LAS Pro September-October 2021

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September/October 2021

Ready, Set, Reconnect

AALAS National Meeting attendees gather onsite and online to learn, explore, and network. Meet New AALAS Trustees and VP-Elect, Bob Quinn AALAS Focuses on D&I Efforts Managing PI Departures Pig Enrichment Mirrors and Group Housing Ideas for Swine



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September/October 2021 Vol. 9 Issue 5

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE...

10

Up to Speed with KC

12

Pro Tip

14

Meet Bob Quinn

16

Building on a D&I Tradition

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Go Inside the Meeting

36

AALAS Serves

AALAS National Meeting attendees will experience a warm KC welcome in this Midwestern city devoted to barbecue, jazz, and fountains!

Learn from the best when the 2021 Technical Trade Presentations are presented onsite and online for meeting attendees.

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Bob Quinn takes on the Vice President-Elect role at the conclusion of the Kansas City meeting.

AALAS leadership takes steps to build on the association's diversity and inclusion efforts.

Get a glimpse of the 2021 education sessions with these selected sneak peeks from assorted meeting presenters.

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Inspirational messages line a hallway and make a difference, one sign at a time.

September/October 2021

Ready, Set, Reconnect

AALAS National Meeting attendees gather onsite and online to learn, explore, and network. Meet New AALAS Trustees and VP-elect, Bob Quinn Managing PI Departures Pig Enrichment Mirrors and Group Housing Ideas for Swine

2 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

On the cover: Kendrick Jenkins, AS, is an Associate Director of Laboratory Animal Resources in Comparative Medicine at Takeda Pharmaceuticals. Photo provided courtesy of Sharron Kirchain, DVM, DACLAM, Senior Director of Comparative Medicine at Takeda Pharmaceuticals in Cambridge, MA.



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56

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DEPARTMENTS 5 Publisher’s Note

56 Tech Tips

6 People & Places

61 Across the Pond

No place like home

New hires, promotions, awards, memorials

8 PROfiles

Meet Emily Watson

Insights on techniques and tactics

62 AALAS Connection Learn more with AALAS

65 AALAS Foundation News

38 Inside the IACUC Exit strategies for PIs

67 Ad Index

48 Career & Training

68 Pet Talk

New takes on training

50 DIY

Foraging saucer

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PUBLISHER’S NOTE Staff Publisher Ann Turner Associate Publisher Chris Lyons

No Place Like Home

Managing Editor John Farrar Associate Editor Liz Rozanski Ad Sales John Farrar

I have always liked red shoes. When we booked the National Meeting for Kansas City, I focused on the Kansas part of our host city’s name and envisioned a certain pair of ruby red slippers. With the events of the past 18 months, I feel like we are traveling in a very strange land on a yellow brick road. And, like Dorothy and Toto, I am eager to go home. Except home does not look like a Kansas farmhouse. For me home is a face-to-face meeting with all of you! The Wizard of Oz story and its themes illustrate so much of this experience for me. AALAS members have shown great heart, not unlike the Tin Man, as they have persevered through unprecedented challenges. From last year’s virtual meeting to this year’s hybrid meeting, our leaders, volunteers, and staff have the energy and focus to deliver great meeting experiences. Of course, even the Scarecrow would admire the brain power on display for this event. From the informative program our National Meeting committees have created to the amazing presenters sharing their knowledge, the meeting we have planned will inspire and educate. And who could forget the Cowardly Lion. His courage in the face of obstacles parallels what all of you have achieved and overcome since we last gathered in 2019. You worked on the front lines of research to deliver COVID19 vaccines while educating the world about the value of animal and human partnership seen in biomedical research. We are Courageous Lions! I’m excited. I miss seeing you! Know that whether you can attend onsite or through the virtual platform, we appreciate your heart, brains, and courage. I wish I had Glenda’s magic wand to transport all of you to Kansas City in October. AALAS is our home and not even the Wicked Witch and her flying monkeys can change that! Follow that yellow brick road and I will see you in Kansas (City) soon!

Design/Production Zara Garza

Editorial Advisory Board Leslie Birke Louisiana State Univ Andrew Burich Benaroya Research Institute Bob Dauchy Tulane Univ School of Medicine David DeOrnellis Champions Oncology Penny Devlin Pennsylvania State Univ College of Med Sonia Doss Duke Univ Medical Center Kelly Ethun Emory University Glenn Jackson Cornell University Richard Marble Alpha Genesis Inc Elizabeth Nunamaker Univ of Florida Sara Oglesby Abbvie Karuna Patil Seattle Children's Research Institute Amy Pierce Tulane Univ School of Medicine Stacy Pritt UT Southwestern Medical Center Robin Tucker Georgetown Univ

Mission Statement Laboratory Animal Science Professional (LAS Pro) is the official magazine for American Association for Laboratory Animal Science members. LAS Pro provides a wide range of useful resources and knowledge to the association’s 14,000 laboratory animal science professionals who are involved in advancing responsible laboratory animal care and use to benefit people and animals. All signed articles, including, committee reports, news, and commentary, reflect the individual views of the authors and are not official views of AALAS. Authorization to photocopy portions for personal or internal use is granted by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science. Photocopying for purposes of resale or outside distribution is prohibited unless written approval is obtained from the AALAS Director of Communications. Copyright 2021 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science.

Ann Turner

Publisher Executive Director American Association for Laboratory Animal Science

Laboratory Animal Science Professional (USPS 010-730) is published bimonthly by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, 9190 Crestwyn Hills Drive, Memphis, TN 38125. Periodicals Postage paid at Memphis, TN 38101 and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to AALAS, 9190 Crestwyn Hills Drive, Memphis, TN 38125-8538.

American Association for Laboratory Animal Science 9190 Crestwyn Hills Drive Memphis, TN 38125-8538 Phone: 901-754-8620 Fax: 901-753-0046 E-mail: info@aalas.org Web: www.aalas.org

September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 5


PEOPLE & PLACES

New hires, promotions, meeting updates, and memorials.

!Summer Olympics UT Southwestern Style

UT Southwestern celebrated the Summer Olympics by holding their own Olympic Games. Each area created a flag to represent them and played a variety of minute-to-win-it games. Just like in the Olympics, each game has gold, silver, and bronze medalists. At the end of the week, the area with the most metals was announced and won a breakfast. Employees could also earn raffle entries by playing online games, such as: Guess Who? (a baby picture guessing game), Name that Tune, and What is That?! (a picture matching game). Everyone really enjoyed playing the games and having some summer fun. UT Southwestern staff members were all in on the paper airplane race. Ready, set, soar!

Folding the perfect paper airplane for an Olympic event.

!Mispro Expansion in Cambridge

Mispro, with locations in all major U.S. biotech hubs, including a facility in Kendall Square, has announced the addition of a second facility in Cambridge, set to open in Alewife this fall. Mispro’s Alewife facility will be located in the CambridgePark Drive life sciences park and will offer shared, semi-private, and private options for research space, as well as a low-barrier-to-entry pricing structure that was designed to enable the area’s influx of early-stage companies to launch their in vivo program in a world-class research facility and with minimal budget.

!AALAS Cosigns Research Animal Transportation Letter

AALAS joined 90 other organizations in signing a letter commending the recent decision to appoint a chief science officer to the US Department of Transportation. Dr. Robert C Hampshire, PhD is the appointee. With this recent appointment, the letter also encouraged review of the 2018 docket complaint (Docket No. DOT-OST-2018-0124, NABR v. United Airlines et al) regarding refusal of certain airlines to transport animals for research purposes. The letter notes that this unresolved complaint continues to jeopardize essential biomedical research by inhibiting access to the appropriate animal models necessary for addressing the nation’s pressing scientific and public health questions. Also, the point is made that with the current administration’s efforts to elevate science in the policy-making process, the signers encourage the Department of Transportation to review the complaint and ensure that airline policies do not arbitrarily exclude transport of animals required for life-saving biomedical research, including drug testing required by law. The letter also points out that nearly every major medical advancement has involved animal research, including most recently, virulence factor characterization of SARS-CoV-2 and the subsequent development of COVID-19 vaccines.

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!AALAS Staff Enjoys Shelby Farms Park

AALAS staff spent an afternoon at Shelby Farms Park. Staff played games, strolled around the lake, and had snacks. Plus, some staff members brought their dogs to play. Shelby Farms is one of 20 largest urban parks and is five times the size of Central Park.

AALAS staff members Amber, Heather, and Zara were joined with their dogs Jericho, Atlas, and Lager at the park. AALAS staff gathered for fun and food at Shelby Farms Park.

IN MEMORIAM

C

aroline Murray, 64, died May 23, 2021. Murray graduated from Newfield High School in Centereach and Farmingdale State University in 1989 with a degree in veterinary science. She earned a veterinary technician’s license in 1991 and a Bachelor of Science degree from Empire State College in 1999. She became Education and Quality Assurance Specialist at Weill Cornell Medical

J

oel Morgan Shepherd II, 83, died July 28, 2021. Joel had a long and successful career as a business entrepreneur. He founded Shepherd Products Company in 1965 as a supplier to the manufactured housing industry. In 1981, Joel acquired the small business that became Shepherd Specialty Papers. Joel’s vast knowledge of base materials and paper filled significant needs within the animal research community. He developed numerous products that served a variety of industry applications culminating in the invention of the transformational bedding material ALPHA-dri®. To this day, these inventions enhance animal care and improve biomedical

College and held other credentials. She was a member of national AALAS and the Metro New York AALAS Branch. She received the branch’s 2020 Lifetime Achievement Award as well as Manager of the Year Award. The AALAS Training and Educator Award has been created in her name to future recipients. Remembrances in Caroline’s name may be made to the AALAS Foundation at www.aalasfoundation.org. research integrity. He has made a mark on the industry that will continue for years to come. Upon his retirement, Joel’s favorite pastime was fly fishing for bonefish, tarpon and permit among the flats of the Florida Keys. His passion for this unique marine environment inspired him to support the creation of The Bonefish & Tarpon Trust conservation organization as a founding member. The family suggests that memorial donations can be made to: The Peter Frampton Inclusion Body Myositis Research Fund John Hopkins Myositis Center Development Office Mason F. Lord Building Center Tower Suite 358 5200 Eastern Avenue Baltimore, MD 21224 http://(https//www.hopkinsmyositis.org/gift/peterframpton-myositis-research-fund/) or the Bonefish & Tarpon Trust, http://(https//www.bonefishtarpontrust.org/donate/

September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 7


5

minutes with...

Emily Weston, MS, RLATG

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PRO-files in LAS Facility/Employer: Division of Comparative Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH)

Job Title: Training and Care Assurance Manager How did you get in this field? While working on my degrees at North Carolina State

University, I worked part-time as a husbandry tech at Embrex, an AAALACi accredited poultry vaccine development company. That job quickly grew into a full-time Research Investigator role upon graduation, right after the company was acquired by Pfizer. When that job relocated out of state, I transitioned to academia and became a Lab and Transgenic Mouse Colony Manager for a neurobiology team at Duke University. When a position opened at UNC-CH to join the IACUC team, I jumped at the opportunity and spent 8 years as the Training and Compliance Manager for the IACUC office.

Who were your mentors? The researchers I worked with at Embrex, brand new to the field,

and then later at Pfizer, as a researcher myself, were my true introduction to the lab animal field. Their passion for the science, effectively combined with a compassionate focus on the care of the animals involved, really inspired me to consider this a career path. When I came to UNC-CH, my career took a new direction into compliance and training, where I have my current colleagues at UNC-CH to thank for their mentorship. The team I work with now took time to teach me the ins and outs of a large academic institution. I grew my understanding of the field, was inspired to become involved in our local AALAS Branch (RTB President 2020-21), and even took on a newly created role in DCM, combining my passion for training both researchers and husbandry staff.

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What are your current interests in animal science? Initially, I tried my hand at the

researcher side of the business, trying to use my science degrees to “do science,” and instead learned that my passion truly lies with the animal models themselves and the people who work with them. I am always interested in learning new techniques that minimize stress and improve efficiency for all those involved. Therefore, I am interested in expanding consistent training across our field for both researchers and support staff so we can all move close to the goal of “good science.”

Getting Personal What companion animals do you have?

My old lady pup, River, who just turned 15 years old, and my new girl, Coqui’, a rescue mutt from a recent trip to Puerto Rico for Project Monkey Island (post-Hurricane Maria relief efforts led by primatologists and lab animal professionals).

Best binge-watching TV series?

Grey’s Anatomy, Ozark, and Outlander.

What is the last book you read?

Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead by Brené Brown.

Where is your favorite vacation spot? Anywhere I can scuba dive or camp near a river.

What is your favorite dessert?

Anything with a lot of buttercream icing, especially birthday cake and cinnamon rolls!

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Where do you see yourself in 5 years? In the 2 years since we merged the IACUC and

DCM Training Programs, we’ve doubled the team, increased research training offerings, and created a husbandry training pool to decrease wait time for new staff. I would like to continue to build on that momentum by building consistency and accountability into training methods, further developing a team of trainers, and creating more electronic material to improve outreach and education amongst staff, researchers, and our community. I’ve also considered leaving it all behind to raise goats on a tropical island where I can scuba dive and walk my pups at sunset on a beach every day, but until then, I want to remain a versatile member of this community and leverage my experiences as a researcher, colony manager, husbandry tech, compliance manager, inspector, and trainer to improve experiences for those in our field.

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What is your favorite part of your job? Even though my recent roles have focused more on management aspects of the field, I still make time to get out of the office and into the lab to teach our hands-on courses to new researchers as frequently as possible. I love watching someone who has never seen a certain kind of animal in person go from apprehension to confidence in a matter of hours. I truly enjoy watching others learn and discover the intricacies of our work, from a new husbandry tech just finding out about our field, or a new manager learning to develop their staff, to a seasoned researcher learning a refined technique.

What advice do you have for others just beginning their animal science career? If you

haven’t figured out your direction yet, that’s okay. Keep working in varied roles, learning as much as you can, until you hear about an interesting aspect of the field that excites you, then seek out growth in that area. Ask questions. There is a multitude of directions you can go with a passion for animal science – and not everyone who wants to work with animals when they grow up becomes a vet. Let yourself discover new areas and give yourself time to find what gets you excited to make a change.

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What is the most rewarding aspect of your career? I love knowing that with a career in

biomedical research, whether in a husbandry or research capacity, a compliance or trainer role – we all have an impact on the scientific discoveries happening all over our world, in real-time. What we do today impacts animals who end up in the news for major discoveries tomorrow! I also have fallen in love with hiring the next generation of technicians and promoting our shining stars from within. Sharing our stories and helping others create theirs makes interviewing a rewarding part of this role.

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FEATURE

Kansas City

Kansas City Delivers Hearty Midwestern Welcome to 72nd AALAS National Meeting Attendees

K

ansas City is home to over 2 million people who enjoy the “new Midwest” vibe in the heart of the United States. Located on Missouri’s western edge, Kansas City is famous for barbecue, jazz, and fountains! Yes, KC lays claim to more fountains than Rome, Italy. From its beginnings as a trading post for settlers heading west to a hopping major metro area, KC is eager to welcome AALAS National Meeting attendees and invites them to learn #HowWeDoKC! Transportation

Hotels

The Kansas City International Airport (KCI) is located about 19 miles from the convention center. A state-of-the-art streetcar is available for free and links the entire downtown corridor. With 16 stops, the streetcar connects the River Market, the Crossroads, and Union Station/ Crown Center.

Headquarters: Loews Hotel 1515 Wyandotte Street Kansas City, MO 64108 $215 Single/Double

Streetcar hours are: • Monday – Thursday: 6:00 a.m. – 12:00 a.m. • Friday: 6:00 a.m. – 2:00 a.m. • Saturday: 7:00 a.m. – 2:00 a.m. • Sunday: 7:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. The KC Streetcar is a two-mile route that loops the downtown area. View the route and learn more at kcstreetcar.org/route.

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Crown Plaza Kansas City Downtown 1301 Wyandotte Street Kansas City, MO 64105 $189 Single/Double Hilton President Kansas City 1329 Baltimore Ave Kansas City, MO 64105 $199 Single/Double Kansas City Marriott Downtown 200 West 12th Street Kansas City, MO 64105 $189 Single/Double


KC Fun Facts Did you know Walt Disney ran his first animation studio in Kansas City? Some say that Mickey was inspired by a mouse Disney saw in his office! After World War 1, future president Harry S. Truman ran a haberdashery in downtown Kansas City. The city boasts of more than 200 fountains located throughout the metro area. Only 48 of the 200 plus registered fountains are publicly owned. An annual Fountain Day celebrates the publicly owned water features. This year’s National Meeting tee shirt features a fountain inspired by these well-known landmarks. In the 1870s, the Kansas City stockyards were second only to Chicago in providing beef to the country. Hence the origin of the Kansas City steak. The stockyards were destroyed in the Great Flood of 1951.

Prohibition was never fully observed in Kansas City, MO. While Kansas enacted statewide prohibition, Missouri didn’t follow suit until the 18th Amendment was passed. The city, however, never enforced or observed the law due to the influence of local city bosses, James and Tom Pendergast. They kept the bars open and the federal prosecutor in their payroll to avoid prosecutions. The National World War I Museum and Memorial (https://www.theworldwar.org/) is located at 2 Memorial Drive in Kansas City. The museum is built in an Egyptian Revival style and holds over 100,000 artifacts. Other national museums in Kansas City are the National Frontier Trails Museum (http://www.ci.independence.mo.us/nftm), the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum (https://nlbm.com/), the American Jazz Museum (https://americanjazzmuseum. org/), and the National Museum of Toys and Miniatures (https://toyandminiaturemuseum.org/). Please visit their websites for hours and ticket costs.

Exploring KC The Power & Light district is hailed as KC’s most dynamic neighborhood. Named after The Kansas City Power and Light building, a 1931 art deco skyscraper and KC landmark, the district has been open since 2008. The district is located between Grand Boulevard on the east and Baltimore Street on the west, Truman Road is the south border, and 13th St on the north. The district encompasses just over 8 blocks and contains various restaurants, entertainment venues, and shopping. Since its opening, over 95 million visitors have experienced the district and have contributed to downtown KC’s revitalization. Take a stroll from the convention center and explore what the Power & Light District has to offer. The district is open 24/7, with most bars and restaurants open until 3 a.m. but do check venue websites for specific hours.

Let’s talk barbecue. As the national office is in Memphis (the true barbecue capital of the world), acknowledging the KC ‘cue is tough to do, but here are a few places to visit in case you want to compare! • Jack Stack Barbecue Freight House: 101 W 22nd St #300, Kansas City, MO 64108 https://www.jackstackbbq. com/freight-house/a/freight-house/ • County Road Ice House: 100 E 14th St #2919, Kansas City, MO 64106 https://www.countyroadicehouse.com/ • Plowboys Barbeque: 1111 Main St, Kansas City, MO 64105 http://www.plowboysbbq.com/ • Gates Bar-B-Q: 1221 Brooklyn Ave, Kansas City, MO 64127 https://gatesbbq.com/

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FEATURE

Kansas City

All Technical Trade Presentations will be livestreamed on the meeting’s hybrid event platform. Additional livestreamed content is also noted with this icon.

Online and Onsite: Showcasing Latest LAS Technologies and Innovations

Technical Trade Presentations’ dual tracks encourage AALAS National Meeting attendees to learn from the best.

T

he Exhibitor Advisory Council will host dual tracks again this year for the Technical Trade Presentation (TTP) portion of the 72nd AALAS National Meeting in Kansas City, MO. The tracks, set to run on Sunday, October 17 will be held from 1:00 p.m.–4:20 p.m. Room locations will be available in the mobile app. All TTPs will be livestreamed on the meeting’s virtual platform. TTPs are informal talks given by representatives of exhibiting companies within the laboratory animal industry. These presentations provide a forum for the exchange of tips and information about new technologies and products in the industry that my help to improve animal welfare, research methods, management, production, and facility efficiencies. The dual track concept was launched in 2017 and due to the success of the event, and the quality of submissions, the AALAS Program Committee embraced the opportunity to offer this robust educational event for a fifth time. 12 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

The TTPs kick off the presentation portion of the meeting. The two tracks of presentations are entitled “Track I – Innovative Solutions in Animal Welfare” and “Track II – Is Your Facility State-of-Art?” Attendees can benefit from the presentations by learning about these new technologies, the companies presenting them, and any other potential supporting literature around these products, technologies, and systems. Additional opportunities to meet and learn from exhibiting companies will begin when the Exhibit Hall opens on Monday, October 18 with the ribbon cutting at 8:30 a.m.

Track I – Innovative Solutions in Animal Welfare – Room 2505A • Feed Safety in the 21st Century: An Overview of Feed Safety Programs Used in Laboratory Animal Feed Production: Laura N Tracey. 1:00 PM–1:20 PM (TTP)


• Solutions to Improve Animal Study Reproducibility: Brad Nemer. 1:20 PM–1:40 PM (TTP) • A Novel System for Continuous, Undisturbed, and Remote Monitoring of Digital Biomarkers - Temperature and Activity - in Group-housed Mice: Jose R Gadea. 1:40 PM–2:00 PM (TTP) • Reducing Stress in Animals and Researchers: Integrating Catheter Access Buttons into an Automated Blood Collection System: Candace A Rohde-Johnson. 2:00 PM– 2:20 PM (TTP) • New Developments in Percutaneous Catheter Access Buttons for Small and Large Animal Research: Merryl Cramer. 2:20 PM–2:40 PM (TTP) • Achieving Greater Repeatability in the Measurement and Analysis of Subcutaneous Tumors by Using a 3D and Thermal Imaging Platform: Andrew Smith. 2:40 PM–3:00 PM (TTP) • Working With Isoflurane Anesthesia: Is It Safe for Me and My Animals?: Eugene Marino. 3:00 PM–3:20 PM (TTP) • The Value of Documenting Your Animal Care and Husbandry Data with an Integrated Management Software: Eric Y Rieux. 3:20 PM–3:40 PM (TTP) • What's in a Cage Card? Maximizing Productivity with Coded Cage Cards: Anne M Gath. 3:40 PM–4:00 PM (TTP) • Cannibalism and Other Challenges in Rodent Breeding Colonies: Tips and Solutions to Improve Performance: Morgane G Stum. 4:00 PM–4:20 PM (TTP)

Track II – Is Your Facility State-of-Art? – Room 2503A • Program Planning for Animal Facility Construction and Renovation: Andrew G Stepp. 1:00 PM–1:20 PM (TTP) • From Isolators to Vivariums: Cutting Edge HHP Decontamination Technology for Various Spaces in Laboratory Animal Facilities: Frances M Grinstead. 1:20 PM–1:40 PM (TTP) • Designing a UV-C Disinfection Pass-through Room: Emily Lorcheim. 1:40 PM–2:00 PM (TTP) • New Generation Dry Heat Sterilizers: Robert C Davis. 2:00 PM–2:20 PM (TTP) • Integrating Your Animal Welfare Program: Lindsay Andrews. 2:20 PM–2:40 PM (TTP) • Why You Need a Real-time Data Solution in 2021: Gennifer Caesar. 3:00 PM–3:20 PM (TTP) • Taking the Guesswork Our of Cleaning and Disinfection: Matthew Buccioni. 3:20 PM–3:40 PM (TTP) • Importance of Continuous Monitoring of Extrinsic Environmental Conditions in the Research Lab Animal Environment: Jeremy G Turner. 3:40 PM–4:00 PM (TTP) • Disaster Planning? Automation Has You Covered: Andrew Arvanites. 4:00 PM–4:20 PM (TTP)

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FEATURE

VPE Interview

Introducing AALAS’ New Vice President-Elect Bob Quinn joins the Executive Committee in October. LAS Pro: When did you join AALAS, and why did you decide to join?

LAS Pro: What would you like to say to the AALAS membership?

QUINN: I joined AALAS in 1991 at the beginning of my residency at the University of Michigan. Honestly, at the time, I didn’t know much about AALAS. It was just something everyone in the residency joined. I quickly learned about all the educational and informational services that AALAS provides and have been a big fan ever since.

QUINN: This is an easy one. I am so proud to be associated with such an amazing and selfless group of professionals. AALAS members are the unsung heroes of “essential workers.” Most of us went to work every day for the last 18 months without hesitation. Even when everything was unknown and we all thought walking out of our house was a death sentence, so many of our members put that fear aside to make sure our animals got the care they needed. I would hazard to guess that virtually none of us received the recognition given to other essential workers during this pandemic, but that doesn’t matter because we’re all about caring for the animals and supporting critical science.

LAS Pro: What do you think was the most important project you worked on as a BOT/Committee member? QUINN: Without a doubt, the many years I spent with the Certification and Registry Board both as a board member and as a BOT liaison have been the most productive I have felt doing anything professionally. That group works very hard and is so critical to the success of the certification program, which I view as the heart of AALAS. LAS Pro: What will you bring to the table in your new role? QUINN: I have been involved in many aspects of this field for a long time, so I feel I have a good perspective on how the field has changed and how it will be changing in the future. COVID has shaken up all businesses in ways that nobody could have imagined, and laboratory animal science is no exception. We have adapted in ways that may not entirely revert to “normal,” and I look forward to helping AALAS find the new normal without losing sight of what has made us such a great organization for our members.

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14 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

LAS Pro: What is your favorite National Meeting memory? QUINN: Another easy one. I was staffing the booth for ACLAM one day when Dr. Nate Brewer sat down with me. For you younger folks, Dr. Brewer is one of the “Fathers” of laboratory animal science. This was one of the last meetings he attended and, even though he was very advanced in age, he was sharp as ever, and we had a long conversation about how the field had changed over his lifetime. It was fascinating to hear the humble beginnings of the field that we all take for granted now. I probably could have sat and listened to him all day. LAS Pro: Do you have companion animals? QUINN: As of very recently, we are currently animal-free. Last year was a bit tragic for the Quinn household. We lost


2021 AALAS National Election Results Secretary/Treasurer – Tim Mandrell At-Large Trustee Seat 1 – Deb Hickman At-Large Alternate Trustee Seat 1 – Jason Villano At-Large Trustee Seat 2 – Ken Shapiro At-Large Alternate Trustee Seat 2 – Teresa Woodger District 1 Alternate Trustee – Jennifer Kieffer District 3 Trustee – Donna Tignor District 5 Alternate Trustee – Linda Bryan

our cat “Kitty-2” (it’s a long story), our golden retriever “Maggie,” and our tiger oscar “Frankenfish” (another long story). Don’t be too sad, they all lived very long and healthy lives. Since then, we’ve had to get some work done on the house, so we’ve been putting off adopting anything new. The work was completed this week, and I’m already getting hints that another dog is in the near future. LAS Pro: Favorite TV show? QUINN: Now we’re getting tougher. Of all time or currently? I’m pretty eclectic when it comes to entertainment. I like Schitt’s Creek right now, but some of my previous favorites were Dexter, Archer, The Walking Dead, Frasier, and M.A.S.H. LAS Pro: Last book you read for fun? QUINN: I think it was “Altered Carbon,” which is a sci-fi book. I can’t say I read a lot for fun anymore. I spend so much time reading at work that it still sort of feels like work to me, even if it's an excellent book. Besides, I tend to be out on the

20 21

All terms commence on October 21 at the close of the 2021 National Meeting in Kansas City.

golf course a lot which cuts into my reading time. LAS Pro: Favorite vacation spot? QUINN: I don’t have one. I know many people tend to go to the same place routinely for their annual vacation or family reunions, but not me. I’m very much a fan of the saying “been there, done that” because I’m always looking to do something new or see something I’ve never seen before. We tend just to pick a new spot every year. LAS Pro: Favorite dessert? QUINN: Although you wouldn’t know it to look at me, but I’m not really a dessert kind of guy. I prefer an after-dinner coffee (maybe an Irish coffee). I used to love crème brulee until my wife decided to make it for me one day. After she saw how many eggs, how much crème and how much sugar went into it, she said I no longer love crème brulee!

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September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 15


FEATURE

Inside the Meeting

AALAS Builds on Diversity and Inclusion Efforts By Chris Lyons, MBA, CAE

A

ALAS’ tradition of diversity and inclusion is evident in goal five of the association’s six main goals: “Attract, engage and develop a diverse and inclusive membership that promotes the mission.”

During the August 7, 2021, Leadership Summit, AALAS hosted diversity and inclusion consultant Erv Walker to provide training at the AALAS national office in Memphis, TN. AALAS leadership, including the Board of Trustees and committee chairs, vice chairs, and staff participated in a series of interactive training exercises. For AALAS national office staff, this activity built on the various diversity and inclusion training sessions offered through the American Society for Association Executives they attend via webinars. Historically, the Board has used a BOT matrix at its annual session to determine the needs for at-large Board composition for the following year. The matrix helps guide the Board towards a diverse mix of, for example, veterinarians, managers, technicians, researchers, commercial members, and international members. Once the needs are identified, the matrix is passed to the Nominations Committee who recruit candidates for the at-large positions based on the Board’s criteria.

Establishing a D&I ad hoc Committee

In June 2020, AALAS President Tracy Parker proposed,

and the Executive Committee appointed, the Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) ad hoc committee to build on AALAS’ existing membership and leadership efforts. In a post on the AALAS Community Exchange, President Parker noted that the ad hoc committee would help leadership understand how D&I issues impact membership. The committee goals were as follows: 1. Does AALAS need a formal statement on Diversity & Inclusion? 2. As an organization, are there other actions or other items that we need to promote or enhance diversity & inclusion? In setting these goals, President Parker strongly emphasized there must be meaningful actions beyond a formal statement. The committee, co-chaired by Temeri Wilder-Kofie and Janet Steele, includes James Champion, Sonja “Scout” Chou, Jose Espinal, Marc Hulin, James Macy, Mark Suckow, Chandra Williams, and Luis Zorrilla. Ann Turner and Chris Lyons serve as staff liaisons.

Range of agreement on National AALAS’ Diversity and Inclusion Mission Statement. Survey provided options for: 1-Strongly Agree to 5-Strongly Disagree.

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AALAS D&I Statement The American Association for Laboratory Animal Science (AALAS) is committed to fostering diversity and inclusion for all of its members, including but not limited to its membership, leadership, educational, and professional opportunities. AALAS promotes a positive atmosphere that is welcoming of all races, backgrounds, cultures, job roles, and is supportive of initiatives that are aligned with the AALAS Mission. Most importantly, AALAS promotes a globally inclusive culture for all religions, races, ages, gender identities, mental and physical capabilities, sexual orientations and ethnicities, or any other differences with the belief that diversity successfully drives the AALAS Mission. The definition and meaning of diversity and inclusion will evolve, as will AALAS’ approach to ensure advancement and appreciation of contemporary diversity and inclusion concepts within the laboratory animal science community.

Pilot Survey Results on Diversity and Inclusion within AALAS Monday, October 18

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room 2504A Leader/Moderator: Temeri Wilder-Kofie Facilitator: TBN Panelist: Janet L Steele, James D Macy, James R Champion, Temeri Wilder-Kofie, Luis M Zorrilla, Chandra D Williams, Mark A Suckow, Sonja T Chou AALAS leadership, including the Board of Trustees and committee chairs and vice chairs, participated in a series of interactive diversity and inclusion training exercises. The session occurred during AALAS’ Leadership Summit held at the AALAS national office in Memphis, TN, on August 7, 2021. Diversity and inclusion consultant Erv Walker facilitated the exercises. Pictured from left to right: Satish Adusumilli, Temeri Wilder-Kofie, Jim Flood, Rachel Rubino, and Marc Hulin.

AALAS’ D&I Statement and Membership Survey The committee drafted, and the Board of Trustees approved an AALAS Diversity and Inclusion statement. The committee also surveyed the membership on various diversity and inclusion issues. Because more than 85% of respondents indicated they would be willing to update their membership demographics to include ethnicity and gender, the D&I committee gained approval from the Board to allow members to provide this information if they choose. AALAS staff will soon be updating the member profile section of the AALAS website, where members can provide their demographics. Survey results also indicated that 66.4% of respondents were women, with the largest age group of respondents,

Breakdown of survey responses based on racial/origin/ethnic identification.

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50.5% falling in the 35-54 age bracket. The Diversity and Inclusion statement approved by the Board of Trustees was viewed favorably by 67.7% of respondents (strongly agree and agree), and 61.6% (strongly agree and agree) felt that national AALAS respected and valued all backgrounds and cultures.

2021 National Meeting Panel

Members of the Diversity & Inclusion ad hoc committee also will be moderating and participating in the panel discussion “Pilot Survey Results on Diversity and Inclusion within AALAS.” This session is scheduled on Monday, October 18, 12:30 to 2:00 PM during the AALAS National Meeting in Kansas City, MO. D&I committee co-chairs Dr. Temeri Wilder-Kofie and Janet Steele encourage attendees to participate in the AALAS National Meeting Panel Discussion. “This is an opportunity for you to share your feedback on the D&I survey results and engage in meaningful exchanges of ideas surrounding diversity and inclusion,” Wilder-Kofie said. “Your input may help shape the direction of next steps on this important topic,” Co-chair Janet Steele added. AALAS remains committed to a diverse and inclusive membership and will keep you informed as new initiatives unfold. Chris Lyons, MBA, CAE, is Associate Executive Director of AALAS in Memphis, TN.


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FEATURE

Inside the Meeting

Predicting and Communicating Adverse Phenotypes: A Best Practices Approach By Marina M. Hanson, DVM, PhD, DACLAM and Mila Kundu, MS, DVM, DACLAM

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enetically engineered mouse models (GEMs) play a vital role in research, enabling investigators to obtain the model most relevant for the specific study objectives. While GEMs prove invaluable in drug discovery, they also can pose animal welfare challenges. GEMs potentially exhibit both expected and unexpected adverse phenotypes (some of which are lethal at the homozygous stage), typically resulting from the genetic modification, a change in the model’s genetic background, or environmental factors like a shift in the model’s microbiome or the presence of infectious agents. To limit an adverse phenotype’s impact on the animal’s welfare, lab staff must adapt their husbandry and clinical observation practices and investigators must adjust their humane endpoints accordingly. Researchers who can predict the adverse phenotypes for a particular model, accurately and consistently, are better positioned to make vital adjustments proactively and ensure more consistent study outcomes. When the research institution outsources breeding functions to an animal model provider, it’s equally important for the provider to know upfront which adverse phenotypes to expect and to be prepared to take compensatory measures to maintain the animal’s health and welfare throughout breeding. US regulations don’t provide specific guidelines on how to predict and communicate model-specific adverse phenotypes,

Researchers who can predict the adverse phenotypes for a particular model, accurately and consistently, are better positioned to make vital adjustments proactively and ensure more consistent study outcomes. but investigators in Europe can turn to “Guidelines of the Working Group of Berlin Animal Welfare Officers on Severity Assessment and Classification of Genetically Altered Mice and Rat Lines” for such recommendations. With the EU guidance as its inspiration, a team of veterinarians and geneticists at Taconic Biosciences set out to develop a global process to evaluate and monitor novel and established models for adverse phenotypes and communicate with investigators and animal care staff about the compensatory measures that can ensure the animal’s welfare throughout a study. Using a collaborative problem-solving method called 20 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

SPRINT—an iterative development process that engages teams to arrive at solutions fast—in one week, the group developed an effective process for addressing animal welfare concerns related to adverse phenotypes. A novel questionnaire obtains essential details about the model from the investigator, with the resulting data used to categorize the line and its expected phenotype by organ system, using a global severity scoring model. Using this information, investigators and animal care staff can take steps to reduce, prevent, or compensate for adverse phenotypes and consistently collect and evaluate the data needed to determine appropriate humane endpoints. During this TED Talk-style session—"ASAP: Assessment and Surveillance of Adverse Phenotypes in Genetically Engineered Models”— veterinarians and geneticists will review how the SPRINT technique enabled rapid development of a process that meets EU and US guidelines. Attendees are invited to share their adverse phenotype scenarios to discuss how to apply this approach to real-world situations. Vets in a clinical or regulatory role, investigators, IACUC members, and animal care staff who work with genetically engineered mouse models will gain insights on how to predict, monitor, and communicate about phenotypes that can impact the animals under your care and your research studies. Marina McCoy Hanson, DVM, PhD, DACLAM, is Associate Director, Veterinary Sciences at Taconic Biosciences. Mila Christen Kundu, MS, DVM, DACLAM, is Director, Animal Welfare and Compliance at Taconic Biosciences. ASAP: Assessment and Surveillance of Adverse Phenotypes in Genetically Engineered Models Tuesday, October 19 8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room 2501B Speakers: Lisa DiCarlo, Marina Hanson, Charlotte Thygesen, Peter Gade, Mila Kundu Moderator: Jeffrey Lohmiller Facilitator: Megan MacBride


Compassion Fatigue and Burnout in Laboratory Animal Professionals By Heather Hersh, PsyD

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aboratory animal professionals are often drawn to the field by their connection to and compassion for animals and animal welfare. Because they are invested in animal wellbeing, these professionals care greatly and emotionally pour themselves into their work. Laboratory animal professionals are impacted by animal loss and are susceptible to compassion fatigue, especially when animals reach humane endpoints and are removed from study. Further, because veterinarians', veterinary technicians', and husbandry staff ’s work is stressful, busy, and often pressured, there may be risk for job burnout. These vulnerabilities became even higher during the COVID-19 pandemic when many had higher work stressors, continued working as they were considered essential, and may have had to cull additional animals due to research pauses. Importantly, although compassion fatigue and burnout are similar, they are quite distinct. Compassion fatigue is defined as an overexposure to suffering and pain that can cause personal stress and a reduced capacity for empathy. In contrast, burnout is emotional exhaustion, decreased professional efficacy, diminished motivation, and lack of empathy brought on by the work environment. Although veterinary professionals are at risk for both compassion fatigue and burnout, they often do not receive appropriate training to build their resilience and develop coping strategies to protect against these conditions. Additionally, veterinary management and leadership often struggle to determine how to best support their staff in order to prevent compassion fatigue and burnout. This Special Topic Lecture, “Compassion Fatigue and Burnout in Laboratory Animal Professionals,” will address these critical topics. The speaker holds a doctorate in psychology and has expertise in this critical area of emotional-health support for veterinary professionals. During this lecture, important distinctions between compassion fatigue and burnout will be highlighted. In particular, the lecture includes the physical, behavioral, and psychological symptoms of compassion fatigue, which will enable managers and individual professionals to better understand these symptoms and what to monitor in themselves, colleagues, and staff. The talk will provide practical recommendations for facility

leadership and management, including tools that will allow leadership and management the ability to evaluate, assess, and minimize compassion fatigue and burnout across teams. Attendees will also learn how facility leadership and management can support their teams through debriefing sessions and individual supervision, professional development, and staff empowerment. These and other tools are important means for managers to protect and enhance team wellbeing. Additionally, for individual professionals in the field, the lecture will provide practical strategies to prevent compassion fatigue and to address it when it occurs. A self-assessment tool will be highlighted, which will give laboratory animal professionals a tool to monitor their own symptoms. As laboratory animal professionals are at risk of compassion fatigue, the lecture will also discuss how it is imperative they actively and regularly practice self-care to prevent and ameliorate compassion fatigue. Veterinary professionals will leave this lecture with an understanding of how to construct a practical compassion fatigue protection toolkit and personalized self-care plan to remain energized and engaged in this rewarding and important field. Maintaining emotional wellbeing in the workplace requires that leadership, the animal care teams, and individuals have strategies and safeguards that allow everyone to thrive professionally and personally while providing high quality care to the animals. The target audience for this lecture is veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and husbandry staff. Heather Hersh, PsyD, is the owner of Thrive Well-Being in Philadelphia, PA. Compassion Fatigue and Job Burnout in the Animal Research Field Tuesday, October 19 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 2501A Speaker: Heather Hersh Moderator: F Claire Hankenson Facilitator: Leah Makaron

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FEATURE

Inside the Meeting

Naturally Occurring Large Animal Models of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Gene Therapy By George J. DeMarco, MS, DVM, DACLAM

Animal models of human disease can be subdivided into two broad categories: induced, and naturally occurring or spontaneous. Induced models are created by purposeful alteration of the animal including (not limited to) genetic engineering, chemical treatment, and surgical or dietary manipulation. Naturally occurring models arise from spontaneous mutations and or other known or unknown factors and tend to much less common than induced models. For the past several decades, rodents, in particular induced and to some extent spontaneous mouse models have dominated the biomedical research landscape. Although no one can argue the vast contribution mouse models have made to science, their shortcomings, in particular problems with translating to human disease, have become glaringly apparent. This appears particularly relevant to neurodegenerative diseases. Large animals with naturally occurring diseases present significant advantages over rodents as models for human disease. Very importantly animals with naturally occurring diseases actual have a disease in which the underlying genetics, pathophysiology, and clinical signs often very closely recapitulate the human disease. Other advantages of large animal models include a body size closer to humans, longer lifespan, relatively outbred genetics, orthologous disease related genes and proteins, and similar physiology. Compared to rodents, large animals have brains which are neuroanatomically closer to humans including size, being gyrencephalic, and having similar cortical and subcortical structures and meninges. The aforementioned neuroanatomic similarities are critically important features for translational imaging, delivery and biodistribution studies and histopathology. While having significant advantages as models, using large animal is accompanied by disadvantages as well. Large animals are large and per animal they require vastly more space to house than rodents. Large animal husbandry is much less efficient that that for rodents and costs are significantly higher. Handing and restraint for many large animal species can be challenging and risks for staff injury greater. Anesthesia, procedures, and post procedure care for large animals requires staff with specialized training and experience. The pathophysiology of many neurodegenerative diseases involves progressive cellular accumulation of dysfunctional proteins or toxic metabolic species leading to cell death. To date there are no approved drugs that correct the underlying disease processes for any neurodegenerative disease and approved drugs are at best symptomatic. This underscores that despite decades of research and development it is unlikely that a small molecule will emerge as a “cure” for any neurodegenerative disease. Herein lies the potential for gene therapy, the ability to actually correct or compensate for the underlying defect and effect a cure. Gene therapy involves inserting genes to replace missing genes or compensate for mutated genes. Thus, missing proteins responsible for disease are reintroduced or defective disease inducing 22 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

proteins such as non-functional enzymes are compensated for. Gene editing which could insert missing genes, remove detrimental genes, or correct gene mutations that lead to disease is also an active area of research although comes with considerable technical and ethical hurdles. Attendees for the Special Topics Lecture “Naturally Occurring Large Animal Models of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Gene Therapy” Will learn about the natural history, model development, and treatment of large animal models for Tay-Sachs Disease ( Jacob sheep), Cerebellar Abiotrophy (goat), and Maple Syrup Urine Disease (cattle). Participants will learn about the genetic and biochemical aspects of the diseases to be discussed, clinical course, and use as models for the corresponding human diseases. The development of gene therapy for these diseases, in particular adeno-associated-viral gene therapy, and why these diseases are uniquely suited for gene therapy will be discussed. The seminar should be of interest to veterinarians and researchers interested in large animal models and gene therapy.

George J. DeMarco MS, DVM, DACLAM, is Director of Animal Medicine and Associate Professor of Pathology at UMass Medical School.

Naturally Occurring Large Animal Models of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Gene Therapy Tuesday, October 19 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 3501A Speaker: George J DeMarco Moderator: Stephen I Levin Facilitator: TBN


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The New 3Rs: Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle—Going Green in the Vivarium Tuesday, October 19 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 3501H Leader: Jeffrey D Wyatt Moderator: Dana M LeMoine Facilitator: Suhrim Fisher Panelist: Jeffrey D Wyatt, Michael J Huerkamp 24 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021


FEATURE

Inside the Meeting

Successful Sustainability Strategies in Animal Resource Operations By Jeff Wyatt DVM, MPH, DACLAM

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ront-line stakeholders often trigger green initiatives, but sustainable practices must come from an organization's top leadership. It is important to identify eco-friendly practice benefits with concept proof. Cost efficiencies, environmental health gains, customer and employee satisfaction, and enhanced workplace morale nurture adoption even in the face of institutional pushback. Sustainability-minded animal resource personnel looking for ways to reduce wastage, recycle materials, and promote green operations face resistance due to the perception they are not feasible, pose no return on investment, or are too costly. Animal resource initiatives implementing the new 3Rs (reduce, reuse, and recycle) support the 17 sustainability development goals adopted by all United Nations (U.N.) member states. The U.N. goals frame a 2030 agenda to improve human lives and protect the environment. These goals include industry innovation and responsible consumption to promote sustainable and resilient communities (https:// sdgs.un.org/goals). The National Institutes of Health has developed the Green Labs Program to increase laboratory personnel’s awareness and participation in sustainable laboratory practices, with the goal of protecting the environment and human health (https://nems.nih.gov/green-teams/Pages/ NIH-Green-Labs-Program.aspx). Laboratory animal facilities create considerable waste. They use large volumes of water and detergents, store pallets stacked high with PPE, bedding, and diet, and use copious amounts of electricity and fuels for lighting, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. With some groundbreaking

creativity and innovative thinking, this session will share some of the challenges and success stories of going green in the vivarium. Attendees interested in promoting planetary health and learning about sustainability in the vivarium will learn how two institutions implemented sustainability initiatives in their vivaria. Strategies shared include PPE recycling, composting programs, zero-waste, elimination of

Front-line stakeholders often trigger green initiatives, but sustainable practices must come from an organization's top leadership. rodent cagewash detergents, refining 180F cagewash cycles, LED lighting, and recycling PPE into lawn furniture. Plus, learn how an aquaponics innovation removed nitrogenous waste, reduced daily reverse osmosis water production, and decreased water changes in a core recirculating zebrafish system while growing organic microgreens to enrich other lab animal diets. In addition to the cost-savings, team building, and morale-boosting benefits, challenges and complications faced will be shared. Attendees are encouraged to share their own experiences incorporating green practices in laboratory animal resource operations. Jeff Wyatt, DVM, MPH, DACLAM, is a Professor and Chair in Comparative Medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry in Rochester, NY.


When All Your Plans Go Up in Smoke: The 2020 Oregon Wildfires

Tuesday, October 19 2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room 2501C Leader/Moderator: Jennifer L Sargent Speakers: Kim E Saunders, Andrew J Haertel, Katy Murray, Kathleen Snell Facilitator: TBD

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FEATURE

Inside the Meeting

A Look Back at the 2020 Oregon Wildfires By Jennifer Sargent, DVM, MS, DACLAM

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here are questions you anticipate as a laboratory animal veterinarian. People will ask about wound management or diagnostics for an unusual illness. It is commonplace to get asked questions about refining husbandry procedures. Then there are the questions you never thought you would have to address: Can a llama wear a mask? How does ash affect the pH balance of aquarium water? How close should the air purifier be to the guinea pig caging to mitigate poor air quality? During the 2020 Oregon Labor Day fires, many faced unimagined challenges. Strong winds and dry conditions fanned several large wildfires. Over a million acres burned, approximately 40,000 people were evacuated, and several towns were destroyed. Against this backdrop, Oregon’s institutions carried on. Animal care does not pause for holidays or even federally recognized disasters, but ongoing care required adapting to new obstacles. Veterinarians from four institutions will share experiences caring for laboratory animals during an exceptional fire season. Due to different facility types, research, and animals at each institution, the challenges faced varied. At Oregon State University, the primary challenges were the species-diverse decentralized nature of the program and aging ventilation systems in some buildings. Although far removed from the fire lines, smoke and poor air quality lasted for a couple of weeks. Oregon State has agricultural animals in farm settings, outdoor hatchery fish, and more traditional laboratory animal species. This presented a challenge as staff worked to maintain communication with various decentralized animal facilities across the state. Meanwhile, within centralized facilities, the ash tested the building’s ventilation systems. Many buildings had increased ventilation to counter COVID-19, but now these same systems pumped smoke into the buildings and clogged filters. Ash incursion occurred where the seals were poor, and some ash came through air ducts after filters were overwhelmed. The experience was a great reminder of the laboratory

animal community being a part of the larger community. After reaching out to the university’s veterinary college, I became involved, providing veterinary support for the region’s evacuated animals. It was an eye-opening experience introducing me to local- and state-level emergency management. Like veterinary medicine, disaster management has its systems and jargon, which can bewilder the uninitiated. In muddling through that initial experience, I gained knowledge and connections that have built the foundations for a more organized effort moving forward. Speakers from three other institutions will share experiences about the fire’s local impacts, institutional preparations and responses, and lessons learned. Oregon Health & Science University supports biomedical research for the state’s largest academic medical center in Portland, Oregon. OHSU’s nearby West Campus is home to the Oregon National Primate Research Center, which cares for a robust macaque population, including large groups in outdoor corrals. Further south, the raging Holiday Farm Fire threatened the University of Oregon and the Zebrafish International Resource Center. From these different perspectives, attendees of the “When All Your Plans Go Up in Smoke: The 2020 Oregon Wildfires” will learn considerations and strategies for tackling the unexpected. As the state faces historic drought conditions, the fires of the 2021 season are already raging again. We are meeting this fire season with the lessons learned last year, and we look forward to sharing those perspectives. Jennifer Sargent, DVM, MS, DACLAM, is an Attending Veterinarian, Director in the Laboratory Animal Resources Center, and an Assistant Professor with the Carlson College of Veterinary Medicine at Oregon State University in Corvallis, OR. Photos courtesy of the Oregon State University Carlson College of Veterinary Medicine. September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 27


Kendrick Jenkins, AS, is an Associate Director of Laboratory Animal Resources in Comparative Medicine at Takeda Pharmaceuticals. He will be a panelist for "A Candid Conversation about Racial Justice in Laboratory Animal Science."

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FEATURE

Inside the Meeting

A Candid Conversation about Racial Justice in Laboratory Animal Science

By Sharron Kirchain, DVM, MBA, DACLAM; Donna Matthews Jarrell, DVM, DACLAM; Gerard M. Cronin; Tanise L. Jackson, DVM, DACLAM, CPIA; and Kendrick Jenkins, AS

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f you’re like the authors, chances are you entered the field of laboratory animal science because you enjoy science and care about animal welfare. Compassion is at the heart of our values and is a daily motivator determining our thoughts and actions. It can also be the source of discomfort or pain when it is challenged. Over the last 18 months, our compassion for each other has been challenged with the many examples of racial struggles for minorities under-represented in our field, particularly for African-Americans, Asian-Americans, and Semitic communities. News media covered racially motivated incidents with more prolonged coverage and more detail than the usual hashtag cycles. In this session, we will engage in candid dialogue, focusing on racial equity and what it means to be fully inclusive for our staff, research partners, and professional organizations. Experience has taught us that candid conversations in safe, brave settings provide the right environment for these dialogues. Where does racial justice fit into your discussions on diversity, equity, and inclusion (DE&I)? Let’s talk. “One size fits all” strategies are often employed in the workplace to improve diversity, equity, and inclusion for a variety of demographic groups, which can include: sex, gender identity, race, ethnicity, and disabilities, to name a few. Such broad-brush approaches may fail to address the unique disparities experienced by any particular group and result in even further inequities. There is a revised national racial equality mandate throughout the nation and within our organizations, sparked by racial brutality incidents during the global COVID-19 pandemic, that opened possibilities for a new DE&I direction, including confronting the collective complacency with the status quo as it relates to true racial equality. The establishment of our new national holiday ( Juneteenth) is one example of the change necessary to acknowledge the value and benefit of full DE&I community solidarity. This panel discussion takes a deep dive, in a brave and safe space, into the persistent racial injustices that continue to need full and ongoing focus. Successful DE&I is defined as: 1. Recognizing and respecting everyone’s unique abilities and attributes (Diversity) 2. Fair and respectful treatment of all people (Equity) 3. Everyone feels respected, accepted, and valued (Inclusion)

To be successful requires that everyone come to the table to address the challenges. This discussion will ask the questions: • Where are we as a laboratory animal science industry when it comes to racial justice in the workplace? • How far have we come?

• Where can we/ do we/ should we be going from here? The laboratory animal science community has an opportunity to lean into this racial justice movement. Dialogue is a critical element to move towards full equity and inclusivity. DE&I topics covered or encouraged during the COVID-19 pandemic by the VOE-Network included a 100-year birthday celebration of Henrietta Lacks, born August 1, 1920 (August 2020), the VOE-Network/ HBCU collaboration webinar (August 2020), The Davis-Thompson Foundation “Black Voices in Pathology” ( January 2021), DE&I ACLAM Forum Happy Hour (May 2021), and the launch of the AVMA Brave Space training certification program. If we are to realize lasting change in our industry, let’s keep the conversation going. Let’s take the next step on our inclusive journey to better. A Candid Conversation about Racial Justice in Laboratory Animal Science Wednesday, October 20 12:30 PM–2:00 PM / Room: 2503A Leader: Sharron Kirchain Moderator: Tanise L Jackson Panelists: Kendrick Jenkins, Donna Matthews Jarrell Facilitator: Gerard M. Cronin September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 29


Annabella Williams, BSc, MA, FRSA, CCFP, is Head of Engagement at Understanding Animal Research in London, UK, and will serve as a leader and panelist for the Working with Emotional Labor: An Interactive Discussion.

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FEATURE

Inside the Meeting

Emotional Labor: A Key for Care, Compassion, and Resilience By Annabella Williams, BSc, MA, FRSA, CCFP; Keith Davies, MBA, PhD, FIAT, RAnTech; and Anneke Keizer, BS, MBA, LATG, CCFP

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ork can be more than the job we do and working with laboratory animals can become more than a way to earn a living. When our work involves connecting with and caring for either people or animals, it occupies – for better or worse – significant emotional space. Learning to acknowledge, understand, and manage the workplaces’ emotional challenges enables us to be better caregivers, support one another, and cope with the role’s demands. These tools become our “emotional PPE.” Emotional labor describes work that requires demonstration of emotions that conflict with someone’s true feelings. Their emotion is the work they do. It is a type of acting fundamental to many professional service roles, including animal care. People will occasionally put on a face to survive social situations, masking true feelings. However, continually projecting conflicting emotions can lead to emotional conflicts and a sense of isolation, causing chronic stress. Emotional labor creates a high baseline stress level which is often overlooked or misunderstood. This can be especially true when the work involves emotive or traumatic experiences. Processing the isolation becomes increasingly difficult the longer it remains unacknowledged, particularly where appropriate avenues to share or understand the emotional burden are unavailable. Whether they are caregivers, technicians, disaster workers, zookeepers, veterinarians, researchers – or a host of other professions – people who work directly with animals face emotional challenges. They may necessarily form bonds with the animals. These bonds can be a source of stress and anxiety, but paradoxically, create the basis of an institutional culture of care. While it is possible to provide excellent husbandry and deliver good welfare without attachment, this type of provision is, by definition, not care. Most people who work with animals choose to do so because of the relationship: caring for animals drives them. The emotional connection pushes people to go above and beyond, but giving something of themselves, can have a cost. While a degree of pragmatism is necessary, without guidance and support, animal caretakers develop various emotional coping strategies, which can become problematic. Ways of coping, such as desensitization, can prevent positive feelings of joy or satisfaction and undermine our investment in providing care. Coping mechanisms can spill over into daily lives, affecting relationships, self-esteem, and wellbeing. Constantly caring, dealing with grief, and masking true feelings in the workplace is exhausting. Professional burnout

is a significant problem for people working with animals, and one they need to tackle to successfully maintain this career path. The daily emotional struggles are compounded by the traumatic events involved in laboratory animal research. Carrying out procedures or euthanasia is traumatic, compounded by attachments to animals, things that go wrong, and the unheralded intense disruption due to COVID-19 add to existing burdens, increasing the risk of compassion fatigue and other stress-related disorders. This is not inevitable. Displaying feelings is not a sign of weakness and should not be discouraged. Understanding is key. The emotional component of care does not need to be a cost but can be a huge asset once we realize that even the best caregivers can suffer burnout and compassion fatigue. Emotional labor can be supported, managed, and worked with through identifying where the problems lie and establishing ways of dealing with them more effectively. During this discussion on working with emotional labor, attendees will hear from three experts on the role of emotion work in the care of laboratory animals. This interactive session will lead attendees to listen, consider, and share their views. Explore how we can work most effectively, develop emotional resilience, and deliver the best care. Join a discussion that will leave you thinking differently about how we care for laboratory animals and for each other. Annabella Williams, BSc, MA, FRSA, CCFP, is Head of Engagement at Understanding Animal Research in London, UK.

Keith Davies, MBA, PhD, FIAT, RAnTech, is a consultant at KD Consulting in Cardiff, UK. Anneke Keizer, BS, MBA, LATG, CCFP, is a consultant and certified compassion fatigue professional at COPEPLUS in NJ, USA, and Switzerland. Working with Emotional Labor: An Interactive Discussion Wednesday, October 20 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 3501G Leader: Bella J Williams Moderator: Kathryn Bayne Facilitator: Paula A Clifford, Matthew J Gallacher Panelist: Bella J Williams, Keith Davies, Anneke Keizer

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FEATURE

Inside the Meeting

The Biggest Threat to the Future of Biomedical Research By Cindy A. Buckmaster, PhD, CMAR, RLATG

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eople and dogs suffer from many of the same diseases. Foundational research with dogs has led to various treatments that have improved the quality of life for people and dogs struggling with progressive, terminal illnesses, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, cardiovascular disease, and cancers. Dogs are also critical for evaluating the safety and efficacy of candidate drugs targeting human and animal diseases before clinical trials in people and pets. Their value cannot be overstated. Toxcicity testing in dogs before clinical trials has allowed researchers to screen out millions of candidate drugs from testing, sparing countless human and animal lives. Millions of people and their pets live longer, healthier lives due to the therapeutics derived from critical research and testing in dogs. USDA regulated, Class A dog breeders are an essential part of the health research and drug discovery process. Carefully bred animals with known pedigrees, health histories, and temperaments that acclimate quickly to research settings and procedures are vital for the medical advances we depend on for ourselves and our loved ones. Several research advocacy organizations in the US and abroad have made this clear in social media posts, posters, flyers, mailings, and interviews with the media. Nevertheless, groups opposed to research with dogs are springing up globally to end this critical work, and they’re gaining traction. Perhaps their most con-

The Biggest Threat to the Future of Biomedical Research Thursday, October 21 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 2501A Speaker: Cindy A Buckmaster Moderator: Rick VanDomelen Facilitator: Steve Burkholder

32 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

cerning targets are the Class A dog breeders. With so few research dog breeders in America, eliminating any source will significantly impact the research community’s ability to obtain animals needed for ongoing and future studies. Animal rights groups believe if they eliminate the businesses that produce animals for research, they can eliminate animal studies. They’re


right. Our community has posited that the elimination of dogs in research is a gateway to the end of biomedical research with other critical species. The momentum for driving Class A dog breeders out of business is unprecedented, and Class A breeders of cats and ferrets are now also in the crosshairs. Animal rights groups are driving a false narrative about the current availability of more predictive alternatives to animals in research while demonizing those that breed dogs for research. The general public and US legislators are buying it. Unfortunately, many CROs, universities, and pharmaceutical companies are unaware of the ongoing animal rights groups’ efforts to eliminate lab animal breeders, particularly those breeding dogs, leaving the people they rely on for animals to fight this battle alone. The historic tactic of staying under the radar is not working. Class A breeders need the biomedical research community’s support to ensure their necessary work can continue. We are closer to losing this privilege than most are aware of or willing to admit.

Why haven’t the ceaseless educational efforts of our advocacy groups prevented this from happening? What more can they do? What do they need from the rest of us? How do we get the public, including our legislators, to believe that our animals are loved and well cared for? How do we get them to believe in the value and necessity of our work? Please join me for a Special Topics Lecture Thursday morning to learn more about the unprecedented threat before us. Let’s brainstorm together about how we might turn this around. Cindy A. Buckmaster, PhD, CMAR, RLATG, is Director of Public Outreach, National Animal Interest Alliance (NAIA), Chair of Americans for Medical Progress (AMP), and President of the Texas Society for Biomedical Research (TSBR).

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Illuminated Injection Cones

September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 33


Opioid Analgesic FFor subcutaneous use in mice and rats only. CAUTION: Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. LEGAL STATUS--In order to be legally marketed, a new animal drug intended for a minor species must be Approved, Conditionally Approved, or Indexed by the Food and Drug Administration. THIS PRODUCT IS INDEXED--MIF # 900-014. Extra-label use is prohibited. This product is not to be used in animals intended for use as food for humans or food-producing animals. WARNING: ABUSE POTENTIAL, LIFE-THREATENING RESPIRATORY DEPRESSION, and ACCIDENTAL EXPOSURE Abuse Potential Ethiqa XR contains buprenorphine, a high concentration (1.3 mg/mL) opioid agonist and Schedule III controlled substance with an abuse potential similar to other Schedule III opioids. The high concentration of Ethiqa XR may be a particular target for human abuse. Buprenorphine has opioid properties that in humans may lead to dependence of the morphine type. Abuse of buprenorphine may lead to low or moderate physical dependence or high psychological dependence. The risk of abuse by humans should be considered when storing, administering, and disposing of Ethiqa XR. Persons at increased risk for opioid abuse include those with a personal or family history of substance abuse (including drug or alcohol abuse or addiction) or mental illness (suicidal depression). Because of human safety risks, this drug should be used only with veterinary supervision. Do not dispense Ethiqa XR. Life-Threatening Respiratory Depression The concentration of buprenorphine in Ethiqa XR is 1.3 mg/mL. Respiratory depression, including fatal cases, may occur with abuse of Ethiqa XR. Ethiqa XR has additive CNS depressant effects when used with alcohol, other opioids, or illicit drugs that cause central nervous system depression. Because of the potential for adverse reactions associated with accidental injection, Ethiqa XR should only be administered by a veterinarian or laboratory staff trained in the handling of potent opioids. DESCRIPTION Ethiqa XR is an injectable suspension of extended-release buprenorphine. Buprenorphine hydrochloride, an opioid analgesic, is the active ingredient in Ethiqa XR. Lipid-bound buprenorphine hydrochloride is suspended in medium chain fatty acid triglyceride (MCT) oil. Lipids encapsulate the buprenorphine limiting diffusion which provides for larger doses and prolonged action.1,2 Ethiqa XR has a slightly yellow to white opaque appearance. Each mL contains approximately 1.3 mg buprenorphine hydrochloride. The sterile product contains cholesterol, gl yceryl tristearate, and buprenorphine hydrochloride suspended in MCT oil. Buprenorphine Formula C29H41NO4

INDICATIONS Ethiqa XR is indicated for the control of post-procedural pain in mice and rats. MOUSE DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Wear protective clothing when administering Ethiqa XR (see Human Safety Warnings). Shake the vial briefly before each use to ensure uniform suspension. If stored refrigerated, bring to room temperature before use. Use aseptic techniques to withdraw the dose into a disposable 0.5 or 1 mL syringe. A 20 to 23 gauge needle should be used for injections due to the viscosity of the drug suspension. The dosage of Ethiqa XR is a single subcutaneous injection of 0.05 mL per 20 gram mouse (3.25 mg/kg body weight). Therapeutic drug concentrations are maintained for 72 hours after the initial dose. If needed, a single repeat dose may be administered 72 hours after the initial dose. Secure the mouse in a scruff-of-the-neck hold. Insert the needle into the dorsal subcutaneous space created by the scruff hold. Inject the entire dose into the dorsal subcutaneous space. An oily sheen may be observed in the dorsal fur of the mouse after injection due to leakage of the oil-based drug suspension from the injection site. The oily sheen may last for 4 to 5 days post-injection. Leakage from the injection site can be minimized by slowly injecting Ethiqa XR into the subcutaneous space. The mouse can be returned to its cage immediately after receiving Ethiqa XR. Do not return any unused drug suspension from the syringe back into the vial. Once the vial is broached, Ethiqa XR can be stored at 15° to 25°C (59° – 77°F) or refrigerated for 28 days. DO NOT FREEZE. Product could change its physical properties if not stored within the specified storage conditions and original vial container. RAT DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Wear protective clothing when administering Ethiqa XR (see Human Safety Warnings). Shake the vial briefly before each use to ensure uniform suspension. If stored refrigerated, bring to room temperature before use. Use aseptic techniques to withdraw the dose into a disposable 0.5 or 1 mL syringe. A 20 to 23 gauge needle should be used for injections due to the viscosity of the drug suspension. The dosage of Ethiqa XR is a single subcutaneous injection of 0.1 mL per 200 gram rat (0.65 mg/kg body weight). Therapeutic drug concentrations are maintained for 72 hours after the initial dose. If needed, a single repeat dose may be administered 72 hours after the initial dose. Secure the rat in a passive restraint tube or by holding with a heavy glove with one person to secure the rat and a second person to administer the drug. Insert the needle in the dorsal subcutaneous space. Inject the entire dose into the dorsal subcutaneous space. An oily sheen may be observed in the dorsal fur after injection due to leakage of the oil-based drug suspension from the injection site. The oily sheen may last for 4 to 5 days post-injection. Leakage from the injection site can be minimized by slowly injecting Ethiqa XR into the subcutaneous space. The rat can be returned to its cage immediately after receiving Ethiqa XR. See CONTRAINDICATIONS and Rat PRECAUTIONS for additional information on bedding. Do not return any unused drug suspension from the syringe back into the vial. Once the vial is broached, Ethiqa XR can be stored at 15° to 25°C (59° – 77°F) or refrigerated for 28 days. DO NOT FREEZE. Product could change its physical properties if not stored within the specified storage conditions and original vial container. CONTRAINDICATIONS Only administer Ethiqa XR by subcutaneous injection. Ethiqa XR is not intended for intravenous, intra-arterial, intrathecal, intramuscular, or intra-peritoneal injection. Do not use on mice or rats with pre-existing respiratory deficiencies. Do not keep rats on wood chip-type bedding after administration of Ethiqa XR. HUMAN SAFETY WARNINGS Not for use in humans. Keep out of the reach of children. Human User Safety while handling Ethiqa XR: Two trained staff for administration: Ethiqa XR should only be handled and administered by a veterinarian, veterinary technician, or laboratory staff trained in the handling of potent opioids. To prevent human adverse reactions or abuse, at least 2 trained administrators should be present during injection of Ethiqa XR. Protective covering: To prevent direct contact of Ethiqa XR with human skin or mucous membranes when handling the suspension, protective clothing is recommended. Mucous membrane or eye contact during administration: Direct contact of Ethiqa XR with the eyes, oral or other mucous membranes of humans could result in absorption of buprenorphine and the potential for adverse reactions. If accidental eye, oral or other mucous membrane contact is made during administration, flush the area with water and contact a physician. Skin contact during administration: If human skin is accidentally exposed to Ethiqa XR, wash the exposed area with soap and water and contact a physician. Accidental exposure could result in absorption of buprenorphine and the potential for adverse reactions.

Drug Abuse, Addiction, and Diversion of Opioids: Controlled Substance: Ethiqa XR contains buprenorphine, a mu opioid partial agonist and Schedule III controlled substance with an abuse potential similar to other Schedule III opioids. Ethiqa XR can be abused and is subject to misuse, abuse, addiction, and criminal diversion. Ethiqa XR should be handled appropriately to minimize the risk of diversion, including restriction of access, the use of accounting procedures, and proper disposal methods, as appropriate to the laboratory setting and as required by law. Abuse: Abuse of Ethiqa XR poses a hazard of overdose and death. This risk is increased with concurrent abuse of alcohol and other substances including other opioids and benzodiazepines. Buprenorphine has been diverted for non-medical use into illicit channels of distribution. All people handling opioids require careful monitoring for signs of abuse. Drug abuse is the intentional non-therapeutic use of a prescription drug for its rewarding psychological or physiological effects. Abuse of opioids can occur in the absence of true addiction. Storage and Discard: Ethiqa XR is a Class III opioid. Store in a locked, substantially constructed cabinet according to DEA and local controlled substance guidelines. Discard broached vials after 28 days. Any unused or expired vials must be destroyed by a DEA registered reverse distributor; for further information, call 1-833-384-4729. Physician information: Ethiqa XR injectable suspension is a mu-opioid partial agonist (1.3 mg buprenorphine/mL). In the case of an emergency, provide the physician with the package insert. Naloxone may not be effective in reversing respiratory depression produced by buprenorphine. The onset of naloxone effect may be delayed by 30 minutes or more. Doxapram hydrochloride has also been used as a respiratory stimulant. PRECAUTIONS Mice The safety of Ethiqa XR has not been evaluated in pregnant, lactating, neonatal, or immune-compromised mice. As with other opioids, buprenorphine may cause sedation, decreased blood pressure, decreased heart rate, decreased gastrointestinal mobility, and respiratory depression. Use caution with concomitant administration of Ethiqa XR with drugs that cause respiratory depression. The use of paper or soft bedding for up to 3 days following administration of Ethiqa XR should be considered. Normal mice may exhibit an obtunded response to stimuli up to 4 hours after receiving Ethiqa XR. Buprenorphine is excreted in the feces (see Clinical Pharmacology section below). Coprophagy may lead to ingestion of buprenorphine or its metabolites by mice treated with Ethiqa XR and untreated cage mates. Rats The safety of Ethiqa XR has not been evaluated in pregnant, lactating, neonatal, or immune-compromised rats. As with other opioids, buprenorphine may cause sedation, decreased blood pressure, decreased heart rate, decreased gastrointestinal mobility, and respiratory depression. Use caution with concomitant administration of Ethiqa XR with drugs that cause respiratory depression. Rats may exhibit signs of nausea including pica up to 3 days post-treatment. Rats should be maintained on paper or soft bedding to avoid ingestion of wood chip-type bedding after administration of Ethiqa XR. Pica involving wood chip-type bedding can be lethal in rats. Buprenorphine is excreted in the feces (see Clinical Pharmacology section below). Coprophagy may lead to ingestion of buprenorphine or its metabolites by rats treated with Ethiqa XR and untreated cage mates. ADVERSE REACTIONS Mice No adverse reactions were observed in 20 to 25 gram young adult male and female mice after a single subcutaneous injection of Ethiqa XR at a dose 5 times the indicated dose. Laboratory parameters evaluated in the study included hematology and clinical chemistry; histopathology was also performed. In a second study, adult male and female mice received Ethiqa XR subcutaneously at 5 times the indicated dose for three doses at four day intervals. A surgical procedure was performed on the study mice prior to receiving each of the three doses of Ethiqa XR. Mortality was seen in two male mice after the third surgical procedure and dose of Ethiqa XR (total dose of 49 mg buprenorphine/ kg body weight in 8 days). Weight loss has been observed in mice treated post-procedurally with Ethiqa XR. Rats Adverse reactions were evaluated in 180 to 200 gram young adult male and female rats after a single injection of Ethiqa XR. A surgical procedure was performed on the rats prior to administration of a single dose at the intended dose of 0.65 mg/kg or a single dose of 2, 6 or 10-fold excess dose. Adverse reactions also were evaluated in male and female rats administered 2, 6 and 10 times the intended dose for three doses at four day intervals. A surgical procedure was performed on the rats prior to administration of the first of three doses. Laboratory parameters evaluated in the study included hematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, histopathology, and bodyweight. Signs of nausea were observed at all dose levels within 24 hours of the dose. Signs included self-licking, self-gnawing and efforts to eat wood-chip bedding. Mortality was seen in 1 of 36 rats exposed to wood chip bedding. Necropsy revealed the stomach and esophagus were compacted with bedding, the bladder was abnormally distended and the urine contained blood. Mortality was seen in 3 of 222 rats treated with Ethiqa XR due to technical complications with serial bleeding of the jugular vein. For technical assistance, or to report an adverse drug reaction, please call Fidelis Pharmaceuticals LLC at 1-833-384-4729. For additional information about adverse drug experience reporting for animal drugs, contact FDA at 1-888-FDA-VETS or http:// www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/SafetyHealth. CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY3 Buprenorphine can act as an agonist and antagonist at different classes of opioid receptors. Agonism at the mu opioid receptor and, in some cases, antagonism at the kappa or delta opioid receptors are possible underlying mechanisms for the ceiling effect and bell-shaped dose-response curve of buprenorphine. Studies with knockout mice have shown that the antinociceptive effect of buprenorphine, which is mediated primarily by the mu opioid receptor, is attenuated by the ability of the drug to activate the opioid receptor like (ORL-1) receptor. The drug can be described as a ‘full’ and a ‘partial’ agonist at the same receptor depending on the specific assay. There appears to be no ceiling effect for analgesia, but there is a ceiling effect for respiratory depression. Pharmacokinetic studies with bolus injections of buprenorphine in mice and rats provide similar models. After bolus intravenous administration, plasma levels decline tri-exponentially. The drug is n-deakylated in the liver to norbuprenorphine (NBN), an active metabolite. Studies have shown that glucuronide metabolites of buprenorphine and NBN are also metabolically active, and can approximate or exceed the concentration of the parent drug. Un-metabolized drug excreted in the urine and feces one week after injection was 1.9 and 22.4% of the dose, respectively, and 92% of the dose was accounted for in one week.3 Mice Pharmacokinetic parameters of Ethiqa XR were studied in 6-8 week old male and female Balb/c mice following a single subcutaneous injection of 3.25 mg/kg bodyweight. Clinically significant blood levels were observed up to 72 hours after subcutaneous injection. Rats Pharmacokinetic parameters of Ethiqa XR were studied in 8 week old male and female Fischer rats following a single subcutaneous injection of 0.65 mg/kg bodyweight. Clinically significant blood levels were observed up to 72 hours after subcutaneous injection. HOW SUPPLIED Ethiqa XR is supplied in a 5 mL glass vial containing 3.0 mL of injectable drug suspension (NDC 86084-100-30). U.S. Patent No. 8,461,173; 10,555,899 STORAGE INFORMATION Store between 15° and 25°C (59° – 77°F) or refrigerated. DO NOT FREEZE. If stored refrigerated, bring to room temperature before use. Once broached, the multi-dose vial should be discarded after 28 days. REFERENCES 1. Mishra et al., Drug Delivery and Transl. Res, 2:238-253; 2012. 2. Bethune et al., The role of drug-lipid interactions on the disposition of liposome-formulated opioid analgesics in vitro and in vivo. Anesth Analg. 93(4):928-33; 2001. 3. Guarnieri et al., Lab Animal, 41(11): 337-343; 2012. Manufactured for: Fidelis Pharmaceuticals LLC CCIT Incubator 675 US Highway One, Suite B113 North Brunswick, NJ 08902 833-384-4729 www.EthiqaXR.com Fidelis Pharmaceuticals® and EthiqaXR® are registered trademarks of Fidelis Pharmaceuticals LLC, a Delaware Corporation. August 2021 FID-ETH-PI007


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WARNING: ABUSE POTENTIAL, LIFE-THREATENING RESPIRATORY DEPRESSION, and ACCIDENTAL EXPOSURE Abuse Potential This formulation contains buprenorphine, a high-concentration (1.3 mg/mL) opioid agonist and Schedule III controlled substance with an abuse potential similar to other Schedule III opioids. The high concentration may be a particular target for human abuse. Buprenorphine has opioid properties that in humans may lead to dependence of the morphine type. Abuse of buprenorphine may lead to low or moderate physical dependence or high psychological dependence. The risk of abuse by humans should be considered when storing, administering, and disposing of Ethiqa XR. Persons at increased risk for opioid abuse include those with a personal or family history of substance abuse (including drug or alcohol abuse or addiction) or mental illness (suicidal depression). Because of human safety risks, this drug should be used only with veterinary supervision. Do not dispense Ethiqa XR. Life-Threatening Respiratory Depression The concentration of buprenorphine in Ethiqa XR is 1.3 mg/mL. Respiratory depression, including fatal cases, may occur with abuse of Ethiqa XR. Ethiqa XR has additive CNS depressant effects when used with alcohol, other opioids, or illicit drugs that cause central nervous system depression. Because of the potential for adverse reactions associated with accidental injection, Ethiqa XR should only be administered by a veterinarian or laboratory staff trained in the handling of potent opioids. Important Safety Information for Rats and Mice For Rats and Mice: Only administer Ethiqa XR by subcutaneous injection. Ethiqa XR is not intended for intravenous, intra-arterial, intrathecal, intramuscular, or intra-peritoneal injection. Do not use on mice or rats with pre-existing respiratory deficiencies. Do not keep rats on wood chip-type bedding after administration of Ethiqa XR. Use caution with concomitant administration of Ethiqa XR with drugs that cause respiratory depression. For Humans: Ethiqa XR should only be administered by a veterinarian or laboratory staff trained in the handling of potent opioids. Protective clothing is recommended to avoid direct contact with human skin or mucus membranes which could result in absorption of buprenorphine and adverse reactions. Not for use in humans. For more information, consult the Prescribing Information including the boxed warning located on the next page. ethiqaxr.com 833-EthiqaXR (833-384-4729) © 2021 Fidelis Pharmaceuticals, LLC February 2021 FID-ETH-024

All Rights Reserved


AALAS Serves

AALAS in the community

Making a Difference One Sign at a Time Inspirational quote wall started last year continues to boost morale.

By Karen Briar; Danielle E. Covington, DVM, DACLAM; Penny L. Devlin, MLAS, RLATG; Brooke Fulginiti, CVA; Kasandra Rubendall, BS; and Tiffany L. Whitcomb, DVM, DACLAM

D

uring the early days of COVID-19, Karen Briar, an animal caretaker at the Penn State College of Medicine, decided to help improve the Comparative Medicine department’s team morale by handwriting motivational quotes. The department experienced staffing shortages during the pandemic, and she wanted to help motivate employees and alleviate stress. Although not all of Karen’s coworkers shared her vision, she continued to persevere and spread positivity. Karen’s efforts began with a simple dry erase board in March. She started by writing short messages on Fridays and Mondays. This grew into a daily ritual. During the pandemic’s toughest days, she took it upon herself to develop inspiring and relevant messages. On her scheduled days off, other coworkers followed her lead and continued the daily ritual.

MAD: Making a Difference

As the daily ritual gained momentum, writing quotes on the small dry erase board morphed into writing them on plain paper and then, with the support of the animal care supervisor, eventually on colorful paper. Karen taped the quotes in the animal facility’s entrance hallway. The result was a vibrantly decorated hallway filled with cheerful messages. Some of these quotes included daily affirmations and friendly notes to improve mood and morale. A staff favorite was “We are all M.A.D. here, Making A Difference.” Danielle Covington, a veterinarian at Penn State, arrived at the university five months into the shutdown. “I was eager to begin in my new role; I must admit that it was oddly strange to be in a new place with so few people around. Seeing the positive and encouraging quotes lining the corridor walls brought a smile to my face every time I walked by them. I even began to memorize my favorite ones,” Covington said. She added that it was comforting to know she had joined a team that visibly cared for the mental wellbeing of its teammates, especially during a time filled with so much uncertainty. Animal care technician Brooke 36 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

Karen Briar and Brooke Fulginiti holding their favorite inspirational quote: We are all MAD here – Making A Difference!


new ways every day reconnected everyone to their motivation. Zig Ziglar is often quoted, “Motivation doesn’t last. Well, neither does bathing. That’s why we recommend it daily.” Inspiring coworkers and keeping the team’s morale high became even more important during the pandemic when the facility felt empty. Gary Dividock is an independent service provider who visited the facility and purposefully walked that hallway to see what new quotes were posted. He noted he enjoyed reading and rereading the quotes. “I often worked some of them into my daily conversations, as they seemed to fit the events of the time and still do today,” Dividock said. Staff learned how they inspire each other to keep going, even when they feel they cannot. Leaning on one another is powerful; it helped build stronger bonds. Researcher Maryknoll Palisoc noted that the signs served as a great reminder to find something positive and meaningful in daily life. "As the pandemic disrupted our everyday lives, it has been more difficult to be productive and easier to feel isolated. We are resilient and stronger than we know,” Palisoc said. Now that the seeds of inspiration have been planted, staff plans to continue to shower colleagues with inspiring acts.

Conclusion

Wall of inspiration!

Fulginiti said she looked forward to reading the quotes. “I never knew what quote I would see next. They were all relevant to the situation of the pandemic we were going through,” Fulginiti said. Fulginiti was so inspired that she picked up where Karen left off when her colleague was not there.

Touching Lives One Sign at a Time

The inspirational quotes touched many lives. People from diverse roles and backgrounds shared how meaningful the signs were to them. For Karen, creating and giving the signs gave her a sense of joy. For those receiving her gift, vendors, faculty veterinarians, and researchers, the message was a beacon of hope and communicated compassion. Kasey Rubendall, an animal care supervisor, was touched that Karen took the initiative to inspire her co-workers. “I enjoyed reading the new quotes; it gave me something to look forward to each morning," Rubendall said.

Inspiring Motivation

Through Karen’s efforts, staff learned that inspiring others in

The quotes are still on display. From outside vendors to in-house staff, Karen’s messages lining the hallway continue to make an impact. While Karen wrote these messages for others, she also wanted to improve her outlook and morale while at work. Little did she know this seemingly small act would have such a wide-reaching impact. Karen Briar, is an Animal Caretaker at Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, PA

Danielle E. Covington, DVM, DACLAM, is an Assistant Professor of Comparative Medicine and Clinical Veterinarian at Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, PA Penny L. Devlin, MLAS, RLATG, is the Program Manager of Comparative Medicine at Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, PA.

Brooke Fulginiti, Certificated Veterinary Assistance, is an Animal Care Technician at Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, PA Kasandra Rubendall, BS, is the Animal Care Supervisor of Comparative Medicine at Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, PA.

Tiffany L. Whitcomb, DVM, DACLAM, is an Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine and Associate Director of Animal Resources at Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, PA. September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 37


Inside the IACUC IACUC administrators are laser focused when it comes to onboarding new PIs, which is commonly referred to the “new PI Orientation.” This onboarding and orientation training is vital for setting PIs up for success, and many presentations, articles, and tips have been developed over the years to discuss how institutions can improve their onboarding processes. However, what happens when a PI departs an institution is much less discussed. Typically, when PI departures are discussed, it is usually due to some non-compliance that resulted from an unknown or ill-managed departure. Courtney Mitchell’s article in this issue’s Inside the IACUC explores how one institution developed a rigorous program for PI departures. The goal of the program is to ensure that PIs are aware of all of their options when preparing to leave an institution and that compliance, along with IACUC oversight, is maintained as animals are transitioned onto other protocols or transported to other institutions. Originally published as a poster presentation for the virtual 2020 Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIM&R) Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Conference, I hope you enjoy the information provided here about how one institution formalized their PI departure process. Stacy Pritt, DVM, MS, MBA, CPIA, CHRC, DACAW

Where in the World Is Dr. Carmen Sandiego: Management of Principal Investigators Departing Your Institution

By Courtney Mitchell, MS, CPIA; Kathryn Cavanaugh, BS, CPIA; Stacy Pritt, DVM, MS, MBA, CPIA, CHRC, ECoP (EAR), DACAW

U

T Southwestern Medical Center’s animal program includes approximately 300 principal investigators (PIs) and 765 protocols. Within an animal program of this size, there is a constant flux of investigators coming and going from the institution. One of the challenges with investigators leaving the university is ensuring that their animal protocols have been appropriately transferred or closed, and the disposition of all animals included in these protocols has been determined, prior to the PI's departure. Our IACUC Office previously relied on informal communication networks to stay informed about upcoming PI departures. Over time, we recognized that a structured process for receiving information about PIs departures and preemptively providing guidance to PIs and various components of the animal care and use program could be adopted to improve efficiency and effectiveness. To this end, the IACUC Office at UT Southwestern developed defined communication channels to become aware of PI departures, composed educational resources to help PIs navigate their departure, and developed intradepartmental resources to track the status of the PI’s departure progress and confirm completion. To achieve the goal of restructuring our communications process for PI departures, the IACUC Office sought to obtain access to the university's Faculty Termination List. The Faculty Termination List is an internal institutional email that is sent weekly and lists all faculty members that will be departing along with their prospective departure date. This list was previously only provided to the Animal Resource Center (ARC) but the IACUC Office was added to its distribution as a first step in our redesigned process (Figure 1). When the name of a PI for an IACUC protocol appears on this list, the IACUC Office reaches out to that PI to inquire about their plans for their currently active protocols and, if needed, gives them options if they have not yet determined the

38 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

disposition of their protocol(s). In select cases, the departing PI may respond clarifying, that they will transition to another employment status, but will continue to conduct animal research. However, most commonly, the departing PI will respond with their action plan for closing or transferring their protocols. The IACUC Office will then share these plans with designated individuals within the ARC. The preemptive outreach to the ARC allows that office to better prepare for the shipment or transfer of any animals. It is very common that PIs will ship animals to another institution prior to their departure. If the PI cannot arrange for the ARC to ship out the desired animals prior to their departure date (and protocol closure), the IACUC Office will again act as the central point of contact and inform the PI and the ARC that the remaining animals will be placed on the ARC holding protocol until the rest of their shipments are complete. These communication processes focusing on the PI's departure, orchestrated through the IACUC Office, provides an efficient departure activated by the PI, IACUC, and ARC. In tandem with these communication efforts, the IACUC Office has also developed a preemptive outreach strategy by creating a PI Departure Information Page on the IACUC webpage. This webpage was created by the IACUC Office in an effort to establish a "one-stop-shop" for departing PIs, providing relevant information on the available


PI Contacts IACUC Office

Figure 1. PI departure communication flow.

options for their protocols such as protocol closure, protocol transfer, or moving any remaining animals on the ARC Holding protocol if shipping timelines will overlap with their departure date. The webpage is continually updated with new information that PIs may find helpful during their departure. For example, the IACUC Office noted that protocol transfer was a common option exercised by departing PIs and questions commonly arose on how to complete this transfer. In response, the IACUC Office created a tutorial on how to submit an amendment to transfer their protocols to another UT Southwestern PI. This tutorial was added to the webpage, along with instructions encouraging PIs to remove/update any personnel who will no longer be conducting animal work on the protocol and remove/update any studies that will no longer be conducted with the transfer. The webpage also directs the investigator to contact the IACUC Office about their upcoming departure, establishing the IACUC Office as the definitive point of contact. This webpage outlines available options for closing or transferring their protocol, and the PIs are directed to submit any protocol transfer amendments at an appropriate timeline determined by the IACUC Office. Since launching the PI departure page, the PIs have demonstrated a better understanding of what is expected prior to their departure date. In addition, the webpage has provided the IACUC Office one location to direct PIs, lab managers, or departmental administrators if they have questions about our PI departure process and protocol transfers. As a complement to the established departure process, the IACUC Office developed an electronic document to track the progress of PI departures. This electronic document is

managed by one designated staff member and was designed to track and document the PI departure process in real time (Figure 2). The designated staff member will maintain this internal document and include up to date information on the name of the PI departing, their departure date, current active protocols, plan for those protocols (closed or transferred), the species and cage inventory for each protocol, all communication dates with the PI, and the status of any amendments in progress. In addition to tracking the status of ongoing departures, it also serves as an archival list of all previous protocol closures/ transfers as well. The use of this document has allowed for all information pertaining to an investigator's departure to be easily accessed by the IACUC Office staff. The use of an internal electronic document has resulted in office members being on the same track and having access to the most up-to-date information. Through the restructured communication process and educational resources made available by the IACUC Office, the PIs are better informed on the IACUC's expectations for what needs to be accomplished prior to their departure. It also aids in the collaboration between the IACUC Office and the ARC to ensure that all departure activities are appropriately completed between the two departments. The status of these departures is kept on track through the development of the intradepartmental document in the IACUC Office, which enables staff to stay informed on all activities and timelines associated with the departure. Since implementing these practices in late 2019, our office has had no non-compliances related to PI departures and has successfully managed the departure of 22 PIs and the closure or transfer of 47 animal protocols. September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 39


PI Name

Sandiego, Carmen

Doe, John

Departure Date

APNs

Confirmation

Species

Cage Count

APN Status

Notes

1234-567891

PI to Close APN on X/X/2020

Mus

0

Protocol Set to Expire on X/X/2020

Confirmation on PI (Date); Confirmed with ARC - 0 cages (Cage Counts as of X/X/XX)

9876-543210

PI to Transfer APN to Dr. Chase Devineaux

Rattus

48

Amendment Submitted X/X

Confirmation on PI (Date); ARC Confirmed 48 cages (Date); Amendment sent for Committee Review (Date)

1313-131313

Protocol Transferred to Dr. Jane TOPAZ

Mus

12

Amendment Submitted and Approved on X/X/XX

Confirmation on PI (Date); Confirmed with ARC -12 cages (Cage Counts as of X/X/XX);

1111-222222

Protocol Closed

Pig

0

Protocol Closed X/X/2020

Confirmation on PI (Date); ARC Confirmed 0 Animals (Date);

X/X/2020

X/X/2020

Figure 2. Intradepartmental electronic document to track the progress of PI departures.

Key: Protocol Closed Set to Expire Transfer Amendment Submitted Transfer Completed

After employing these processes, we have refined our methods to include the IACUC Chair on initial communication emails sent to the ARC. Our IACUC Chair is the designated reviewer of transfer amendments, and we have found it advantageous to include our Chair on this communication, so that they are aware of the departure and any upcoming transfer amendments. These methods of communication and internal process improvements are well suited for both large and small institutionsai162973132535_ElmHillLabs_ad.pdf looking to increase efficiency in1their PI departure 8/23/2021 10:08:48 process.

Courtney Mitchell, MS, CPIA, is a Senior Regulatory Analyst at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, TX. Kathryn Cavanaugh, BS, CPIA, is an IACUC Manager at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, TX. Stacy Pritt, DVM, MS, MBA, CPIA, CHRC, DACAW is Assistant Vice President at UT Southwestern Medical Center in AM Dallas, TX.

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40 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021



ALLENTOWN NEWS

The following is sponsored content

Improving Life—It’s in Our DNA

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ne value, one purpose, and one philosophy drives the people of Allentown—to service science with integrity and care. Dedicated exclusively to serving the biomedical and life sciences industries, Allentown’s workforce focuses on providing laboratory animal science leaders with customizable solutions to improve human and animal life through scientific discovery. With operations in the U.S., France, U.K., and Switzerland, and distributors worldwide, Allentown’s global presence covers over 54 countries. Our growth from a small, high-tech steel factory founded in 1968 to a global solutions provider in 2021 can be attributed to strong business integrity, talent, exacting attention to detail, and unparalleled client service. Improving life is truly in our DNA as our tagline references, and while the industry has historically associated Allentown with providing innovative animal housing solutions and services, over the past year Allentown has expanded its LAS offerings to include even more options that enhance the safety of lab staff and the quality of management and care of lab animals.

Contamination Control and Research Anesthesia—The Difference Is in the Details

Through our continuous evolution over the past 53 years into a global life sciences solution provider, and looking ahead to the future, we are continuously inspired to forge strategic partnerships and to develop and contribute new, useful products and services to support life-saving discovery. Recently, Allentown launched sterilization bags, the first and only of their kind in the industry with process-changing indicators signaling when the bags have completed a sterilization process. Reducing user error and protecting against cage damage, this easy-to-use solution is but one example of how the Allentown difference is truly in the details. For ease and urgency, this product and others can be purchased from Allentown’s convenient online store: https://store.allentowninc.com/. Our deep experience with sterilization makes Allentown a reliable resource, from the finer details like sterilization bags to large scale operational challenges. In Fall 2020, Allentown created the Capital Equipment Division comprised of a group of highly experienced washing and sterilization professionals focused specifically on designing, manufacturing, installing, and servicing capital equipment for biomedical research facilities. Allentown is the exclusive provider of Matachana sterilizers and sterilization monitoring products for lab or vivarium applications. Our partnership with this international leader uniquely positions Allentown as a provider that can offer animal housing and a full line of decontamination, as well as washing and sterilization solutions, allowing us to support our customers even more completely worldwide. Rounding out the company’s contamination control offerings is a new product line featuring the highest

quality and eco-friendly workspace cleaning solutions and hand sanitizers. For use on everything from caging to safety cabinets and beyond, the Stereze workspace cleaners are 70% high-purity IPA as recommended by the CDC for disinfecting surfaces. The complementary FDA registered, high-purity alcohol-based fluid hand sanitizers offer even further personal protection for researchers and staff. Early this year, Allentown added a new product line of research anesthesia equipment and anesthesia system and vaporizer services for the animal welfare and research community. Allentown is the exclusive representative for SOMNI Scientific, a company that has been at the cutting edge of vaporizer and anesthesia system design for over 35 years. With a focus on clinical accuracy, clinician and technician safety, economic performance, and intuitive functionality, Allentown and SOMNI together deliver tailored solutions to exceed the expectations of the world’s leading institutions.

Going the Extra Mile

Allentown has unmatched practical experience as a solutions provider to the global LAS community, especially as it relates to helping our clients overcome day-to-day operational and housing challenges faced within their lab animal programs. We go the extra mile because that just might be the factor that helps determine a scientific breakthrough. Putting research first, Allentown will continue its growth to best support our customers’ evolving needs. Contact info@allentowninc.com to learn more.

42 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

Allentown Professional Education Resources Nearly 700 professionals across the globe registered to attend Allentown’s recent monthly educational webinar on animal enrichment. The LinkedIn Group “The Value of Enrichment” was created to keep the conversation going. Board certified lab animal veterinarian, Timothy D. Mandrell, DVM, DACLAM, is group moderator and will be joined by guest moderators. Be a part of the conversation: https://bit.ly/enrichment-group


BIO-SERV NEWS

The following is sponsored content

Disposable Enrichment as a Budget Friendly Option for Advancing Animal Welfare

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io-Serv has been producing this successful line of enrichment for many years, which has been driven in part by our ability to respond to and meet the ever-changing needs of the research community. This year has been an exceptional year and labor shortages and budget constraints have been key points of discussion in the laboratory animal community. As a result of these constraints, the demand for disposable enrichment has increased as a means of reducing labor needs and softening husbandry budgets. What does disposable enrichment mean? At Bio-Serv, it means an economical and cleverly designed product that is made of paper or cardboard material that is intended to be single-use enrichment that can be disposed of at time of cage change or pen cleaning. We currently offer several disposable enrichment products, including our Nesting Sheets, Bio-Huts for Mice, and our Bio-Tunnels for mice and rats. Nesting Sheets are a lint-free, Certified (contaminant screened) thin paper sheet that provide a safer nesting substrate as compared to cotton, which can sometimes entangle digits or cause ocular irritation. Bio-Huts for mice are a Certified (contaminant screened) virgin pulp paper house that provides shelter, gnawing, and nesting opportunities. Bio-Tunnels for mice and rats are made of 100% recycled pulp paper and reduce boredom and aggressive behavior by providing sheltering, nesting, and gnawing enrichment for rodents. We have designed two new disposable enrichment options that we are very excited to introduce this year. Many of our customers find great value in our non-disposable polycarbonate Fat Rat Hut because it provides sheltering and climbing options for over-sized or group housed rats. The enormous success of the Fat Rat Hut is due to its ability to meet

Bio-Huts for Rats

the incredibly important physiologic and behavioral need for rats to shelter. Animal care staff are pleased that their mature oversized rats can have a garage-style hut they can fit into when seeking shelter. With this in mind, we designed the Fat Rat Hut in a disposable paper option called the Bio-Hut for Rats. It is the exact same design as the Fat Rat Hut, but made of 100% virgin pulp paper, and is also Certified (contaminant screened). The benefit of the paper material is that it provides enrichment for several rat behaviors. Plump rats or socially housed rats can shelter in it, climb and rest on top of it, or gnaw it to make a nest out of the paper material. The Bio-Huts are autoclave-safe and can be purchased gamma irradiated as an option for barrier facilities. Our newest disposable enrichment product is the Hide N’ Seek Shelter. Bio-Serv has had numerous requests for a disposable shelter that would accommodate larger species including rabbits, guinea pigs, ferrets, and primates. Working with our knowledgeable and experienced customers, who provided incredible feedback on product design, we were able to successfully develop a larger cardboard triangular shelter. This shelter is shipped flat and packed 20/case. Each shelter is easily assembled. The Hide N’ Seek Shelter is made of cardboard and is Certified (contaminant screened). The shape of the shelter is ideal as the flat bottom provides comfy paw pad relief from mesh flooring and is roomy enough to shelter one or more larger species. This product not only offers shelter, but the cardboard material encourages gnawing and shredding opportunities.

Visit us at booth 1713 to see these products and many more! Hide N' Seek Shelter—Our newest disposable enrichment

September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 43


ClearH2O News

AquaFeed Z ®

Gel Technology: Addressing Zebrafish Husbandry Challenges The First Gel Diet Specifically Formulated for Zebrafish With the increasing popularity of zebrafish as a research model, there is corresponding focus on optimizing husbandry practices to address the current challenges of inefficient feed delivery, waste management, and standardized nutrition. Diet, and its form, is a key component to solving these challenges. ClearH2O, well-known by the research laboratory animal community as leaders in product innovation for hydration, nutrition, and medication delivery gel supplements and diets for terrestrial lab animals, has applied their proprietary technology to developing the first aquatic gel diet specifically formulated for zebrafish, AquaFeed® Z. AquaFeed®Z represents the introduction of ClearH2O’s gel delivery platform incorporating a diet formula based on the most up-to-date knowledge of the specific nutritional requirements for zebrafish integrated into a sustained delivery gel cube. The physical properties of the AquaFeed®Z gel cube elicits a more natural grazing behavior in contrast to the frantic, binge feeding associated with dry flake or pelleted diets. AquaFeed®Z improves fish health and welfare by supporting uniform feeding by all fish, reducing competition and stress. Truly unique to the gel product format of AquaFeed® Z, is the physical property of being cut into a clean, consistent unit of measure; 1 cube = 1 gram. Feeding guidelines indicate the dosage of 1 gram per 10 adult zebrafish, making this unit of measure convenient for technicians to easily scale up or down depending on fish tank density. In addition, in contrast to dry diets, handling of the gel cube allows for clean application outside and inside the fish tank.

AquaFeed® Z is ready-to-use, room temperature shelfstable, and packaged in 190 gram pouches. 30 pouches per case.

AquaFeed® Cutting Device produces uniform 1 gram cubes for clean consistent dose administration.

The Clearly Better Diet Solution for Zebrafish Husbandry Nutrient Specific – Formulation based on nutrient requirements that researchers have identified as specific for zebrafish growth, reproduction, and maintenance. Quality Ingredients - Made with purified ingredients, including sustainable protein with high digestibility for optimum nutrient utilization. No fillers, added starches, or binders.

Natural Feeding – Gel cube properties provide for a longer feeding period and more natural grazing behavior, reducing stress and competition for food, resulting in improved fish welfare. Consistent Unit of Measure – Designed to be cut into uniform 1 gram cubes for ease of clean and consistent feed administration. Each cube of AquaFeed® Z is 1 gram. The firm gel properties allow for clean and consistent administration.

Visit us at AALAS 2021 at our Booth #1637 to learn more. See you in Kansas City. www.clearh2o.com



SOMNI SCIENTIFIC NEWS

The following is sponsored content

Get Active: Solutions to Waste Anesthetic Gas Exposure By Ryan Sullivan

ISEE No Problem

When it comes to the equipment checks, visual cues are often taken, and when seeing no problem, there can be the misconception that everything is working correctly. Halogenated anesthetic agents such as isoflurane are commonly used in the lab environment for animal research. Inhalant anesthesia is quick, cost-effective, and can be maintained for long periods. However, waste gas scavenging has not been performed effectively to protect those in the laboratory until recently. It is becoming a significant issue as Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) departments are taking notice of exposure levels to users. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) states that the recommended exposure limit (REL) should not exceed 2ppm over an 8-hour time-weighted average for the technician. As we know, if the technician can smell isoflurane, they are well exceeding those limits, often many hundred times greater. Headaches, dizziness, and nausea are all common symptoms of repeat exposure to isoflurane, which can be avoided with new state-of-theart equipment.

What Is the Difference: Active vs. Passive

In the past, the standard of collecting waste gases has been through passive methods. This method depends on the delivery gas to push the waste gas into an activated charcoal canister or create a seal around the subject’s nose, which would not allow the waste gas to enter the workplace. The problem with this method is that the gases are very volatile and will follow the path of least resistance. Once the gases have entered the workplace air, they are tough to capture because of their properties. Instead of depending on flowrates to push the gases to their waste gas collection filters, it is much more efficient to actively draw these gases to a device and then exhaust them either to a filter or a non-recirculating fume hood. The issue with this is the risk of removing too much gas and affecting the subject’s depth of

anesthesia, causing the subject to awaken. Therefore, a vacuum or suction must be attenuated with specific vacuum-designed devices (nose cones, induction chambers, etc.). These accessories and attenuating the vacuum are the keys to making an active scavenge system work.

The Solution

The Exposure Prevention System (EPS-3), designed by Somni Scientific, is a self-contained three-station flowmeter controlled active waste gas scavenging system designed to solve the problems mentioned above. The EPS-3 is powered by an internal linear vacuum pump that can pull 45 lpm (liters per minute). Equipped with three independent flowmeters for attenuation of the vacuum allows for a combination of devices to be used simultaneously. Each of the three scavenging ports includes a stopcock to allow independent scavenging flow and can be turned off when not in use without the need to change the flowmeter setting. A rear discharge port pushes the collected waste gas into a large charcoal filter (such as the SOMNI WAG Canister) or a non-recirculating fume hood, which can be utilized to dispose of the waste gases if the lab is equipped. The EPS3 is compact (12 × 8 × 7 in) and lightweight (14 lbs.) and is equipped with a safety auto-off timer switch that shuts the unit down after a selectable period. The SOMNI EPS-3 is also available as a non-pump version that can be used with an in-house active vacuum system. The non-pump option is a perfect fit for facilities that can use their in-house vacuum system but want a way to attenuate it or control multiple stations. Somni Scientific has developed a selection of accessories that work with an active vacuum system, such as the EPS-3. SOMNI’s accessories include various nose cones and manifolds that are magnetically positioned and multiple induction chambers that have been independently tested to meet NIOSH REL standards. SOMNI’s manifold systems can accompany three, five, and up to 10 mice at one time.

Ryan Sullivan is an Industrial Designer and Director of Research and Development for Somni Scientific. 46 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021


Getinge, bringing science to life We support every step of your journey—from science, to life. We help scientists and engineers move from idea to innovation—from threat to cure. By leveraging our deep application know-how and global footprint, Getinge partners with scientists and engineers to develop and manufacture better pharmaceuticals. We focus on contamination prevention and upstream bioprocessing to provide tailored, efficient, and compliant solutions to our customers and partners who are dedicated to prevent, mitigate, and cure diseases — saving lives.

At AALAS 2021, visit Getinge at Booth 1323 Getinge is a registered trademark of Getinge AB, its subsidiaries, or affiliates in the United States or other countries • Copyright 2021 Getinge AB or its subsidiaries or affiliates • All rights reserved

Explore all we have to offer! https://www.getinge.com/us/solutions/ life-science/


Management/Career & Training

Human Connection – The Authentic Networking Experience of an AALAS National Meeting By Jarrod Nichol, MBA, PMP, CLSSBB, Prosci

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fter one of the most challenging years in modern times, it will be wonderful to greet old and new friends at the AALAS National Meeting. Travel restrictions are being lifted, and the global vaccination effort is in full swing, with many countries slowly returning to some semblance of normalcy. While the meeting is a great place to interact with incredible vendors and learn about the newest products, it is also a perfect place to sit back and take notes during the constant stream of quality presentations. Both are worth the trip, but I have found two irreplaceable National Meeting components. I refer to these as official and unofficial human connection opportunities, also known as networking.

Official Human Connection Opportunities

AALAS workshops are a fantastic official human connection opportunity. Workshops cover various topics, from surgical practices to animal welfare enhancements and management techniques. You will find something interesting. These unique sessions are almost always interactive and present opportunities to meet with individuals you likely do not know in a controlled environment. It is easier to get to know people in a workshop, especially since most break the attendees into smaller groups or teams. Over the years, I have met with hundreds of people in these workshops, and I am proud to say I now consider many of them friends. I reach out to these people when I am struggling with a particular problem in my vivarium or when I want to brainstorm. A recent example of how profound these friendships can be is when I needed to organize an external audit. We are often requested to perform an external audit to ensure we are maintaining industry best practices outside of government-regulated guidelines and policies. In other words, we like to ensure we’re up to date on items like animal enrichment, staff development, etc. When the time came to put together the team, who do you think I contacted? I went to colleagues I had met at workshops I had attended. In the end, we had three excellent professionals help, and the external audit was profoundly informative. These workshops are educational, highly informative, and a great way to break the ice and meet people. The workshops are also a fantastic entry point to some of the larger AALAS-sponsored events. The contacts you make at these events are irreplaceable. 48 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

Unofficial Human Connection Opportunities

So what are these unofficial human connection opportunities? These are opportunities that typically develop from official events. I have been invited to dinner or to go sightseeing with people I met at official events. Usually, these invitations evolve into a small group and more networking opportunities result. That means more experience you can pull from and more people to add to your digital Rolodex. One year during the Austin, Texas, National Meeting, we had just finished a workshop on leadership development using continuous improvement methodologies when I overheard one of my teammates talking about bats. I initially thought they had bats in their vivarium, but it turns out they knew of a place in Austin (Congress Bridge) where bats fly out at sunset to snack on the bugs over the water. You can see this between mid-March to early November, which was perfect as the National Meeting was right at the end of bat season. I asked about the bats, and before I knew it, we were on the Congress Bridge, watching hundreds of thousands of bats flying around. It was a remarkable experience, and I stayed in touch with this group ever since. It does not get more unofficial or unexpected than that.

Authenticity Is Genuine

Regardless of how you meet new people, the key to successful networking is being open and true to yourself. You don’t need a plan and you don’t need a set of subjects to talk about—just be yourself. In the context of the National Meeting, I always tell people to start with the workshops and see where things go from there. AALAS has many wonderful networking opportunities, including local events, dinners, and more. Jared Nichol, MBA, PMP, CLSSBB, Prosci, is a Continuous Improvement Program Manager in the Comparative Medicine and Animal Resources Centre at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.


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ENRICHMENT ITEM

TOYS, TREATS, AND TIPS

DIY: Acacia Gum Hanging Saucer By Kelsey Lambert, BS, LATG

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his DIY hanging item is great for NHP and swine. All dietary items should be approved by your veterinarian for the intended species and individual before use.

Ingredients:

• Acacia Gum or Arabic Gum (available from Bio-Serv) • Liquid • Can use water, or other approved flavored liquids or juices • We use Gatorade Zero to make a diabetic or low-calorie friendly treat

Supplies (Figure 1): • • • •

Hanging Saucer (available from Bio-Serv) Mixing cup (we used a 3oz dixie cup) Wooden popsicle stick to mix and spread or a spoon Optional – foraging items (hay, seeds, cereal, oats, etc.)

Directions (Figure 2):

Figure 2

Figure 1

50 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

1. Mix 3 parts acacia gum powder with 1 part liquid (though this could be adjusted based on desired consistency) 2. Smear acacia paste on saucer (can use stir stick/spoon or put on gloves to smear by hand) 3. Top with desired foraging options (organic unshelled pumpkin seeds, hay, and un-sweet coconut flakes shown here) 4. Freeze ~3-6 hours 5. Once frozen, hang on mesh of enclosure and secure clip a. Quick link clip (shown here) will need to be tightened with pliers when hanging for NHP.


INSTECH NEWS

The following is sponsored content

Refinements in Catheter Lock and Flush Solutions for Laboratory Animals L aboratory animals are often catheterized for repeated blood sampling, such as for pharmacokinetic studies, or for infusion of test compounds. Researchers use lock solutions to keep the catheter patent (free of blockages such as blood clots) when they will not be accessed for a long time, such as the days when the animal is recovering from surgery. Flush solutions are used in the process of accessing the catheter: pulling out the lock solution, checking patency, pushing in a bolus dose or clearing blood remaining in the catheter after sampling. Non-sterile solutions can cause patency problems or infections which could compromise your research and the animal’s health. The quality of these solutions deserves as much attention as you give to the catheter you will implant, your surgical procedures and the preparation of your test article.

Making Your Own

Preparing lock or flush solutions in house can be convenient and cost effective. Pharmaceutical grade 0.9% saline and heparin-sodium are usually readily available from clinical suppliers. Follow strict aseptic procedures so that the solution remains sterile up to the moment you inject it into the catheter. Pay careful attention to expiration dates. Once opened, multi-dose vials should be used within 28 days. Maintaining sterility when adding heparin to an IV bag of saline through the injection port is straightforward, but more complex formulations and filling of syringes can be challenging. If you don’t have access to the proper procedures, equipment and a controlled environment including a biosafety cabinet, and you are not able to test your solutions to ensure they are sterile, you should strongly consider buying them off-the-shelf.

How Can I Ensure Solutions I Buy Are of the Highest Quality?

The gold standard for compound quality is pharmaceutical grade: meeting the standards set by the US Pharmacopeia (USP) or other regional pharmacopeias for chemical purity. If you are injecting novel pharmaceutical compounds, why would you risk your research by flushing them with solutions of unknown quality? Here’s what to look for: Pharmaceutical Grade: Heparin in particular has a notoriously twisted supply chain,2 starting with pig farms in China. Contaminated heparin harmed hundreds of patients in 2008, leading the FDA to require improved testing3 to receive the USP designation. And yet non-pharmaceutical-grade heparin remains readily available from many suppliers. Using pharmaceutical-grade ingredients is not the same as a pharmaceutical-grade end product. Be careful.

USP: Look for the USP mark on the label. Sterile USP solutions will have been prepared according to the USP <797> standard4 for compounding sterile pharmaceutical preparations. Sterile: At minimum, your product should be clearly labeled sterile. You must then follow careful procedures to make sure you can maintain a sterile product until injection. For example, syringes with tips that are not sealed will not keep the contents sterile.

What Does AAALAC Say?

AAALAC International states that using pharmaceutical-grade compounds, if available, is preferred in some situations and required in others.1 If you are using non-pharmaceutical-grade flush or lock solutions, your IACUC should require a justification.

Using Sterile Solutions Is a 3Rs Refinement

Researchers work diligently to ensure that studies are carefully conducted, skilled surgeries are performed using aseptic techniques, and extra efforts are made to ensure catheter patency. A blocked catheter is not just a nuisance, but it costs time, money, and a potentially wasted animal. If you care about your research, and the animals you work with, be sure to make the use of sterile, pharmaceutical-grade solutions a standard practice in your research. Learn more at https://instech.mobi/sterile-solutions

REFERENCES 1. AAALAC. [Internet]. 2020. Accreditation program. [Cited 20 July 2021]. Available at: https://www.aaalac.org/accreditation-program/ faqs/#B9 2. Barboza D, Bogdanich W. [Internet]. 2008. Twists in chain of supplies for blood drug. New York Times. [Cited 20 July 2021]. Available at: https://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/28/world/asia/28drug.html. 3. United States Food and Drug Administration. [Internet]. 2018. Information on heparin. [Cited 20 July 2021]. Available at: https://www. fda.gov/drugs/postmarket-drug-safety-information-patients-and-providers/information-heparin 4. USP. [Internet]. 2020. General chapter <797> pharmaceutical compounding – sterile preparations. [Cited 20 July 2021]. Available at: https://www.usp.org/compounding/general-chapter-797

September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 51


KENT SCIENTIFIC NEWS

The following is sponsored content

The History & Safety of Isoflurane Use in Animal Surgery

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soflurane is a halogenated ether compound commonly used as an inhalant anesthesia to induce and maintain general anesthesia in research animals. It is a clear, colorless, volatile liquid at standard temperature and pressure, with a mild, ether-like odor. Some insight into its history and safety considerations can help to inform lab personnel who work with isoflurane. Isoflurane was developed by chemists Louise Speers Croix and Ross C. Terrell, who synthesized new fluorinated compounds while working for Ohio Medical Products in the 1960s and 1970s. At the time, the most popular inhalant anesthetic was halothane—a nonflammable compound that quickly replaced ether and chloroform as the inhalant anesthesia of choice when it was introduced in 1956. Halothane presented issues with toxicity and side effects, so Croix and Terrell looked for a safer alternative. They came up with four: enflurane desflurane and sevoflurane and isoflurane. Isoflurane proved to be relatively safe and effective in clinical trials and produced anesthesia more quickly than halothane. Approved for medical use in the United States in 1979, it is now the most commonly used anesthetic gas in the veterinary and animal research fields. Isoflurane has several benefits over other inhalant anesthetics for lab animals. • Isn’t metabolized so has little or no toxic effects. • Enables anesthesia levels to be changed quickly. • Has minimal effects on cardiovascular function and cerebral blood flow. • Is relatively insoluble in blood and is gets expelled from the body quickly: quick recoveries.

Using Isoflurane Safely

Isoflurane is safer for animals and humans, although like every type of anesthesia, there are side effects on bodily systems and functions, especially with prolonged, repeated, or over exposure. Proper use minimizes the risks of these effects. Animals exposed to inappropriately high levels of isoflurane can experience depression of the respiratory and cardiovascular system, which can be life-threatening. Animals subjected to repeated isoflurane exposure have displayed motor and learning deficits and anxiety-related behavior. It is recommended that isoflurane be administered to lab animals using a vaporizer to precisely control the percentage of anesthetic in breathable gas. Isoflurane also affects humans administering anesthesia, making it important to minimize exposure to waste anesthetic gas (WAG)— small amounts of anesthetic that may leak into the environment. While studies and exposure level recommendations offer varying guidelines, it is generally agreed that in humans, short-term overexposure to isoflurane can lead to symptoms including: • • • • • • •

Eye, skin, and respiratory irritation Headache Dizziness Drowsiness or fatigue Nausea and vomiting Asphyxia Loss of consciousness

52 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

Effects of chronic exposure to isoflurane are not well documented, but symptoms include reduced mental performance, liver and kidney disease, and possible reproductive effects. Guidance suggests a conservative approach to any prolonged or repeated exposures. It is important that labs prevent leaks and spills, and use equipment that delivers precise amounts of inhalant gas with appropriate scavenging systems while following these practices that minimize WAG exposure: • Wearing personal protective equipment such as gloves and safety glasses • Ensuring a tight seal around the animal’s nose cone • Flushing the induction chamber with oxygen prior to opening the chamber to transfer animals • Providing a well-maintained environment with proper room temperature and adequate ventilation in surgical areas when inhalant anesthesia is used • Using an appropriate active or passive scavenging system to ensure no WAG escapes into the workspace • Employing a low-flow anesthesia system, which uses a fraction of the normal amount of isoflurane and produces minimal amounts of WAG • Performing routine checks and maintenance on equipment to prevent leakage With care, proper training, and the right procedures and equipment, isoflurane remains the safe anesthetic option for both humans and animals.


LABDIET NEWS

The following is sponsored content

Product Stability Defines the Shelf Life of LabDiet®: Studies under Real-world Conditions

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utritional quality of animal feed degrades over time, even under ideal storage conditions. Scientists and medical researchers are rightly concerned about animal food quality— valid experimental results depend on product consistency. However, reliance on a customary 180-day shelf life for LabDiet® products is overly cautious, costly, and wasteful. Vitamins are the most sensitive nutrients. Extensive research of LabDiet® products under real-world conditions demonstrates vitamin quality is sustained over longer periods, even beyond 12 months.

Background

Caution of lab animal professionals derives from research conducted decades ago. The most recent edition of Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals summarizes this, stating: “Most natural-ingredient, dry laboratory animal diets stored properly can be used up to 6 months after manufacture.” Importantly, the Guide continues with, “food storage time should be reduced to the lowest practical period and the manufacturers’ recommendations considered.” Previous research showed LabDiet® products are nutritionally complete up to 18 months from the date of manufacture (DOM) when stored under recommended temperature (<72⁰F/21⁰C) and relative humidity (RH; ≤ 50%). What about long-term exposure to real-world conditions?

Real-World Results

Global distribution involves ocean freight with bags packed in uninsulated steel shipping containers exposed to elements for weeks, sometimes months. Once in-country additional delays, unpredictable transportation, and variable storage conditions are realistic. Comprehensive studies of vitamin stability in LabDiet® products were performed on shipments to subtropical Taiwan and the temperate UK. Pacific transit: During the 50-day journey from US to Taiwan, temperature and humidity levels exceeded recommendations by up to 20⁰F and 20% RH (pictured to the right). After arrival, the Certified LabDiet® Dealer stored diets under recommended conditions. Atlantic transit: During the ~25 day journey to the UK, products were also exposed to great temperature and humidity variation. Unlike in Taiwan, continued storage conditions were variable. Degradation of labile vitamins A and E were greater in the Taiwan study. Thiamin loss was higher in the UK study. Regardless of loss observed, all diets continued to meet or exceed minimum nutrient requirements of the animals at the end of the 18 or 24 month testing periods.

Formulated for Longer Shelf Life in the Real World

LabDiet® formulates to meet or safely exceed animal requirements, despite suboptimal transportation and storage conditions. Results of these, and other studies illustrate LabDiet® products are nutritionally sound even when exposed to conditions that deviate beyond normal.

Using this proven safety margin, LabDiet® assures an expiration date for standard products at 9 months from DOM and 12 months from DOM for all irradiated diets. LabDiet® supports facilities adopting a similar “internal shelf life” protocol to dramatically reduce facility costs and product waste while assuring the integrity of lab animal nutrition to support research. For more information about the studies summarized above, including full citations, as well as nutrient stability after exposure to extreme temperature and humidity in the short-term, visit https://www.labdiet.com/ ProductStability/index.html or contact your LabDiet® representative. September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 53


LOMIR NEWS

The following is sponsored content

Animal Jacket Selection: Best Practices Ensuring Optimal Fit & Performance By Teresa Woodger, President, Lomir Biomedical

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he use of animal jackets in research protocols provides an immense potential for scientists and benefits may include improved animal comfort, reduced acclimation periods, enhanced quality and consistency of data collection, and limit the time spent handling animal subjects. To see these benefits, however, users must select jackets that provide the right fit, as well as features that will accommodate their unique protocols. The following concepts must be given careful thought before purchasing a jacketed solution.

Identify the species and size. Jackets that are too small or large may cause problems such as irritation from chafing. All models can be sized to fit any age and species, from neonatal minipigs to adult Yorkshire swine and baboons. Make sure to access your manufacturer’s measurement sheet and consider your protocol. Will your subjects be gaining significant mass and size during the process? If so, interchangeable, zippered spandex panels, for instance, can be introduced to accommodate changes in fast-growing swine. Consider how devices or equipment will pair with jackets. Custom-sized pockets and straps can be added to any jacket to integrate pumps, dermal patches, telemetry equipment, infusion sets, and more. For nonhuman primates in social settings, additional D-rings and zipper protectors can prevent interference with equipment. Additionally, pockets can be made with opaque fabric to protect photosensitive equipment. Select features that meet your protocols. As an example, a full body jacket is often used with a tether system, while 3/4-length jackets are better suited for less active subjects. The padded neck can be snug and high (standard) or lowered into a V-neck that accommodates a pole-and-collar restraint

54 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

system. If you are working with the manufacturer, jackets can be adapted to meet any such requirement. Opt for an undershirt. Made with spandex and moisture wicking fabrics, undershirts can be used to secure telemetry equipment and other devices. They may even serve to protect dermal application sites and surgery sites, thus eliminating the need for bandaging. For subjects with sensitive skin, such as swine species, undershirts may also reduce chafing. Plan for acclimation. This essential process must be considered before purchasing a jacket. Ask the manufacturer about the latest solutions. In recent years, a number of specialized solutions have become available, thanks to advances in materials technology and the miniaturization of devices. These include: smart undershirts that provide integrated ECG leads and wires; full-body jackets for nonhuman primates, to track gait; and custom-colored jackets to track different groups in social housing. Our team has been designing and manufacturing innovative solutions since 1989. Contact us to discuss your next project. www.lomir.com | 1-877-425-3604


PEROXIGARD NEWS

The following is sponsored content

Three Questions to Ask for Building Effective Disinfection Protocols By Matthew Buccioni

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nimal research professionals understand the crucial role that disinfection plays in preventing disease outbreaks. However, a few small mistakes can get in the way when attempting to build effective protocols. As the creators of Peroxigard™ Disinfectants, we want to ensure that our users are equipped with the tools they need to protect their facilities against infection. Here are three questions that we recommend asking to make sure your disinfection protocols are in good working order: 1. Is your disinfectant effective against pathogens of concern? Many lab animal facilities have a specific bioexclusion list, or a “most wanted” list of the top viruses, bacteria and fungi that can threaten the health of their colonies. While it may not be essential for your disinfectant label to carry claims against every organism, it is critical that the product you choose is effective against a wide range of pathogens. Your disinfectant should be effective against a broad spectrum of hard-to-kill viruses, bacteria, and fungi to give you confidence that you will be covered against the pathogens that matter most. 2. Is your disinfectant properly prepared and labeled? Many disinfectants are offered in the form concentrates designed to be diluted in water. While this can be an economical choice for covering large areas, it also introduces opportunities for dangerous mistakes – over-diluting the disinfectant may make it ineffective against pathogens, while under-diluting may make the product less safe to handle and lead to money being poured down the drain. In addition, diluted concentrate will likely have a shorter shelf life than the full-strength solution, so it’s important to ensure that the solution is being used before it expires.

Many facilities have found that investing in an automated dilution system has helped reduce the risk of human error from hand-mixing solutions. We also recommend the use of test strips to validate concentrate dilutions, as well as workplace labels to mark down the expiry date, ensure that the product is still effective. Peroxigard is also available in readyto-use liquid and wipe formats, as a convenient option for daily cleaning and disinfection. 3. Are you achieving even surface coverage and contact time compliance? Even the best disinfectant can only be effective if it is able to reach pathogens on a surface. The disinfectant also needs to be in contact with the pathogens for a particular length of time – this is known as the product’s contact time. If the surface dries before this contact time has been reached, pathogens may be left behind. One strategy that we recommend to achieve proper surface coverage is to apply your disinfectant using a foaming application. Hose-end or pump-up foamers can help you quickly cover a large surface area with disinfectant, while helping the surface stay wet long enough to meet the product’s contact time. For smaller surfaces, foaming trigger sprayers or premoistened wipes can allow you to evenly cover the surface with disinfectant, ensuring that nothing gets missed. Choosing a disinfectant with rapid contact times is also essential, as this will enable you to realistically achieve compliance within a single application. Matthew Buccioni is an Infection Prevention and Biosecurity Specialist at Virox Technologies, creators of Peroxigard Disinfectants located in Oakville, Ontario, Canada. September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 55


TECH TIPS

Insights in husbandry, enrichment, and new techniques and tactics

Design and Construction of a Low-cost Mirror for Enrichment of Socially Isolated Pigs By Anne L Merley, DVM and Felicia D Duke Boynton, DVM, DACLAM

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igs are a common large animal model used in biomedical research due to their anatomic and physiologic similarities with humans.7 Because of their intelligence and social nature, close attention to their physical and social environment in research facilities is of utmost importance to their welfare.6 Due to their social needs, every effort should be made to house pigs with compatible conspecifics; however, there may be instances where due to experimental or veterinary concerns, single housing is necessary. In those situations, sensory contact with other pigs or if isolated additional enrichment should be provided.4 One type of item that has been utilized for pig enrichment are mirrors.5 Despite vision not being considered one of the main senses in pigs, pigs do have adequate visual acuity to distinguish images at close range.8 Although there is some debate on how pigs interact with and interpret mirror images (e.g. recognition of self vs. another pig, instrumental use to solve a problem), the general consensus is that they are able to recognize the images.1,3 In testing their preference between enrichment items (conspecific, mirror, mat) with humans present, isolated pigs preferred the conspecific and mirror equally.2 The authors interpreted this behavior as the mirror providing social support when a perceived threat is present. Based on these results, our institution decided to implement mirror use for our socially isolated pigs. The main considerations were the cost, ease of placement within the pen to accommodate the pigs’

Figure 2. Examples of adaptation of mirrors to other pen designs.

Figure 3. Pig utilizing mirror within the pen.

near-sightedness, and the product's durability to ensure safety of the animals. Large enrichment mirrors are available through select vendors but were not cost effective to implement at our large institution. Therefore, we sought to design and build mirrors that were economical and practical to put into use.

Materials and Methods Figure 1. Placement of the mirror within the pen.

56 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

All pigs housed with mirrors are on IACUC-approved studies at the University of Minnesota or the Mayo Clinic. At both


Figure 4. Example of reused mirror with minimal damage.

institutions, scientific justification is required for singly housed pigs. Acrylic mirror (48 × 24 × 0.118 in) was purchased from a vendor (Grainger Industrial Supply, Lake Forest, IL). Using a standard drill fitted with a ½ in drill bit, holes were drilled in at the top mirror 5 in from each side. To place the mirror in the pen, the bottom was placed within the gap between the tenderfoot and the pen wall (Figure 1). The top of the mirror was secured with plastic zip-ties through the drilled holes (Figure 1). This design was suited to fit one specific pen layout, but these mirrors can be adapted to fit other pen designs by shifting the location of the drill holes (Figure 2). As part of our enrichment program, these mirrors were added to the pen anytime a pig was singly housed even if there were conspecifics in the same room (Figure 3). The mirrors were sprayed off daily and scrubbed once per month along with the rest of the pen environment by the husbandry staff. The mirrors were found to be durable and were able to be reused (Figure 4). Rarely, the mirrors broke. This occurred most often with larger pigs and commonly in the bottom corners where the mirror rested between the tenderfoot and the pen wall (Figure 5). No injuries have been associated with the broken mirrors and they were simply replaced when noted by husbandry staff.

Conclusion

Based on the literature, mirrors were identified as a possible enrichment item that could be used to meet the guidelines for singly housed pigs. To implement mirrors on a wide scale in our facility, we purpose-built them out of mirrored acrylic. The design made it easy to build several mirrors for a low-cost. Given their durability, we have been able to reuse them and easily move mirrors between pens. By having these mirrors, we have been able to increase the robustness of our enrichment program and provide an item that was not available previously for pigs at our institution.

Figure 5. Example of a broken mirror.

Anne L Merley, DVM, is a veterinary resident in laboratory animal medicine at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, MN. Felicia D Duke Boynton, DVM, DACLAM, is a Senior Associate Consultant at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN.

REFERENCES 1. Broom DM, Sena H, Moynihan KL. 2009. Pigs learn what a mirror image represents and use it to obtain information. Anim Behav 78:1037-1041. 2. DeBoar SP, Garner JP, Lay Jr DC, Eichner SD, Lucas JR, Marchant-Forde JN. 2013. Does the presence of a human affect the preference of enrichment items in young, isolated pigs? Appl Anim Behav Sci 143:96-103. 3. Gieling ET, Mijdam E, van der Staay FJ, Nordquist RE. 2014. Lack of mirror use by pigs to locate food. Appl Anim Behav Sci 154:22-29. 4. Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. 2011. Guide for the care and use of laboratory animals, 8th ed. Washington (DC): National Academies Press. 5. McCrackin MA, Swindle MM. 2016. Biology, Handling, Husbandry, and Anatomy, p 39-88. In: Swindle MM, Smith AC editors. Swine in the Laboratory, 3rd Ed. Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press. 6. Studnitz S, Jensen MB, Pedersen LJ. 2007. Why do pigs root and in what will they root?: A review on the exploratory behaviour of pigs in relation to environmental enrichment. Appl Anim Behav Sci 107 (3-4):183-197. 7. Swindle MM, Makin A, Herron AJ, Clubb FJ Jr, Frazier KS. 2012. Swine as models in biomedical research and toxicology testing. Vet Pathol 49(2):344-56. 8. Zonderland JJ, Cornelissen L, Wolthuis-Fillerup M, Spoolder HAM. 2008. Visual acuity of pigs at different light intensities. Appl Anim Behav Sci 111:28-37. September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 57


TECH TIPS

Insights in husbandry, enrichment, and new techniques and tactics

Group Housing Procedure of Laboratory Farm Pigs By Yukiyoshi Watai, BA; and Mayu Uchihashi, DVM, DACLAM, DJCLAM

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t our facility, we mainly use 3-4-mo-old, castrated male and female farm pigs to provide training for medical personnel to ensure proper use of our medical devices. All procedures acute and pigs spend less than 24 h at our facility. All training protocols are reviewed by our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee and approved by the executive director. Since the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals1 and Five Freedoms3 both recognize the importance of social housing, we group house pigs whenever possible. Our initial attempt was to individually place pigs in cages according to the serial numbers assigned by the vendor and remove cage inserts to combine those that happened to be next to each other. Unfortunately, this resulted in many fighting incidents. To investigate the cause of fighting, we re-evaluated information on the shipping slip from the vendor. The slip listed farm, serial number, individual identification (ID) number, sex, date of birth (DOB), and body weight (BW). This vendor owned 2 farms, and we had an impression that grouping pigs from Farm 2 resulted in fewer fights than Farm 1. We discussed with the vendor, and they agreed to provide more detailed information for each farm and add the final housing location (FHL) of each pig on the shipping slip. We learned that pigs were always group housed at Farm 2, while at Farm 1, pigs may be singly housed in pre-shipment to control BW. Additionally, each shipment could include pigs from different facilities, rooms, or pens/cages. Based on this additional information, we conducted 2 trials seeking to reduce the incidence of fighting and percentage of singly housed pigs. In this article, we share our findings and conclusions.

Figure 1. Pattern assignment.

Table 1. Success rates of the pre-trial by pattern.

Pre-trial

We conducted a pre-trial to identify potential key factors for successful group housing. We did not change the grouping procedure but recorded and compared the results against the information on the shipping slip. If a group was once separated and another group was formed, it was counted as 2 groups even if the same pig was involved. As the pre-trial progressed, we began to suspect FHL and DOB as potential key factors, which allowed us to identify low- and high-risk groups. For high-risk groups, we paid careful attention and immediately separated pigs if they showed any signs of fighting. To analyze FHL in this project, we used “pattern”. Pattern consisted of 3 items (facility, room, and pen/cages). Based on how many items were shared within a group, we assigned one of the 5 patterns (Figure 1) to each group. During the pre-trial, we created 38 groups (Table 1 and 58 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

Table 2. Success rates of the pre-trial: Pattern 2 groups by environment and date of birth (DOB).

Table 2). Overall success rate was 57.8% (22 out of 38 groups). 23.8% of pigs were housed individually. The success rates were


Figure 2. Example of group determination and map of the housing room.

100% for Pattern 3 and 0% for Pattern 0. For Pattern 2, we did not have much data, but the percentage of successful groups was higher for Pattern 2G and groups sharing the same DOB.

Figure 3. Flow chart for group housing.

We learned the following from the pre-trial: • FHL (pattern) had the biggest influence on group housing results. Larger number of common factors were proportional to the duration that pigs were housed together and likely led to a 100% success rate for Pattern 3. • DOB and ID number were both important. Because the average litter size was eight to ten for farm pigs,2 we would consider pigs littermates for the trial, if they had same DOB and the difference between ID numbers were within nine. • Because of a higher percentage of successful groups for Pattern 2G than Pattern 2S, pigs raised in groups may be more “acclimated” to group housing.

Table 3. Success rates of the trial by pattern.

Trial

Based on the pre-trial, we established the order of priority. Pattern 3 became the top priority regardless of the DOB. Remaining patterns were prioritized in order of 2G, 2S, 1 and 0. For each pattern, pigs with the same DOB (littermates over non-littermates) were prioritized over those with different DOB. We also modified the grouping procedure. We arranged with the vendor to send us a copy of the shipping slip prior to the arrival of pigs. Groups were pre-determined and a map indicating the group and the location of each pig was posted in the housing room (Figure 2). A cage card was placed on each cage to reflect pigs’ serial numbers. Upon arrival, pigs were placed in designated cages, paying attention to both cage cards and the map to prevent human error. When recording the results, we considered the group a “success” if pigs stayed grouped until the next morning. The group was considered a “failure” if pigs were separated due to evidence of fighting. If there was only 1 pig, that pig was excluded. We calculated success rates by pattern, and for Pattern 2 only, DOB and sex. We created 83 groups during the trial (Table 3 and Table 4). Overall success rate was 73.5% (61 out of 83 groups). 10.8% of pigs were housed individually. The success rate of

Table 4. Success rates of the trial: Pattern 2 groups by DOB and sex.

Pattern 3 continued to be100%. The percentage of successful groups was much higher for pigs with the same DOB than those with different DOB. There was no obvious difference between sex.

Conclusion

In this project, we established the grouping procedure for pigs that had been temporarily separated for BW control prior to shipment. While successful group housing of pigs can lead to their improved wellbeing, finding compatible groups can be quite labor intensive, and inappropriate grouping will result in fighting and injury, negatively affecting the wellbeing of the pigs. The technique introduced in this article may be used beyond our facility, and could be applied to other research studies, in which pigs need to be temporarily separated for various reasons. September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 59


Although we had little or no data for some patterns, we identified that FHL and DOB were key factors. We learned that Pattern 3 could always be group housed, while Pattern 0 (and in principle, Pattern 1) should be singly housed to avoid unnecessary fight. For Pattern 2, success rate may be further improved by paying careful attention to DOB and ID number. Based on the above, we decided to continue with the modified grouping procedure, and created the flow chart (Figure 3) for grouping. As future considerations, we will continue working with the vendor, who has already agreed to include the litter number on each shipping slip. We will also request to minimize the number of pigs that would be Pattern 0 and 1. We plan to carefully observe and analyze groups that were unexpectedly successful or unsuccessful to identify any potential factors such as BW differences, behavioral signs, genetic background, and health conditions. Finally, we will continue collecting data to further improve the success rate of group housing and minimize the number of singly housed pigs. Acknowledgment: We would like to thank our vendors for their collaboration. We would also like to thank the lab support staff for their

excellent animal care, and executive director, Mr. Shuichi Nanikawa, and the Veterinary Care Team members at the Medtronic Innovation Center, for their support. Yukiyoshi Watai, BA, is the Husbandry Supervisor at the Medtronic Innovation Center, Japan. Mayu Uchihashi, DVM, DACLAM, DJCLAM, is the Attending Veterinarian at the Medtronic Innovation Center, Japan. REFERENCES 1. Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. 2011. Guide for the care and use of laboratory animals, 8th ed. Washington (DC): National Academies Press. 2. Japanese Society for Laboratory Animal Resources, editor. 2018. Advanced Laboratory Animal Science and Technology, 7th ed. Tokyo: Adthree. 3. Mellor DJ. [Internet]. 2016. Updating Animal Welfare Thinking: Moving beyond the “Five Freedoms” towards “A Life Worth Living”. [Cited Dec 2020]; 6(3):21. Available at: https:// doi.org/10.3390/ani6030021

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60 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021


Get on BOARD 2021 - Opening the Conversation about Research By Nicky Windows and Alanah Mudie

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uropean Animal Research Association (EARA) adopted the “Get on BOARD” slogan for their first Be Open Animal Research Day event in July. The event encouraged institutions and organizations to join the conversation and celebrate transparency about animal research’s importance. Ana Barros, the Communications Officer at EARA, ran the project. Barros works to bridge the knowledge gap between academia and public knowledge. EARA noted trends towards adopting proactive and transparent communications at several European institutions and this movement kickstarted the global #BOARD21 campaign. The campaign shared infographics, articles, and Q&A sessions. Instagram live sessions were conducted in multiple languages including Portuguese, Greek, Dutch, and Polish. “English is the international language of science, but we want the public to understand why we use animals in research, which is why we used different languages,” Barros said. Following the campaign, EARA translated this material.

Opening the Conversation

Industry shifts towards transparency are evident to those with long-term associations. Adrian Woodhouse started as a cage washer in 1996 and is now Development Training Manager at Red Kite Veterinary Consultants and Institute of Animal Technology Council member. He affirmed accounts of a “culture of fear” during protests. “My parent’s workplace was attacked, and we had to check under the family car every day for devices. Fast forward 40 years, and thankfully the public is now much better informed, and the value of animal research is better understood. We still have a way to go, but I am proud of the care and commitment shown to every research animal in the UK by the fabulous people who work in this industry. The key to this public understanding is openness, and I thoroughly advocate the ongoing openness campaign,” noted Datesand’s Nicky Windows. “With the amount of success that research has had and the breakthroughs that have been made, people are more open to what we’re doing,” added Woodhouse. Openness and transparency in animal research have gained traction in Europe. The UK’s “Concordat on Openness” was introduced by Understanding Animal Research in 2014. Universities include research programs on their websites, and the National Centre for 3Rs pushes awareness. Home Office standards mean a strict level of consistency ensure safe and best practices. EARA works to help to create similar transparency agreements for other European countries. Barros was pleased to see the German transparency agreement published during the Get on BOARD campaign. Even COVID vaccine development revealed how animal research was instrumental in delivering safe vaccines. It is essential to coherently explain

to the public why animals are still needed in research. Dr. Roman Stilling, from Tierversuche verstehen in Germany, noted these social initiatives are just as important to the scientific community as they are to the public. “Campaigns like #BOARD21 provides community building and show the solidarity within the community,” Stilling said.

Challenges

Pressure to completely remove the animal use in Europe remains. European Parliament members have pushed a strategy for phasing out animal research. A level of public hostility persists. Recently a permanent protestors camp was built outside a UK facility. Dr. Stilling recognized while academics and professionals are afraid of becoming targets for animal rights activism, he believes a much greater threat is the research community exaggerating animal research benefits and not faithfully presenting the facts to promote a positive image. Social media is a promotional tool, but has the potential to cause harm. Misinformation is easily spread. Barros shared a quote: You cannot support what you do not understand.

Moving Forward

Woodhouse emphasized key actions to maintain momentum: • Keep supporting the cause and animals by providing high levels of welfare. • Ensure establishments look after staff with top-level training and support. • Keep pushing boundaries and following the existing well-structured legislation. EARA’s widespread Get on BOARD campaign highlighted institutional initiatives. The campaign's success reflects a positive step for research’s future. To view campaign highlights search #BOARD21 on Twitter or visit www.eara.eu. Nicky Windows is a Global Commercial Manager with Datesand in the United Kingdom. Alanah Mudie is a Social Media Executive with Datesand in the United Kingdom. September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 61


AALAS CONNECTION

GLAS Awardees Advancing Animal Welfare By Ashlee Vaughn, PhD

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he mission of the AALAS Grants for Laboratory Animal Science program (GLAS) is to enhance scientific knowledge in laboratory animal health and welfare through research and to promote collaborative efforts by the AALAS membership within the broader scientific community. Since the first grants were awarded in 2007, the GLAS program has awarded 86 grants totaling $1,684,062. We are proud to announce the 2021 GLAS awardees! Congratulations to the newest recipients! 2021 GLAS Grant Awards and Recipients Evaluation of the Wellbeing of Aging Male Sprague Dawley Rats in a Variety of Commercially Available Individually Ventilated Caging System (Indiana University)

PI: Debra Hickman, MS, DVM, DACLAM, DACAW An assessment of the wellbeing of large, aging male Sprague Dawley rats pair-housed or individually housed has not been completed. This gap hampers the ability of laboratory animal professionals to provide guidance regarding ideal housing strategies for these animals. Our objective in this proposal is to determine the wellbeing of large (>500 g) male rats housed individually or in pairs.

Moving Marine Fish Toxicity Tests Towards the 3Rs (Texas Christian University)

PI: Marlo Jeffries, PhD Co-I: Dalton Allen, BS Fish-based toxicity tests have been instrumental in protecting environmental health. However, up to 5 million larval and juvenile fish are used annually for effluent testing which poses serious ethical considerations. Furthermore, recent legislation calls for improvements in the welfare of vertebrates, including fish, utilized in toxicity assessments. The goal of this study is to identify alternative toxicity testing methods capable of replacing current methods that feature marine fish larvae.

Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Macaque-Specific Probiotic in Managing Post-relocation Diarrhea in a Colony of Macaca fascicularis (Charles River)

PI: Keely McGrew, BSc, CVT, LATG, CMAR Co-I: Nicole Monts de Oca, DVM, ACLAM Diarrhea is one of the most common health conditions noted in captive macaque populations and can result in mortality. Preventing the loss of valuable research animals through a proactive approach would be a refinement to current management practices of laboratory NHPs. The aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of a species-derived probiotic (SD Pro™) to prevent relocation-induced gut dysbiosis and subsequent diarrhea in cynomolgus macaques. 62 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

Handling, Enrichment, and Reproduction: The Effects of Transfer Tunnels on the Reproductive Indices of BALB/c and CD-1 Mice (University of Florida)

PI: Elizabeth Nunamaker, PhD, DVM, DACLAM, DACAW and Penelope Susan Reynolds, PhD Co-I: Margaret Anne Hull, MoP, DVM; Current methods of handling mice during cage change procedures have been shown to cause stress to the point of potentially compromising welfare. Transfer tunnels provide a simple and animal welfare friendly tool for cage change. However, there is no published data concerning the effect of transfer tunnels on breeding mice. The goal is to provide evidence of tunnel use as a major refinement measure for laboratory rodent handling, improving colony productivity, and improving overall welfare of rodents used in research.

Effects of LED Lighting on Fecundity and Stress in C57BL/6 mice (Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)

PI: Joyce Stuckey, MS, DVM Co-I: John Hershey, VMD, PhD Lighting is a critical consideration for the housing and welfare of animals. Standard lighting protocols were developed under fluorescent and incandescent lights which are being replaced by new technology, light emitting diode (LED) lights, as facilities upgrade or construct new vivaria. However, the impacts of this lighting change on the health and welfare of animals have not been thoroughly investigated. The goal of this study is to determine the effects of LED lighting on breeding and stress. We look forward to the 2022 GLAS applications. Updated grant application forms will be available beginning December 1, 2021, with a deadline for submission on February 1, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. CT. For more information on the GLAS program and application submission guidelines, visit our website at www.aalas.org/glas. Ashlee Vaughn, PhD, is an Education Resources Editor at AALAS in Memphis, TN.


The 2021 AALAS Compensation Survey Highlights High Staffing Need and Lower Attrition Rates By Colton Miller, PhD

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hen AALAS gathered data for the biennial 2021 Compensation Survey, the hardships of 2020 and the importance of flexibility and preparedness took center stage. Questions about future planning for facilities were included in the survey, highlighting key facility staffing changes. For example, 42% of animal facilities are expected to increase employee numbers for the current year based on the responses. The survey offers insights into company pandemic responses by identifying specific steps taken by organizations and the growth rate for remote working among institutional staff. Merit increases in 2020 significantly fell compared to the last survey, which was reported on average to be between 2% and 3% in the 2019 compensation survey. In addition, attrition rates also fell, when compared to the 2019 survey – under 2% in the 2021 compensation survey. Another interesting finding reported a rise in remote working, with institutions reporting 25.7% of their employees working remotely, instead of only 4.6% in 2019. This survey offers comprehensive data concerning overall compensation across 18 positions within the laboratory animal science community. The survey’s primary focus is to provide detailed information on current compensation from the previous year. Additionally, it offers insights into how the community responded to the 2020 pandemic as well as current trends. The survey also presents general information about laboratory animal facility salary trends, with detailed analysis provided for job positions ranging from directors to techni-

cians to cage washers. Compensation data for each position is broken down by various segments, including geographical location, institution type, institution employee number, department employee number, and annual institutional revenue. This segmentation analysis allows for an institution to compare data against other similarly structured institutions. One of the new 2021 Compensation Survey highlights is the addition of differentiating CMAR-certified and non-CMAR-certified data for the Manager and Facility Compliance Manager positions, much like other job titles with AALAS-certified and ACLAM-certified compensation. The survey data shows AALAS-certified personnel generally have a higher median total compensation than non-certified personnel. AALAS is pleased to offer this survey as the most comprehensive and up-to-date compensation report available for the laboratory animal science community. While primarily focused on the compensation of members of our community, we hope that the information found here provides insight into compensation levels and offers a glimpse of preparedness for the future. Over 90 institutions generously provided data to allow AALAS to compile this report. Your institution can obtain a copy of the 2021 Laboratory Animal Facility Compensation Survey today. For more information, please visit aalas.org/store at https://www.aalas.org/store/detail?productId=11125866. Colton Miller, PhD, is an Educational Resources Editor at AALAS in Memphis, TN.

September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 63


AALAS CONNECTION

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TRAINING SHORTS

nterested in training for technicians at your facility? Consider AALAS Technician Training Shorts to help extend your training program. Active learning exercises are included with their presentation so that technicians can participate in the learning process. Use the new Technician Training Short “Health Observations of Mice and Rats” developed by the AALAS Educational Resources Committee and narrated by Steven Rydberg, CMAR, RLATG. This TTS will train staff to identify signs of good health and recognize common health problems. The Technician Training Short has 3 parts, each discussing different health issues. • Part 1: Signs of obesity, emaciation, malocclusion, alopecia, barbering, dermatitis, and fight wounds • Part 2: Signs of hunched body and ruffled fur, lethargic, mori-

bund, porphyrin staining, and diarrhea • Part 3: Signs of a mass, rectal prolapse, vaginal or uterine prolapse, penile prolapse, and dystocia This short, focused presentation gives essential information to help technicians do their jobs effectively in supporting animal welfare. The presentation has pause breaks for completing the active learning exercises accompanying each part, which are a quiz and scenarios for guided discussions. The three parts can be done during one training session or at different times. Other topics in the TTS series include ergonomics training and compassion fatigue. Individuals who view any TTS recording and participate in the exercises may apply their training time toward CEUs in the Technician Certification Registry or CMAR recertification. Visit the AALAS Store and plan a training session today!

Focusing on Mice: Common Health Conditions in a Nutshell ALL hosts a new microlearning series on mouse health issues and clinical conditions.

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ne of the important tasks for laboratory animal facility staff, as well as researchers, is to monitor animals’ health under normal and experimental conditions. In collaboration with the MD Anderson Cancer Center at The University of Texas, AALAS is proud to bring you a new microlearning series on the AALAS Learning Library: Common Health Conditions of Mice. A special thank you goes to Dr. Nicole Monts de Oca, DVM, DACLAM, and Dr. Cynthia Lockworth, DVM, DACLAM, who, through their diligence of constructing these courses, presented AALAS with the opportunity to implement these courses into the AALAS Learning Library. This 10-course series details a wide range of mouse health issues and ways to identify clinical conditions in mice for early detection. Each course focuses on a veterinary topic and describes related clinical conditions, their etiology, and management plans. Supporting references are also provided. The courses are: 1. Physical Exam 2. Non-specific Signs 3. Integumentary 4. Ophthalmic 5. Gastrointestinal 6. Reproductive & Urinary 7. Musculoskeletal & Neurologic 8. Respiratory 64 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

9. Other Conditions 10. Emergency

One exciting feature is the video examples for many of the clinical conditions presented. These videos, in addition to the course photos and condensed text, offer a quick yet informative reference tool aimed at helping anyone identify and respond to common health conditions in mice. Many of these courses can be completed in under 5 minutes and are the ideal addition to your institution’s training curriculum. We are thrilled to present this opportunity that is now currently available in the AALAS Learning Library in the Common Health Conditions of Mice

course series.


Celebrate the Mouse Video Essay Contest Winners By Terri Swanson – AALAS Foundation

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he mission of the AALAS Foundation is to support educational outreach on the essential role of responsible laboratory animal care and use in science to advance human and animal health.

In 2017, the AALAS Foundation started a new competition for middle and high school students - The Celebrate the Mouse Video Essay Contest. We asked students: “How Has a Mouse Helped You – Or Someone You Know?” The contest asked students to develop a creative, educational and informative video essay to explain how they, a family member, friend, or pet, have benefited from the medical discoveries made possible thanks to work conducted with mice in biomedical research. Contest winners were eligible to earn cash awards in response to how animals in research have helped the lives of people and/or animals. This contest was open to all legal residents of the United States or District of Columbia who are registered students in grades 5–8 (Level 1) or grades 9‐12 (Level 2). Every student was eligible regardless of whether they were in a public, parochial, private, or independent school, or were home‐schooled. Students were asked to: (1) Describe the role a mouse played in discovering or perfecting a surgical procedure, medication, or treatment method used to help the individual or animal; or how a mouse was used in developing a detection technique used to identify a disease or condition. (2) The name(s) of researcher(s) who worked with the mice to achieve the medical discovery. (3) The date the medical advancement was achieved. Our 2020 contest received 21 entries from both grade categories! Entries were from across the United States. The winners in each category were selected by the AALAS Foundation Technology Committee which used a scoring system to judge each video independently. Student videos were also posted on

Kaitlyn Culbert and Pam Straeter.

Lily Walls and Molly Romick.

the AALAS Foundation’s You Tube channel for people to vote for a Fan Favorite. In the 9-12 grade category this year’s winning video was submitted by Victoria Clinger (#20) of Ronald W. Reagan High School in Winston-Salem, NC. Victoria’s video focused on pancreatic cancer, which sadly took her grandmother just 4 months after diagnosis. Our 2nd place winner was Kaitlyn Culbert (#27) from Toms River High School North in Toms River, NJ. Kaitlyn did a great presentation on knockout mice. Our third place winner was also our Fan Favorite winner and was from Kino Deligero (#13), also from Ronald W. Reagan High School in Winston-Salem. Kino’s video about diabetes and how it has affected his family is a must watch! These three amazing students each received a cash prize from AALAS, in addition Ronald W. Reagan High School also received a cash prize as the winning school. In the middle school category first place was awarded to Lydia Denton from Sallie B. Howard School of the Arts in Wilson, NC (entry #26). Lydia’s video focused on her own allergies and how mouse research is helping her. Second place and Fan Favorite went to Lily Walls of Meadowlark Middle School in Winston-Salem and focused on migraines. Sallie B. September 2021 Laboratory Animal Science Professional 65


Lydia Denton during the prize presentation.

Howard School also received the middle school prize award. Lily’s award was featured on her local news! You can check out the story at: "Celebrate the Mouse" (wsfcs.k12.nc.us) AALAS members Molly Romick and Pam Straeter visited these winning schools and presented the students with their awards in person this year. Winning student Kaitlyn sent a follow up letter to Pam. “Because of the contest opportunity, I learned a great deal about the pivotal contributions of mice in research, particularly for human diseases. I am hopeful that my video also served to educate others on the important role of animals in research too. My hope is to one day to become a scientist and conduct research. My dream is to be able to make a discovery that will have a positive impact on our society!” Kaitlyn wrote. Many thanks go out to the AALAS Foundation’s Technology committee members who watched and judged all the video entries. The committee comprised of AALAS members Andrea Swanson, Cherylann Gieseke, Mona Jaffari, Karrie Southwell, Matt Taylor, and Terri Swanson had a tough time judging all the wonderful entries. You can still view the 5-8 grade category entries by visiting https://tinyurl.com/Celebrate-5-8 and view the 9-12 grade category entries by visiting https://tinyurl.com/Celebrate-9-12 The 2021 Celebrate the Mouse Biomedical Research Video Essay contest will be accepting entries beginning September 3, 2021. Visit http://kids4research.org/fun-stuff/Celebrate-the-Mouse-Video-Essay-Contest for more information, or, contact foundation@aalas.org. 66 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021

Victoria Clinger (left), Kino Deligero (right), and Molly Romick (center).


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AALA COM AInnovive MUNI NGE ITY EX ITY EXCHA S CO ALAS U N I T Y www.innoviveinc.com ALAS OMM S A M N E A A A M C 3, 45 A L H U O G L M A S E C E M N C A A O M A LA S EX UN HA NG ANG AALA E AALAS C AALAS CO OMM UNITY UNITY EXC ITY EXCHA EXCHANGE HANGE AA NGE AALA ANGE EXCH C E M H G S C M N A X L M C CO N HA UN TY Instech 9, 51 A Awww.instechlabs.com T Y E Laboratories C H A Inc. NGE HANG COM ITY EX ALAS XCHA OMM MUNI Y EXC MUNI ITY EX XCHA ANGE Y EXC ALAS GE A LAS C ALAS COM S COMMUN OMMUNIT MMUNITY E NITY MMUN OMMUNIT MMUNITY E NITY EXCH NGE A C H A Nwww.kentscientific.com E AA CO C 52 S C O U A A A X G L S E M H Kent Scientific Corporation 14/15, C U N A E A O C M Y L S A M A T G C X CO CH M AN OM UNI GE TY E AALA AALA E AALAS E AA COM ALAS ITY EX NITY EXCH LAS C AS COMM MUNI CHAN EXCHANG NGE G E Acover ALAS COM E AA L U MMUN C H A 54, TY EX inside back C H A NBiomedical HANG GE A C NITY E XLomir S C O www.lomir.com OMM E AA ALAS TY EX MUNI H A N G Inc N I X U A C A G E C A M N L M N S X H U A O Y E E A M A T C A M I G O M AL S C EX CH UN NITY CHAN XCHANGE M UPlasLabs AALA E AALAS C AALAS CO G E A www.plas-labs.com ITY EX OMM UNITY 33 ITY EX E M U NInc. CHAN G LAS C AS COMM ANGE E COM MMUN UNITY ITY EX E AA L EXCH CHAN EXCHANG O M N A G X Y C U M E A N T I S O M A Y N E A IT G PMI 53, inside front cover ITY U Nwww.labdiet.com A A LLabDiet EXCH LAS C ALAS COM S COMMU CHAN OMM MMUN MMUNITY E AA A ITY EX ALA LAS C S CO HANG CPriority ANGE GE A S CO HServices MMUN A A L A www.priorityoneservices.com 60 E AA N A C O G L One A X E C N A H E G A A S C LA CH NITY HAN GE TY EX E AA ITY EX Y EXC Y EXCHAN MUNI HANG MMUN OMMUNIT T SOMNI 46 C O M Scientific Y E X C www.somniscientific.com S CO MUNI T C I A M L S N O A A U L A S C MM AA G ETOMI AALA S CO N A SteraMist By www.tomimist.com 13 A E L H A G A EXC CHAN ANGE TY EX EXCH Y Tecniplast www.tecniplast.it 41 MUNI T I N MU COM

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LAS PRO 's

PET TALK Cleo

The day Cleo went to a local veterinary school for spaying, she met Mia, a senior doing surgical skills rotation. “She immediately stole my heart. I just had to adopt her!” recalled Mia, now a clinical veterinarian. Doctors diagnosed Cleo at age 9 with chronic degenerative valvular disease (CVD), the most common cardiac disease of dogs. In dogs, repairing or replacing a bad heart valve requires open-heart surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass. This is an expensive procedure with no guarantee of success. Mia chose the veterinary prescription drug pimobendan – the result of animal research – as therapy for Cleo. She said it was the right decision because the medication successfully prevented death from premature heart failure and enabled Cleo to live comfortably into her older years. Mia said Cleo helped her become the veterinarian she is today.

Echo

Sarah adopted Echo as a kitten from the Animal Refuge League of Greater Portland more than a decade ago. When Sarah returned from a work conference in 2010, her pet sitter said she found blood in the litter box. A thorough exam and urinalysis revealed Echo had a severe urinary tract infection (UTI). After Echo finished the initial course of prescribed antibiotics, and then a second course, she showed little improvement – the infection kept returning. The vet thought the problem could be bladder stones, and an X-ray confirmed it. Echo started a prescription diet designed to dissolve the stones, and they disappeared. Echo was soon back to full health, and many years passed without any major issues. Fast forward to December 2019. Echo’s bladder was loaded with stones. Hoping to avoid surgery because of her advancing age, Sarah tried the prescription diet again. But this time it didn’t work. Early in 2020, Echo had a cystotomy – the medical term for opening the bladder to remove stones. The surgery was a success! The vet put her on a lifelong prescription diet to prevent the stones from ever coming back.

These stories are adapted from FBR Real Pet Stories™. Do you have a pet story to tell? Please submit your pet’s information to the Foundation for Biomedical Research (email: info at fbresearch.org) and LAS Pro for a chance to be featured. Email us at laspro@aalas.org. 68 Laboratory Animal Science Professional September 2021



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