supported. Communicationsoutreach partnerships are often some

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

of the most critical relationships when seeking administrative buy-in for these initiatives. This session will advise participants on how to develop effective organizational relationships to build a strong outreach program that aligns with and informs other institutional communications efforts. Speakers include animal research communications experts, members of the laboratory animal research community working to build their institution’s outreach and advocacy efforts, and a researcher who has been the focus of an anti-animal research campaign who can talk about the benefits of increased transparency. Participants will learn answers to the following questions: Where is the best place to start an outreach program? Who do I need to partner with? Who needs to be at the table? What do I do when there are disagreements when forming a program? What should we do if outreach receives negative or unwanted attention? How should I respond to letters from students, activists, or other members of the public? The target audience is those involved in outreach, as well as all members of the animal care and use program and institutional administration and communications teams. This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by American College of Lab Animal Medicine/American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners Program Committee (ACLAM/ASLAP).

THE HUMAN VARIABLE: ESSENTIAL CONSIDERATION FOR PROMOTING EXCELLENCE IN ANIMAL WELFARE 

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 341 Leader/Moderator: Andy Foster Facilitator: TBN Panelist: Genevieve Andrews-Kelly, Cassondra Bauer, Jenny Jones, Nikki Vilminot

As compassion fatigue becomes a growing concern within the laboratory animal research community, the need to promote compassion satisfaction as a preventative measure is imperative. In addition to ethical responsibilities, institutions need to acknowledge that

49


WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

increased interest is being given to baseline animal wellness in analyzing study data, and must, therefore, work to control human variables such as the factors that lead to the onset of compassion fatigue. An institutional culture of compassion satisfaction and effective emotional engagement can be promoted in a variety of ways. By acknowledging, learning, and embracing human psychosocial behavior, institutions will leverage strengths inherent in emotional behavior instead of reacting to them. Successful implementation of programs that manage compassion fatigue as well as promote compassion satisfaction contributes to keen awareness in animal caregiving, acute performance in study function activity, retention of experienced leadership, positive employee engagement, and overall job satisfaction. While efforts may vary, maintaining a commitment to facilitating a culture of emotional supportiveness and compassion satisfaction is paramount in ensuring that animal welfare remains every institution’s foremost priority. In exercising this commitment, several initiatives have proven to be beneficial in achieving this type of culture and can be implemented with minimal capital investment. Participants of this panel discussion will learn basic psychosocial tendencies essential when considering action; receive details on proven methods for supporting compassion satisfaction; gain tips for approaching management and executive leadership for program approval; engage in brainstorming sessions to find right-fit solutions for each participant’s institution; share ideas for implementation and buy-in; and make connections for longterm support and encouragement in building a successful program. The target audience is laboratory animal science technicians, managers, veterinarians, and organizations. This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by Charles River, ENVIGO and The University of Michigan.

50

WORKING SMARTER, NOT HARDER: THE LATEST MANAGEMENT TOOLS PROVEN TO MAKE VIVARIUM OPERATIONS EASIER

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 343 Leader: Jarrod Nichol Moderator: Gerry M Cronin Facilitator: TBN Panelist: Ethan Hildebrand, Donna Jarrell, Sharron Kirchain, Tammy Williams Vivaria around the world are finding it difficult to manage while continuously tasked with doing more with less, and avoiding the insidious “fake work” that creeps in every day. This interactive session will unlock the mysteries behind removing everyday problems facing our industry. Through the use of innovative tools and techniques developed to foster a culture of quality, speakers will offer invaluable information on the tools they are using to work smarter, not harder. Using the collective experience of several institutions, we will demonstrate a wide array of tools and concepts to help you overcome your daily struggles. As the industry moves ever closer into the digital age, combining breakthrough apps with readily available yet powerful tools and techniques will increase the velocity and understanding of information to facilitate better management decisions. Our panel will highlight several low-cost and simple approaches that can and will solve some age-old problems our industry faces on a daily basis. Whether you’re looking to enhance your program by offering a continuous culture of quality, or you want to increase the visibility of operational data, our panel discussion will offer you a way to jump-start improvements at your own institution. Participants will learn successful and innovative techniques that work well for managers and staff. Practical and inexpensive solutions to everyday problems covering a variety of topics, and from the point of view of the veterinarian’s manager’s and husbandry technician’s viewpoints will be presented. The collective experience of several institutions will discuss their lessons learned so that attendees will

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

be able to jump-start their programs ahead of the curve. Topics of discussion include management development tools and approaches, task management data reporting tools, building a culture of quality, low-cost electronic and self-service tools to enhance daily husbandry and veterinary rounds tasks, and lessons learned about going digital. The target audience includes directors, veterinarians, animal care technicians, veterinary technicians, and financial administrators.

WORKSHOPS W-15 ANIMAL FACILITY, DESIGN, PROCESSES, DECISIONS, AND TECHNOLOGY

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: 345 Leader: Mark Corey Faculty: Laura Halverson, Katie McGimpsey, Cliff Roberts, Lauri Tyrrell Facilitator: Karen L Lencioni Workshop Fee: $140     Workshop Limit: 50 This session will benefit those involved with animal facility design and operations by describing the process, decisions, and technologies involved in the design, construction, and management of animal facilities. The workshop will begin with a discussion of the facility design process, including who should be involved, the objectives and level of effort by stakeholders, milestone decisions to be reached, and anticipated durations of the various phases of the process. Current trends in the industry will be explored through discussions about planning, interior construction, and finishes. Faculty will frame the discussion from the owner’s perspective and experiences in the real world. The workshop will also cover mechanical, electrical, and piping design and operations. The discussion will focus on the risks associated with animal welfare, loss of research and facility resiliency, and how engineering decisions affect each of these parameters. The lessons learned will help enable participants to

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

make more informed decisions as they develop and operate their own facilities. Planning energy and resource efficient facilities is no longer a trend or an option, but rather an integral driver in facility planning. We will discuss sustainability strategies regarding energy and water that are being effectively implemented in animal facilities and the long-term benefits derived from each. W-16 IACUC PROTOCOL REVIEW CHALLENGES 

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: 348 Leader: Marcy A Brown, Deb A Frolicher Faculty: Gary Borkowski, Marcy A Brown, Deb A Frolicher, Eileen Morgan, Nicolette A Petervary Facilitator: TBN Workshop Fee: $140      Workshop Limit: 50 This popular workshop will be presented using a mixture of case studies, group discussion, and interactive exercises. Workshop participants may submit scenarios involving protocol review challenges or IACUC issues that have either occurred at their institution or that they wish to discuss. Workshop leaders consist of certified IACUC professionals, as well as representatives from OLAW, USDA, and AAALAC International. Participants will work in small groups to discuss certain challenges and then share their recommendations with the whole group. Leaders will interact with each group on an individual basis to assist them in developing methods to deal with difficult situations involving the IACUC. Situations likely to be discussed may include pain/ distress categories, humane endpoints, rationale for species and numbers of animals, noncompliance, difficult investigators, high-risk animal models, how to implement and use veterinary verification and consultation (VVC), and training issues. Participants will leave with a more thorough knowledge of common IACUC issues and a variety of methods to deal with them. The target audience includes veterinarians, IACUC members (including nonaffiliated members), animal technicians, investigators, and investigative staff members.

W-17 VIVARIUM ERGONOMICS: WORKING SAFER AND SMARTER

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: 346 Leader/Faculty: Jennifer S Kilpatrick, Terry Snyder Facilitator: Trinka W Adamson Workshop Fee: $140      Workshop Limit: 50 Vivarium staff experience a high incidence of work-related musculoskeletal injury, pain, and discomfort. This can lead to loss of experienced employees, costly workers compensation claims, and negative impact on morale, quality, and productivity. A robust ergonomic program can successfully address these problems. Using practical examples this interactive workshop will introduce participants to effective strategies and methods for problem identification, worker engagement, and establishing a successful program of continual, sustainable improvements. These concepts will be reinforced throughout this interactive workshop with small group activities. By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to identify the major risk factors for musculoskeletal injury and methods to successfully address these challenges in their workplace. 

PLATFORM SESSIONS

2:15 PM-5:00 PM Platform Session abstracts will be available on www.aalas.org in July. They will also be included in both the mobile app and the National Meeting Final Program.

SEMINARS EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT SEMIANNUAL INSPECTIONS HOW TO GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR IACUC INSPECTIONS  2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom I Leader: Judy M Hickman-Davis Moderator: Carrie L Freed Facilitator: Kathryn Emmer

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

Semiannual program review can be complicated by the need to inspect multiple sites, follow-up on noted deficiencies, and ensure compliance with currently approved protocols and institutional policies. The ability to decrease regulatory burden, increase process efficiency, and adequately meet the intent of the current regulations while providing for excellent animal care is not simple. Researchers that use animals may experience several inspections a year from EHS, the biosafety office, and radiation safety, as well as from the IACUC. Collaboration among different institutional entities may decrease the number of inspections but has the potential to increase the time involved, complicate scheduling, and dilute the focus for any particular group. The use of dedicated post-approval monitoring personnel may increase efficiency or inflate the administrative burden. How findings are classified will impact what follow-up information or action is required, and how this information can be used to identify trends that may be of larger institutional concerns. The ability to address animal or facility concerns identified during the semiannual review process requires attention to detail, persistent follow through, and adequate personnel for oversight. Institutions should periodically review current practices to ensure they meet the letter and intent of the regulations without inadvertently erecting roadblocks that impact the ability to perform research. This session will review practices and options for conducting semiannual inspections at large academic institutions. Different ways to approach the inspection process, the role of the different members of the IACUC inspection team, difficulties associated with the classification of inspection findings, and a discussion of the challenges associated with enacting change post-semiannual review will be provided. This seminar would be for anyone who might be involved in the semiannual IACUC inspection process.

51


WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

Speakers/Topics: 2:45

3:00

3:25

3:50

4:15

dialogue and action within the greater research community that will benefit Carrie L Freed our veterinary and human patients. Welcome and Introduction Participants will learn how various Judy M Hickman-Davis confounding factors and unintended bias Education or Inspection? How in animal study design can influence Do You Approach the Semiannual Review Process experimental outcomes. In addition, Erin N Yu participants will learn about mitigation Conducting the Inspection: Who, approaches to enhance scientific When, and How? rigor and experimental reproducibility. Valerie K Bergdall The discussion will have relevance What Do You Call It—Significant, for research biologists, lab animal Minor, Administrative, or a Note? scientists, laboratory animal medicine Becky S Schwiebert practitioners, veterinary pathologists, and Cracking the Whip: How to biostatisticians. Follow-up and Get the Most Out of Your Inspection Findings

2:45

Speakers/Topics:

2:50

William P Feeney

3:10

Michael P Quaile

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom II Leader/Moderator: William P Feeney Facilitator: TBN

3:30

Alicia Donnelly

There has been significant discussion in recent years about enhancing the characterization of animal models to ensure greater scientific and translational relevance. An increased focus on the optimization of animal models and a heightened awareness of the value of robust scientific review provide unique opportunities to address potential confounding factors and sources of bias in study design. These efforts can facilitate the improvement of scientific research studies by fostering increased scientific rigor and experimental reproducibility. Speakers will present reviews of select topics and/or case studies to illustrate how various experimental factors and unintended bias in study design can influence experimental outcomes. Intrinsic animal factors including genetics, immune status, and microbiome, as well as extrinsic factors including dietary influences, will be highlighted. In addition, the use of blinding and randomization to minimize experimental bias will be discussed. The object of this session is to promote further

IMPROVING CLINICAL TRANSLATION: IDENTIFYING POTENTIAL CONFOUNDING FACTORS AND SOURCES OF BIAS IN ANIMAL STUDY DESIGN

52

William P Feeney Welcome and Introduction

Extrinsic Factors—Dietary Influences

out. We will then travel deeper into the physiological jungle and examine specific organs with the use of ultrasound. Applying this modality we will show how the heart and blood flow can be directly and dynamically visualized and how the tissues respond to stimuli and toxins. Finally, we will delve down to the cellular level with intravital microscopy (IVM) and see real-time cell-cell interactions with multiphoton confocal microscopy in the live animal. On this part of the journey, we are likely to see bacteria engulfing macrophages and witness immune cell interactions. After completing the journey, travelers will have a better appreciation of how the latest imaging technology is applied in discovery and pharmaceutical development. 2:45

Speakers/Topics:

2:55

Norman C Peterson

3:50

Sunish Mohanan 3:30

Kathleen Gabrielson

4:10

Mandy l Bergquist

4:35

Intrinsic Factors—Immune Status

Intrinsic Factors—Microbiome Intrinsic Factors—Genetics

Sources of Bias and Mitigation

4:15 William P Feeney

Discussion

JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF THE MOUSE

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom III Leader/Moderator: Norman C Peterson Facilitator: TBN

Advances in in vivo imaging technologies have made it possible to visualize biological process at multiple levels in the live animal in real-time. These developments have enabled us to better understand systemic, tissue, cellular, and molecular interactions which have in turn led to advancements in science and medicine. Our journey will start by exploring whole live animal imaging with PETCT and optical imaging. With these modalities, we can map where labeled compounds and therapeutics travel throughout the body. Imaging biomarkers to study metabolism, tumor growth, and pharmacodynamic reactions as they occur in real-time will also be pointed

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

Norman C Peterson

Welcome and Introductions

Applications of PETCT and Optical Imaging in Animal Studies Applications of Ultrasound in Animal Studies

Jonathan Boyd

Applications of Intravital Microscopy in Animal Studies This Seminar is sponsored in part by North American 3Rs Collaborative (NA3RsC).

YOU CREATED A COMPASSION FATIGUE PROGRAM—WHAT’S NEXT? 

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom IV Leader: J Preston Van Hooser Moderator: Sally Thompson-Iritani Facilitator: Brianna N Meyer Compassion fatigue (CF) is the cost of caring for other lives in emotional, mental, and physical pain. CF is characterized by deep physical and emotional exhaustion and a pronounced change in the ability to feel empathy. Laboratory animal professionals are vulnerable to CF because of the work that we do and the care that we provide to animals. While CF can be a normal consequence of caring, we must continue to learn ways to improve the support system within

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


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THURSDAY MORNING AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

the laboratory animal workplace and become more resilient and avoid becoming overwhelmed, shutdown, and/or leave the profession altogether. Such support will help to maintain a healthy and productive climate in lab animal science for both humans and animals. In order for us to continue to provide the best environment possible for advancing science and supporting animal welfare, we must incorporate CF management as part of our overall work environments. The authors will provide a brief overview of the causes and impacts of CF as well as the progress and pitfalls of an institutional compassion fatigue program. Presentation will include perspectives from different institutions at different stages of implementation and references and ideas will be provided for attendees. The authors propose to work with AALAS to establish a National Compassion Fatigue Awareness week/ month so that as an industry we can increase awareness about the topic. The learning objectives are 1) reintroduce the topic of CF as it applies to staff 2) share progress and pitfalls of established institutional compassion fatigue programs from around the country and efforts to incorporate CF into an occupational health (OH) program 3) present powerful ways to take control and learn how to change the image of our work by talking about and sharing the important work that we do and 4) develop and implement a National Compassion Fatigue Awareness week/ month in collaboration with AALAS and fellow institutions. 2:45

Sally Thompson-Iritani Welcome and Introduction

2:55

Holly M Nguyen

3:20

Elizabeth A Clemmons

3:45

Andreanna D Pavan

54

Speakers/Topics: What Is Compassion Fatigue and How Does It Apply to Laboratory Animal Professionals and Administrative Support Staff

Tips on Understanding and Recognizing Compassion Fatigue Systems

Assessing Oneself for Compassion Fatigue and Treating Compassion Fatigue in the Workplace

4:10

Ken Gordon Feeling Proud About Your Work and How To Talk About It

GLP animal studies for medical device submissions to FDA.

4:30

James “Preston” Van Hooser

Speakers/Topics:

8:00

Judith A Davis

8:10

Kira Moore

8:30

Natalie A Miller

8:50

Diane Cordray

9:10

Karen Manhart

9:30

Annabelle Crusan

4:55

Establishing a National Compassion Fatigue Awareness Week

James “Preston” Van Hooser Closing Remarks

NOVEMBER 1, 2018 THURSDAY MORNING

SEMINARS

FROM

THE FDA TRENCHES: SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DESIGN A GLP ANIMAL STUDY?

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom II Leader: Annabelle P Crusan Moderator: Judith A Davis Facilitator: Elizabeth Katz Why is FDA presenting on GLP animal studies that support medical device safety? We want to share our unique perspective as FDA animal study reviewers so that you and device manufacturers can design, conduct, and report on animal studies that effectively and efficiently support medical device clinical trials and marketing submissions. Whether you are already conducting GLP animal studies or want to expand your knowledge, join us for a discussion on what defines a successful study. We will provide an overview of the medical device regulatory framework and the skill sets required to effectively design and conduct an animal study to support device safety. We will share insights from the FDA reviewer’s perspective on good study design (hint: GLP compliance does not guarantee a good study design that will adequately address regulatory concerns); common GLP deviations and the problems they create; the importance of gross and histopathology; pertinent raw data; and how to prepare a final study report that effectively summarizes the study data. Along the way, we will present avoidable pitfalls we have encountered during our reviews. Finally, we will wrap up with a conversation about how we can work together to help you conduct efficient and effective

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

Welcome and Introduction

The Animal Study Reviewer Skillset and Animal Model Selection GLP Compliance and a Good Study Design Common GLP Deviations and Problems They Create The Importance of the Pathology Report and the Final Report Group Discussion

PASSIVE ELECTRONIC DATA COLLECTION USING RFID TECHNOLOGY: IMPROVING ANIMAL WELFARE AND STUDY DOCUMENTATION EFFICIENCY AND ACCURACY

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom I Leader: Brad Gien Moderator: Craig Jordan Facilitator: Ashley Cheetham Accurate and timely data collection is critical when conducting any research projects. This seminar will focus on the importance of accurate data collection in a new innovative way. The goal is to create an individual animal record as part of the larger study documentation through passive electronic data collection from the time an animal is weaned through necropsy and tissue analysis. We will introduce advanced RFID microchips and custom software for tracking all elements of a research study from simple applications such as high throughput body weight screening, minor surgical modifications, major surgical disease models, medical device implants, PK/PD research, and short and long duration toxicology studies. The goal of this seminar is to demonstrate best practices for efficient, accurate data collection in many different laboratory settings and show the impact of good

FACILITY DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND OPERATION


THURSDAY MORNING AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

pre-registering animal studies ensures better quality research outcomes. We will demonstrate and practice strategies for effectively searching existing literature and reports. We will make the connection between different housing, husbandry, analgesia, and anesthetic practices and rigorous science. We will lay out the importance of datasharing and full reporting beyond the typical methods and results to the Speakers/Topics: reproducibility of animal experiments. 8:00 Brad Gien Throughout the seminar, attendees Welcome and Introduction will have the opportunity to apply the 8:15 Matt Ruiter concepts we present to real-world RFID: New Uses Beyond Simple Identification examples of animal research proposals. 8:45 Robert Ross This seminar series is suitable for all Using RFID to Compile and Analyze laboratory animal professionals and will High Throughput Body Weight give participants a strong understanding Screening 9:15 Brad Gien of how the 3Rs impact rigorous and Advanced Lab Animal Surgical reproducible science. data collection and the cost of poor data collection. Participants will take away a better understanding of new innovative data collection techniques and the importance of efficient methods to complete this often monumental task. The target audience for this seminar will be research technicians, study directors, and investigators.

9:45

Data Collection and Analysis Matt Ruiter Electronic Data Collection— Improved Accuracy, Efficiency, and Animal Welfare from Start to End

THE LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL’S GUIDE TO HOW THE 3RS ENHANCE RIGOR AND REPRODUCIBILITY

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom III Leaders: Kathrin Herrmann, Eric K Hutchinson, Kelly A Metcalf Pate Moderator: Casey Kissel Facilitator: Adam D Werts Animal research has come under increased scrutiny recently due to a perceived lack of rigor and reproducibility. The laboratory animal research community has a unique responsibility to ensure the validity of animal research studies while also caring for the wellbeing of the research subjects themselves. This highly interactive seminar will focus on the importance of preparation, information gathering, housing and husbandry, analgesia and anesthesia, and reporting to assure highquality, translational science. We will start with a discussion of the necessary steps to ensure effective research before a study even begins, and why

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8:00 8:05

Speakers/Topics:

8:15

Kathrin Herrmann

Be Prepared: Setting Yourself up for Success with Deliberate Study Planning

8:30

Kristina Adams

8:50

Kelly A Metcalf Pate

9:00

Eric K Hutchinson

9:15

Jennifer Lofgren

9:30

Kathrin Herrmann

9:45

Kelly A Metcalf Pate

Kelly A Metcalf Pate Welcome and Introduction

Kelly A Metcalf Pate

How the 3Rs Contribute to Rigor and Reproducibility

Be Informed: Searching the Literature for more than Alternatives

Interactive Exercise: Using the 3Rs to Enhance Rigor and Reproducibility

Be Refined: Harnessing Behavior for Better Science Be Humane: Minimizing Pain as a Research Variable Be Transparent: Comprehensive Reporting to Improve Reproducibility and Reduce Unnecessary Duplication

Interactive Exercise: Using the 3Rs to Enhance Rigor and Reproducibility—During and After the Study This Seminar is sponsored in part by Johns Hopkins University Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing.

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

TRAPPED IN A BUBBLE: IN MANAGING GNOTOBIOTICS, ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom IV Leader: Carrie L Freed Moderator: Judy M Hickman-Davis Facilitator: Kate Nolan Since the inception of gnotobiotics in the 1940s, research applications have evolved to include a wide variety of species. The role of microbiota in health and disease has far-reaching implications and such research, in the areas of immunology, cancer, and vaccine development, support the continued need for gnotobiotic housing. Available animal models come in very different sizes and therefore housing SOPs must be developed that fit both the needs of a particular species and any limitations of the facility. Due to significant financial burden and intense operational needs it is common for animals to be maintained as part of a core service, with dedicated personnel providing the day to day care for the animals. Delineating responsibility within the housing space and addressing fiscal responsibilities in advance is important to ensure expectations are clear. Depending on the species, veterinary support and technical needs may vary greatly. Once established, rodent models may be maintained long term with minimal direct veterinary involvement while larger models such as piglets or calves may require veterinary support for the initial derivation and ongoing blood collection or inoculations. Regardless of the species selected, attention to detail is important from start (the coordination of initial derivation procedures) to finish (breakdown of the isolator) for successful management of gnotobiotic housing to ensure highquality research can be performed with animal welfare of utmost importance. This session will provide a better understanding of terminology related to gnotobiotic housing and the application of these concepts in an animal model. Attendees will become familiar with equipment and husbandry needs for mice, piglets, and calves housed within an isolator and will develop an

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appreciation for the veterinarian’s role for each model. The target audience includes facility managers, technicians, or veterinarians currently working in a facility that maintains gnotobiotic animals or those considering future plans. This will be valuable for any individual looking to improve their understanding of management of animal models in the field of gnotobiotics. 8:00

Speakers/Topics:

8:15

Judy M Hickman-Davis

8:45

Stacey M Meeker

9:10

Carrie L Freed

9:35

Juliette Hanson

10:00

Panel Discussion/Question

Carrie L Freed Welcome and Introduction

History of Gnotobiotics and a Review of Basic Terminology

From the Researcher’s Perspective, Application of Gnotobiotic Mouse Models for IBD and Colon Cancer Research Working in a Bubble: Coordination between Core Research Staff, Operations, and Veterinary Teams for Successful Management of a Swine Model

The Challenges of Working with Large Animal Models—Gnotobiotic Calves

PLATFORM SESSIONS

8:00 AM-10:45 AM Platform Session abstracts will be available on www.aalas.org in July. They will also be included in both the mobile app and the National Meeting Final Program.

SPECIAL TOPIC LECTURES ANIMAL

LAW AND THE ANIMAL RESEARCH COMMUNITY: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW, WHAT YOU NEED TO DO

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom II Speaker: Jerrold Tannenbaum Moderator: B Taylor Bennett Facilitator: TBN

One of the most important threats to animal research has been the recent emergence of animal law. Typically, proponents of this field do not define it simply as the area of the law that deals with animals. Rather, animal law—often called “the animal law movement”—is viewed as legal advocacy on behalf of animals, which in turn is viewed as using the legal system to terminate or severely curtail many traditional uses of animals, including their use in scientific and medical research. This session will discuss how animal law so defined has become a central tool of animal activists in opposing animal research. We will look at how most of our country’s law schools are promoting this activist view of the law. We will discuss underlying foundations of this approach to animal law, including developments in academic philosophy and what colleges and universities now call “animal studies.” We will also look at the significance of a development in activist legal theory that has thus far been ignored by many in the research community: a focus on limited, pragmatic legal aims while the educational arm of the animal activist movement prepares the way for eventual achievement of the more fundamental general goals of legal standing for animals, animal rights, and animal personhood. The session will discuss why animal activist lawyers and legal theorists now have a significant head start over supporters of animal research. It will not be easy for the research community to develop legal tools that will be necessary to win current and future battles. There are some reasons for optimism. However, it is essential for supporters of animal research to understand how animal activists are attempting to use the law to achieve their aims and to think seriously about what the research community should do. The target audience will be all who involved in animal-based biomedical research. This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by National Association for Biomedical Research (NABR).

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

EXPLORING ACUPUNCTURE IN LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom III Speaker: Jibing Yang Moderator: Patrick Lester Facilitator: Kelsey Cornelius In laboratory animal medicine, clinical cases become challenging to manage when clinical care or treatment is limited by research objectives or speciesspecific pharmacotherapy options. Traditional Chinese veterinary medicine (TCVM), like acupuncture, can be used to complement or replace common veterinary management procedures in select cases. Benefits of acupuncture include analgesic effect and being a noninvasive approach, which can limit any potential research confounding effects. This lecture will provide a general overview of the history and basic principles of TCVM, its origins and evolution over thousands of years, and its current application in veterinary medicine. Specifically, the benefits and applications of acupuncture in general veterinary and laboratory animal medicine will be illustrated using case scenarios with dogs and rabbits. The lecture will conclude with a discussion on the safety of acupuncture and its scientific evidence in complementary medicine. The audience will gain a general picture of TCVM and the potential benefit of acupuncture in clinical care. The target audience includes veterinarians, veterinary technicians, research staff, and others who are interested in TCVM.

GENE EDITING AS A PATH TO MORE INFORMATIVE PRECLINICAL RESEARCH

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom I Speaker: Daniel F Carlson Moderator: Amy G Andrews Facilitator: Katherine LaVallee There are an estimated 10,000 to 20,000 genetically inherited diseases in the human condition. Our ability to treat these genetic diseases is limited by several factors, but perhaps most notable

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is that many novel therapeutics that are effective in standard research models are not effective in human patients. The pig, physiologically and anatomically, is widely considered one of the closest matches to humans. Until recently, it was considered was too difficult to engineer pigs to model a variety of specific genetic diseases. Modern gene editing technology has changed that, and now several novel and innovative swine models of human disease are available. These models not only give us a new platform for testing therapies, but have also enabled discovery of new disease mechanisms that could guide the next generation of therapeutics. Our dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) pig model is one such example. In addition to our DCM model, we’ll briefly discuss additional swine models of human disease and review the process to develop and utilize novel swine models of human disease for preclinical testing and discovery.

THE ACHEONOMICS— NEW SPORTS MEDICINE

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom IV Speaker: Tony Kaczowski Moderator: Carmen Wilbourn Facilitator: TBN Within a demanding and clinically detailed workforce, the lack of efficient medical providers, and an estimated annual spend of over $52 billion dollars in direct health costs associated with work-related injuries in the U.S. alone, organizations have needed to look at cutting-edge solutions to solve the problem of employee health. The partnership between an organization and an industrial sports medicine team greatly aids in not only driving down work-related medical costs and injury statistics, but also provides a muchneeded tool in preventing and intervening in potential employee health risks. The three components of a successful industrial sports medicine program combine early intervention and care of discomfort and injury through an on-site industrial sports medicine professional, effective ergonomic solution development, and proactive injury and illness prevention systems. Though

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these are the components required, the principles that drive success are less tangible but even more important. These principles include the ability to foster sincere relationships with those being cared for, operating as a team, and understanding that the only way to lead individuals down the path of better health is to educate them on why they need to be involved and that this involvement is for the ultimate good. Topics covered will include a general overview of the financial impact of musculoskeletal discomfort on an employer; discussion of the psychological, sociological, and economic barriers in accessing today’s health care systems; basic human anatomy and physiology; review of common injuries and early intervention tools to reduce severity; a demonstration of general stretching and strengthening exercises to address discomfort; a demonstration of biomechanical coaching tools and how they will assist in the prevention of the common injuries in a workplace; and a question/answer session. This interactive presentation is for all levels and will be in a lecture and group discussion format. This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by Covance and InSite Health.

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

PANEL DISCUSSIONS

IN PURSUIT OF BETTER RESEARCH OUTCOMES: INFLUENCE OF VETERINARY NURSES ON PATIENT CARE, REDUCING ANIMAL NUMBERS, AND INSTITUTIONAL COMPLIANCE  12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 337 Leader: Chrystal L Montgomery Moderator: Ann L Murray Facilitator: Summer M Boyd Panelist: Stephen J Cital, Victoria R Elam, Chrystal L Montgomery, Lawrence Young

ANIMAL WELFARE, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

As the realm of biomedical research expands and evolves, so has the focus on veterinary clinical techniques to improve efficacy and safety for animals and personnel. There is a trend of increasing emphasis on the role veterinary technicians are used in maintaining the integrity of the institutional animal care program and to streamline research efforts. The expertise of veterinary technicians is of value to IACUCs and investigators in this regard and is essential to preserving animal welfare. This panel discussion will explore various options available to veterinary technicians and researchers to preserve quality science by regularly applying the 3Rs. The refinement of study techniques will, in turn, improve animal health and welfare. The reduction of pain and distress with the use of anesthesia and non-invasive techniques, such as imaging, will reduce the number of animals needed. The replacement of historical procedures and the animals needed will be facilitated when opportunities for technicians and nurses are explored, and this knowledge is extended into managerial and compliance role use. The target audience is veterinary technicians, veterinarians, research technicians, animal care technicians, and animal resource managers. This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by Academy of Laboratory Animal Veterinary Technicians (ALAVTIN).

JOINING FORCES TO DRIVE LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE HARMONIZATION 

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 339 Leader: Scott A Mischler Moderator: Laura A Conour Facilitator: TBN Panelist: Laura A Conour, Judy Franco, Scott A Mischler, Ana Isabel Moura Santos

The laboratory animal science community represented by the Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations (FELASA) in Europe and the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science (AALAS) in the United States have been working together to harmonize animal care and research recommendations. This

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session will provide an overview of the structure and relationship between FELASA and AALAS, and the value of this harmonization effort to the laboratory animal community. Brief updates on ongoing joint activities of the associations will be presented. Finally, there will be ample time provided for panel and audience participation to explore future collaborative efforts between the associations. Topics will include the history of the relationship between AALAS and FELASA, liaison body and working group establishment, updates on the transportation working group and zebrafish working group, the value of harmonization and how you can get involved, and an open microphone discussion on potential future collaborations and topics. The target audience will include AALAS and European researchers and laboratory animal scientists who are interested in learning about the joint efforts and accomplishments of AALAS and FELASA in harmonizing guidelines between the world regions. Additionally, audience participation will be critical in defining future directions and potential participants of the joint efforts. This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by American Association for Laboratory Animal Science/Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations (AALAS-FELASA) Liaison Body.

purpose is to discuss topics related to transitioning from a training environment to a job. These topics include preparing for and obtaining your first job posttraining, capitalizing on opportunities during training that prepares you for your job, marketing yourself for a position, interview process peculiarities related to different areas in the field, and negotiating for the resources you need to succeed. Panelists will share their experiences and give insights regarding challenges commonplace in those first years, including preparing for ACLAM boards while working, managing people, managing work-life balance, changing positions within the first couple of years, and navigating extenuating circumstances, such as being geographically limited due to family obligations. The target audiences are veterinarians currently in or finishing their training, veterinarians who have recently finished their training and are transitioning to a first job, and LAM training program directors and faculty.

THE MODERN VIVARIUM— DIGITALLY ENABLED AND ENERGY EFFICIENT Thursday, November 1, 12:30 PM 2:00 PM/Room: 341 Leader: Clement Feng Moderator: Michael Evans

PREPARING FOR THE REAL WORLD AS A LABORATORY ANIMAL VET: WHAT WE KNOW NOW THAT WE WISH WE KNEW THEN

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 343 Leader/Moderator: Victoria K Baxter, Kelly A Metcalf Pate Facilitator: Jenny M Estes Panelist: Cynthia D Cary, Dalis E Collins, Joshua Kramer, Joanna Walker

This panel consists of veterinarians who have completed their specialty training in laboratory animal medicine in the last 10 years. The panelists represent diverse areas, including academia, industry, and government, and serve in a variety of roles, including clinical medicine, teaching, research, and regulation. The

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, MEDICINE, AND METHODOLOGY

Facilitator: TBN Panelist: Gary L Borkowski, David W Brammer, Pete Hmelyar, Matt Moose In this age of the IoT (Internet of Things) technologies, there is both insight for facilities that was previously not available, and at the same time opportunities for deep energy savings. This presentation will explore the technologies that enable the proactive management of a healthy vivarium environment, while also reducing energy use by up to 50% through demand control ventilation (DCV). Findings from a study conducted at the University of Houston will compare the use of DCV to constant flow in nonhuman primate and rodent rooms and review the resulting benefits of cost savings and a measurably better environment for both human and animal occupants. A representative from AAALAC International will address AAALAC’s expectations regarding air exchange rates. The objectives of this panel are to learn about findings in a comparative study of a static air change rate to DCV in animal holding rooms, to gain a better understanding of the AAALAC standard relating to air change rates in the vivarium, and to understand a platform that helps proactively manage a healthy vivarium environment.

Creative Animal Resource Education

Leading the path to AALAS certification! Training Offerings Include

ALAT, LAT, LATG, CMAR Exam Prep Courses

Online, interactive courses run year round. Proven success, high pass rate, convenient learning! Register @ http://soldelmarinc.com/training Inquire: getcertified@soldelmarinc.com

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MEETING NEWS & EVENTS AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

REGISTRATION

MEETING DETAILS

Attendees who submit the registration form and payment for the 2018 National Meeting before August 1 will receive a $100 discount off the advance registration fee. Attendees, who submit the registration form and payment between August 2 and September 25, save $100 off the onsite registration fee. Another advantage to registering early is the time you’ll save once you get to Baltimore. You will receive your badge and registration materials by simply showing your photo identification at the registration counter.

Attending your first National Meeting can be an overwhelming experience. Join us for the National Meeting orientation session on Sunday, October 28 from 2–3 p.m. This session is for first timers, new members, international members, and anyone else who wants to get the most from the National Meeting. You’ll receive tips on how to plan your week as well as information on AALAS programs and opportunities.

REGISTER EARLY AND SAVE

Completing an early workshop application is also recommended—these sessions fill up fast. The registration form and the workshop application are included in this program, or you can register online at www.aalas.org/national-meeting.

YOUR NAME BADGE AND MEETING CARD

Name badges are issued to all registered attendees to access education sessions, access the exhibit hall, and to record your contact information at vendor booths. You will be issued a card if you have registered for a workshop. Each card will be encoded with your contact information, but each card serves a different function. Please keep track of both cards. Your badge holder, which is issued with your card(s) at the registration booth, is a great way to store and display your cards.

LOST BADGE FEE

There is a $50.00 fee to replace a lost, misplaced, or forgotten badge.

FIRST NATIONAL MEETING? START HERE!

AVOID HOTEL PENALTIES

Before you reserve your hotel room, be sure to finalize your travel plans! Fees may apply if you cancel your reservation or check out early.

AIRLINE WEBSITES

Air Canada: www.aircanada.com Alaska Airlines: www.alaskaair.com Allegiant Air: www.allegiantair.com American: www.aa.com British Airways: www.britishairways.com Condor: www.condor.com Delta: www.delta.com JetBlue Airways: www.jetblue.com Southwest: www.southwest.com United: www.united.com Virgin America: www.virginamerica.com

BEST VALUE PACKAGE

Select the AALAS Best Value Package and receive your registration to the AALAS National Meeting plus access to up to 100 hours of recorded educational sessions (as released for inclusion). Bonus: When you use the recorded sessions to teach a seminar, both the presenter and attendees receive continuing education units for use in maintaining your technician certification registry status or CMAR certification.

INTERNATIONAL ATTENDEES

VISA APPLICATIONS AND INVITATION LETTERS

International registrants who plan to attend the AALAS National Meeting are urged to research visa application requirements for their country and to apply early. AALAS cannot assist with visa applications or with the embassies, but will gladly provide invitation letters to attend the meeting. To request an invitation letter, send an email to kathy.douglass@aalas.org; include in the request the applicant’s full name and

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complete mailing address. Submit your request by August 15 to allow for timely visa application, facilitate advance registration for the meeting at the lower rate, and increase chances of booking a hotel in the AALAS block. Invitation letters will be mailed via regular U.S. post; if expedited delivery is desired, you must prepay for this service.

DON’T MISS THE NATIONAL MEETING ORIENTATION

International attendees are invited to join us for the National Meeting orientation on Sunday, October 28, from 2–3 p.m. See the Final Program for location.

INTERNATIONAL LUNCHEON

The AAALAC/AALAS/ICLAS International Luncheon will be held Wednesday, October 31, from 12:00 p.m. to 2 p.m. This luncheon is open to all international meeting attendees; an email invitation will be sent to all internationals registered for the National Meeting. The luncheon location will be listed in the invitation email and in the Final Program. RSVP is required.


MEETING NEWS & EVENTS AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

TECH EVENTS

BEGIN YOUR TECH WEEK PLANNING

The 20th Annual International Laboratory Animal Technician Week will be held January 27–February 2, 2019. Don’t miss out on the opportunity while at the AALAS National Meeting to pick up and order special items of recognition for the technicians at your facility. Complimentary Tech Week materials will be displayed at both the Technician Fun Fair booth sponsored by the Committee on Technician Awareness and Development (CTAD) and the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS) booth. All Tech Week items are also available at the AALAS Bookstore. For those facilities wanting to do a little something extra for their technicians, additional International Laboratory Animal Technician Week gifts will be available for purchase in the AALAS Bookstore. Let your technicians know you appreciate them. Be sure to visit these booths during the meeting! The Charles C Hunter Lecture will take place on Monday, October 29 from 11:00 a.m to 12:00 p.m. The topic is “Lions, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!” presented by Dr. Cindy P Driscoll. Dr. Driscoll is the state Fish & Wildlife Veterinarian/Director for the Fish & Wildlife Health Program with the Maryland Department of Nature Resources.

2018 TECHNICIAN FUN FAIR Who: All technicians!

When: Starting Sunday, October 28 at 1:00 p.m., CTAD will pass out exam packets. The Fun Fair will be held Monday from 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m. and Tuesday from 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Exams must be turned in by 11 a.m. on Wednesday to be eligible for prizes. Scores will be posted at the Technician Fun Fair booth on Wednesday, October 18. Prizes will be awarded and photos will be taken around 2:00 p.m. Where: Register at the Technician Fun Fair booth. Why: To learn more about AALAS and your field, meet other technicians and make new friends, check out exhibitors’ new products and services, win cool prizes, become active in your organization, and earn CEUs! For more details, visit www.aalas.org/national-meeting or email Nancy Dorcy at nancy.dorcy@aalas.org.

CTAD & VETERINARY TECHNICIANS

The Committee on Technician Awareness and Development (CTAD) supports veterinary technicians! In honor of National Veterinary Technician Week, CTAD will be offering information to National Meeting attendees. Stop by the Technician Fun Fair booth to learn more about: • • • • •

Role of the Veterinary Technician National Meeting Events Networking within the Field Opportunities in Lab Animal Science Outreach in the Vet Tech Community

TECHNICIAN LUNCH & LEARN

Are you a technician and attending the National Meeting in Baltimore? If so, here is a great opportunity for you. Hosted by CTAD and sponsored by PMI LabDiet, the Lunch and Learn is on Monday, October 29, at 12:30–2:00 p.m. This is an excellent way to enjoy a complimentary lunch and hear educational talks on lab animal science. This year, the Baltimore Mobile Zoo will provide a presentation. Seats are limited so preregister soon, but reservation can only be taken after you have registered for the National Meeting. Reserve your spot today by registering online at https://www.aalas.org/national-meeting/meeting-features/special-events or by contacting Nancy Dorcy at nancy.dorcy@aalas.org.

BRANCH & DISTRICT EVENTS BRANCH CHALLENGE WINNER TO BE HONORED

Be sure your branch is represented at the Opening General Session on Sunday, October 28, from 5–6:30 p.m. when the winner of the 2018 AALAS Branch Challenge will be announced. The branch with the highest overall percentage growth of AALAS national members from the previous year will be the 2018 AALAS Branch Challenge winner. This branch will be awarded a banner bearing the branch’s name. The branch’s name will also be engraved on a handsome perpetual plaque that will be displayed at the national office. Full award criteria are listed at www.aalas.org/get-involved/ branches. Contact Mary Katherine Billings for more information at (901) 754-8620 or by email at mary.billings@aalas.org.

NOMINATE A FUTURE LEADER FOR THE LEADERSHIP ACADEMY

Would someone in your branch make a great leader in AALAS? If so, nominate him or her for the 19th annual Leadership Academy, to be held Sunday, October 28. This training seminar prepares attendees for leadership positions at the branch and national levels. It is open to one representative from each branch at no cost to the individuals. Attendees will get tips on how to function as a board or committee member and guidance in dealing with the media and public relations. Candidates should contact their branch president to be nominated. Each branch may nominate one primary and one alternate candidate; alternates fill vacancies created by branches that do not send nominations. Nominations must be received by August 15, 2018. For more information, please contact John Farrar at John.farrar@aalas.org or (901) 754-8620.

CAREER CENTER

Post resumes and job openings on the Career Center bulletin board. Looking for a job? Post your resume and check back for notes from potential employers. Looking for new employees? Post your openings, and browse resumes to find the perfect candidate. If you cannot attend the National Meeting, we’ll post your job opening ad for you. Please send your poster to Amy Sauls, AALAS, 9190 Crestwyn Hills Dr, Memphis, TN 381258538. The poster should be no larger than 11 × 17 inches and must be received no later than October 1, 2018.

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MOBILE APP

Partnering with one of the leading conference app providers, Crowd Compass, our mobile app provides users with the following features, plus many more. • • • • • • • • •

General meeting information Schedule by day, tracks, session type, and speaker Posters and platforms Exhibitor listings by name and category Interactive maps Social media access QR scanner Speaker listings Interactive attendee list

Mobile app users can review the National Meeting schedule, bookmark events to attend, set reminders, and create a personalized meeting schedule. Users will have the option to log in and access even more features, or to use the app from a non-logged in status. Stay tuned for directions on how to download the app for your device.

AALAS FOUNDATION

AALAS FOUNDATION “SET SAIL WITH LAS” CONTEST

Be part of an exciting and creatively challenging contest to benefit the AALAS Foundation! The AALAS Foundation is challenging individuals to enter its “Set Sail with LAS” contest where entrants will creatively paint/decorate a 8.5” wooden sailboat. To enter the contest a $20 contest entry fee and a 2018 “AALAS Foundation Cup – Set Sail with Lab Animal Science” contest entry form must be completed and received by the AALAS Foundation no later than September 7, 2018. Entry fees and registration may be made online via the official online registration form (https://tinyurl.com/ AF-BOAT), or, by check, money order, or credit card. Mailed registration forms and entry fees should be addressed to: AALAS Foundation ATTN: Set Sail with Lab Animal Science 9190 Crestwyn Hills Drive Memphis, TN 383125 Each decorated boat entered into the contest will be assigned a unique registration number by the AALAS Foundation. All entries must be assigned into one of the following contest categories: Individual Category, Corporate Category, Branch Category or Institution/Organization Category. Note: AALAS Foundation reserves the right to make final category selections for all entries. All who register for the contest and pay the $20 contest registration fee will be provided a unique contest registration number, a link to order the official “Set Sail with Lab Animal Science” wooden 8 1/2” boat for painting/decorating, along with specific guidelines for the contest. Complete contest guidelines are available at https://tinyurl.com/AF-BOAT.

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PUBLIC OUTREACH: AREA PROGRAM LOOKING FOR VOLUNTEERS

The AALAS Foundation is seeking volunteers to assist with this year’s Animal Research and Education Awareness (AREA) Program, sponsored by Pfizer, to be held at the 2018 AALAS National Meeting in Baltimore. The AREA Program will take place on Tuesday, October 30, from 9:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The Foundation needs tour guides to work from 8:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. Tour guides lead small groups of students on a tour of the National Meeting exhibit hall during the scavenger hunt portion of the program. The tour guides also participate in small group discussions about career opportunities and the care and use of animals in research. To register as a tour guide, please visit http://tinyurl. com/2018-AREA-Program. If you would like to participate in this important outreach program contact the AALAS Foundation at foundation@aalas.org or call (901) 754-8620.

AALAS FOUNDATION APPRECIATION RECEPTION & LIVE AUCTION

Join the AALAS Foundation for an evening of fun as we celebrate the donors and volunteers who generously support the Foundation. The Appreciation Reception & Live Auction, sponsored by Charles River, will be held on Wednesday, October 31, from 6:30 pm–8:30 pm in the Baltimore Convention Center, Room 337. All AALAS National Meeting attendees are invited to attend. AALAS 2018 National Meeting badges are required for entry into the Reception area.

AALAS FOUNDATION SILENT AUCTION: AUCTION DONATIONS NEEDED The AALAS Foundation is holding its annual silent and live auction at the AALAS National Meeting in Baltimore. Proceeds from this fun-filled event support the Foundation’s efforts to educate the public about the essential role of animals in research. You can help these outreach efforts by contributing an auction item to this year’s event. To donate to the AALAS Foundation Silent and Live Auction, complete the online pledge form, located at http://tinyurl.com/AF-2018Auction, or email your donation pledge to foundation@aalas. org. Auction item donations must be received by the AALAS Foundation office no later than October 1, 2018. Alternatively, auction donations may be dropped off at the Foundation booth in Baltimore. Donors contributing silent auction item donations by August 17, 2018 will be acknowledged in the 2018 National Meeting Final Program.

Donation items should be mailed to:

Attn: AALAS Foundation Silent Auction AALAS Foundation 9190 Crestwyn Hills Drive Memphis, TN 38125

Schedule of Events

SILENT AUCTION SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28 MONDAY, OCTOBER 29 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31

9 AM – 5 PM 8 AM – 5 PM 8 AM – 5 PM 8 AM – 1:00 PM


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MEETING NEWS & EVENTS AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

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DISTRICT MEETINGS

Learn about recent actions taken by the AALAS Board of Trustees and provide feedback to AALAS national leadership by attending your district membership meeting, conducted by your district trustees. They will lead discussion on recent board decisions, issues, policies, and procedures. Check the list to see which district you’re in and who your trustees are; for example, individuals living in Maryland belong to District 3. District membership meetings will be held Monday, October 29, from 5:15–6:15 p.m.; room assignments will be listed in the Final Program. International members of AALAS will have a designated meeting room as well and will meet at the same time as the districts.

District 1

District 2

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Branches

Metro New York New England Northern Mountain Southern New England Upstate New York

Branches

Delaware Valley New Jersey Three Rivers

States

Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire New York

States

Delaware New Jersey Pennsylvania West Virginia

Rhode Island Vermont

Trustee

Robert Quinn

Trustee

Pamela Straeter


MEETING NEWS & EVENTS AALAS 69 th NAT IONAL MEET ING

District 3

Branches

States

Trustee

District 4

Branches

Research Triangle Park Southeastern

Greater Virginia National Capital Area

Maryland Virginia Washington, DC

Larry Shelton Jr.

Appalachian Caribbean-Puerto Rico Florida Mid-South

States

Georgia Mississippi North Carolina South Carolina Tennessee

District 5

Branches

States

Trustee

District 6

Branches

States

Wisconsin Wyoming

District 7

District 8

Central Ohio Indiana Kentucky Michigan Southern Ohio

Central Illinois Chicago Iowa Minnesota Nebraska Wisconsin

Branches

Arkansas Kansas City Louisiana Mid-Missouri

Branches

Arizona Hawaii Northern California Northern Rocky Mountain Oregon Sacramento Valley

At Large Trustees:

Alabama Florida

Indiana Kentucky Michigan Ohio

Illinois Iowa Minnesota Nebraska North Dakota South Dakota

Mile High Oklahoma Texas

States

Arkansas

San Diego Southern California Mountain West Washington

States

Alaska Arizona

US Commonwealth of Puerto Rico

Trustee

Mark Sharpless

Stacy Cantrell

Trustee

Marilyn Watson

Colorado Kansas Louisiana Missouri New Mexico

California Hawaii Idaho Montana Nevada Oregon Utah Washington

Oklahoma Texas

Trustees

Lindsay Holmes

Trustee

Amber Carte

Laura Mistretta, Lisa Secrest, Sonja Chou, James Macy

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HOTEL INFO & FORMS AT WWW.AALAS.ORG/REGISTRATION.

baltimore.org twitter.com/baltimoremd facebook.com/bmoremd 1-877-baltimore

Hilton Baltimore Headquarters 401 W Pratt Street $220 Single/Double Days Inn by Wyndham Inner Harbor 100 Hopkins Plaza $165 Single/Double

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Holiday Inn Inner Harbor 301 W Lombard Street $219 Single/Double

Royal Sonesta Harbor Court 550 Light Street $199 Single/Double

Marriott Inner Harbor 110 S Eutawa Street $219 Single/Double

Sheraton Inner Harbor 300 S Charles Street $215 Single/Double

Renaissance Harborplace 202 E Pratt Street $219 Single/Double


National Meeting Registration Form 69th AALAS National Meeting • October 28–November 1, 2018 • Baltimore, MD Type or print clearly. You may duplicate this form. Fax copies are acceptable if using credit card for payment.

Registration Fees Bringing a guest? Complete the Guest Registration section below.

BEST VALUE!

 AALAS/ICLAS/CALAS member  Nonmember

Full meeting registration plus session recordings

Full Meeting Registration  AALAS/ICLAS/CALAS member Sunday through Thursday  Nonmember

Pre

Advance

until Aug 1

Aug 2–Oct 8

$429 $550

$529 $650

$330 $420

$430 $520

Onsite

Advance Registration Deadline: October 8.

Onsite registration only after Oct 8. Forms received at the AALAS office after this date will be processed onsite.

$629 $750

Nonmembers: Join AALAS and save!

Submit your AALAS membership application (aalas.org/association/ membership.aspx) and dues along with this registration form to receive the AALAS member registration rate.

$530 $620

One-Day Registration

The American Association for Laboratory Animal Science (“AALAS”) does not discriminate against individuals or groups regarding AALAS membership and/or AALAS event attendance. However, AALAS reserves the right to deny registration to individuals for any reason, including, but not limited to an individual’s or group’s previous history of affiliation with organizations that make or have made a practice of opposing the beliefs, mission, and/or affiliation(s) of AALAS and/or has a prior history of negative interaction with AALAS.

Prices per day

    Sun & Mon         Tues     Wed     Thur Meeting Extras

Must be registered to purchase. Guest registration is not for coworkers.

 AALAS/ICLAS/CALAS member  Nonmember

$195 $285

Buy session recordings (max 100 hrs)  AALAS/ICLAS/CALAS member $169  Nonmember $199  Guest registration

$75

$295 $385

$395 $485

$169 $199

$219 $249

$90

$125

Guest name:____________________________________________________ First Last

Name Badge Info Pick up your badge* at the Advance Registration counter in the Baltimore Convention Center. (Photo ID required.)

First name

MI

Last name

Nickname (optional)

Job title

Company/institution

City

State

*Lost Badge Fee: There is a $50 fee to replace a lost badge. Membership

Proof of membership is required. Individuals from outside the US who belong to one of the ICLAS member associations and/or CALAS are also eligible for the AALAS member registration rate; see nationalmeeting.aalas.org for list.

One-day Registration

Workshop registration and Best Value packages not available with one-day registration.

Special Needs

If you have special needs or requirements, please notify AALAS in writing no later than October 8.

Save time—register online! https://www.aalas.org/registration

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Contact Information

Please include a valid email address. Confirmation of registration will be emailed.

Registrant name                                                      AALAS certification 

                 DVM

Company

Department

  PhD

  Other (enter on line above)

Mailing address

City

State

Zip

Country

Email (required to send confirmation)

Phone

AALAS member number

    New AALAS Member

 First-time National Meeting Attendee

 Please remove my name and contact information from lists sent to vendors after the meeting.  If you reside in a European Union country, please check the box to receive occasional product and promotional offers for AALAS affinity programs and/or from AALAS commercial members and exhibitors. You can opt out at any time.

Method of Payment Make checks payable to AALAS. Full payment (in USD, drawn on a US bank) must accompany registration. No purchase orders or delayed/back-dated checks. There will be a $25 charge to change method of payment. For your protection, credit card information sent to

AALAS via email is deleted immediately. Please submit your credit card information via a secure means such as fax (901-753-0046), website (www.aalas.org) or mail (AALAS, 9190 Crestwyn Hills Dr., Memphis, TN 38125).

Total enclosed: $ ______________   MasterCard   American Express

  VISA   Discover   Check #_______________

Month

Expiration Date

Account Number—please include all digits

Name on card

Year

Signature

Billing address

City

Country

State

Zip

Cardholder phone

Cancellations

Cancellation requests must be received in the AALAS national office in writing at least 30 days before the opening session of the meeting. Administrative fees will be retained on meeting, workshop, and session recording fees: $50 for meeting registration, $25 for each workshop, and $25 for session recordings. Please allow 30 days for processing.

Transferring Registrations Registrations are not transferrable.

Session Recording Policy

Cameras and recording devices are not permitted in the Exhibit Hall or education rooms.

Return this form to:

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AALAS, 9190 Crestwyn Hills Dr., Memphis, TN 38125-8538. Fax (901) 753-0046 (credit card payments only).


Workshop Availability and Pricing 69th AALAS National Meeting • October 28–November 1, 2018 • Baltimore, MD

Anesthetic Monitoring 101 - Back to Basics . . . . . . $140 W-01 Monday, October 29, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Limit: 25

Would You Like to Improve Your Suturing and Rodent Surgery Aseptic Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $140 W-09 Monday, October 29, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Limit: 30

CMAR - Animal Resource Exam Prep Class . . . . . . . . $140 W-02 Monday, October 29, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. (8-hour workshop continued Tuesday 8 a.m.) Limit: 50

Microsurgery Skills Training Using Surgical Loupes-A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $250 W-03A Monday, October 29, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Limit: 20

Technician to Supervisor: Management 101: The Ups and Downs of Managing People . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $140 W-04 Monday, October 29, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Limit: 50

Essentials of IACUC Administration (EIA) . . . . . . . . . $250 W-05 Monday, October 29, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (8-hour workshop cont. Tuesday 8 a.m.) Limit: 50

Leading the Self and Others with Emotional Intelligence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $140 W-10 Tuesday, October 30, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Limit: 50

Introduction to GI Endoscopy in Laboratory Animals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $140 W-11 Wednesday, October 31, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Limit: 20

LAS Pro Article Writing Boot Camp . . . . . . . . . . . . . FREE W-12 Wednesday, October 31, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Limit: 50

Successful Operation of a Gnotobiotic Facility . . . . $140 W-13 Wednesday, October 31, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Limit: 50

W-06 Monday, October 29, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Limit: 25

Understanding the Roles of Animal Care and Facility Design Staffs in Planning a Research Animal Facility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $140

Managing the Gap: Working and Leading in MultiGenerational Teams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $140

Animal Facility, Design, Processes, Decisions, and Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $140

How to Deal with Anesthetic Complications

. . . . . $140

W-07 Monday, October 29, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Limit: 50

Microsurgery Skills Training Using Surgical Loupes-B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $250 W-03B Monday, October 29, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Limit: 20

Teaching Monkeys to Cooperate with Restraint: Using Positive Reinforcement Training and Temperament Testing Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $250

W-14 Wednesday, October 31, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Limit: 50

W-15 Wednesday, October 31, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Limit: 50

IACUC Protocol Review Challenges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $140 W-16 Wednesday, October 31, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Limit: 50

Vivarium Ergonomics: Working Safer and Smarter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $140 W-17 Wednesday, October 31, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Limit: 50

W-08 Monday, October 29, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (8-hour workshop continued Tuesday 8 a.m.) Limit: 50

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Workshop Registration Form 69th AALAS National Meeting • October 28–November 1, 2018 • Baltimore, MD

Contact Information Name

Company

Mailing address City

State

Zip

Country

Email (required to send confirmation) Phone     I have registered for the meeting. (You must be fully registered to attend workshops.)

Workshops

Indicate which workshops you plan to attend. See previous page for titles.

    W-01: $140

    W-04: $140

    W-08: $250

    W-12: FREE

    W-16: $140

    W-02: $140

    W-05: $250

    W-09: $140

    W-13: $140

    W-17: $140

    W-03A: $250

    W-06: $140

    W-10: $140

    W-14: $140

    W-03B: $250

    W-07: $140

    W-11: $140

    W-15: $140

Method of Payment Make checks payable to AALAS. Full payment (in USD, drawn on a US bank) must accompany registration. No purchase orders or delayed/back-dated checks. There will be a $25 charge to change method of payment. For your protection, credit card information sent to AALAS via email is deleted immediately. Please submit your credit card information via a secure means such as fax (901-7530046), website (www.aalas.org) or mail (AALAS, 9190 Crestwyn Hills Dr., Memphis, TN 38125).

Total enclosed: $ ______________   MasterCard   American Express

  VISA   Discover   Check #_______________

Name on card

Month

Year

Expiration Date

Account Number—please include all digits

Signature

Billing address City Country

Workshop Registration

Workshops are open to preregistered registrants only. AALAS national members preregistered as commercial exhibitors may also apply for workshops. Workshop registrations cannot be processed by telephone. After October 8, workshop registration will be allowed on-site ONLY.

Workshop Schedule

Seating is limited; register early! Workshops offered in multiple sections include an A or B in the workshop number; if you choose a workshop section that is unavailable, you will be given the opportunity to sign up for the alternate section.

Cancellations

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Cancellation requests must be received in the AALAS national office in writing at least 30 days before the opening session of the meeting. Processing fees will be retained on meeting and workshop registration fees: $50 for meeting registration and $25 for each workshop. Please allow 30 days for processing.

State

Zip

Cardholder phone

Transferring Registrations Registrations are not transferrable.

Session Recording Policy

Cameras and recording devices are not permitted in the Exhibit Hall or session rooms.

Return this form to:

AALAS, 9190 Crestwyn Hills Dr., Memphis, TN 38125-8538. Fax (901) 753-0046 (credit card payments only).


Win a fr registratio ee n to 2019 mee the ting!

Facilitator Sign-up Form 69th AALAS National Meeting • October 28–November 1, 2018• Baltimore, MD. Facilitators are needed to assist in most seminars, special topic lectures, panel discussions, platform sessions, and workshops. Responsibilities will vary with each session, but may include passing out handouts, working with the moderator to ensure that the speaker can be heard at the back of the room, and helping attendees find seats after the session has started. (Facilitators do not introduce speakers.) Individual area instructions are sent once assignments have been made. Registration to the AALAS National Meeting is not waived for those who volunteer to serve as facilitators; however, your name does go into a drawing for a free registration to next year’s meeting or for one of two $50 gift certificates to the AALAS Bookstore. In addition, workshop facilitators will be given a certificate of attendance for the workshop.

2018 facilit ator entered in s are automatically to free 2019 a drawing for a N registration. ational Meeting facilitators Two other lucky will certificate win a $50 gift to the A Bookstore. ALAS

Sessions are assigned on a first-come, first-serve basis. Please review the sessions and sign up for your desired session early. You will be notified of your assignment. The deadline to volunteer as a facilitator to be included in the Final Program is August 1, 2018. Name: __________________________________________________________ Degree(s): _____________________________ Title: ___________________________________ Company: ____________________________________________________ Address: ______________________________________________________________________________________________ City ____________________________________ State ____ Zip __________ Country _______________________________ Phone: ( _______) _____________________ Fax: ( ______ ) ______________ Email: ________________________________ Session Times: Please note that Seminars, Workshops, and Platforms are offered in both the morning and afternoon. Seminars 8:00 -10: 15 a.m. / 2:45-5:00 p.m.

Special Topic Lectures 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Workshops 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. / 1-5:00 p.m.

Platforms 8:00-10:45 a.m. / 2:15-5:00 p.m.

Panel Discussions 12:30-2:00 p.m.

Please list sessions/areas that you would like to facilitate in order of availability. Write “any” if you have no preference. 1_____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 2_____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 3_____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 4_____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 5_____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Areas of expertise or specialty training: ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Times available to facilitate: _______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Times unavailable to facilitate: _____________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Will facilitate more than one session?

  Yes

  No

Prior facilitator experience?

  Yes

  No

Send to: Temeri Wilder-Kofie Phone: (240) 651-6810 Email: wilderkofietd@mail.nih.gov

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69th AALAS National Meeting Preliminary Program

THIS AALAS, Get Ready for More Innovation!

Booth #1552

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October 2–6, 2011

To schedule a demo on-site call 1.877.669.2243

aalas welcome breakfast - sunday, october 28 - 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM - take a sneak peek at what’s new!


69th AALAS National Meeting Preliminary Program

69th AALAS NATIONAL MEETING | OCTOBER 28–NOVEMBER 1, 2018

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

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October 2–6, 2011

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2018 AALAS National Meeting Preliminary Program  

2018 AALAS National Meeting Preliminary Program