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CONTENTS

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

PROGRAM COMMITTEE Chair: Chris A Manuel

WELCOME Program Chair’s Message President’s Message Meeting/Registration Information

Vice Chair: Rachel R Rubino

4 4 5

EXHIBITORS & SPONSORS Exhibitors & Sponsors

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EDUCATION PROGRAM & MEETING SCHEDULE Program Overview Opening General Session and General Membership Meeting Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday

6 8 14 18 26 34 42

MEETING NEWS & EVENTS Registration & Travel Info Technician Events Biplane Battle Contest Branch & District Information Posters Hotel Map

46 46 47 48 50 54

Seminars Chair: Sarah Hansen Vice Chair: Kristin D Evans Special Topic Lectures Chair: Jennifer L Asher Vice Chair: Karen L Lencioni Panel Discussions Chair: Temeri Wilder-Kofie Vice Chair: Jennifer S Wood Workshops Chair: Sean C Adams Vice Chair: Natasha J Melfi Facilitators Chair: Glicerio A Ignacio Vice Chair: Heather E Marshall Local Arrangements Chair: Julie V Vineyard BOT Liaison, President, ex oficio Tracy Parker Abstract Review Subcommittee Chair: Kari L Koszdin Platform Session: Tanya L Herzog Poster Session: Maggie Behnke, James B Finlay, Lauren Habenicht, Rachel Larsen, Sharoll L’Italien, Adam Murphy, Karuna Patel, Karen Strait, Wanda West

EXHIBITOR ADVISORY COUNCIL Chair: Joseph P Guider Vice Chair: Paulina Michaud Warren Ball, Eugene Marino, Todd Poley, Fredrick Rock, Carrie Schultz, Perry Spires, Chris Manuel, John Park Past President: Morag Mackay BOT Liaison: Teresa Woodger

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Ann Turner

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4 AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

THE QUEEN CITY WELCOMES YOU! On behalf of the National Meeting Program Committee (NMPC), I would like to extend some southern hospitality and welcome y’all, attending in person or virtually, to the 71st AALAS National Meeting in Charlotte, NC! Serendipitously, the spotlight forum of this year’s meeting is “Overcoming Challenges,” which is timely considering the world around us. We have all heard that this is extraordinary times because it is extraordinary times. Over that last 7 months, we have all faced unique challenges and flexed our creativity while managing limited resources. This year’s program includes many fascinating examples of how our colleagues have overcome a variety of challenges, in addition to those that are obvious. There are also many other exciting, educational, and relevant submissions, which are sure to give all AALAS members numerous topics of interest to choose from throughout the meeting. I want to thank the NMPC, AALAS staff, and the Local Arrangements Committee for all their time and effort in getting this meeting off the ground and onto the track. This amazing group of people put in a colossal amount of effort, especially this year, to create the firstever AALAS National Meeting virtual component. We can’t thank them all enough. Finally, thank you to all who submitted topic ideas and abstracts despite the challenges you faced. Your drive to share your knowledge and exciting research are what makes each meeting a unique and worthwhile educational experience for all AALAS members.

Chris Manuel 2020 Program Committee Chair

WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITIES IN CHARLOTTE! I want to welcome you to the 71st AALAS National Meeting! In what has undoubtedly been a tumultuous year, I am still excited that the NMPC has been able to assemble a top rate program full of educational opportunities for our members. No matter your background, there are plenty of topics available for whether you are attending in person or online. The theme of this meeting is “Overcoming Challenges,” which I chose without any foresight into what 2020 would bring for us. Having said that, the program has a fair amount of COVID topics, but that is just the beginning. We all know that we overcome challenges every single day in our facilities, our research, and our lives. Join us if you want to find out more! I hope to “see” you one way or another.

Tracy Parker 2020 AALAS President


GENERAL MEETING INFORMATION

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GETTING READY FOR CHARLOTTE

ONLINE REGISTRATION:

Charlotte

71st AALAS NATIONAL MEETING OCTOBER 25 - 29, 2020

Pre-registration fees are $350 for AALAS national members and $445 for nonmembers. Note: You must be a current member at the time you register in order to get the membership discount. Pre-registration pricing is available until September 1. Advance registration pricing begins September 2 - October 5. Onsite registration pricing only after October 5. Access the online registration portal here: https://www.aalas.org/national-meeting/general-information/registration Registration includes access to the virtual meeting platform. The virtual platform will be available through December 31, 2020.

WORKSHOP REGISTRATION Descriptions for the 2020 workshops are available throughout this program or here: https://www.aalas.org/national-meeting/general-information/registration. Workshops may be purchased online during the registration process.

BADGE PICK-UP AND ONSITE REGISTRATION Saturday, October 24, 2 – 6 p.m. Sunday, October 25, 7:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. Monday–Wednesday, October 26 – October 28, 7:30 a.m.– 5 p.m. Thursday, October 29, 7:30 a.m. – noon

PRESENTER AND FACILITATOR INFORMATION Looking for speaker tips, session instructions, and facilitator/moderator guidelines, and more? Visit here: https://www.aalas.org/national-meeting/submission/presenter-information The National Meeting always needs facilitators. Access the facilitator sign-up form on the above website page. Help us make this the best meeting yet by being a volunteer!

COMMITTEE MEETINGS AND EVENTS A complete list of committee meetings and events will be added to www.aalas.org in August and loaded into the meeting app/virtual platform.

EXHIBIT HALL SET-UP AND EXHIBIT HALL HOURS Exhibit Hall set up will take place Saturday, October 24, 10:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m. through Sunday, October 25, 7:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m. The Exhibit Hall Ribbon Cutting will take place on Monday, October 26 at 8:30 a.m. Exhbit Hall hours are: Monday, October 26: 8:30 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 27: 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Wednesday, October 28: 9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m. The Exhbit Hall dismantling will take place Wednesday, October 28 from 1:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

Looking for quick info on Charlotte and the AALAS National Meeting? Here are some tips and links to help you plan for the Queen City. Remember, the most current information will be loaded on the AALAS website, www.aalas.org/national-meeting, and in the meeting app/virtual platform once it is launched.


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AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

PROGRAM OVERVIEW SUNDAY

ity with Coded Cage Cards: Anne M Gath. Room: 203B. 3:00 PM–3:20 PM. (TTP)

tion: Natalie A Bratcher. Room: 207D. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM. (P)

OCTOBER 25

Afternoon TRACK I - Digital Vivarium

q Ensure Healthy Animal Feeding Even during Forced Unattended Periods: Xavier Cañis Robles. Room: 203B. 3:20 PM–3:40 PM. (TTP)

q Podcasting to the Public and the Art of Storytelling: Angela Stoyanovitch. Room: 213B. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM. (P)

u Why You Need a Real-time Data Solution in 2020: Gennifer Caesar. Room: 208A. 1:00 PM–1:20 PM. (TTP)

m The Future of Macaque Housing: New Findings Led to Innovative Ideas that Aim to Improve Animal Welfare, Research, and Facility Operations: Randy Moseley. Room: 203B. 3:40 PM–4:00 PM. (TTP)

m Promoting Animal Welfare through Improvements in Nonhuman Primate Caging Designs: John J Hasenau. Room: 213C. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM. (P)

u Isoflurane: I Monitor the Animal, but Who’s Moni-

and Technology: Mark Corey. Room: 209A. 1:00 PM–5:00 PM. (W)

u Airports Don’t Use Pen and Paper Anymore, Nor Should Animal Facilities. Insights for Animal Facilities. Insights for Animal Facility Management Solution Planning: Eric Y. Rieux. Room: 208A. 1:20 PM–1:40 PM. (TTP) m Use Case Studies Showing How Digital Transformations Are Improving in Vivo Workflows: Julie Morrison. Room: 208A. 2:00PM–2:40PM (TTP) q Use of Automated Blood Sampling to Improve Animal Welfare and Data Collection for Large Animal Studies: Candace Rohde-Johnson. Room: 208A. 2:20PM–2:40PM. (TTP) q Using 3D Scanning to Improve the Measurement and Analysis of Subcutaneous Tumours: Karl Turley. Room: 208A. 2:40 PM–3:00 PM. (TTP) u Use Internet of Things Connectivity to Drive Laboratory Sterilization Throughput Efficiency: David Larson. Room: 208A. 3:00 PM–3:20 PM. (TTP) u Dry Heat Sterilization in Vivariums: An Alternative Option for Sterilization in the Lab Animal Facility: Robert Charles Davis. Room: 208A. 3:20 PM–3:40 PM. (TTP) u Increase the Ease and Speed of Decontaminating Isolators: Explore Modular Hybrid Hydrogen Peroxide: Frances M Grinstead. Room: 208A. 3:40 PM–4:00 PM. (TTP) u Protecting Your Animals and Team with Optimized Cleaning and Disinfection Protocols: Nicole Kenny. Room: 208A. 4:00 PM–4:20 PM. (TTP)

Track II: Research Models and Facility Design m All Hot and Not Bothered: A Novel Way to Provide Thermal Comfort to Mice: TBN. Room: 203B. 1:00 PM–1:20 PM. (TTP) q Improving Rodent Breeding Performance with Nutritional Supplementation: Morgane G Stum. Room: 203B. 1:20 PM–1:40 PM. (TTP) v Humanized Mouse Models: Jenny Rowe. Room: 203B. 1:40 PM–2:00 PM. (TTP) q Humanized Preclinical Models in Immunotherapy and 3Rs Guidelines: Thomas Tribou. Room: 203B. 2:00 PM–2:20 PM. (TTP) u From Outdated to Cutting-Edge: Transforming a

1970s-Era Facility into a Xenotransplantation Suite: TBN. Room: 203B. 2:20 PM–2:40 PM. (TTP)

q Successful Oncology Research Using the 3Rs: Animal Model and Services Selection: Sheryl J Wildt. Room: 203B. 2:40 PM–3:00 PM. (TTP) u What’s In a Cage Card? Maximizing the Productiv-

toring Me?: TBN. Room: 203B. 4:00 PM–4:20 PM. (TTP)

MONDAY OCTOBER 26 Morning

u W-04 Animal Facility Design, Processes, Decisions,

v W-02B Microsurgery Skills Training Using Surgical Loupes Loupes: Robert F. Hoyt. Room: 210A. 12:00 AM–12:00 AM. (W)

u W-01 Communicating for Engagement: Gary Jones.

Room: 201B. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM. (W)

v Accelerating Drug Discovery with Noninvasive Animal Imaging: The 3Rs Perspective: Jeffrey P Morin. Room: Ballroom A. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM. (S)

v W-02A Microsurgery Skills Training Using Surgical Loupes: Robert F. Hoyt. Room: 210A. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM. (W)

q Beyond Buprenorphine: Pain Management in Fish and Exotic Animals: Heather Ann Zimmerman. Room: Ballroom B. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM. (S)

v W-03 Tips and Tricks of Monitoring during Anesthesia: Cholawat Pacharinsak. Room: 209A. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM. (W)

u Exhaust Air Dust PCR Update: A Pathogen

q On the CUSP: A New Option for Addressing Administrative Burden: Sally Thompson-Iritani. Room: Ballroom B. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM. (S) u Overcoming Interruptions to Daily Operations in a

Large Rodent Vivarium: Andrew Thomas Pesek. Room: Ballroom C. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM. (S) v The Role of Animal Models in the Immunotherapy Revolution: Zachary Thomas Freeman. Room: Ballroom D. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM. (S) v Pathology Quiz Bowl: Craig L Franklin. Room: Ballroom A. 8:30 AM–10:00 AM. (P) q Building Momentum in Openness about Animal Research in the U.S.: F Claire Hankenson. Room: Ballroom B. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM. (STL) v Charles C Hunter Lecture: Rational Design of Novel Treatments for Psychiatric Illness: Flavio Frohlich. Room: Ballroom A. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM. (STL) v The Intricacies of Neoplasia and Its Therapeutics in Zoological and Exotic Animals: Tara M Harrison. Room: Ballroom C. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM. (STL) u The TNPRC Regional Biosafety Laboratory: A

Screening Method for Many Vivariums, but Not for All: Kenneth S Henderson. Room: Ballroom D. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM. (S) q Reaching the Next Generation through Innovative Ways to Connect with Students Both Inside and Outside of the Classroom: Paula A Clifford. Room: Ballroom C. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM. (S)

TUESDAY OCTOBER 27 Morning

v W-05 Improving Research: Reporting and Review: Cory F Brayton. Room: 201B. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM. (W) q W-06 Occupational Health and Safety Considerations in Animal Research: Learning through Interactive Case Studies: Lesley A Colby. Room: 202B. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM. (W) v Best Practices for Inflammation-based Animal Models: Portia S Allen. Room: Ballroom A. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM. (S) q Ongoing Changes within the Animal Research Oversight Environment: B Taylor Bennett. Room: Ballroom B. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM. (S)

Vital National Resource: Edwin Scott Kreitlein. Room: Ballroom D. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM. (STL)

m Overcoming Challenges in Miniature Swine Translational Research: Derek Brocksmith. Room: Ballroom C. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM. (S)

MONDAY

u Who Stays and Who Goes? Considering Modern

Afternoon

m An International Perspective on Managing the COVID-19 Pandemic in Laboratory Animal Care Programs: Mathias Leblanc. Room: 207B. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM. (P) q Identification of Rodent Husbandry Refinement Opportunities through Benchmarking and Collabora-

Prevalence and Disease Association when Formulating a Rodent Infectious Agent Exclusion List: Kenneth S Henderson. Room: Ballroom D. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM. (S) q Charles River Ethics and Animal Welfare Lecture: Your Perception May Not Be My Reality: How Human Perception Shapes Evaluation of Animal Well-being during Euthanasia: Debra L Hickman. Room: Ballroom B. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM. (STL)

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


PROGRAM OVERVIEW v Creation, Care, and Utility of Humanized Mouse Models: Jenny Rowe. Room: Ballroom D. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM. (STL)

v Wallace P. Rowe Lecture: TBN. Room: Ballroom A. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM. (STL)

TUESDAY Afternoon

m Challenges Credentialed Veterinary Technicians Face in Laboratory Animal Science: Ann L. Murray. Room: 207B. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM. (P) v Grants for Laboratory Animal Science: Do You Want $50K for Your Research?: Victoria K Baxter. Room: 207D. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM. (P) q Harnessing the Media to Enhance Public Understanding of Animal Research: B Taylor Bennett. Room: 213B. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM. (P)  v Not All Individually Ventilated Caging (IVCs) Systems Are Created Equal: Scott E Perkins. Room: 213C. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM. (P) q W-07 CMAR Preparatory Class for the Animal Resources (AR) Exam: Diana P Baumann. Room: 209A. 1:00 PM–5:00 PM. (W) q W-08 Teaching Monkeys to Cooperate with Restraint: Using Positive Reinforcement Training and Temperament Testing Methods: Jaine E Perlman. Room: 219A. 1:00 PM–5:00 PM. (W) u W-09 Vivarium Ergonomics: Establishing an

Effective, Sustainable Program: Terry Snyder. Room: 210A. 1:00 PM–5:00 PM. (W) q A Roadmap to Respond to Emerging Animal Rights Trends: Derek Brocksmith. Room: Ballroom A. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM. (S) v How to Start, Maintain, and Expand the Capacity of a Germ-Free/Gnotobiotic Program: A Review of Planning, SOPs, Training, New Equipment, and Resources Proven to be Successful: Joe Romano. Room: Ballroom B. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM. (S) q Practical Diversion Control Strategies in the Animal Research Environment: Iris D Bolton. Room: Ballroom C. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM. (S) v The Role of the Murine Gut Microbiome in Today’s Vivarium: Peter C Smith. Room: Ballroom D. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM. (S) 

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 28 Morning

q W-07 CMAR Preparatory Class for the Animal Resources (AR) Exam (CONT): Diana P Baumann. Room: 209A. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM. (W) q W-08 Teaching Monkeys to Cooperate with Restraint: Using Positive Reinforcement Training

m W-10 Developing a Sustainable Program to Promote Compassion Resiliency and Prevent Fatigue: Vanessa Keller Lee. Room: 201B. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM. (W)

m W-13 Working with Difficult Personalities: How to Survive and Thrive: Laura A Conour. Room: 201B. 1:00 PM–5:00 PM. (W)

u W-11 Publish with LAS Pro: John Farrar. Room:

q Beyond the IACUC: The Current Landscape of Opportunities and Challenges in Research Administration: Stacy L Pritt. Room: Ballroom B. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM. (S)

v Applying Microbiome Management in Rodent and Nonhuman Primate Research Models for Real-world Studies: Kourtney P Nickerson. Room: Ballroom B. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM. (S)

u Old and New Technology in the Mouse House:

202B. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM. (W)

v Biological Materials Testing: An Important Component of an Animal Resources Biosecurity Program: Cynthia L Besch-Williford. Room: Ballroom C. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM. (S)

q Increasing Openness and Transparency in Animal Research: Institutional, Personal, and Innovative Approaches from around the World: Kirk Leech. Room: Ballroom C. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM. (S)

Carrie L Freed. Room: Ballroom D. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM. (S)

u When the Odds Are not in Your Favor: Lessons

THURSDAY

Learned from Small-scale Disasters with Large-scale Implications: Lesley A Colby. Room: Ballroom D. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM. (S)

m Overcoming Challenges of Pain Management in Rodents: Mark A Suckow. Room: Ballroom A. 2:45 PM–5:00 PM. (S)

OCTOBER 29 Morning

q Cautionary Tails: FOIA and Other Threats to Sustainability of Animal Research: Nancy Halpern. Room: Ballroom B. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM. (STL)

m W-14 Science Outreach with a Link to Research: Julie Kathleen Kent. Room: 201B. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM. (W)

m Creative and Economical Solutions for an Occupational Health Program: Lisa M Kelly. Room: Ballroom C. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM. (STL)

u W-15 Technician to Supervisor: Management 101:

v Nathan E. Brewer Lecture: TBN. Room: Ballroom A. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM. (STL) v Reimaging Preclinical Studies through Digital Transformation: Leveraging Computer Vision, Machine Learning, Mixed Reality and Informatics Platforms to Maximize Data Quality and Clinical Relevance of Preclinical Studies: Szczepan W Baran. Room: Ballroom D. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM. (STL)

Stephen T Baker. Room: 202B. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM. (W) m Overcoming Challenges in Gnotobiotics: Alton G Swennes. Room: Ballroom A. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM. (S) m Raising the Next Generation of Lab Animal Professionals: Judy M Hickman-Davis. Room: Ballroom B. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM. (S) q Research Animal Behavioral Management for the 21st Century: Patricia V Turner. Room: Ballroom C. 8:00 AM–10:15 AM. (S)

WEDNESDAY

q Exploring a New Ethical Framework for the Review of the Proposed Use of Research Animals: Margaret F Riley. Room: Ballroom A. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM. (STL)

m Finding Homes for Our Animal Heroes: Overcoming Challenges in Research Animal Adoption: Abigail Wolf Greenstein. Room: 207B. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM. (P)

q Organ-On-Chip Technologies: Hype or Reality?: Szczepan W Baran. Room: Ballroom B. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM. (STL)

q Measuring the Success of Outreach Efforts: Does Public Polling Tell the Full Story and How Do We Truly Gauge if We Are Moving the Needle?: Paula A Clifford. Room: 207D. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM. (P)

v Risk Assessment and Decontamination in Laboratory Animal Research: Jason S Villano. Room: Ballroom C. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM. (STL)

u Relocating Animal Programs from Older to New

Afternoon

Afternoon

Buildings? How to Balance Strategy, Sanity, and Surprises: F Claire Hankenson. Room: 213B. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM. (P)

m Six Degrees of Separation: How to Expand Your Network in a Meaningful Way: Tasha M Thomas. Room: 213C. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM. (P) v W-12 Practical Applications of Randomization and Blinding in the Vivarium: Esther Pearl. Room: 210A. 1:00 PM–5:00 PM. (W)

THURSDAY m Pandemic 101: Animal Care and Use Programs Face COVID-19: Jason S Villano. Room: 207B. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM. (P) q Retirement of Nonhuman Primates from Research Facilities: Rewards, Challenges, and Considerations: Peter C Smith. Room: 207D. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM. (P) q The Future of the Guide: Margaret S Landi. Room: 213B. 12:30 PM–2:00 PM. (P)

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

m Keeping Your Culture of Care Current: Joy Redmond. Room: Ballroom C. 11:00 AM–12:00 PM. (STL)

and Temperament Testing Methods (cont.): Jaine E Perlman. Room: 219A. 8:00 AM–12:00 PM. (W)

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OPENING GENERAL SESSION/ GENERAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING Charlotte Convention Center | Sunday, October 25, 2020 5:00-6:30 PM | Crown Ballroom • • • • •

Welcome from AALAS President, Tracy Parker AALAS Awards presentations Recognition of guests and Board of Trustees members Branch Challenge Award presentation Gavel ceremony introducing the new president

Welcome Reception, Richardson Ballroom Sunday, October 25, 2020 District membership meetings will be held on Monday, October 26 at 5:15 PM. See the meeting app/virtual platform for room numbers.

WIN $200 Drawings will be held during the General Membership Meeting. Must be present to win. Badges must be printed by 5:00 p.m. on Sunday to be entered into the drawing.

• Introduction of new trustees • Incoming president, Doug Taylor’s address • Welcome Reception from 6:30-8:00 PM, Richardson Ballroom


BRANT MENSWAR, KEYNOTE SPEAKER With his authentic rock star swagger, Brant Menswar challenges us to become values-based leaders, empowers us to choose our purpose and inspires us to change what’s possible with his incredible story of hope, creativity and determination. Brant Menswar is a critically acclaimed author, award-winning musician and the CEO and founder of Rock Star Impact, a boutique agency that teaches people and organizations how to cultivate values-based leadership and activate organizational values to help connect the head and heart. His unique and compelling approach of using music to build bridges across generational, gender and competency-based gaps has changed what’s possible for industry-leading organizations like Netflix, Verizon, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Microsoft, Hilton and dozens more. Passionate, engaging, and transformational, Brant encourages audiences to move forward with deliberate intention. His interactive and entertaining techniques of defining what matters most compels audiences to dive deeper into their lives, identify their core values and give them the airplay needed to become life-changing anthems that change what’s possible.

Unbreakable Leadership: Engaging the Power of Purpose

The world’s greatest illusionist, Harry Houdini, once said, “What our eyes see and our ears hear, our mind believes.” Strong leaders learn to control those everyday illusions by filtering outside influences and acting with deliberate intention. In this high-energy, interactive presentation, Brant Menswar shows you how to do that immediately and effectively daily. He illustrates that – despite what we’ve been told – we all need to start with our “What” in order for our “Why” to be accurate. Discover how to identify your non-negotiables to amplify and align with your organizational values. With his Rock 'N' Roll infused session, Brant shows audiences how to forge unbreakable leaders and empower them to choose their purpose.

Photos courtesy of Keppler Speakers


AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

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PROGRAM SPONSORS


Charlotte

71st AALAS NATIONAL MEETING OCTOBER 25 - 29, 2020

DON’T MISS THE AALAS NATIONAL MEETING EXHIBIT HALL! Approximately 300 companies (more than 650 booths) exhibit at the AALAS National Meeting. Exhibitors interact with people from the academic community, research institutions, government organizations, and commercial companies. Visit the Exhibitors section of nationalmeeting.aalas.org for a prospectus, a list of previous exhibitors, sponsorship opportunities, and other information.

RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONY COMMERCIAL COMPANY BOOTHS AFFILIATE BOOTHS

Monday, October 26, 8:30 a.m.

Visit with our affiliate members and check out their public outreach and educational materials.

CHARGING STATIONS

Located in the Exhibit Hall and the Registration Lobby

REFRESHMENT BREAKS

Monday: Tuesday: Wednesday:

(Located in the Exhibit Hall Lounge)

POSTER SESSIONS

EXHIBIT HALL HOURS

Monday, October 26: 8:30 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 27: 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Wednesday, October 28: 9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Learn about the latest products and services offered by vendors in the field.

8:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m. sponsored by NEPCO 2:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. sponsorsed by Animal Specialties & Provisions LLC 9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m. sponsored by Priority One 2:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. sponsored by Bio-Serv 9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m. sponsorship available

Come view this year’s poster sessions, and don’t miss the Poster Reception on Tuesday from 2:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Meet the authors, enjoy some refreshments, and see who won this year’s Poster Awards.


AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

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EXHIBITORS & SPONSORS Alfa Wassermann Diagnostic Technologies LLC Allentown Inc Alpha Genesis Inc Alternative Design Manufacturing & Supply Inc ALZET® Osmotic Pumps/Durect Corp American Protective Products Ancare Corp Animal Care Systems, Inc. Animal Care Training Services (ACTS) Animal Identification & Marking Systems Inc

Animal Resource Management Inc

FEFA, LLC FiberCore LLC Fidelis Pharmaceuticals Fine Science Tools Fuel3D-BioVolume Galilei Software Gmbh GenoTyping Center of America

Getinge

Silver Level Sponsor

National Meeting App Banner Silver Level Sponsor

Girton Manufacturing Co Inc Gruenberg TPS

Animal Welfare Institute Art’s Way Scientific Inc A-Tune Software Inc. AVID Identification Systems Inc Avidity Science, LLC

Hilltop Lab Animals Inc Hot Dog Patient Warming

BASF Corporation BASi (Bioanalytical Systems Inc) BetterBuilt bioBUBBLE Inc BioInfoRx Inc Bioquell Inc BMT USA, LLC Brain & Software International-BSI Britz & Co. BZ Sales & Support LLC

IDEXX BioAnalytics

National Meeting App Banner Silver Level Sponsor iMedRIS Data Corporation InfoEd International, Inc Innovive Instech Laboratories Inc Intuitive Biosciences, Inc IWAKI Aquatic JANVIER LABS JRS - Biofresh Lab

CannonDesign Cayuse

KARL STORZ Endoscopy

Charles River

National Meeting App Banner

President’s Level Sponsor Cibertec, S.A.

ClearH2O Inc

Gold Level Sponsor ClorDiSys Solutions Inc Colonial Medical Supply Consolidated Sterilizer Systems Continental Equipment Company Inc Covetrus CURIS® System Danio Lab Datesand Ltd DRE Scientific, A Division of DRE Veterinary Drexel University Durable Superior Casters Dustcontrol Inc Elm Hill Labs

Envigo

Silver Level Sponsor Esco Technologies Inc ETC Sterilization Systems Exemplar Genetics Explora BioLabs E-Z Systems / Euthanex Corp

Kent Scientific Corporation Lab Products Inc Lab Supply Inc LBS (Serving Biotechnology) Ltd Lenderking Caging Products LGL Animal Care Products Inc Life Science Products Lighthouse Life Sciences (Proudly Representing Peroxigard) Lithgow Laboratory Services Locus Technology Inc

Lomir Biomedical Inc

President’s Level Sponsor Ludomed Equipment Inc MAI ANimal Health/Vetcorder Marshall BioResources Medline Industries Inc Medtech International Group Microchip ID LLC MILA International, Inc. Mispro Biotech Services Mosaic Vivarium (Virtual Chemistry, Inc.) Moulton Chinchilla Ranch Mouse Specifics Inc MP Biomedicals, LLC New England Ovis


EXHIBITORS & SPONSORS Northeastern Products Corporation (NEPCO)

Tecniplast

NuAire

The Andersons Lab Bedding Products The Jackson Laboratory Thoren Caging Systems Inc

Refreshment Break Sponsor Silver Level Sponsor

Oak Hill Genetics Overwatch Research Ltd Patterson Scientific Pharmacal Research Labs Inc Plas-Labs Inc

PMI LabDiet

President’s Level Sponsor

PreLabs

Silver Level Sponsor PRI Bio Primate Products Inc

Gold Level Sponsor

Transnetyx Inc

National Meeting App Splash Screen President’s Level Sponsor Triple F Farms, Inc. Turner Scientific UID Identification Solutions Verona Safety Supply Inc

VetEquip Inc

Silver Level Sponsor

Priority One Services Inc

Vetland Medical Sales & Services, LLC Visron Design Inc VRL Laboratories-USA

PVS Process Equipment, Inc.

W F Fisher and Son Wedgewood Pharmacy Worldwide Primates Inc

Quip Laboratories Inc

XpressBio

Rad Source Technologies Inc RapID Lab, Inc Research Diets, Inc. Res-Tek Inc RICA Surgical Products Inc Ridglan Farms Inc Robinson Services Incorporated Rochester Midland Corporation RockStep Solutions

Zeigler Bros Inc Zoologix Inc ZooPharm-SR Veterinary Technologies

S&S Farms DBA Premier BIoSource SAFE Complete Care Competence SAI Infusion Technologies Sarstedt Inc Shepherd Specialty Papers Shoe Cover Magic Sika Industrial Flooring Sinclair BioResources LLC SMC-Roe SoftMouse.NET SOMARK Innovations Inc SOMNI Scientific Spire Integrated Solutions Springer Nature Lab Animal ssniff Spezialdiaeten GmbH Starr Life Sciences Corp Sterilizing Systems STERIS Corporation Strahman Valves Inc Suburban Surgical Co Inc SwifTAG Systems Systems Engineering

Bristol-Myers Squibb-Princeton

Gold Level Sponsor Refreshment Break Sponsor

Tandem Products/Tenderfoot Div. TBJ Inc

NONEXHIBITING SPONSORS Animal Specialties and Provisions LLC Refreshment Break Sponsor Gold Level Sponsor President’s Level Sponsor

Sanofi-Aventis

Silver Level Sponsor

Siemens Industry Inc

National Meeting App Banner Silver Level Sponsor

AFFILIATES

AAALAC International American College of Lab Animal Medicine (ACLAM) American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners (ASLAP) Association of Primate Veterinarians (APV) FeSAHANCCCAL Foundation for Biomedical Research (FBR) International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS) Laboratory Animal Breeders Association (LABA) Laboratory Animal Management Association (LAMA) Laboratory Animal Welfare Training Exchange (LAWTE) National Association for Biomedical Research (NABR) North American 3rs Collaborative (na3rsc) Scientists Center for Animal Welfare (SCAW) Thai Association for Laboratory Animal Science (TALAS) Zebrafish Husbandry Association (ZHA)

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

Gold Level Sponsor

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SUNDAY AFTERNOON

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TECHNICAL TRADE PRESENTATIONS TRACK I - CAPITALIZING DATA TECHNOLOGY u

Why You Need a Real-time Data Solution in 2020

1:00 PM - 1:20 PM/Room: 208A Speaker: Gennifer Caesar Moderator: TBN

In the age of accelerating data collection, having the ability to turn data into meaningful information in real-time is now a necessity for laboratory animal research environments. Unfortunately, with antiquated systems, by the time you discover the information you are looking for, it is likely to have been modified many times over. Stale data impedes institutions from addressing urgent issues expediently, making fast operational changes, reporting on compliance efficiently, and providing accurate research data. We will demonstrate four key ways that using a real-time data solution not only addresses this increasing need but also benefits all groups in the laboratory animal research industry including management teams, researchers, animal caretakers, and veterinary staff. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Virtual Chemistry, Inc.

that are not repeatable, resulting in uncertainty, re-work, and delays. Adding to the challenge, data captured from in vivo studies are usually stored in spreadsheets, binders, and point solutions creating disconnected data silos, each with unique data formats that are difficult to harmonize, quality check, and aggregate for analysis. The resulting data chaos puts a drag on operational efficiencies and slows discovery while wasting research resources. Until recently, digitalizing research workflows has been a promise of the future. New tools are now transforming how in vivo research workflows are conducted such that operations are becoming more efficient, and data are harmonized and aggregated from the point of data capture. We will discuss how research labs are experiencing efficiency gains with the potential to reduce the burden on research animals and speed drugs to market. We will look at how study teams, including scientists, planners, and lab technicians work seamlessly within one digital ecosystem across business sites, departments, and therapeutic areas. This digitalization of in vivo research workflows is shown to improve laboratory efficiency and data quality. These efficiency gains mean that more research can be conducted with the same resources. The new tools offer streamlined communications, chain of custody tracking, real-time situational awareness, and 360-degree views into data. Since data is harmonized at the point of data capture and discoverable, they can easily be repurposed to speed studies in other therapeutic areas. We propose that organizations that have undergone a digital transformation have a market advantage over those that lag behind. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by RockStep Solutions

Airports Don’t Use Pen and Paper Anymore, Nor Should Animal Facilities. Insights for Animal Facility Management Solution Planning

q

Speaker: Eric Y Rieux Moderator: TBN

Speaker: Candace Rohde-Johnson Moderator: Shelly Carballo

u

Use of Automated Blood Sampling to Improve Animal Welfare and Data Collection for Large Animal Studies

1:20 PM - 1:40 PM/Room: 208A

2:20 PM - 2:40 PM/Room: 208A

What is the difference between an animal facility and an airport? Both must screen, move, trace, and keep their clients and “subjects” happy. This means ensuring they are all delivered safely, on-time, and to the right place. Both must reliably manage operations of buildings and maintain environmental conditions under strict controls while ensuring that all critical supplies are stocked. Both must ensure that staff have the right training, qualifications, and are assigned to the right task (don’t confuse the pilot with the janitor!). Both operate with many key performance indicators (occupancy rates, services on-time, etc.) and under strict regulatory compliance. Both must be able plan and react to the unplanned and to alerts. And finally, both face regular changes and must be able to adapt and evolve. Just as airports no longer operate with paper records, animal facilities are more than ever relying on software tools to manage it all. And just as two airports are never the same, each animal facility is unique. This talk will make the case that no one solution for animal facility management is perfect and encompassing. Each unique case requires a solution that fits. Participants will learn how to put together a basic User Requirements Specification (URS), what questions to ask internally and externally when searching/sourcing a solution, which colleagues and function to include and enlist from the get-go, and how to get buy-in to increase chances of being funded. The target audience includes research directors, lab/facility/ operations manager, veterinarians, and last but not least, the people who get things done, zoo technicians.

Automating blood sampling in large animal models can improve translatability and reproducibility for preclinical drug development. This is achieved through several mechanisms including sampling from animals with reduced stress, combining study protocols to incorporate both pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) in a single animal, and the ability to collect samples from free moving animals, even during overnight periods. Not only does automation lead to better data, but it also makes it possible to reduce overall animal numbers. This presentation will review studies and publications by researchers who have refined their studies using the Culex-L automated blood sampling system for large animals. Further, the presentation will outline the simple steps and materials you need to incorporate automated sampling into your studies.

This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Brain & Software International (BSI)

Use Case Studies Showing How Digital Transformations Are Improving in Vivo Workflows m

This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by BASi Research Products.

Using 3D Scanning to Improve the Measurement and Analysis of Subcutaneous Tumors q

2:40 PM - 3:00 PM/Room: 208A Speaker: Andrew Smith Moderator: Karl Turley

We will discuss the benefits using a 3D and thermal scanning system to monitor the development of subcutaneous tumors in in-vivo oncology research. Providing an overview of how utilizing the latest capture technologies, machine learning and data science are providing a wide range of benefits. Improving data traceability, scientific confidence, study repeatability and animal welfare. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Fuel3D.

2:00 PM - 2:20 PM/Room: 208A Speaker: Charles Donnelly Moderator: Julie Morrison

In vivo studies are complex and the results are sensitive to numerous operational and biological variables. Studies are expensive to run and often produce outcomes qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


SUNDAY AFTERNOON Use Internet of Things Connectivity to Drive Laboratory Sterilization Throughput Efficiency u

3:00 PM - 3:20 PM/Room: 208A

The key to an effective sterilization process is built on efficient throughput of the media being sterilized, whether it be cages and bedding in vivariums or instruments in research laboratories. The key to effective implementation of an Internet of Things (IoT) System is creating a solution where all stakeholders, such as facility managers, maintenance staff, veterinary technicians, and IT professionals, have buy in to maximize usability and eliminate barriers to system integration. This presentation will walk you through numerous options to integrating an IoT management system to your sterilization process, while weighing the features and drawbacks to each option. Key features include immediate control system customer support, technician remote monitoring, mobile app usage, and digital cycle results. In addition, the presentation will cover a custom solution to maximize sterilization use while minimizing utility consumption by removing manual processes in a sterilization cycle completed “after hours.” Bringing IoT capability to the autoclave rooms has a multifaceted benefit while maintaining the flexibility to create unique solutions for any laboratory or vivarium. These benefits include real-time control system technical assistance, cycle monitoring and alerting, sameday system updates and upgrades, and remote monitoring. All of these benefits can be used through new equipment and control system upgrades on existing autoclave equipment. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Beta Star Life Science Equipment.

Dry Heat Sterilization in Vivariums: An Alternative Option for Sterilization in the Lab Animal Facility u

This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by CURIS System.

Protecting Your Animals and Team with Optimized Cleaning and Disinfection Protocols u

4:00 PM - 4:20 PM/Room: 208A

Speaker: Nicole Kenny Moderator: Siobhain Sweetingham

COVID-19 has changed our attitudes toward infection prevention, both inside the vivarium and throughout our communities. Your expertise in preventing infections in animal housing areas can be a highly effective tool to help protect your team from the threat of infection, in addition to the animals under your care. This presentation will reveal how you can optimize your cleaning and disinfection protocols throughout your facility, with safety to the user and animals at the forefront. The target audience is facility supervisors, vivarium managers, environmental health and safety staff and laboratory animal technicians.

3:20 PM - 3:40 PM/Room: 208A

This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Peroxigard Disinfectants by Virox Technologies Inc.

The presentation focuses on the use of dry heat instead of steam for the sterilization of laboratory animal cages, IVC racks, enrichment, and other items used in the vivarium. Topics to be covered include the development of dry heat sterilization in laboratory animal facilities; what is dry heat sterilization and how does it work with laboratory animal cages, IVC racks and related items; how the dry heat sterilizer is configured; the benefits and limitations of dry heat sterilization; recent case studies showing specific customer challenges and how dry heat sterilization solved them; how dry heat sterilization compares to steam sterilization; and how these systems are validated.

TECHNICAL TRADE PRESENTATIONS

Speaker/Moderator: Robert C Davis

This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by TPS-Gruenberg.

Increase the Ease and Speed of Decontaminating Isolators: Explore Modular Hybrid Hydrogen Peroxide u

3:40 PM - 4:00 PM/Room: 208A Speaker: Frances M. Grinstead Moderator: Rich Mullen

Decontaminating gnotobiotic chambers and the spaces they inhabit takes enormous amounts of time and labor, severely hampering the turnaround time for routine disinfection. The current process delays the delivery of food, bedding, and supplies to the chamber in addition to the commencement of new studies. Traditionally, decontamination treatments involve labor-intensive disassembly of soft chambers, discarding any HEPA filtration and spraying with caustic chemical sterilants like peracetic acid and chlorine dioxide. On average, it takes 3 days for chemically treated chambers to dry out completely and become reusable. While immersion sterilization is well documented to achieve spore sterilization, the process treats only removable items and efficacy in filtration systems is unknown. Increasing the ease and speed of the gnotobiotic decontamination process would greatly enhance research capabilities, allowing scientists to focus more on their studies

TRACK II – RESEARCH MODELS AND FACILITY DESIGN All Hot and Not Bothered: A Novel Way to Provide Thermal Comfort to Mice m

1:00 PM - 1:20 PM/Room: 203B Speaker: Beverly A Chua Moderator: TBN

Laboratory rodents are typically housed in rooms set at temperatures well below their thermoneutral zone, primarily to match the comfort requirements of the personnel working in these rooms. The rodent thermoneutral zone is the range of temperatures within which rodents maintain their body temperature without expending extra energy to keep warm. Housing rodents in temperatures lower than their thermoneutral zone subjects them to cold stress, which leads to changes in physiology, behavior, and immune function, variably impacting research. The Optimice® SMART system is a compact 20-cage individually ventilated rack with individual heated floorspace provided to 10 cages. Heat levels can be tailored to meet the thermal demands of animals in each cage, and mice can choose the heated floor or a cooler floor surface within the cage. The ability for animals to choose their thermal comfort level sets SMART apart from other systems that either provide heated air to the cage or heat the entire cage bottom area. Participants will learn how SMART can alleviate cold stress in mice and be used to provide thermal support to postoperative mice and other research models. The options to expand the use of the system are vast since SMART is also equipped with 25 watts of USB power ports at each station for connecting additional monitoring, camera,

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

Speaker/Moderator: David Larson

than manual labor. This presentation explores modular hybrid hydrogen peroxide (HHP) fog technology as a faster, safer alternative to conventional protocols. Participants will understand how combining aerosol and vapor hydrogen peroxide creates HHP capable of a 6-log reduction of spores in the most challenging locations within a closed system in just over an hour. We will examine the challenges and results of performing HHP decontamination of gnotobiotic chambers, their contents, delivery sleeves, and laboratory spaces. Discover how the TRINITY HHP process is key to achieving spore inactivation with low-level 7% hydrogen peroxide while decreasing decontamination time by days and reducing the man hours necessary to successfully result in a 99.9999% reduction of pathogens. This presentation is ideal for facility directors, veterinarians, and researchers in charge of maintaining the integrity of the research environment, from whole-laboratory spaces to individual gnotobiotic chambers.

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SUNDAY AFTERNOON

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

or behavioral devices. The target audience is all lab animal professionals and researchers who are interested in a platform to provide continual thermal support to mice without the limitations of traditional heat support devices. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Animal Care Systems.

Improving Rodent Breeding Performance with Nutritional Supplementation q

1:20 PM - 1:40 PM/Room: 203B Speaker: Morgane G Stum Moderator: William Thomas

Breeding programs for laboratory research animals are in place in most medical research institutions and can include a variety of genetic strains and backgrounds, from inbreeds to transgenics to newly engineered mice. Common breeding challenges are often observed, including poor breeding performance (nonproductive units, dystocia, small litters), pup health issues (low lactation, mortality, and cannibalism), and weaning complications (low weight, runt, difficulty finding their food and water source). Poor breeding can have disastrous consequences for principal investigators and animal care professionals. On a large scale, poor breeding production can incur increased costs, wasted resources, and additional technician time. On a smaller scale, poor breeding performance can mean delays in research results and even loss of unique and precious transgenic lines. A range of precautions can be taken to help at every step of the breeding program to ensure optimum breeding performance. Nutrition is a major influencer to healthy reproduction; however, there is little research on the importance of good nutrition for laboratory animals during this highly demanding process. ClearH2O’s DietGel® Prenatal, a purified dietary gel supplement specifically formulated for breeders contains a variety of nutrients essential to healthy reproduction, pregnancy, and lactation, such as folic acid, iron, calcium and omega-3s. DietGel® Prenatal also contains flax seeds, adding extra foraging opportunity to reduce stress. Independent and collaborative research studies have shown that using ClearH2O dietary supplement gels to support laboratory animal breeding programs has many benefits, including increased breeding performance, production of larger litters, reduction in cannibalism, and higher survival of pups and weanlings. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by ClearH2O. v

Humanized Mouse Models

1:40 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 203B Speaker: Jenny Rowe Moderator: TBN

When evaluating the world of humanized models it’s important to consider the unique differences in each model for your researchers’ study needs. Charles River offers multiple options, both founded on the triple-immunodeficient NCG mouse strain. The ability of human immune cells to engraft in the NCG mouse makes it a powerful tool to evaluate compounds for immuno-oncology, infectious diseases, and inflammatory diseases. This presentation will provide an overview of the humanized mouse portfolio, including a summary of models engrafted with either human PBMCs or human umbilical cord blood derived CD34+ stem cells. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Charles River Laboratories.

Humanized Preclinical Models in Immunotherapy and 3R Guidelines q

2:00 PM - 2:20 PM/Room: 203B Speaker: Erwan Corcuff Moderator: Thomas Tribou

Two levels of preclinical requirements exist in Europe. The first is research without any obligations. The second is research with regulatory requirements. Excluding

this differentiation, global preclinical approaches include discussions about the relevance of models to the 3Rs, and how to provide and use more predictive pre-clinical models to meet 3R requirements. Preclinical models have emerged over the past 20 years that can partially reproduce functional human immune systems and associated human tumors, among others. Derived from academic research centers, these specific models make it possible to generate useful information for translational research. In immunotherapy, these models are particularly useful in preclinical trials to demonstrate early rejection or drug candidate inclusions. In parallel with procedure optimizations, the team training and the scientific incrementation of the models has made it possible to reduce the number of animals used. An effective industrial preclinical base for 10 years, the industrial and scientific development of these advanced models has been justified. The combination of the science, logistics, and production elements makes it possible to meet the 3Rs. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Janvier Labs.

From Outdated to Cutting-Edge: Transforming a 1970s-Era Facility into a Xenotansplantation Suite u

2:20 PM - 2:40 PM/Room: 203B Speaker: Alissa McFarland Moderator: TBN

Society’s need to advance research from bench to bedside, coupled with an increasingly competitive life sciences industry, has generated demand for facilities designed to support clinical research and foster the optimization of breakthrough therapies. Translational research using large animal models requires specialized spaces designed to meet multiple criteria at high dollars per square foot. Grant funding often falls short of the capital required for institutions to build new facilities, necessitating programs to grow within existing buildings that lack the infrastructure to support program needs. This situation poses significant design challenges requiring thoughtful programming, planning, and life-cycle cost analysis to implement effective and sustainable solutions that balance user requirements with facility constraints. University of Maryland School of Medicine entrusted CannonDesign to transform existing laboratory space into a state-of-the-art animal surgery suite for cardiac xenotransplantation, where researchers are breaking new ground in the exploration of xenotransplantation to mitigate the shortage of human organs for transplants. We’ll share the methodology and tools used to guide the stakeholders in quick decision making and creative solutions that balance the complex design requirements and challenges presented by the 1978 building, not originally designed to house animals. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by CannonDesign.

Successful Oncology Research Using the 3Rs: Animal Model and Services Selection q

2:40 PM - 3:00 PM/Room: 203B Speaker: Sheryl J Wildt Moderator: Jamie Naden

The rate of successful translation from animal models to clinical cancer trials is less than eight percent. Proper experimental design may be the difference between the success and failure of an investigational drug. Conducting carefully designed experiments and choosing the right animal and tumor model does not only impact success rate, but also support the 3Rs. Oncology research is heavily dependent on animal work, but here participants will learn the steps for selecting the optimal oncology model for a research study and complementary services to make the most out of each study, each animal, time, and funding. We will discuss various animal models available for oncology research on the market today, including the new B-NDG (NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid IL2rgtm1/Bcgen) ultra-immunodeficient mouse model. In addition, we will discuss the importance of highly characterized tumor models, particularly PDXs, in reducing the number of animals needed to answer research questions. Finally, we will highlight the importance of the sequence

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


SUNDAY AFTERNOON and type of studies that are done to collect the maximum amount of data from each animal. The target audience is principal investigators, graduate students, lab managers, technicians, or any lab animal professionals involved in designing experiments for or participating in oncology research.

What’s In a Cage Card? Maximizing the Productivity with Coded Cage Cards u

3:00 PM - 3:20 PM/Room: 203B

Speaker: Anne M Gath Moderator: Amanda M Coldwell, Jennifer L Hoard

This talk will discuss the advantages of coded cage cards for managing animal colony data. A robust colony management system can allow facility staff and researchers to access a wealth of information connected to a cage card. A cage card can be connected to protocol, breeding history, animal history, cage locations, as well as history, billing, medical records, and much more. Learn how you can save time on cage counts and easily manage protocol counts and monthly billing with automated, real-time information connected directly to your cage cards. Allowing permission-based access to research staff also reduces the time spent on updating cage and animal information, managing cage counts, and tracking protocols. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by BioInfoRx, Inc.

Ensure Healthy Animal Feeding Even During Forced Unattended Periods q

3:20 PM - 3:40 PM/Room: 203B Speaker: Xavier Cañis Robles Moderator: TBN

In uncertain times when we are forced to limit animal facility access, it is important to keep animal feeding as automated as possible especially when healthy feeding patterns are required. Many studies have validated that automated feeding leads to healthier animals in terms of obesity and associated issues. Establishing a healthy feeding pattern is not an easy task. Healthy feeding routines require 24/7 animal facility personnel dedication. However, human error will occur possibly affecting the associated experiments or animal lives. Automated feeding systems are on the market that can be located in standard animal cages. These systems control food and drink access, by time or intake. Animal feeding is monitored and recorded around the clock, making metabolic research easier during dark cycles (circadian rhythm). Some requirements should be met for complete reliability. Systems must be able to be remotely monitored from any connected device. It must be easy to set up and clean (no cables). The system must be user-friendly and provide email alerts when issues occur. In addition, the automated system must log and record everything and be cost-effective. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Cibertec SA (Spain).

The Future of Macaque Housing: New Findings Led to Innovative Ideas that Aim to Improve Animal Welfare, Research, and Facility Operations m

3:40 PM - 4:00 PM/Room: 203B Speaker: Massimo Ferrari Moderator: Randy Moseley

Many NHP experts and research facilities using NHP as animal models agree that macaque caging for experimental monks and pairs presents a limit to some species’ natural behaviors, such as locomoting unhindered, the ability to see their surroundings, or sleep properly. From an operational standpoint, vivarium doorways heights and the capacity of washing areas, especially in older buildings, are a challenge for the workflow of operations and the operators. This session will give a view of the future of macaque housing that aims to reduce most of the current limitations. The innovative approach includes removing the heavy lifting and obstruction issues during procedures, maintaining highly desirable forms of enrichment, and providing space for the animals to lay down or stretch out naturally or to be able to sit next to each other for grooming. The vision for a new design takes into consideration the importance of the quality of the research and the facilities’ space limitations and operations. This session is for professionals working in facilities that use and house NHP as animal models and are looking for improvements in animal welfare, research, and the flow of operations. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Tecniplast.

Isoflurane: I Monitor the Animal, but Who’s Monitoring Me? u

4:00 PM - 4:20 PM/Room: 203B Speaker: Eugene Marino III Moderator: TBN

Isoflurane was developed as a safer alternative to the use of flammable ethers for anesthesia in the early days of surgery and was approved for medical use in the United States in 1979. Since then, it has become the ubiquitous agent for inhalant anesthesia in veterinary and laboratory research surgeries. But what about the safety of isoflurane not just for the subjects, but those who work around it on a regular basis and experience waste anesthesia gas exposure? A quick look at available data and even the lab animal resource protocols of research centers shows there is not even a consistent description of its isoflurane, much less empirical evidence of its risks. While we do have recommended maximum exposure limits from NIOSH, what exactly do and don’t we know about safely working in an environment where isoflurane is in regular use? Our talk will outline what known and suspected risks are faced, what measures we can take to protect ourselves, and what methods and equipment are appropriate and safest to use. This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Kent Scientific Corporation.

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

This Technical Trade Presentation is sponsored in part by Envigo.

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MONDAY MORNING WORKSHOPS

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

u

W-01 Communicating for Engagement

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 201B

Leader/Faculty: Gary Jones Facilitator: TBN Workshop Fee: $150     Workshop Limit: 50

At the core of most successful leaders and managers is their ability to communicate. We explore the five factors that drive your approach to any communication, the two needs that everyone has when interacting with others, and how to meet those needs using the foundation skills and interaction process. Participants will learn how to use the foundation skills and interaction process through a variety of scenarios and role playing. This workshop would be good for anyone who interacts frequently with colleagues and for those serving in management roles of different levels, whether as supervisors, managers, or directors. The speaker is a seasoned HR professional who previously served as vice president of HR at Hilton Worldwide and has recently consulted with the fundraising arm of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and national AALAS. The target audience is supervisors/managers/directors. v

W-02 Perioperative Anesthetic Monitoring

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 210A

Leader: Robert F Hoyt Jr Faculty: Robert F Hoyt Jr, Randall R Clevenger, Karen J Keeran, Tannia S Clark, Gayle

Z Nugent, Kenneth R Jefferies, Tanya L Herzog, Audrey Noguchi Facilitator: TBN Workshop Fee: $250     Workshop Limit: 20 Performing surgical procedures with the aid of magnification has gained widespread use in human medicine over the past 30 years. Using surgical loupes, surgeons can now perform procedures on very small structures that were considered impossible a few decades ago. Within the past 25 years, the use of magnification to perform microsurgical techniques has also quickly spread to other health care disciplines, including dental specialties and dermatology, to increase surgical precision, such that it is now considered the standard of care to use them. The use of microsurgery and its value to biomedical research has, unfortunately, only just begun to be realized. Because of their small body structures, laboratory animals such as rats and mice, have generally not been considered as animal models for many types of surgical procedures routinely performed in biomedical research. Investigators have rather elected to utilize larger species such as dogs, pigs, sheep, rabbits, or nonhuman primates for such modeling because both surgical support equipment is more readily available, and the surgical techniques are more familiar to the support personnel. The recent shift to using genetically engineered rodents, especially mice, has now resulted in increased researcher desires to utilize these animals in more sophisticated modeling procedures, especially surgery. Rather than being limited to only simple procedures such as IM, IP, or IV injections, researchers using microsurgery can now perform complex surgical procedures on many rodent organ systems, such as the heart, lungs, and the gastrointestinal tract. This workshop will introduce the basic techniques, equipment, and general applications of microsurgery using surgical loupes. Hands-on training will be conducted in 2 phases: teaching students to develop technical skills by performing exercises using surgical loupes and applying these skills to perform simple surgical procedures using rodent and organ surrogates. This Workshop is sponsored in part by Q-Optics, RICA Surgical Products, SurgiReal Products, Inc., and Supramid Suture.

v

W-03 Tips and Tricks of Monitoring during Anesthesia

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 209A

Leaders: Cholawat Pacharinsak Faculty: Patrick E Sharp Facilitator: TBN Workshop Fee: $150     Workshop Limit: 30

Monitoring is a crucial part of making anesthesia safer. Safer anesthesia starts with anesthetists understanding monitoring systems and the interpretation of the resulting data. Subsequent and appropriate actions can be taken to prevent irreversible anesthetic-related complications. Ideally, anesthetists should monitor during the pre-, intra-, and post-operative periods. This workshop will cover basic monitoring systems and interpreting the resulting data focusing on large animals and some small part on rodents. These monitoring systems will include cardiovascular, respiratory, central nervous, and thermoregulatory systems containing some tips and tricks during anesthesia based on experiences. This workshop is suited for veterinarians, veterinary technicians, IACUC members, scientists, and researchers. This Workshop is sponsored in part by Kent Scientific.

SEMINARS On the CUSP: A New Option for Addressing Administrative Burden q

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom B

Leader/Moderator: Sally Thompson-Iritani Facilitator: Jennifer N Davis

Under the auspices of the Federal Demonstration Partnership (FDP), the Compliance Unit Standard Procedure (CUSP) Project offers an option to address administrative burden at the institutional level and improve reproducibility within and across institutions. The goal of this project is to create an online repository where institutions can share standard procedures used in animal care protocols with the broader animal welfare compliance community. Use of this tool is supported by OLAW and the USDA and is a burden-reducing initiative from the 21st Century Cure Act. A working group, representing over 40 institutions, has been formed to support site design and development. The group has made significant progress in developing this resource over the past year. This session will provide participants with an overview of the project, including responsibilities of participants using the system, a demonstration of the test site, and an update on the status of the project. The targeted audience is IACUC members, veterinarians, postapproval monitors, and researchers.

Speakers/Topics: 8:00

Sally Thompson-Iritani

Welcome and Introductions

8:10

Elaine K Kim

Using CUSP to Decrease Burden and Maintain Compliance

8:35

Madeline L Budda

Tailoring CUSP to Your Institution (Small, Large, Academic, Industry)

9:05

Scott D Bury

Convincing the IACUC and Leadership that CUSP is Right for You

9:30

Anthony E Munn

Transitions and Change Management with CUSP in Mind

9:55

Sally Thompson-Iritani

Live Demo of the CUSP Site, Q&A

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


MONDAY MORNING Overcoming Interruptions to Daily Operations in a Large Rodent Vivarium u

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom C

This seminar will cover UT MD Anderson Cancer Center’s planning, actions, and response to recent events that disrupted major business functions of the Houston animal care operations. The events included a major cagewash renovation that originated as a simple cage washer replacement project but grew in both scope and duration. Additionally, we managed a planned weeklong animal drinking water outage, necessitated by the replacement of rodent drinking water supply lines, that required us to support the hydration of thousands of mice without routine drinking water. We experienced a massive, unexpected citywide water outage that arose due to the rupture of a 96-inch water line, causing a complete loss of water to half of the city, including the Houston Medical Center and our animal facilities. Lastly, as is the case for every institution in the country, we grappled with the COVID-19 crisis, which remains a chronic challenge to be managed. Each of these disruptions had different and variable impacts on operations, personnel, research, and the animal population. For expected events, advance planning successfully mitigated the potential impact, allowing for the reallocation of resources and effort. Business continuity planning can address unplanned events; however, some events are particularly unique. In each of these events, communication is the key to ensuring successful navigation through events with significant operational impact. Participants will learn issues to consider for both planned and unplanned disruptions to mission critical operations, and strategies to mitigate their impact. Various approaches peculiar to each event will be shared. The target audience for this seminar is directors, husbandry and operation managers, supervisors, and animal care staff.

Speakers/Topics: 8:00

Andrew T Pesek

Welcome and Introductions

8:05

Cynthia R Lockworth

Working without Water: How to Successfully Manage a Water Outage in a Vivarium

8:40

Chetna Patel

What Were We Thinking? An EightMonth Cagewash Renovation

9:15

Andrew T Pesek

We Did Not Plan for This: A Citywide Water Outage

9:45

Stacy A LeBlanc

Don’t Panic: Communication Is the Key to Reducing Anxiety

The Role of Animal Models in the Immunotherapy Revolution v

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom D Leader: Zachary T Freeman Moderator: Courtney Hunter Facilitator: Kelly A Metcalf Pate

Immunotherapy has transformed human and animal medicine by offering therapies that can modulate the existing immune response to impact the course of disease. Immunotherapy is any therapy that acts to modulate the immune system to treat a disease condition. In many instances, immunotherapy has led to new therapies for diseases that have been untreatable in the past, including autoimmune disease and cancer. Basic and translational research in animal models have been critical to the development of these therapies by advancing our understanding of the immune system in various diseases. Immunotherapy offers the unique ability to regulate the immune system by either increasing or decreasing its function based on how the immune system contributes to the disease outcome. For example, immunotherapy

Speakers/Topics: 8:00

Zachary T Freeman

Welcome and Introductions

8:05

Courtney Hunter

Introduction to Immunotherapy

8:15

Victoria Baxter

Immunotherapy in Rodent Models: Approaches and Considerations

8:45

Diana G Scorpio

Immunotherapy Development in Large Animal Models of HIV and Other Infectious Diseases

9:15

Rimon Duran-Struuck

Immunotherapy in Large Animal Models of Transplantation

Zachary T Freeman

Reverse Translation: Utilizing Patient Data to Improve the Use of Mouse Models for the Development of Cancer Immunotherapy

9:45

PLATFORM SESSIONS 8:30AM - 10:45AM Laboratory Investigations 1 8:00 a.m.-9:45 a.m. Room: 203B 8:00

PS1 Lessons Learned during Murine Microbiome Analysis on a Decentralized Campus S Hashway*, J Reuter

8:15

PS2 The Influence of Daytime LED Light Exposure on Fatty Acid and Protein Levels in the Major Metabolic Tissues of Mice

8:30

PS3 Exposure to Animal Facility Light at Night Disrupts Circadian Rhythms of Metabolism and Physiology in Nude Mice

8:45

PS4 Pathogenicity of 2 Corynebacterium bovis Isolates in NSG Mice K Szilagyi*, J Liu, AK Bloom, M Granitar, GE Sandusky, R Livingston

9:00

PS5 Evaluation of Ankylosing Enthesopathy in C57BL/6J Male Mice BL Kick*, L Anderson, Z Bichler, R Doty, J Wotton

RT Dauchy*, LM Dupepe, GL Dobek, AT Pierce, GB Voros, SM Hill, VP Belancio, BB Kiely, EM Dauchy, AA Allen, DE Blask

RT Dauchy*, LM Dupepe, GL Dobek, GB Voros, AT Pierce, BB Kiely, SM Hill, M Anbalagan, DE Blask

9:15 PS6 Development and Characterization of the Ultra-immunodeficient NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid IL2rgtm1/Bcgen (B-NDG) Mouse Model J Naden*, J Xiang

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

Leader/Moderator: Andrew T Pesek Jr Facilitator: Jessica L Grahmann

is being used to inhibit inappropriate immune responses that lead to autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection. By contrast, immunotherapy is also being used to augment immune responses that are inhibited in cancer and chronic viral disease. Despite these advances, some diseases are resistant to immunotherapy and could benefit from the development of new immunotherapies. Animal models continue to play an essential role in understanding these mechanisms of resistance, thus guiding how the next generation of immunotherapies are being developed. Audience members will first learn about what immunotherapy is and how animal models have been critical to its development. Speakers will then discuss how small and large animal models are impacting the development of cutting-edge immunotherapy in the treatment of viral diseases including HIV, transplantation, and oncology. This seminar series will be of interest to a broad range of audience members interested in how animal models are used to advance human and animal health.

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MONDAY MORNING

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

9:30

PS7 Assessing the Welfare of Mice following Repeat Administration of Anesthetic Agents B Skiles*, T Shafer, S King, DL Hickman

luncheon on Tuesday. This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by Committee for Laboratory Animal Training and Research (CLATR) and IDEXX BioAnalytics.

Husbandry/Management 8:00 a.m.-10:45 a.m. Room: 208A

Exhibit Hall Refreshment Break— Charlotte Delights! 8:30 a.m.– 10:30 a.m. Sponsored by NEPCO

8:00

PS8 From Vivarium to Hospital: Safeguarding Animals and People in the Face of COVID-19 LE Riddle*, KD Bean, CV Rose, CM Bell

8:15

PS9 A Collaborative Solution for Animal Care Technician Recruitment S Ogeka*, L Muca, M Morrison, K Krueger

8:30

PS10 Rapid Buildup of Intracage Ammonia (NH3) in Small Volume Mouse IVC Cages: A Husbandry Challenge MA Eskandarani, O Kalliokoski, J Hau*

8:45

PS11 Space Is at a Premium: A Real-time Graphical Tool for Cage Space Allocation Planning D Hanson*, H Manning, M Terrasi

q

9:00

PS12 Forays into Farrowing Sow: Extra-large Swine in a Modest Facility A Hicks-Nelson*, S Baker

Speakers: F Claire Hankenson Moderator: Cynthia A Pekow Facilitator: Paula A Clifford

9:30 PS13 Two Case Management Lessons Learned from Gas-Bubble Disease in Xenopus laevis: Practical Problem-Solving in an Aquatic Facility NJ Fabian*, S Muthupalani, NY Chan, O Paugois, C Bresilla, CS McCoy, OL Franco Mahecha, JG Fox, D Annamalai 9:45

PS14 Enrichment Innovation: Human Team Building Activity Benefits Nonhuman Primates B Culp*

10:00

PS15 Challenges of Capturing, Transporting, Housing, and Safely Handling Wild Caught Juvenile Alligators: Husbandry Considerations and Adaptations For Successful Research RK Banks*

10:15

PS16 Reusable Surgical Masks in the Face of Supply Shortages K Brannick*, MA Robinson, C Janssen, T Gomez

10:30

PS17 Chapparvovirus/Mouse Kidney Parvovirus Eradication by Cross-foster Rederivation P Sharp*, I Faseeh, K Greca, A Frost, G Manship

PANEL DISCUSSIONS v

Pathology Quiz Bowl

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM/Room: Ballroom A

Leader: Cynthia L Besch-Williford, Craig L Franklin Moderator: Craig L Franklin Facilitator: Crysti Reed Panelists: Craig L Franklin, Cynthia L Besch-Williford

This session will consist of an informal review of the pathology of laboratory animals in the form of an image-based quiz. Topics will include lesions of well-described infectious and noninfectious diseases, pathological manifestations of emerging diseases, and selected phenotypic characteristics of important genetically engineered animal models. The images will be educational and challenging to laboratory animal specialists at all levels of pathology expertise. Targeted audience is comparative medicine trainees, laboratory animal veterinarians, pathologists, and scientists. Participants from comparative medicine training programs can receive a fabulous cash prize for the highest score. A participation cash prize is also provided. The comparative medicine trainee with the highest score will be recognized at the Committee for Laboratory Animal Training and Research (CLATR)

SPECIAL TOPIC LECTURES Building Momentum in Openness about Animal Research in the U.S. 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom B

Health discoveries that benefit humans and animals rely on animal research. However, recent public opinion polls show that only half of Americans support health research involving animals. As public support falls, activist groups are successful in placing increased restrictions on research. In response, science organizations are recognizing the need for expanded outreach and communications, a strategy that has worked well in other parts of the world to quell public fears and improve trust in science. A growing number of U.S. research organizations, including universities, biotech, and pharmaceutical companies, are posting website information about how and why animals are studied. Participation in public outreach initiatives, such as Biomedical Research Awareness Day, is increasing annually. However, significantly expanded engagement with the public by more institutions is needed to achieve meaningful public discourse about why, when, and how animals are involved in research. Participants will learn why increased openness is essential to scientific progress, the developing U.S. grassroots effort taking place to engage and assist research organizations in becoming open about their work with animals, and the first steps of an Openness Initiative steering committee convened in the U.S. in 2020 to inform a way forward.

Charles C Hunter Lecture: Rational Design of Novel Treatments for Psychiatric Illness v

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom A Speaker: Flavio Frohlich Moderator: Julie A Avalos Facilitator: TBN

Dr. Frohlich will show how a biomedical discovery made under the microscope in a lab dish has enabled the development of a novel, noninvasive brain stimulation paradigm. His lab has discovered that electrical communication signals in the brain are surprisingly susceptible to weak electricity, which can be used to sculpt and restore neuronal communication. Today, this noninvasive approach is being investigated in clinical trials for psychiatric and neurological illnesses such as depression, schizophrenia, and chronic pain. This successful translation was enabled by preclinical biomedical research using a ferret model, which provides the basis for the rational design of personalized treatment paradigms by allowing insights into the mechanism of action of brain stimulation. He will discuss how combining computer simulations, preclinical research, and clinical trials provide a novel approach that leverages synergy and thereby accelerates the journey towards greatly improving animal and human brain health. Participants will learn the unique and important

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


MONDAY MORNING role of species other than mice and rats in brain science, the role of brain rhythms in health and disease key considerations for rapid translation from basic science to clinical trials, brain networks as novel treatment targets of psychiatric and neurological illnesses, and a new perspective on biology that focuses on networks and ecosystems rather than organs and individuals. The target audience is laboratory animal technicians, veterinary technicians, veterinarians, and research personnel.

u

This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by Committee for Technician Awareness and Development (CTAD).

In February, the Tulane National Primate Research Center (TNPRC) became one of the first research facilities in the nation to receive authorization from the CDC to obtain specimens of SARS-CoV-2, the virus known as COVID-19. With more than 142,600 confirmed cases in 135 countries with at least 5,400 deaths by the mid-March 2019, this highly infectious virus has rapidly become a threat to health across the globe. All the work associated with the virus conducted at the TNPRC will be performed in the Regional Biosafety Laboratory (RBL). As the largest facility of its kind in the nation, this highly sophisticated, NHP, biomedical research facility was designed to the requirements of ABSL-3 design guidelines established by the NIH and the CDC. The facility has played an important role in the discovery of vaccines developed to support the health programs of the country, including research on the coronavirus. This presentation will focus on key components of the RBL, and how they work together to assist staff to complete the important tasks they necessarily need to execute. Completing these tasks are done so under extremely strenuous working conditions. Among the items that will be discussed are an aerobiology suite, telemetry monitoring, surgical functions, pathology, cage processing and sterilization, tissue digestion, lab functions, and sustainability/energy saving applications. Planning concepts, images, and details will be shared with attendees by the lead lab planner who was involved in the realization of this extremely important national resource from the generation of the grant that funded the facility to its inception. Participants will learn about the nuances of designing a facility of this complex nature, and in so doing obtain a understanding and appreciation for their role in the research and discovery of solutions that prevent the costly impact that emerging infectious diseases have on humanity.

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom C Speaker: Tara M Harrison Moderator: TBN Facilitator: TBN

Neoplasia has been diagnosed regularly in multiple zoological and exotic animals. Through the acceptance of routine physical examinations neoplasia is being diagnosed at a time that treatments are possible. Many neoplasms in exotics are well described, such as lymphoma in ferrets, but what about lymphoma in a guinea pig, a lion, or leukemia in a bearded dragon? How do you calculate medications or even decide what to prescribe? How common are these neoplasms? How do these neoplasias act similarly or differently to other animals and are there any cancer protective mechanisms that these species possess or not? The exotic species cancer research alliance (www.escra.org) along with Arizona Cancer and Evolutionary Center is working on these problems. A centralized database on cancer and its treatments across species is being compiled to answer and provide insight to clinicians faced with diagnosing cancer in their patients. This presentation will not only introduce common cancers that are being diagnosed in a variety of zoological and exotic animals, but will also introduce therapies that are having success as well as preliminary research analyzing survival of these patients with neoplasia.

The TNPRC Regional Biosafety Laboratory: A Vital National Resource 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom D Speaker: Edwin S Kreitlein Moderator: Luis M Zorrila Facilitator: TBN

This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ACLAM) American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners (ASLAP) Program Committee.

FLAVIO FROHLICH

HUNTER LECTURE

Dr. Frohlich is a member of the Comparative Medicine Institute at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC. He also serves as an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at NC State and an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, NC. He is the founder and Chief Scientific Officer of Pulvinar Neuro, LLC., and is a Director at the Carolina Center for Neurostimulation. Dr. Frohlich received his PhD in Computational Neurobiology at the University of California, San Diego. He has an International Diploma from the Imperial College in London, UK, in electrical and electronic engineering.

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

The Intricacies of Neoplasia and Its Therapeutics in Zoological and Exotic Animals v

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MONDAY AFTERNOON PANEL DISCUSSIONS An International Perspective on Managing the COVID-19 Pandemic in Laboratory Animal Care Programs

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

m

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 207B

Leader/Moderator: Mathias Leblanc Facilitator: TBN Panelists: Lois A Zitzow, Lesley A Colby, John N Norton, Alberto Gobbi, Sonja T Chou

Pandemics are large-scale outbreaks of infectious diseases that can increase morbidity and mortality in humans and result in significant economic, social, and political disruptions. Evidence suggests that the incidence of pandemics will increase over the next century because of increased global travel, urbanization, industrialization, and greater exploitation of natural environments. Since 2003, the world has faced epidemics of SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, H5N1, and H7N9, as well as a pandemic of H1N1. The recent COVID-19 pandemic has challenged many organizations throughout the world and highlighted significant vulnerabilities and lack of preparedness at the federal, state, and local levels. Universities are particularly susceptible to the effects of an infectious disease outbreak due to the nature of their operations that rely on a large diverse work force, often including students, to manage their academic and research endeavors. Business continuity of animal care and use programs during an outbreak becomes a significant challenge and requires close coordination between numerous actors, including institutional officials, IACUC members, researchers, animal care program leaders, and an entire supply chain to ensure the health and wellbeing of research animals and preserve animal based research programs. We have gathered international leaders in the laboratory animal care communities from Asia, Europe, and the United States to reflect on the management of the COVID-19 crisis and determine plans that will support animal care programs in dealing with future outbreaks. The target audience is individuals at all organizational levels, including directors, managers, and supervisors.

Identification of Rodent Husbandry Refinement Opportunities through Benchmarking and Collaboration q

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 207D

Leaders: Natalie A Bratcher, Holly N Burr Moderator: Natalie A Bratcher Facilitator: Holly N Burr Panelists: Mark J Prescott, Joseph P Garner, Craig L Franklin, Carolyn M Allen

Expanding the use of methods that replace, reduce, and refine (the 3Rs) is fundamental to the use of animals in research, for both ethical and scientific impact. The mission of the 3Rs Translational and Predictive Sciences Leadership Group (3Rs TPS LG) of the International Consortium for Innovation and Quality in Pharmaceutical Research (IQ Consortium) is to promote sharing and integration of science and technology to advance the 3Rs in the discovery and development of new medicines, vaccines, medical devices, and health care products for humans and animals. The 3Rs TPS LG is dedicated to identifying opportunities where member companies share practices in a precompetitive way to enhance learning and promote discussions with the aim of advancing the 3Rs across the industry. One such opportunity was a benchmarking survey conducted by the CRO Outreach Working Group designed to share practices in rodent husbandry for safety research and identify potential opportunities for refinement. IQ member companies and CROs in Asia, North America, and Europe were surveyed, and areas identified for potential alignment include approaches to social housing, enrichment strategies, and bedding substrates, with an interest in how such factors could impact animal welfare and scientific outcomes. This panel will highlight high-level topics in these three areas and panelists will lead a discussion about opportunities for related refinements. Participants will learn about general trends in rodent husbandry practices, as well as general considerations for social housing, enrichment selection, and potential impact of bedding substrate. They will also join in discussions about how we might collaborate more broadly to identify refinements to rodent husband-

ry. The target audience is anyone interested in learning about and discussing how to promote refinements in rodent husbandry, animal welfare, and the 3Rs, including scientists, technicians, veterinarians, IACUC members, or facility managers. This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by 3Rs Transnational and Predictive Sciences Leadership Group of the International Consortium for Innovation and Quality in Pharmaceutical Research. q

Podcasting to the Public and the Art of Storytelling

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 213B

Leaders: Angela G Stoyanovitch Moderator: Cindy A Buckmaster Facilitator: Alice White McVey Panelists: Angela G Stoyanovitch, Tom Leach, Jeff Marshall, Megan R LaFollette

What basic tools are required to start a podcast? What are the advantages and hurdles of using podcasting? How can podcasting help communicate difficult topics on human and animal health to the public? How can podcasting pivot the discussion to better engage public opinion? What unique aspects of podcasting help tell facts and not fiction? How might a podcaster or public relations strategist improve upon their storytelling skills to execute a heartfelt message that speaks to society with compassion and transparency? The audience participants will learn essential resources needed to launch a podcast, insights into the art and goal of storytelling, and the use of podcasting as a platform for public relations, marketing, and messaging of your mission. In the world of pandemic paranoia and misuse of media, getting in front of the story through podcasting allows for a more balanced log of oral history passed from generation to generation. Podcasting and other digital media platforms now trending provide a unique opportunity to educate the public on matters of animal science without a face-to-face conversation. Panelists will reflect on their podcast experiences and provide audience members insights, tools, and resources. Audience members may be interested in launching a podcast, managing a podcast for their organization, learning how to scale their podcast audience, or gaining insight into the power of podcasting for use in public relations. This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by Legal Drugs Agency and Americans for Medical Progress (AMP).

Promoting Animal Welfare Through Improvements in Nonhuman Primate Caging Designs m

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 213C

Leader: John J Hasenau, Monika A Burns, Lawrence Williams, LaVonne D Meunier,

Kristine Coleman, Dawn M Abney Moderator: John J Hasenau Facilitator: TBN Panelists: John J Hasenau, Monika A Burns, Lawrence Williams, LaVonne D Meunier, Kristine Coleman, Dawn M Abney The panel will discuss nonhuman primate (NHP) caging, focusing on historical, current, and future indoor caging designs that promote animal welfare and facilitate study procedures. Cage space allotments and differences between North American and European standards have indicated the need for well-designed, performance-based studies to assess space utilization and welfare. Discussions will concentrate on key design considerations for existing and new mobile and fixed caging for New World and macaque species. Behaviorists with NHP expertise will discuss how animal environments and cage design impact species typical behaviors and improve welfare. Results from an Association of Primate Veterinarians/ American Society of Primatologists survey on caging standards will be included. Current caging enhancements for specific study-related aspects (aging studies, neurological studies, and toxicology studies) will be discussed. Audience questions and discussion will be encouraged throughout the session. Panel participants have many years of experience with different caging and are knowledgeable about NHP behavior performance standards. The target audience includes all participants of the NHP user community (technicians, scientists, veterinarians, behaviorists,

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


MONDAY AFTERNOON administrators) to enhance their knowledge of NHP caging design and promote the welfare of NHPs with design features.

WORKSHOPS W-04 Animal Facility Design, Processes, Decisions, and Technology

PLATFORM SESSIONS 2:15 PM-5:00 PM Animal Welfare, Training, and the 3Rs 2:15 p.m.-4:00 p.m. Room: 208A

u

2:15

PS18 Public Outreach at Work: Kids Allowed! AT Pierce*

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: 209A

2:30

PS19 Modern Teaching Methods Increase Employee Success KL Brackett*, A Schile

2:45

PS20 Reimagining Training and 3Rs through Extended Reality E Crooker*, S Baran

3:00

PS21 Evaluation of Various Handling Methods and Frequencies to Minimize Stress in Rats J Kurpinski*, T Plachta, D Cooper, J Kylie

3:15

PS22 Identifying Risk Factors of Self-directed Abnormal Behavior in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca Mulatta) C Widmaier*, K Baker

Leader: Mark A Corey Faculty: Lauri Tyrrell, Chad Zuberbuhler, Clifford R Roberts, Laura Halverson,

Kathleen L McGimpsey Facilitator: TBN Workshop Fee: $150     Workshop Limit: 50 This session will benefit those involved with animal facility design and operations by describing the process, decisions, and technologies involved in the design and construction of animal facilities. The workshop will begin with a discussion of the facility design process—who should be involved, the objectives and level of effort by stakeholders, milestone decisions to be reached, and anticipated duration of the various process phases. Current trends in the industry will be explored through discussions about planning, interior construction, acoustics, and finishes. We will be framing the discussion from the owner’s perspective and their experiences in the real world. We will include critical mechanical, electrical, and piping design and operations. This section will focus on the mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) risks associated with compromised animal welfare, loss of research and facility resiliency, and how engineering decisions affect each of these parameters. The lessons learned will help enable participants to make more informed decisions as they develop and operate their own facilities. Conversations will focus around vivarium operations and facility sanitation and safety. We will also discuss strategies regarding energy and water conservation that are being effectively implemented in animal facilities and the derived long-term benefits.

W-02B Microsurgery Skills Training Using Surgical Loupes B v

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: 210A

Leader: Robert F Hoyt Jr Faculty: Robert F Hoyt Jr, Randall R Clevenger, Karen J Keeran, Tannia S Clark, Gayle

Z Nugent, Kenneth R Jeffries, Tanya L Herzog, Audrey Noguchi Facilitator: TBN Workshop Fee: $250     Workshop Limit: 20 See description on Monday morning.

This Workshop is sponsored in part by Q-Optics, RICA Surgical Products, SurgiReal Products, Inc., and Supramid Suture.

Exhibit Hall Refreshment Break— Charlotte Delights! 2:00 p.m.– 4:00 p.m. Sponsored by Animal Specialties & Provisions LLC

3:30 PS23 Adapting Positive Reinforcement Training to Novel Laboratory Species A Tresler*, C Rasbach, TL Stevens, W Williams 3:45

PS24 Treadmill Training of Laboratory Swine J Kim*, R Eder, J Camacho, C Nguyen

Resident Laboratory Investigations 1 2:15 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Room: 203B

2:15 PS25 Is a Sentinel Program Good for the Detection of Murine Chapparvovirus? RK Dhawan*, ML Wunderlich, S Jennings, D Nicholson, B Tedesco, S Dayani, KS Henderson 2:30 PS26 Indicators of Postoperative Pain in Syrian Hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) AM Edmunson*, FD Duke Boynton, AK Rendahl, A Merley, N Koewler, ML Dunbar, CP Sivula 2:45

PS27 Anti-G-CSF Antibody Does Not Prevent Bone Marrow B Cell Loss in Murine Norovirus Infected Stat1-/- Mice D Eldridge*, K Mears, C Hsu

3:00 PS28 Impact of Differing Gut Microbiota Transfer Methods on Model Phenotypes K Gustafson*, A Ericsson, CL Franklin 3:15

PS29 Evaluation of Goblet Cell-associated Antigen Passages and Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells in the Cystic Fibrosis Mouse Intestine SM Young*, R Woode, NM Walker, L Clarke

3:45

PS30 Bile Acid Composition Contributes to Metabolic Improvements after Sleeve Gastrectomy in Mice J Tu*, Y Liu, L Ding, E Zhang, Z Fang, L Jin, W Huang

4:00

PS31 Evaluation of Various Individually Ventilated Cage Systems Based on Mouse Reproductive Performance and Husbandry and Environmental Parameters MG Stover*, JS Villano

4:15

PS32 The Influence of Daytime LED Light Exposure on Sprague Dawley Rats AA Allen*, AT Pierce, RT Dauchy, GB Voros, GL Dobek

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by Association of Primate Veterinarians (APV).

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AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

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MONDAY AFTERNOON 4:30

PS33 PCR Testing of Media Placed in Soiled Bedding as a Method for Mouse Colony Health Surveillance W Hanson*, K Taylor, DK Taylor

q

4:45

PS34 Differences in Strain Susceptibility and Shedding of Murine Chapparvovirus in CD-1, C57BL/6, and NSG Mice ML Kain*, S Monette, RJ Ricart Arbona, KS Henderson, RK Dhawan, M Wunderlich, NS Lipman

Leader: Heather A Zimmerman Faculty: Cassandra O Cullin Facilitator: Cassandra M Tansey

SEMINARS Accelerating Drug Discovery with Non-Invasive Animal Imaging: The 3Rs Perspective v

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom A Leader: Dinesh K Hirenallur-Shanthappa Moderator: Terri A Swanson Facilitator: Judith E Fenyk-Melody

Responsible lab animal medicine is undertaken with the 3Rs in mind. Efforts are always made with the goal of reducing the number of subject animals needed for a study, as well as performing techniques designed to minimize pain and stress on our subjects. Noninvasive imaging modalities are the perfect way to obtain biological information in living subjects without significantly disrupting their normal physiology. In the field of drug discovery, imaging modalities that are translatable, meaning capable of being used on animals and humans, are the most desirable as they provide comparable information on the efficacy of candidate compounds. This seminar will focus on translatable imaging modalities and how they are helping scientists make sound decisions on which drugs are suitable to go to clinic while also adhering to the utmost in animal welfare. This seminar is targeted toward all animal technicians and scientists who may be interested in the scientific impact of the work they do every day. Attendees will learn about several in vivo imaging techniques. Each talk will cover an individual imaging technique, describing the basic science behind the technology, how it is used in drug discovery, and how each technique can translate into the human clinic. Specific instrumentation that will be covered includes micro CT, ultrasound echocardiography and elastography, and PET. Emphasis will also be made on how the technique contributes to animal welfare, tying scientific discovery to animal care and how the two go hand-in-hand in pushing life-saving drugs into the hands of patients who need them.

Speakers/Topics: 2:45

Terri A Swanson

Welcome and Introductions

3:20

Dinesh K HirenallurShathappa

Advancement in Ultrasound Applications in Preclinical Drug Discovery

3:50

James Goodman

Translational MRI in Drug Discovery and Development

4:20

John M David

PET Imaging in Preclinical Drug Discovery

Crystal Bluette

Application of micro CT Imaging to Assess Body Composition in Preclinical Animal Models of Cachexia

4:50

Beyond Buprenorphine: Pain Management in Fish and Exotic Animals 2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom B

Pain management continues to be a challenge within laboratory animal science—from drug class limitations based on research protocols, to disruptions in medication supply chains, to debates on whether or not certain species experience pain. This seminar will provide information on fish analgesia with an emphasis on the zebrafish and multimodal analgesia and anesthesia in exotic animal species with emphasis on rodent species. Multimodal analgesia will be discussed, including alternatives to systemic drugs by using local anesthesia and analgesia. This seminar is targeted towards veterinarians, technicians, researchers, and students and all are invited to listen and interact with seminar speakers in directed question and answer sessions.

Speakers/Topics: 2:45

Heather A Zimmerman

Welcome and Introductions

2:55

Julie A Balko

Recent Advances in Fish Analgesia

3:35

Fredric Chatigny

Fish Analgesia: What We Know and Where to Go from There

4:15

Angela M Lennox

Multimodal Analgesia and Anesthesia in Exotic Animals in a Clinical Practice Setting

This Seminar is sponsored in part by American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ACLAM) and American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners (ASLAP).

Exhaust Air Dust PCR Update: A Pathogen Screening Method for Many Vivariums, but Not for All u

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom D

Leader/Moderator: Kenneth S Henderson Facilitator: Stefanie L Deluca

Ten years ago, soiled bedding sentinels (SBS) were the primary screening method for routine pathogen screening. It has been documented that many agents are not easily transmitted to or detected via SBS. Because of this revelation, other screening methods such as direct sampling of resident research rodents for PCR and whole blood microsampling for serology have improved detection of many agents. Exhaust air dust (EAD) collection for pathogen nucleic acid detection by PCR opened another possibility for screening. It was demonstrated that the air movement on IVC racks facilitated the collection of EAD from cages or entire rack systems depending if the IVC had cage-level filtration or unobstructed air from all cages moving to a common collection point. EAD PCR methods improved pathogen detection (refine) and reduced or eliminated the need for SBS (reduce and replace) supporting the 3R philosophy. This session will focus on the use of IVC racks with unobstructed EAD collection that facilitates multiple collection schemes for the entire rack, thus effectively replacing the need for SBS. Experimental and user data demonstrating the efficacy of detecting pathogens by EAD and financial advantages will be presented. As confirmation strategies for unexpected EAD findings are not always apparent, this session will review recommendations for different pathogen groups. With the understanding that not all housing systems can accommodate EAD, the use of SBS may still need to be an important element of a pathogen screening program and will be addressed. This session is intended for animal technicians, facility managers, and veterinarians who play a role in designing and managing health monitoring programs.

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


MONDAY AFTERNOON Speakers/Topics: Kenneth S Henderson

Welcome and Introductions

2:55

Cheryl L Perkins

Show Me the Data! Investigate EAD Studies and the Lessons from the Diagnostic Laboratory

3:20

Kerith R Luchins

Is the Juice Worth the Squeeze? Diagnostic Outcomes and Cost Efficiencies

3:45

Kenneth S Henderson

Pathogen Safari: Hunting Down the Source of a Positive EAD Finding on Your IVC

4:05

Rajeev K Dhawan

Is There Still a Place for Soiled Bedding Sentinels?

Reaching the Next Generation through Innovative Ways to Connect with Students Both Inside and Outside of the Classroom

Speakers/Topics: 2:45

Logan K France

Welcome and Introductions

3:00

Wendy Jarrett

Understanding Animal Research’s Animal Research Conversations

3:25

Vicki C Campbell

AALAS Foundation’s K-12 Classroom Resources

3:50

Tom Leach

SPARC and other Informal Animal Research Education Resources

4:00

Ken Gordon

SPARC and other Informal Animal Research Education Resources

q

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom C Leader: Logan K France Moderator: Paula A Clifford Facilitator: TBN

Medical progress requires a significant amount of public trust in science and research. Effective public education about biomedical research, including essential animal studies, requires many different approaches. One method involves engaging with future generations, namely students. There are several effective programs and opportunities available for advocates interested in inspiring and educating students of all ages. These range from classroom visits to volunteering at science festivals or supporting summertime science camps. Activities, lesson plans, and

This Seminar is sponsored in part by American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ACLAM) and American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners (ASLAP).

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

2:45

other resources are available for all levels of students. This session will highlight specific programs that provide ample resources or opportunities to interact with students, while educating them about biomedical research. Information about out how to access or implement these programs will also be included. Attendees will also learn effective strategies for engaging different levels of students from elementary, middle school, high school, and college undergraduate. Participants will learn the importance of teaching students about animal research; effective strategies for engaging different levels of students from elementary, middles school, high school, and undergraduates; specific programs that provide ample resources or opportunities to educate students about biomedical research and the role of animals; information about how to access or implement the programs presented; and resources available to assist in reaching out to and interacting with students.

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TUESDAY MORNING

AAL AS 70 th N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

WORKSHOPS v

W-05 Improving Research: Reporting and Review

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 201B

Leaders: Cory F Brayton, Cynthia A Pekow, Kelly A Metcalf Pate, Jason S Villano Faculty: Cory F Brayton, Cynthia A Pekow, Kelly A Metcalf Pate, Jason S Villano Facilitator: Jessica Herrod Workshop Fee: $150     Workshop Limit: 50

Inadequate reporting of animals and methods in the scientific literature is a factor implicated in poor research, failures in reproducing research, and failures in translation. Workshop participants will work in small groups to critique selections from peer-reviewed literature, as well as (re)write a methods section that aligns with the ARRIVE Guidelines and ILAR reporting guidance. This session will emphasize description of animals; relevant husbandry, environmental, and experimental conditions; and welfare concerns. Attendees should gain appreciation for, and skills to write, a concise, complete, and compliant methods section for reporting experiments with research animals. Examples will represent three research areas: immunology/infectious disease models, immunodeficient mice in cancer studies, and neurobehavioral research. The target audience is personnel who participate in experimental design, research on animals, research reporting, and literature peer review. This Workshop is sponsored in part by International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS) and ILAR Division on Earth and Life Studies of the National Research Council.

W-06 Occupational Health and Safety Considerations in Animal Research: Learning through Interactive Case Studies q

SEMINARS v

Best Practices for Inflammation-based Animal Models

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom A Leader: Portia S Allen Moderator: A Marissa Wolfe Facilitator: Ania Skorupski

In the decade following publication of the Animal Research: Reporting of in Vivo Experiments (ARRIVE) guidelines, laboratory animal professionals and the scientific community alike have placed emphasis on the standardization and refinement of animal models of human disease. Core scientific organizations are collaborating at national and international levels to develop position statements, policies, recommendations, and/or best practice guidance on the conduct of animal research in their respective fields of study. Animal studies involving the induction of inflammation have been particularly challenging to address as confounding variable concerns are frequently raised, from model induction to refinement strategies. The goal of this seminar is to connect the laboratory animal care community with published, field-driven best practice guidance for inflammation-based animal models: sepsis, venous thrombosis, stroke, and obesity. Attendees will learn the current state of animal model recommendations, with an emphasis on rodent models, put forward by these field experts. Awareness of these standards will assist laboratory animal professionals in the provision of high-quality animal husbandry and veterinary care and promote understanding and refinement of procedures proposed in animal use protocols. This session will be of interest to individuals involved in the conduction, care, and regulatory oversight of these animal models, including vivarium managers, veterinary staff, research scientists, and IACUC members or administrators.

Speakers/Topics:

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 202B

Leaders: Lesley A Colby Faculty: Lesley A Colby, Susan B Harper Facilitator: TBN Workshop Fee: $150     Workshop Limit: 50

The animal research environment poses a multitude of potential risks to personnel health and safety. In partnership with environmental health and safety professionals, animal care and support personnel are instrumental in identifying and controlling these risks to ensure a safe environment for themselves, their staff, and others who enter or work within animal facilities. This workshop will focus on the identification, assessment, and control of biological, chemical, radiological, and physical hazards commonly encountered in animal research programs. Topics that will be discussed include how to conduct a risk assessment, management of animals administered infectious agents and chemicals, nanoparticles, humanized animals, ergonomics, equipment-related hazards, and safe housing and handling of agricultural, aquatic, and wildlife species. The workshop will be highly interactive, providing opportunities for participants to work in small groups and participate in discussions using web-based polling and survey tools. Through a mixture of case studies, group discussions, and interactive exercises, participants will evaluate real-world examples and be guided through strategies for identifying potential hazards, assessing the magnitude and extent of induced risks, and developing effective and cost-efficient control measures that protect the safety of workers, animals, and the environment. The targeted audience includes vivarium managers, supervisors, lead technicians, trainers, animal care and veterinary technicians, as well as biosafety professionals.

8:00

Portia S Allen

Welcome and Introductions

8:10

Jean A NemzekHamlin

Best Practice for Sepsis Models: The MOTiPSS Guidelines

8:40

José A Diaz

Best Practice for Venous Thrombosis Models

9:10

Mark J Prescott

Best Practice for Stroke Models: The IMPROVE Guidelines

9:40

Portia S Allen

Best Practice for Obesity Research

This Seminar is sponsored in part by American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ACLAM) and American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners (ASLAP).

Ongoing Changes within the Animal Research Oversight Environment q

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom B Leader/Moderator: B Taylor Bennett Facilitator: Rocco Praglowski

On August 28, 2019, the National Institutes of Health released the Final Report on Recommendations To Reduce Administrative Burden on Researchers in response to the mandate in Section 2034 of the 21st Century Cures Act (Cures). The report contained actions proposed by the working group from the NIH, USDA, and FDA to reduce administrative burden on investigators while maintaining the integrity and credibility of research findings and protection of research animals. In addition, the USDA has been reviewing the Animal Care Policy Manual and the Animal Welfare Inspection Guide. The changes that will occur as result of these activities will have an impact on how animal care and use programs are managed. This seminar will

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


TUESDAY MORNING Speakers/Topics: 8:00

Michael Swindle

Welcome and Introductions

8:05

Michael Swindle

Better Modeling of Cardiovascular Disease and Medical Device Intervention Swine

8:35

Derek Brocksmith

Improving the Human-Animal Bond and Study Outcome through Behavior Enhancement

9:05

Guy Bouchard

Improvements of Using Miniature Swine as a Research

9:35

Douglas R Kern

Advancement in Swine Gene Editing and Modeling of Human Disease

Speakers/Topics: 8:00

B Taylor Bennett

Welcome and Introductions

8:10

B Taylor Bennett

Discussion

9:00

Elizabeth Goldentyer

USDA Update

9:15

Patricia Brown

OLAW Update

9:30

Kathryn Bayne

AAALAC Update

9:45

Dawn C Fitzhugh

DOD Update

10:00

Matthew R Bailey

NABR Update

This Seminar is sponsored in part by National Association for Biomedical Research (NABR), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), Animal Care, National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare (OLAW).

Overcoming Challenges in Miniature Swine Translational Research m

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom C Leader: Michael Swindle Moderator: Derek Brocksmith Facilitator: Vikki Wehmeier

The positive outcome of translational research depends on the study conduct and the selection of the best animal model. Large animals, particularly the miniature swine, represent several unique challenges to the investigator. The proper handling, husbandry, care, and behavior enhancement will greatly improve the outcome of the study. Similarly, the selection of an inappropriate or ineffective animal model can be very costly and unrewarding. An ideal animal model must recapitulate the human disease or condition that is being investigated while also having high preclinical translatability to humans. The miniature swine can be an ideal preclinical animal model due to its anatomical, physiological, pathophysiological, and genetic similarities to humans. However, there are many challenges associated with large animal modeling, whether it be a naturally occurring, surgical, chemically induced, or genetically modified produced swine model. The recognition and use of miniature swine in translational research continues to grow. Translational research where miniature swine are having an impact include cardiovascular and medical device intervention, behavior and cognitive function, dermal research, gene-edited models of human diseases, and neurology. We expect a broad audience will benefit from these presentations, including laboratory animal veterinarians, attending veterinarians, veterinary and animal technicians, facility managers, graduate students, and scientists interested in miniature swine as a model of translational research.

This Seminar is sponsored in part by Sinclair Bio Resources, LLC.

Who Stays and Who Goes? Considering Modern Prevalence and Disease Association when Formulating a Rodent Infectious Agent Exclusion List u

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom D Leader: Kenneth S Henderson Moderator: Theresa Albers Facilitator: Danielle K Cleasby

Pathogen and opportunistic pathogen exclusion lists have evolved over the years as concerning infectious agents have been added, and less prevalent agents or opportunistic agents have been removed. Some of this has been reflected in the FELSA 2014 guidelines, as well as the commonly accepted screening scheme of “testing more often for prevalent agents and less often for uncommon or rare agents.” Additionally, the inhibitory cost of testing for all agents and the cost to rederive combined with susceptibility of immunocompetent versus immunodeficient rodents has moved many vivariums towards the adoption of multiple exclusion lists specific for the different populations of rodents. The last comprehensive evaluation of rodent infectious agents was published over 10 years ago and relied primarily on non-PCR testing of soiled bedding sentinels. PCR-based screening now represents most of the testing submitted to our laboratory from outside academic, biotech, and pharmaceutical institutions. The rise in use of PCR testing has improved sensitivity for detection rodent pathogens and allowed reduction or replacement of soiled bedding sentinels. As a result, the prevalence for many infectious agents for which PCR provides improved detection was higher than previously reported. This presentation will include the current prevalence of commonly excluded or reported viruses, bacteria, protozoa, and parasites found in contemporary rodent research colonies. And, we will provide a review and perspective on development of a modern exclusion list. This session is intended for animal technicians, facility managers, and veterinarians who play a role in managing health monitoring programs, developing infectious agent exclusion lists, or manage communications with principal investigators concerned with the health status of their research models. Exhibit Hall Refreshment Break— Charlotte Delights! 9:00 a.m.– 11:00 a.m. Sponsored by Priority One

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges

AAL AS 70 th N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

provide the attendees with an opportunity to hear from representatives of the USDA, OLAW, AAALAC, the DOD, and NABR regarding possible changes, as well as other ongoing issues within their organization and to discuss with those representatives how their organization’s activities impact the environment in which we work and what changes to expect in the future. Questions for the panelists can be submitted to btbdvm@yahoo.com. The target audience will be those who need to keep current with the regulations and requirements for conducting animal-based biomedical research.

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TUESDAY MORNING

AAL AS 70 th N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

Speakers/Topics: 8:00

Teri Albers

Introduction and Prevalence Study Background

8:10

Teri Albers

Protozoa, Parasites, and Fungi: The Creepy Crawly Freeloaders

8:35

Kenneth S Henderson

Viruses: Good Things Don’t Always Come in Small Packages

9:00

Guy B Mulder

Bacteria: Where Should We Be Directing Our Efforts?

9:25

Greg W Lawson

When Should We Care?

Genetic Profile that May Contribute to Persistent Colonization and Pathogenicity in Nonhuman Hosts A Mannion*, Z Shen, JG Fox

9:45 PS41 Comparison of the Fecal Bacterial Microbiota of Rhesus Macaques (Macaca Mulatta) by Housing Type and Health Status NR Compo*, L Mieles Rodriguez, D Gomez 10:00

PS42 The Use of Gnotobiotic Piglets as a Model for Human Norovirus (HuNoV) Infection and Recombinant PIV5 Vector Vaccine Efficacy Z Chen, Y Ma, J Risalvato*, Z Li, H Wei, J Zengel, M Lu, A Li, X Liang, E DiCaprio, R Jennings, A Niehaus, J Li, B He

SPECIAL TOPIC LECTURES

PLATFORM SESSIONS

Charles River Ethics and Animal Welfare Lecture: Your Perception May Not Be My Reality: How Human Perception Shapes Evaluation of Animal Well-Being During Euthanasia q

8:00 AM-10:45 AM Laboratory Investigations 2

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom B

Tuesday, October 27 8:00 a.m.-10:15 a.m. Room: 203B

Speaker: Debra L Hickman Moderator: Patricia V Turner Facilitator: TBN

8:00

PS35 Pulmonary Delivery of Test Articles by Intratracheal Nebulization or Liquid Instillation in Small Animal Models: implications for Covid19 Therapeutic Testing A Werts*, T Yellowhair, P Kuehl

8:15

PS36 Assessment of Indicators of Well-being in Syrian Hamsters Euthanized with Ethanol DL Hickman*

8:30

PS37 Assessment of Indicators of Well-being In Laboratory Rats and Mice Euthanized with Carbon Monoxide DL Hickman*

8:45

PS38 Evaluation of How Social Interactions Influence the Welfare of Rats during Euthanasia DL Hickman*

9:15

PS39 Development of a COVID-19 Multiplex for Serological Screening of Nonhuman Primate Colonies RK Dhawan*, M Wunderlich, L Campbell

9:30

PS40 Comparative Genomic Analysis of Novel Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated from Domestic Cats with Gastritis Reveals a Unique

DEB HICKMAN

Society has granted laboratory animal professionals with the ultimate responsibility of guiding decisions regarding the euthanasia of animals. As compassionate individuals, the profession has generated guidelines and expectations surrounding the decision-making process for this responsibility. Many times, the guidelines and expectations are developed from this place of compassion, with the perspective of the human superimposed on the predicted perspective of the animal. However, the human perspective is greatly shaped by their own experiences and may not be an accurate representation of the actual experience of the animal. An appropriate evaluation of animal well-being requires that the evaluation be at the level of the animal. In this session, we will explore the relationship of veterinary medicine with the range of language associated with the killing of animals and how this language is shaped by human perception. We will also review the tools and traps that are inherent in the evaluation of well-being of animals during these procedures. The ultimate goal of this presentation is to assist the laboratory animal professional in understanding how to objectively evaluate the well-being of individual animals during the euthanasia procedure. This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by Charles River.

CHARLES RIVER LECTURE

Dr. Hickman is the Director of the Laboratory Animal Resource Center at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, IN. She received her veterinary degree from University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where she also completed a residency in laboratory animal medicine. Her professional expertise spans across academia, government, and commercial research programs. Her research interest is behavioral and physiological assessment of animal welfare with a special emphasis on euthanasia, biomethodology, and husbandry. Dr. Hickman holds a master’s degree in veterinary clinical medicine and is board certified in laboratory animal medicine and animal welfare. She currently serves as a member of AAALAC International Council on Accreditation and is the Vice President of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


TUESDAY MORNING v

Creation, Care and Utility of Humanized Mouse Models

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom D

Immunodeficient mouse models have been widely used to study human diseases over the past few decades. An emerging trend in immunodeficient models is the increasing use of specialized models engrafted with human immune systems, or “humanized mouse models.” Humanized mouse models are powerful tools for evaluating preclinical applications, including the safety and efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitors and other compounds that function by modulating human immune cell components. Humanized mice have unique advantages in providing a more accurate preclinical model for the evaluation of immunooncology therapeutics. This session will provide an overview of humanized mouse models, including technical procedures to humanize immunodeficient mice and health monitoring guidelines. We will also discuss the immunophenotypic characterization and performance of a new humanized mouse model and demonstrate application in immunooncology. This lecture will be of considerable interest to many meeting attendees, including lab animal scientists, laboratory animal medicine specialists, veterinarians, research scientist, technicians, and select vendors. m

v

Wallace P. Rowe Lecture

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom A Speaker: TBN Moderator: Lon V Kendall Facilitator: TBN

Speaker and description will be available after the Award Selection Committee selects the Bhatt Award Recipient and the AALAS Board approves it at their June Board meeting. This session information will be available in the meeting app and in the Final Program. This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by Committee for Laboratory Animal Training and Research (CLATR).

Keeping Your Culture of Care Current

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom C Speaker: Joy Redmond Moderator: Ghislaine Poirier Facilitator: Michael A Koch

The target audience is anyone interested in further defining and developing their culture of care. This presentation is intended to take you on a journey from meaTM

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qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges

AAL AS 70 th N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

Speaker: Jenny Rowe Moderator: Kenneth S Henderson Facilitator: Kourtney P Nickerson

suring your current culture, to developing a vision for the future, to implementation of that vision, and then onward to encouraging future growth of the culture. We will approach the process like creating a perpetual road map. For your journey you will need to determine: 1. Where are you now? 2. Where do you want to go? 3. How do you want to get there? 4. How do you keep the journey ongoing? This presentation will provide some ideas on how to address the process. It includes topics such as creating an inclusive culture of care core team, creating a vision statement, developing an employee survey to provide a baseline of current views, creating new commitments based on survey results, local/global rollout activities, and ongoing education and plans for continuous reassessment and growth.

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TUESDAY AFTERNOON q

Challenges Credentialed Veterinary Technicians Face in Laboratory Animal Science

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 213B

m AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

Harnessing the Media to Enhance Public Understanding of Animal Research

PANEL DISCUSSIONS 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 207B

Leader/Moderator: Ann L Murray Facilitator: Amanda A Bedwell Panelists: Victoria R Elam, Jodi M Ternes, Beth Ann Skiles, Julie A Avalos

Credentialed veterinary technicians (CVT, LVT, RVT) make up a significant cross-section of laboratory animal science professionals. As graduates of an AVMA-accredited program that have successfully passed the Veterinary Technician National Exam, these veterinary technicians have a diverse and unique skill set that set them apart from others in the field. As animal husbandry staff, health technicians, surgery technicians, IACUC coordinators, facility and/or lab managers, credentialed veterinary technicians face day-to-day challenges in terms of education, experience, job satisfaction, recognition, physical and emotional toll, and career advancement. Our panel of dedicated professional credentialed veterinary technicians will review the challenges in regulatory record keeping, share tips on transitioning career paths in research, and provide perspective on compassion fatigue. Participants will learn they are not alone trying to overcome hurdles but to use these as opportunities for growth, as well as to provide proven advice to help navigate their current career path. This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by Academy of Laboratory Animal Veterinary Technicians and Nurses (ALAVTN) and Society of Laboratory Animal Veterinary Technicians (SLAVT).

Grants for Laboratory Animal Science: Do You Want $50K for Your Research? v

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 207D

Leader/Moderator: Victoria K Baxter Facilitator: TBN Panelists: Robert T Dauchy, Nicole E Duffee, William W King, Kelly A Metcalf Pate

Interested in submitting a Grants for Laboratory Animal Science (GLAS) application but don’t know where to start? Members of the AALAS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) and previous successful GLAS awardees will discuss the benefits of funding research through the GLAS program and give the audience tips on how to take their idea and translate it into a successful GLAS application. The GLAS mission is to enhance scientific knowledge in laboratory animal science through research. Examples of research topics previously awarded through the GLAS program include extrinsic environmental conditions, housing and enrichment, pain and distress, health and welfare, euthanasia, and advancements in animal care and use. The panelists will discuss the types of awards available through the GLAS program; how to craft a successful application, including establishing a hypothesis, designing experiments with appropriate controls, outlining clear concise methodologies, choosing proper statistical analyses, and justifying various components of the budget; and common application pitfalls to avoid. The panelists consist of current and former SAC chairs, researchers who have recently received GLAS awards, and an administrator for the GLAS program. The target audience will consist of individuals interested in obtaining extramural funding for a research project at their institution, and attendees will attain invaluable insight the GLAS program and application process. The session will build on previous years’ presentations providing details regarding the types of grants available through the GLAS program and outlining the components of a successful GLAS application.

Leader: B Taylor Bennett Moderator: Matthew R Bailey Facilitator: TBN Panelists: Eva C Maciejewski, Kirk Leech, Liz Rozanski

Traditional and social media are increasingly being used by animal rights activists to target public and private institutions that conduct animal research. While a negative news story is not the same as an act of vandalism or a protest, the consequences are no less devastating for research organizations. In this session, the panelists will discuss the use of media, both traditional and social, to counter anti-animal research propaganda and to explain the purpose of animal research. The tools and guidelines that have been effective in North America and Europe to harness the power of the media both in crisis situations and in non-crisis situations will be reviewed. The panelists will highlight their own experiences with crisis communications and lessons they have learned as means of encouraging members of the audience to discuss their own media experiences. The target audience will be all those who are interested in using today’s media to enhance the public’s understanding of animal research. This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by Foundation for Biomedical Research (FBR) and European Animal Research Association (EARA).

Not All Individuality Ventilated Caging (IVCs) Systems Are Created Equal v

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 213C

Leader/Moderator: Scott E Perkins Facilitator: Tufts University staff member who will attend the National AALAS (to

be named) Panelists: Scott E Perkins, Neil S Lipman, John J Hasenau, Michael J Huerkamp The scientific community uses the terms IVCs or individually ventilated caging systems in a general manner. However, the use of these general terms does not adequately describe the caging systems. The type of IVC used may impact facility design, operational planning, and, most importantly, study reproducibility. We will review a formal classification system that encompasses an array of different approaches and technologies, each with different risk/benefit tradeoffs. There are six parameters in the classification system, including airflow mechanics, rack ventilation, air change rates, cage design, intricate air flow dynamics, and other parameters if assessing microenvironmental conditions. These six parameters should be considered when evaluating IVC systems and the methods employed to meet performance specifications and comparing different system types between studies. Active audience participation is expected, and the target audience will be veterinarians, research scientists, facility managers, reviewers of scientific articles, journal editors, IVC manufacturers, and others interested in IVC systems.

Exhibit Hall Refreshment Break— Charlotte Delights! 2:00 p.m.– 4:00 p.m. Sponsored by Bio-Serv

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


TUESDAY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS (8-hour workshop continued Wednesday 8:00 AM)

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: 209A

Leaders/Faculty: Diana P Baumann Facilitator: TBN Workshop Fee: $150     Workshop Limit: 50

We are heroes to millions of people and animals, and our work makes a profound difference in this world. As leaders, we have a responsibility to support and drive our employees and operations effectively, efficiently, and compassionately. CMAR certification provides us with a unique set of knowledge and tools to accomplish this. Please join us for a preparatory workshop for the Animal Resource exam. Topics covered include IACUC, occupational health and safety, regulations and compliance, veterinary care, and fiscal management. This prep course alone will not prepare you for the AR exam, but can be used to kickstart your preparation, help you along the way, or as final revision to refresh your existing studies.

Speakers/Topics: 2:45

Derek Brocksmith

Welcome and Introductions

2:55

John J Sancenito

Evolution of Animal Rights Tactics

3:25

Matthew R Bailey

Current Legislative Trends Impacting Breeders and the Research Community

3:55

Paula A Clifford

Maintaining Awareness through Public Outreach

4:25

All

Questions and Answers

W-09 Vivarium Ergonomics: Establishing an Effective, Sustainable Program

v

Leader: Terry Snyder Faculty: Jennifer S Kilpatrick Facilitator: TBN Workshop Fee: $150     Workshop Limit: 50

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom B

u

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: 210A

Are you concerned about the high injury rate of your vivarium staff? If so, you are not alone as these jobs are high risk for injury, pain, and discomfort. This can lead to loss of experienced employees, costly workers compensation claims, and negative impact on morale, quality, and productivity. A robust ergonomics program can successfully address these problems. Using practical examples of animal care technician job tasks, this interactive workshop will introduce participants to common risks for musculoskeletal injury and effective improvement methods. But identifying problems and solutions is only the first step in addressing this problem; how often has your facility tried to make changes to improve ergonomics only to find that the new procedures or equipment are not being used? This workshop will also explore effective strategies and methods for employee engagement and steps to establishing a successful program of continual, sustainable improvement. This program is for vivarium managers, supervisors, lead technicians, trainers, animal care and veterinary technicians, as well as occupational health and safety personnel.

SEMINARS A Roadmap to Respond to Emerging Animal Rights Trends q

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom A Leader: Rick Van Domelen Moderator: Derek Brocksmith Facilitator: Nicole Navratil

Laboratory animal breeders are an essential part of the health research and discovery process. Increasingly, many animal rights groups are replacing traditional protest activities with attempts to introduce legislation at local, state, and federal levels that would ban the breeding, sale, and transport of research animals. Their belief is that if you can eliminate the businesses that produce animals for research, you can ultimately eliminate animal studies completely. The purpose of this session is to alert and educate the research community about this tactic and discuss both current and future strategies to stop harmful legislation that may ultimately end

How to Start, Maintain, and Expand the Capacity of a Germ-Free/Gnotobiotic Program: A Review of Planning, SOPs, Training, New Equipment, and Resources Proven to be Successful Leader/Moderator: Brian Bilecki Facilitator: Joe Romano

As the demand for microbiome research increases dramatically, many facilities are either implementing expansions into germ-free and gnotobiotic research, growing their existing colonies and capabilities, or even creating a new dedicated unit. These novel adaptations require new equipment, procedures, supplies, SOPs, and sometimes new competencies, all of which may be significantly different from traditional research strategies and operations. Leading facilities aim at achieving their goals of colony establishment, breeding and research procedures through rigorous and consistent bio-exclusion practices, i.e. “managing sterility,” while maximizing the overall research operational efficiency (housing capacity, set-up times, versatility, personnel, cost, etc.) within their program. A case study of two of these leading facilities will allow insights into their integration of newer technologies, methods, and strategies that motivated change and growth in diverse programs. Also covered will be the global perspective and key considerations on implementation of the germ-free and gnotobiotic research, and how European facilities have implemented similar initiatives and a review of their practices and results. Participants will learn about the main drivers for gnotobiotic colony initiation and growth, the type, and volume of research being achieved, the origination of rodent colonies, the use of new equipment and SOPs required for successful containment, and strategies and implementation for program growth and sustainability. The targeted audience for this seminar is facility directors, supervisors, and senior and junior technicians.

Speakers/Topics: 2:45

Brian Bilecki

Welcome and Introductions

2:50

Brian Bilecki

The State of an Increasing Demand for Microbiome Research Facilities

3:05

Joe Romano

Facilitator

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

W-07 CMAR Preparatory Class for the Animal Resources (AR) Exam q

critical, lifesaving research as we know it. This includes advice on what individual members of the audience can do to help defend research. The seminar will bring together experts in government, public, and community relations who effectively deal with anti-research legislation and public relations/outreach. The target audience for this session includes all members of the research community, including those representing organizations with business interests or research requirements that depend on the availability of animal models either directly or indirectly.

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TUESDAY AFTERNOON

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

3:10

Expansion of a Gnotobiotic Research Program at an Academic Institution Using Individually Ventilated Isolation Cages

Dr. Felix R Wolf

Paula L Roesch

Validating the Use of Sealed Positive Pressure (SPP) Housing and Defining Processes between New Housing and Traditional Isolators

4:40

Patrick Hardy

Global Perspective and Key Implementation Considerations for Germ-Free and Gnotobiotic Research

5:25

Brian Bilecki

NA

3:55

Practical Diversion Control Strategies in the Animal Research Environment q

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom C Leader/Moderator: Iris D Bolton Facilitator: Dominic J Montani

With the ever-increasing pressure applied to controlled substance prescribers to prevent the diversion and misuse of pharmaceutical agents with abuse liability potential, developing and managing programs that are adequately controlled but will allow the appropriate use of the best agents in the animal research environment often demands creative approaches. This presentation should be of interest to anyone requiring access to controlled substances as part of their day-to-day job (veterinarians, veterinary/surgery/anesthesia technicians, those providing post-operative monitoring and emergency care). The speakers represent the academic setting, the contract research setting, the large pharmaceutical environment, and the diversion control arenas and will communicate stories of more-and-less complicated approaches, more-and-less successful programs, and ultimately provide the audience insights to the strengths and weaknesses of their own programs as well as possible tips for program improvements.

Speakers/Topics: 2:45

Iris D Bolton

Welcome and Introductions

2:50

Steven T Shipley

Diversion Control in the Academic Setting

3:20

Dale Cooper

Diversion Control in the Industry Setting

3:50

Iris D Bolton

Diversion Control in the Pharma Setting

4:20

Mike Callan

Diversion Control from the DEA Perspective

The Role of the Murine Gut Microbiome in Today’s Vivarium v

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom D Leader: Peter C Smith Moderator: James G Fox Facilitator: Patricia A Cirillo

In recent years it has become abundantly clear that the murine gut microbiome plays a critical role in animal model phenotype and research reproducibility. As such, defining and preserving the gut microbiome of research mice has been a growing focus of investigators, laboratory animal veterinarians, and animal facility staff. Defining the gut microbiome has become increasingly easy and affordable as sequencing technologies have evolved and been made commercially available. However, preserving and controlling the gut microbiome of research mice under standard vivarium conditions remains a monumental challenge, given its variability and the number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that can affect it. Our panelists will discuss their research and perspectives regarding the significance of the gut microbiome with respect to reproducibility and translation, common vivarium practices that may impact the gut microbiome, and whether there is a place for routine microbiome monitoring in the management of laboratory mouse colonies. Attendees will learn about the importance of the gut microbiome in contemporary animal research and how they might play a role in the control of this critical research variable. The target audience for this panel discussion includes veterinarians, veterinary technicians, animal caretakers, investigators, and research staff.

Speakers/Topics: 2:45

James G Fox

Welcome and Introductions

2:55

Patricia V Turner

The Role of the Gut Microbiome on Animal Model Reproducibility

3:20

Craig L Franklin

Impact of Variation in Common Husbandry Practices on Gut Microbiota

3:45

Alton G Swennes

Leveraging Gnotobiotics to Study the Microbiome’s Impact on Animal Models

4:10

Peter C Smith

Can We (and Should We) Monitor the Gut Microbiome of Research Mice using Sentinels?

4:35

All

Questions & Answers

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


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34

WEDNESDAY MORNING WORKSHOPS W-07 CMAR Preparatory Class for the Animal Resources (AR) Exam

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

q

(8-hour workshop continued from Tuesday 1:00 PM)

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 209A

Leader/Faculty: Diana P Baumann Facilitator: TBN

See Tuesday 1:00 PM for pricing and description.

W-08 Teaching Monkeys to Cooperate with Restraints: Using Positive Reinforcement Training and Temperament Testing Methods q

ment, professional development, occupational health and safety, as well as technician tips and feature stories on the diverse professionals who work in our field. Do you want to be a part of your association’s magazine? Bring your concepts or an article outline and we will help you get started down the road to publication! The magazine’s Editorial Advisory Board will be on hand to offer encouragement and expert advice. The targeted audience for this workshop is any AALAS member looking to publish, particularly those who have not published previously. Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptops to the session. This a free workshop and limited to 50 participants. This Workshop is sponsored in part by American Association of Laboratory Animal Science (AALAS).

SEMINARS Applying Microbiome Management in Rodent and Nonhuman Primate Research Models for Real-world Studies

(8-hour workshop continued from Tuesday 1:00 PM)

v

Leader: Jaine E Perlman Faculty: Jennifer L McMillan, Kristine Coleman, Mollie A Bloomsmith Facilitator: Mark J Prescott Workshop Fee: $150     Workshop Limit: 50

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom B

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 219A

See Tuesday 1:00 PM for pricing and description.

This Workshop is sponsored in part by Lomir Biomedical Inc, Hybex Innovations, Britz & Co and Carter 2 Systems Inc.

W-10 Developing a Sustainable Program to Promote Compassion Resiliency and Prevent Fatigue m

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 201B

Leader/Faculty: Anneke Keizer, Sally Thompson-Iritani, Rhonda P MacAllister,

Elizabeth A Clemmons, Vanessa K Lee Facilitator: TBN Workshop Fee: $150     Workshop Limit: 50 Many animal resource programs aspire to develop a compassion fatigue program but are unsure of how to begin. An effective program will often start with small, achievable goals and then continue to grow in scope. Institutions will be most successful if they encompass both individual and organizational approaches and expect the program to evolve over time. This workshop will provide tools for initiating, growing, and maintaining a program through the various challenges that can arise. Attendees will receive practical advice and resources for writing a successful proposal that includes program goals and justification that is often needed to obtain institutional and programmatic support. Workshop instructors will offer experience and ideas to incorporate into a comprehensive program and help attendees troubleshoot obstacles such as cost, waning enthusiasm, and unexpected crises. The workshop will incorporate facilitated group discussions and attendees will have the opportunity to develop preliminary program goals and lay a solid foundation for a sustainable program. This workshop is suited for any laboratory animal science professional who is interested in developing or working on maintaining a program including veterinarians, veterinary technicians, animal care technicians, operation managers, administrators, IACUC members and scientists. u

W-11 Publish with LAS Pro

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 202B

Leaders: John Farrar, Liz Rozanski Faculty: TBN Facilitator: TBN Workshop Fee: Free     Workshop Limit: 50

Leader/Moderator: Kourtney Nickerson Facilitator: Kenneth S Henderson

The importance of the commensal microbiome on study outcome is emphasized in seemingly every research publication produced. This seminar will reflect on everyday microbiome modifying variables to address how to manage these concerns in real-world scenarios. It is widely accepted that the microbiome is sensitive to changes in food, husbandry, environment, and enrichment, among others. Enlightening talks will discuss how to acknowledge these variables without compromising research studies. A lively discussion of the effect of colony transfer on microbiome will progress into maintenance of germ-free facility and manipulation of germ-free animals to selectively colonize animals. A scenario examining the potential impacts on health and well-being of a microbiome-dependent phenotype in a nonhuman primate model will delve into a frequently overlooked area of the microbiome in nontraditional animal models. Finally, a deeper discussion into the far-reaching effect the microbiome can have on drug discovery studies will be presented, allowing attendees to this session to take their understanding of the microbiome from knowledge to practice. Participants will learn how to minimize the effect of variables that affect the microbiome to ensure robust study design and conduct. Targeted audience for this seminar is laboratory technicians, animal husbandry technicians, veterinarians, and researchers.

Speakers/Topics: 8:00

Kourtney P Nickerson

Welcome and Introductions

8:05

Kourtney P Nickerson

We Know Many Factors Will Affect the Microbiome, But What Can We Do About It?

8:20

Kourtney P Nickerson

Moving Mice: Changes in Microbiome Composition after Transport

8:45

Keely McGrew

Clinical Case Evaluation: Impact of Microbiome on Diarrhea in NHPs in the Research Environment

9:15

J.M. White

Real-world Case Study: Germfree Colony Maintenance and Manipulation of Microbiome

Laboratory Animal Science Professional (LAS Pro), the flagship AALAS publication, features articles highlighting the latest developments and strategies in manageqAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


WEDNESDAY MORNING 9:45

Rana Samadfam

Microbiome in Discovery Research: The Therapeutic Axis of Microbiome, Inflammation, and Immune Response

Increasing Openness and Transparency in Animal Research: Institutional, Personal, and Innovative Approaches from around the World q

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom C Leader: Jodi Salinsky, Kirk Leech Moderator: Patrick E Sharp Facilitator: TBN

Since the spring of 2018 the European Animal Research Association (EARA) has been assessing the websites of European institutions that carry out biomedical research using animals. The results, from close to 1500 websites assessed, reveal that while many institutions have moved towards a more transparent approach, in many countries the research community is still reluctant to provide suitable information for the public on the research it conducts. In the digital world, communicating to the public on the importance of animal research via an institution’s website is an important way of increasing understanding and awareness of the work of the life sciences sector. This openness allows researchers to place animal research, in context, as a necessary part of biomedical research with benefits to both humans and animals. In this seminar, we will evaluate the EARA website survey and provide examples of institutions who are leading the way in seeking to improve institutional transparency with the public. We will hear about methods of personal and institutional openness in various countries and locations and look at how to establish good practice for a long-term communications strategy. This includes a 12-step plan that provides institutions with a practical tool to establish a robust and effective communications platform on animal research and enable them to handle communications in crisis situations. Target audience is anyone actively or peripherally working in laboratory animal science or any aspect of the animal research environment, such as animal technicians, veterinarians, facility managers, industry representatives, and organizational leadership.

Speakers/Topics: 8:00

Lesley A Colby

Welcome and Introduction

Lesley A Colby

Too Hot to Handle: Breach of Radioactive Source Materials during Irradiator Decommissioning

8:30

Richard B Huneke

It All Started with a Spark: How an Animal Facility Storeroom Fire Disrupted Research for Six Months

8:55

John N Norton

When It All Goes Boom: A Case Study of the Unexpected Disaster

9:15

Lois A Zitzow

(Almost) at the Epicenter: the SARS-Cov-2 Outbreak in Singapore

8:05

Exhibit Hall Refreshment Break — Charlotte Delights! 9:00 a.m.– 11:00 a.m. Sponsorship available

Speakers/Topics: 8:00

Patrick E Sharp

Welcome and Introductions

8:10

Kirk Leech

The Zeitgeist of Openness in Animal Research

8:50

Kirk Leech & Jodi Salinsky

What Are the Barriers towards Greater Openness

9:40

Kirk Leech & Jodi Salinsky

Twelve-step Plan to Establish a Robust and Effective Institutional Communications Platform

10:20

Kirk Leech & Jodi Salinsky

Questions and Answers

When the Odds Are not in Your Favor: Lessons Learned from Small-scale Disasters with Large-scale Implications u

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom D Leaders: Lesley A Colby, Lois A Zitzow Moderator: Lesley A Colby Facilitator: Emily S Reimold

Disasters happen. Yet when most lab animal professionals plan for disasters, they

PLATFORM SESSIONS 8:00 AM-10:45 AM Resident Laboratory Investigations 2 Wednesday, October 28 8:00 a.m.-10:45 a.m. Room: 203B 8:00

PS43 Comparison of Laboratory Disinfectants in their Effect on the Mouse Gut Microbiota JD Sciurba*, GE Chlipala, SJ Green, MA Delaney, JD Fortman, JE Purcell

8:15 PS44 Effects of Cisapride, Buprenorphine, and Their Combination on Gastrointestinal Transit in New Zealand White Rabbits ER Feldman*, B Singh, N Mishkin, E Lachenauer, M Martin-Flores, EK Daugherity 8:30 PS45 The Use of Midazolam as an Appetite Stimulant and Anxiolytic in the Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) JA Herrod*, J Avelino, K Schonvisky, J Lynch, EK Hutchinson, JM Izzi

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

This Seminar is sponsored in part by Charles River Laboratories.

envision large-scale natural disasters such as hurricanes, wide-spread flooding, and earthquakes. The likelihood that these disasters will occur is partially determined by geography and, thankfully, happen infrequently. In contrast, small-scale disasters can and do occur at multiple institutions each year. Like large-scale events, these local incidents can endanger human health and animal welfare and can significantly disrupt animal research and facility operations. Managing these disruptions can be especially challenging when staff are expected to relocate animals and maintain normal operations in unaffected areas. In addition, without a clearly recognizable large-scale event, institutions and local authorities may struggle in determining their respective roles and responsibilities while managing the disaster response. Participants will learn important concepts and strategies regarding disaster planning and management as speakers describe recent disasters affecting their animal facilities. The seminar emphasizes what personnel can do now to best prepare for and then manage small-scale disasters. The target audience includes animal husbandry, management, and veterinary care personnel, as well as biosafety professionals.

35


36

WEDNESDAY MORNING

9:30

PS48 Effects of Pair Housing on Behavior, Cortisol, and Clinical Outcomes after Intrafacility Transfer and Acclimation in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) MN Jackson*, M Truelove, K Williams, J Chen, RH Moore, JS Wood, JK Cohen, M Bloomsmith

9:45

PS49 Comparisons of Intervertebral Disc Metabolic Responses between Chondrodystrophic and Non-chondrodystrophic Dogs NN Lee*, JS Kramer, AM Stoker, JL Cook

10:00

PS50 Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Embryo Surface Disinfection: Refining the Bleaching Protocol A Winn*, K Prestia, S Peneyra

Laboratory Animals, indicates that occupational health and safety “is an essential part of the overall Program of animal care and use.” Animal care staff are our most valuable resource. It is imperative that employees receive high-quality healthcare services that protect both their physical and mental well-being. However, it is often administratively and financially challenging to institute and maintain such programs. This session will focus on how the University of Georgia (UGA) creatively and economically met these challenges and established a top-notch occupational health and safety program. UGA was able to make use of existing learning management software in unconventional ways. By expanding on the traditional learning paradigm, UGA significantly decreased onboarding days for new employees and expanded services for participants. Additionally, the university established a robust emergency response system that facilitates collaboration between compliance units (e.g. biosafety, chemical safety) and emergency healthcare providers, to encourage a timely prophylactic response for time-sensitive emergencies (e.g. nonhuman primate bite). UGA was also able to partner with other campus stakeholders to develop a respiratory protection program that pooled resources. This session will provide details on how UGA’s occupational health program increased its capacity for services, enhanced the quality of the services provided, and dramatically improved customer satisfaction, all without additional net cost. This session is ideal for anyone interested in how to run a high-quality occupational health program, which prioritizes employee health, on a limited budget.

10:15

PS51 Propofol as an Effective Means of Euthanasia for Adult Zebrafish A Davis*, DK Chu, JP Garner, SA Felt

10:30

PS52 Optimizing Food Accessibility During Zebrafish Rearing Improves Growth, Survival, and Breeding Performance TA Collins*, S Cabrera, E Teets, JL Shaffer, BW Blaser

v

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

8:45

PS46 Pharmacokinetics of Single-Dose Intramuscular Buprenorphine in Common Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) NJ Fabian*, DE Moody, WB Fang, JG Fox, MA Burns

9:00 PS47 Reference Intervals for Total T4 and Free T4 in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis) and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) JD Sciurba*, JM Hayes, SM Nouraie, HM Wilson, LC Halliday, JD Fortman

SPECIAL TOPIC LECTURES Cautionary Tails: FOIA and Other Threats to Sustainability of Animal Research q

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom B Speaker: Nancy Halpern Moderator: B Taylor Bennett Facilitator: Rocco Praglowski

In this highly informative and unique overview of the current environment surrounding the use of Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to undermine the sustainability of animal research, an in depth analysis of the how the use of the FOIA by animal rights organizations poses a threat to the animal research community will be presented. Recent events will be reviewed that have impacted the use of information obtained through FOIA requests and the court cases that have addressed issues related to the FOIA process. In addition, other tactics currently being used by these groups that also pose a threat to the research community will be highlighted, including how the animal rights organizations have weaponized the FOIA to attack the use of animals in biomedical research and the tools that can be used to respond to that attack. The target audience is those involved in the biomedical research community. This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by National Association for Biomedical Research (NABR).

Creative and Economical Solutions for an Occupational Health Program m

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom C Speaker: Lisa M Kelly Moderator: Natasha Melfi Facilitator: TBN

Nathan E. Brewer Lecture

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom A Speaker: TBN Moderator: Jane M Olin Facilitator: TBN

Speaker and description will be available after the Awards Selection Committee selects the Nathan R. Brewer Lifetime Achievement Award recipient. This session information will be available in the meeting app and in the Final Program. This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by AALAS Awards Selection Committee (ASC).

Reimaging Preclinical Studies through Digital Transformation: Leveraging Computer Vision, Machine Learning, Mixed Reality, and Informatics Platforms to Maximize Data Quality and Clinical Relevance of Preclinical Studies v

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom D Speaker: Szczepan W Baran Moderator: Marcel I Perret-Gentil Facilitator: TBN

As new technologies emerge, it is imperative to keep current so that we are able to leverage them for animal wellbeing and scientific impact of animal studies. Computer vision and machine learning allow for continuous and noninvasive animal monitoring for changes in behavior, physiology, and environment. These monitoring technologies provide an opportunity to optimize preclinical toxicology and efficacy studies by collecting physiologically and translationally relevant data, assessing disease and safety states more objectively with quantitative measures. Tele-clinical assessment allows animal technicians to connect with veterinarians and scientists in real-time and expedite decisions. Integration of these technologies into informatics platform makes animal data accessible, retrievable, learnable, and increases efficiencies of daily processes. This lecture will describe how engagement with these technologies enhances clinical assessments and training and results in real-time actionable insight, faster decisions, reduced biocontamination and noncompliance risks, and increases harmonization and clinical relevance.

The provision of preventative occupational health services is an expectation for institutions conducting animal-based research. The Guide for the Care and Use of

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


38

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON u

Finding Homes for Our Animal Heroes: Overcoming Challenges in Research Animal Adoption

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 213B

m AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

Relocating Animal Programs from Older to New Buildings? How to Balance Strategy, Sanity, and Surprises

PANEL DISCUSSIONS 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 207B

Leader/Moderator: Lauren Brierly Facilitator: TBN Panelists: Abigail Wolf Greenstein, Patti Strand, Jessica M Izzi, Meghan A Connolly

Adoption of research animals is becoming an ethical and, in some states, a legal standard. However, there are many challenges and considerations associated with establishing, expanding, and maintaining a successful animal adoption program. Panelists from academia, government, and industry will discuss the specific challenges they have faced in research animal adoption and how their organizations have confronted those challenges. Topics include reducing security risk and appropriate advertising, managing staff time and other resources, creating a culture that supports adoption, choosing animals and suitable adopters, costs and considerations when preparing an animal for adoption, and how to talk about your adoption program with the public. Following short presentations, panelists will answer questions from the audience. The target audience is anyone interested in learning more about establishing, expanding, and maintaining a research animal adoption program.

Measuring the Success of Outreach Efforts: Does Public Polling Tell the Full Story and How Do We Truly Gauge if We Are Moving the Needle? q

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 207D

Leader/Moderator: Paula A Clifford Facilitator: Jim Newman Panelists: Wendy Jarrett, Jodi Salinsky, Eric P Sandgren

According to public polling data, approximately 50% of Americans are opposed to the use of animals in biomedical research. In response to this alarming statistic, both public and private research organizations across the United States are increasing outreach and public communication efforts. In addition, universities, research organizations, and pharmaceutical companies have launched an effort to form a transparency agreement in the United States. However, while public engagement is increasing, research organizations are struggling to measure the impacts of their outreach efforts. The availability of good data to gauge effectiveness is critically important for outreach planning purposes and for maintaining institutional support for advocacy work. In other countries, such as the United Kingdom, in depth public polling data, which includes a variety of questions about animal studies, help the research community better understand the impacts of their education efforts. In comparison, polling in the United States and New Zealand/Australia is minimal. Surveys that address this issue are often limited to one or two general questions. Another common concern among research organizations is whether public polling alone provides enough meaningful data to guide effective outreach efforts. This session will focus on currently available systems for measuring communications effectiveness. Presenters will propose additional, unique strategies that can be used for gauging the success of individual outreach programs and whether current animal research communication strategies are effective for public audiences. The presentation will also identify areas where the United States and other countries might seek to increase the availability of metrics to gauge overall public attitudes about the role of animal studies in biomedical research.

Leader/Moderator: F Claire Hankenson Facilitator: TBN Panelists: F Claire Hankenson, Kelly A Jimenez, Bernadette C Lake, Mark F Mauntel

Our institution began planning to close one of our oldest animal housing facilities approximately 18 months prior to relocation into a newly constructed research building, containing four floors of lab space and one floor for the vivarium. Despite the best-laid plans, there were numerous challenges and hurdles to overcome as part of the transition. Planning issues included a fluctuating list of researchers and programs that would relocate, the need to eradicate an endemic pinworm infestation, assimilation of four scientific disciplines into a shared collaborative space, copycat construction attempting to repeat the design of another campus research building, and the need for behavioral spaces, altered light cycles, and access to instrumentation outside of the vivarium. Participants will learn about research program considerations when investigators are slated to relocate across institutional areas. Attendees may be veterinarians, facility supervisors, construction managers, technicians, and researchers that are involved in program transitions at their institutions; the audience discussion will include shared experiences and lessons learned.

Six Degrees of Separation: How to Expand Your Network in a Meaningful Way m

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 213C

Leader: Tasha M Thomas Moderator: Ann L Murray Facilitator: TBN Panelists: Tasha M Thomas, Luis M Zorrilla, Dariyen J Carter, Katie Coleman

There is a concept called six degrees of separation, which concludes that all people are only six or less social connections away from each other. This is also known as the 6 handshakes rule. Imagine anything you wanted to pursue or accomplish in life, and that the resources, or specifically the people with the resources, were only 6 handshakes away. More importantly, imagine having the skillset or knowledge that could support someone else? Essentially, someone is looking for someone just like you and there is someone out there right now with a solution for you. As a result, any two people in a maximum of six steps can be connected. Even with social distancing in place, a powerful and diverse network can be maintained through several social media platforms when traditional methods are not practical. Consider your employment options against your current network. Some experts say that 70 percent of people ended up in their current position thanks to networking. Others say it is even higher. But networking is more than just looking for a job. The panelists will share what is networking, why it is important, and when is the best time to network. Panelists will dive into the concept of six degrees of separation, the power of networking, building relationships, and share tips on how to get out of your comfort zone and stay connected. The target audience is industry professionals at all levels who can benefit from a diverse and powerful network. The presentation will appeal to both junior and senior staff with a desire to grow, collaborate, and exchange knowledge and resources to improve their personal and professional lives.

This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by Americans for Medical Progress (AMP) and Understanding Animal Research.

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON PLATFORM SESSIONS

W-12 Practical Applications of Randomization and Blinding in the Vivarium

2:00 PM-5:15 PM What’s Your Diagnosis?

Leaders: Esther Pearl, Megan R LaFollette Faculty: Esther Pearl, Mark J Prescott, Megan R LaFollette Facilitator: Natalie A Bratcher Workshop Fee: $150     Workshop Limit: 50

2:15

PS53 Sudden Clinical Decline in an Experimentally Naïve Yorkshire Pig AL Carlson*, S Kitz, C Cheleuitte, A Michel

2:30

PS54 Fluffy, White Growth on a Captive Freshwater Cichlid M Reichert*, N Koewler

2:45

PS55 Neurologic Signs in a Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata) RJ Floyd*, S Monette, LL Diaz

3:00

PS56 Bump on the Rump in a Bunny A Skorupski*, IL Bergin, PA Lester

v

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: 210A

Bias and lack of randomization in laboratory animal research can lead to invalid or unreliable conclusions and ethical challenges regarding justification of animal use. Minimizing bias in laboratory animal research should be a high priority for all members of the research community, from researchers to animal caretakers. Here participants will learn how they can play a key role in minimizing bias through randomization and blinding. Activities will teach participants randomization methods, complemented by small-group discussions focused on how randomization and blinding can be implemented using real experimental scenarios as a starting point. By completing this workshop, participants will learn how to directly support 3Rs impact and improve validity and reliability of laboratory animal research through randomization and blinding. Participants will learn why randomization and blinding are important, as well as several methods for implementing each in actual research settings. They will also learn how animal facilities can provide improved support by engaging technical staff. This workshop is targeted to animal care staff, research technicians, and veterinarians involved in supporting and running experiments, as well as IACUC members. While we will focus on common species such as rodents and fish, the principles apply across all species. This Workshop is sponsored in part by UK National Centre for the 3Rs (NC3Rs) and The North American 3Rs Collaborative (NA3RsC).

2:15 p.m.-5:15 p.m. Room: 203B

3:15 PS57 Ulcerative Glossitis and Mortality in Neonatal Muntjac Deer (Muntiacus reevesi) E Houston*, J Helbling, M Burton, E McNulty, JD Ayers, LV Kendall, C Mathiason 3:45

PS58 Hematochezia in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) L Birdwell*, R Stammen, S Kirejczyk, J Jenkins

4:00

PS59 Subcutaneous Mass in a Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) EM David*, KL Gardiner, AK Brice

4:15 PS60 Constipation and Weight Loss in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) E Cho*, PC Smith, S Wilson, JL Asher, K Killoran, CJ Zeiss

m

4:30

PS61 Abdominal Pain and Distention in a Ferret SD Alaniz*

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: 201B

4:45

PS62 Ocular Lesions in a New Zealand White Rabbit LF Mosca*, J Snyder

W-13 Working with Difficult Personalities: How to Survive and Thrive Leaders/Faculty: Laura A Conour, Pamela A Straeter Facilitator: TBN Workshop Fee: $150     Workshop Limit: 50

Do you have a PI, colleague, or employee that you just dread working with? Is your day ruined when you see this person looming in the door of your office and stomping into your personal space? Have you tried deep breathing exercises but still find yourself grinding your teeth after a nonproductive encounter? Are you starting to ask yourself, “Is it me?” If you answer “yes” to even one of these questions, then this workshop should appeal to you. Take charge of the situation and learn how to manage these interactions in a manner that keeps you from screaming and doesn’t ruin your workday. This workshop is structured for managers and directors of laboratory animal care and compliance departments. Using a combination of didactic learning, case studies, and role-playing scenarios, we will present you with the tools needed to recognize the personality type of individuals that are challenging to interact with and strategize how to manage these interactions such that they are constructive, productive, and structured in a manner that preserves your sanity. Workshop attendees should come prepared with their own examples of challenging interactions and be prepared to participate in this highly interactive workshop.

5:00 PS63 Hindlimb Lameness in a Pregnant Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) OL Franco Mahecha*, JL Haupt, HR Holcombe, RM Kramer, M Jamiel, JG Fox

Clinical

2:15 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Room: 208A 2:15

PS64 Sustained Release Buprenorphine Effectively Attenuates Thermal Hypersensitivity in an Incisional Model of Postoperative Pain in Neonatal Rats (Rattus norvegicus) A Blaney*

2:30 PS65 Evaluation of Acute Regurgitation in an Olive Baboon (Papio anubis) S Lane*, D Marchi, W Williams 2:45

PS66 Planning and Managing Postoperative Care for Spanish Cross Goats Receiving Total Knee Replacement D Marchi*, S Lane, C Rasbach, E Clary, W Williams

3:00

PS67 Development of a Novel Clinical Scoring System for Corynebacterium bovis Infections for NSG Mice CA Manuel*, EC Pearson, U Pugazhenthi, M Fink, L Habenicht, DL Fong, JK Leszczynski, MJ Schurr

3:30

PS68 Outbreak of Enteropathogenic E. Coli and Diarrhea in a Colony of New Zealand White Rabbits D Eldridge*, B Iritani

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

WORKSHOPS

39


AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

40

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 3:45

PS69 Management of Distal Tibia and Fibula Fracture Using External Coaptation in a Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) AJ McLuckie*, R Ober, R Donocoff, CL Winnicker

v

4:00

PS70 Evaluation of a Continuous Glucose Monitoring System for Use in Diabetic Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis) S Oh*, LC Halliday

Leaders: Cindy L Besch-Williford, Robert S Livingston Moderator: Cindy L Besch-Williford Facilitator: Jeffrey Kovacs

4:15

PS71 Characterization of Gastric Helicobacter spp in a Colony of Research Macaques HR Holcombe*, R Marini, M Patterson, S Muthupalani, Y Feng, AG Swennes, R Ducore, M Whary, Z Shen, JG Fox

SEMINARS Beyond the IACUC: The Current Landscape of Opportunities and Challenges in Research Administration q

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom B Leader/Moderator: Stacy L Pritt Facilitator: TBN

Laboratory animal professionals have long been involved with IACUC management and administration. However, IACUC offices often exist within larger research administration units within institutions. These research administration units typically include other significant components such as human research subjects protection, conflict of interest, export control, stem cell research oversight, grants management, and other federally mandated research oversight activities. For individuals who lead IACUC offices and animal facilities, career advancement often means assuming leadership of other areas of research administration beyond the IACUC. This seminar will explore those career pathways and hot topics in research administration. Building on the experience of several laboratory animal professionals who started with animal facility management or IACUC administration, speakers will highlight the training, skill sets, competencies, and credentials needed to take the next step in a research administration career. Speakers will also highlight how the different areas of research administration that may appear to be separate from animal research are actually interconnected and may become even more so based on evolving government guidelines for the oversight of all research. Laboratory animal professionals, especially veterinarians and individuals in management positions within animal facilities and IACUC offices, will benefit from this discussion. Specific advice for career advancement will be provided as well as ideas for improving administrative management skills.

Speakers/Topics: 2:45

Stacy L Pritt

Welcome and Introductions

2:50

Stacy L Pritt

Introduction to Careers in Research Administration

3:15

Gregory R Reinhard

Leading an IACUC Office

3:40

Christopher S King

Oversight of Multiple Research Administration Programs

4:05

Stuart E Leland

Hot Topics in Research Administration (Conflict of Interest and Export Control

4:30

Deyanira I Santiago

Quality Improvement for Research Administration

Biological Materials Testing: An Important Component of an Animal Resources Biosecurity Program 2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom C

Transplanted cells and tissues engrafted in immunocompromised rodents provide a valuable preclinical model system to study a wide variety of human diseases and evaluate responses to new therapeutics. Model development involves use of various human- or animal-derived biological materials, such as patient-derived xenografts, human blood and other tissues, and cell lines for tumor formation. It has been documented in scientific literature that these research reagents can become contaminated with infectious agents or with cells from another species or cell type. The possible negative outcomes of using contaminated biological materials include infectious disease outbreaks if the biological material contains rodent pathogens, risk of exposure of laboratory and vivarium personnel to human infectious agents if the biological material is of human origin, and the generation of unusable data if the biological material was misidentified or contaminated with other cells. This seminar will overview the contribution of contaminated biological materials to the reproducibility crisis in preclinical research, provide examples of biological material contamination such as with Corynebacterium bovis and Mouse kidney parvovirus, and screening methods that can be instituted as part of a comprehensive biosecurity program. The targeted audience is laboratory animal veterinarians, facility managers, and animal welfare policy and compliance personnel.

Speakers/Topics: 2:45

Cynthia L BeschWilliford

Welcome and Introductions

2:50

Robert Livingston

Viruses in Human-Sourced Biological Materials

3:30

Marcus Crim

Bacterial and Fungal Contaminants of Cells and Cell

4:10

Cynthia L BeschWilliford

Misidentification and Genetic Contamination of Cell Lines and Xenografts

4:50

Robert Livingston

Summary and Questions

u

Old and New Technology in the Mouse House

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom D

Leader/Moderator: Judy M Hickman-Davis Facilitator: Toi A Collins

In the era of cell phones that can turn off your home alarm remotely and stream your favorite video at the same time, tracking information with pen and paper feels inefficient. At academic institutions there are obstacles to implementing new technologies. Funding, operating system compatibility and multiple stakeholders provide challenges for employing new systems. Technologies that facilitate communication between managers, caretakers, veterinarians, and scientists promote animal welfare and research. However, many institutions continue to use a paper format for medical records, to rack animal health and to conduct routine husbandry tasks. The ability to notify researchers about animal health issues from the cage side instantly can be accomplished using electronic smart systems. Electronic medical records can increase efficiency while improving animal care. Electronic task management offers the advantage of tracking job completion in real time and allows teams to effectively allocate resources and personnel. However, no single electronic system fits every facility and the need for changes and software

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Speakers/Topics:

tions of both with respect to research outcomes. The importance of this ethical imperative is further emphasized by 2020 being designated by the International Association for the Study of Pain as the Global Year for the Prevention of Pain. An important overarching challenge is the application of strategies that reflect agreement between veterinary and animal care professionals and scientists which synergize sound animal care with scientific requirements. Participants will gain basic understanding of how pain develops and becomes aversive to animals; how to recognize pain and strategies for pain reduction; and the impact of pain and pain reduction on research outcomes. This seminar is intended for veterinarians, animal care technicians, IACUC members, and scientists.

Speakers/Topics: 2:45

Mark A Suckow

Welcome and Introductions

2:45

Judy M HickmanDavis

Welcome and Introductions

2:50

Mark A Suckow

Regulatory and Ethical Underpinnings of Pain Management

3:15

Erin Yu

Electronic Medical Records, Easy or Not So Easy

3:05

Christina M Larson

Causes and Mechanisms of Pain: A Brief Overview

3:45

Joseph D Thulin

Task Management: There’s an App for That

3:35

Patricia V Turner

Assessment of Pain and Distress

4:15

Ravi J Tolwani

The Rodent Fitbit

4:05

Jennifer L Lofgren

4:45

Carrie L Freed

Sanitation with Cage Washers and Robots, the Lessons Learned

Management of Pain in Rodents

Patricia L Foley

Achieving Consensus: Working with the Research Team to Build Synergistic Strategies

Overcoming Challenges of Pain Management in Rodents m

4:35

2:45 PM - 5:00 PM/Room: Ballroom A Leader/Moderator: Mark A Suckow Facilitator: TBN

The reduction of pain and distress experienced by rodents derives from an ethical imperative to ensure humane care. In this regard, an understanding of pain is critical, including recognition and approaches to pain control, as well as the implica-

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

updates can be time consuming and expensive. Digital health tools have become a mainstay in many households. The application of Fitbit technology to rodent research can improve monitoring of endpoints and allow for real-time behavior assessments. This noninvasive technology is the next generation of monitoring for lab animals. Large automatic cage washers and robotic systems have improved sanitation efficiency and decreased allergen exposure. The challenges include cost, training, maintenance, and functionality especially when dealing with equipment retrofitted into old spaces adapted for reuse as a vivarium. This session will review technologies developed and/ or in use at different academic institutions. The challenges associated with electronic medical records, development of an operations app to track workflow, development of a “fitbit” for mice as a refinement tool, and difficulties encountered with cage washers and robotics systems will be discussed.

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42

THURSDAY MORNING WORKSHOPS

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m

W-14 Science Outreach with a Link to Research

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 210B

Leaders: Julie K Kent Faculty: NA Facilitator: Lindsay S Morgan Workshop Fee: $150     Workshop Limit: 50

It is often a challenge to talk about the benefits of animal research with audiences of mixed ages. This workshop provides training for multiple science experiments and activities that can be tailored to fit audiences of any age. Incorporate your own research interests to personalize your presentation and learn how to modify your talking points to perform the same experiment with elementary, middle, or high school students. Learn how to teach students about the components of their blood and discuss how animal research has helped create treatments for blood-related disorders. Learn to discuss antibodies and antigens and lead an interactive classroom activity to help kids understand more about our immune system, share some of the ways that animals have inspired new technology, and more! Learn how to personalize your own science outreach lesson to be able to share how animal research has impacted an illness or disease that is of interest to you. Participants will leave with resources and information that will allow them to feel comfortable sharing the benefits of animal research with a variety of age groups. The targeted audience is anyone interested in outreach with K-12 students.

discussion of how standard facility processes and procedures were adapted to meet study-specific requirements. Participants will learn from the technical approaches taken in these real-world scenarios, which could be cross-applied in other situations. The discussion session will encourage audience sharing and provide additional perspective for attendees. This seminar targets managers, veterinarians, research scientists, and program administrators. While foundational concepts in gnotobiotics will not be directly covered, the discussion of real-world problems will be highly informative to both seasoned veterans and those that might become involved in gnotobiotics.

Speakers/Topics: 8:00

Alton G Swennes

Welcome and Introductions

8:05

Stephanie W Fowler

Technical Challenges of Performing Gnotobiotic Oncology Studies in Flexible Film Isolators

8:20

Joshua M Frost

Thinking Outside the Isolator: Using Positive Pressure Caging to Expand Technical Capabilities

8:35

Allison Rogala

Rederivation and Procurement of Gnotobiotic Mice

9:50

Alton G Swennes

Systemic Approaches to Risk Assessment and Break Management

10:05

Betty R Theriault

Programmatic Adaptations for Human and Mouse Fecal Transplant Studies

This Workshop is sponsored in part by Quip Laboratories, Inc. u

W-15 Technician to Supervisor: Management 101

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: 202B

Leader/Faculty: Stephen F Baker Facilitator: TBN Workshop Fee: $150     Workshop Limit: 50

When you excel at a technical skill or provide superior husbandry/support, individuals are often rewarded with a promotion that expands their role and responsibilities to include managing others. Individuals whose primary focus/expertise are animals are requested to change gears and channel their soft skills. This workshop will provide an overview of key competencies to support a successful transition. Topics will include performance management, effective communication, how to handle conflict, coaching versus delegating, and what it means to be a leader. This workshop will take participants through various exercises, role plays, and what-if scenarios to provide take-aways that can be applied back at work. The targeted audience includes new supervisors or first-level managers. If you are new to the world of managing others or contemplating getting into management, you do not want to miss this workshop. This Workshop is sponsored in part by Pfizer, Inc.

SEMINARS m

Overcoming Challenges in Gnotobiotics

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom A

Leaders: Alton G Swennes, Betty R Theriault Moderator: Lucy H Kennedy Facilitator: Christopher T Southern

Gnotobiotics facilities encounter numerous technical challenges due to the need for microbial exclusion and the use of specialized equipment. This seminar is designed to present the audience with technical challenges faced in three of the largest academic rodent gnotobiotics programs in the United States. Presentations will outline specific problems faced in these facilities and how they were ultimately addressed. This will include challenges in implementation of positive pressure IVC systems, the use of rederivation to generate germ-free mouse lines, and a

Raising the Next Generation of Lab Animal Professionals m

8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom B

Leader/Moderator: Judy M Hickman-Davis Facilitator: Toi A Collins

Employment of veterinarians, veterinary assistants, and animal caretakers in the laboratory setting is predicted to grow 18-19%, resulting in good job opportunities. The ability to recruit and retain lab animal care providers is essential for providing quality animal care. The opportunity to introduce lab animal care as a profession early in the education process can open the door for identifying quality individuals. Involvement in community programs for high school students provides an opportunity for discussion about careers supporting animal welfare and science. Veterinary technical schools include lab animal medicine as part of their training and partnering with these colleges to host externships can serve as a source for trained veterinary technicians. The availability of undergraduate students for fullor part-time animal care support can serve a dual purpose of filling a workforce need while introducing rewarding career options. The American Society for Lab Animal Practitioners (ASLAP) provides resources and programs for veterinary students and veterinarians in the form of scholarships, student chapter support, lectures, summer fellowships, and contacts for training programs. The opportunity for graduate student training in animal welfare and public policy promotes a better understanding of the human-animal interaction and fills the gap for necessary regulatory support. This session will review practices at academic institutions for introducing lab animal medicine to high school students, veterinary technicians, undergraduates, veterinary students, and graduate students. Opportunities to engage area high school students and veterinary technical colleges, utilization of undergraduate students as part of the essential workforce, the role of ASLAP in veterinary student and veterinarian training, and graduate training opportunity will be discussed. The target audience for this seminar is animal program directors, veterinarians, and facility managers/supervisors. Anyone who might be involved in public outreach, employee recruitment, veterinary student or technician education can benefit from this seminar.

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


THURSDAY MORNING Speakers/Topics:

SPECIAL TOPIC LECTURES

Welcome and Introductions

q

8:15

Valerie K Bergdall

The Relationship between Community Outreach and Technical Support

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom A

8:45

Christopher S King

Student Workers, Higher Education, and Good Animal Care

9:15

Carrie L Freed

Supporting Laboratory Animal Medicine for the Veterinarian

9:45

David Lee-Paritz

Policy and the Human-Animal Bond

Research Animal Behavioral Management for the 21st Century 8:00 AM - 10:15 AM/Room: Ballroom C Leader/Moderator: Patricia V Turner Facilitator: TBN

Improving the welfare of research animals and increasing the validity and reproducibility of scientific outputs attained from working with animals in science in the 21st century requires taking the next step and developing an approach that not only addresses reducing potential pain and distress, but also promotes positive welfare and experiences. This can be achieved by implementing a comprehensive behavioral management program for all species that we work with and care for in research facilities. This seminar will discuss what a comprehensive behavioral management program should address for research animals and how to move our institutions in this direction, as well as provide concrete examples of how this is being addressed for a range of common research animal species. After attending this session, participants will be able to describe necessary components of behavioral management programs that should be considered for all species, how to better prepare research animals for scientific procedures, and how addressing behavioral management improves overall animal welfare, scientific outcomes, and employee satisfaction. This seminar is intended for animal caregivers, research and behavior personnel, veterinary professionals, IACUC members, and scientists.

Speakers/Topics: 8:00

Patricia V Turner

Welcome and Introductions

8:05

Patricia V Turner

An Introduction to Components of a Comprehensive Research Animal Behavioral Management Program

8:20

Peter Fisher

Training Dogs in a Research Environment

8:45

Marie Eriksson

A New Approach to Working with Rats in Research

9:15

Fernando De La Garza

Low-stress Handling and Behavior Management Techniques for Pigs

9:40

Aileen Miline

Improving Macaque Behavioral Management to Achieve More Consistent Scientific Outcomes

10:05

Mark J Prescott

Looking Ahead: Results of an International Survey on Nonhuman Primate Behavioral Management

This Seminar is sponsored in part by Charles River Laboratories, The National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals (NC3Rs) and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK).

Exploring a New Ethical Framework for the Review of the Proposed Use of Research Animals Speaker: Margaret Foster Riley Moderator: Margaret S. Landi Facilitator: B Taylor Bennett

In their recently published Principles of Animal Research Ethics, eminent philosophers Tom Beauchamp and David DeGrazia offer six principles that they claim offer a framework for the evaluation of animal research that can be accepted by both proponents and opponents of animal research. The framework is the first major challenge to the 3Rs rubric that has dominated evaluation of animal research over the last fifty years. Arguably, the framework is not a challenge but an overlay; one that promises to enrich the 3Rs analysis. To help understand both the promise and potential weaknesses of these principles, we will consider several case studies and explore the implications of the Beauchamp-DeGrazia framework and how it might work within current regulations. The target audience will be all those involved with the preparation and review of proposals to use animals in research. This Special Topic Lecture is sponsored in part by Scientist Center for Animal Welfare (SCAW). q

Organ-On-Chip Technologies: Hype or Reality?

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom B Speaker: Szczepan W Baran Moderator: Marcel I Perret-Gentil Facilitator: TBN

Organ-on-a-chip (OOC) technology refers to a miniature device that recapitulates an organ’s structure and its function in vitro. This technology has a potential to impact various stages of drug discovery and development including efficacy and safety, with the additional potential benefit of impacting the 3Rs in preclinical studies. There is a significant amount of hype regarding this technology that exceeds what is currently technically feasible. While there has been an enormous amount of progress in this field, the technology is still in its infancy and requires characterization, validation, and optimization before we can fully understand its potential. This lecture will provide an overview of the current state, challenges that remain before these technologies can be fully incorporated into drug discovery and development, and realistic possibilities of organ-on-a-chip technology.

Risk Assessment and Decontamination in Laboratory Animal Research v

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM/Room: Ballroom C Speaker: Jason S Villano Moderator: Lisa Steiner Facilitator: Janet Follo

The use of animals in research comes with the innate risk of accidental exposure of personnel to various hazards, including chemical agents and infectious materials. This lecture will focus on two important aspects of managing risks associated with the use of these hazards: 1) risk assessment, which involves identification of the risks for specific personnel in a given situation and environment, and 2) decontamination, which renders an area or material safe to handle and reasonably free from a risk of disease transmission. Basic principles and updates from the revised Biosafey in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (BMBL) will be presented and a systematic approach for risk assessment and decontamination using the 4Ws (what, who, when, and where) and 1H (how) will be introduced, especially citing real-life scenarios. The audience will gain fundamental understanding and new paradigms of safe use of hazards in animal research. Target audience include those in animal care and use program management, veterinarians, and IACUC office, EHS, and husbandry personnel.

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

8:00

Judy M HickmanDavis

q

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44

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

PANEL DISCUSSION Pandemic 101: Animal Care and Use Programs Face COVID-19 m

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 207B

Leader/Moderator: Jason S Villano Facilitator: Rachel E Cooper Panelists: Susan R Compton, Scout T Chou, Bryan E Ogden, Gabi Itter, Eric K

Hutchinson COVID-19, the illness caused by SARS CoV-2, caught the world by surprise. Its human health, societal, and economic impact continue to climb to staggering heights, especially as countries continue to grapple with the difficulty of outbreak management of a novel virus. This impact has certainly reverberated to the animal research community and posed unique challenges to disaster plans of animal care and use programs. Continuity of veterinary and husbandry services and research studies could be in peril. Availability of supplies like personal protective equipment, animal feed, drugs, and experimental compounds is being questioned. Anthroponotic concerns of the virus to research animals are being considered. This panel discussion will provide information and facilitate discussion on animal program preparations in the face of SARS CoV-2 outbreak. Basic information about the virus will be provided followed by national outbreak updates and contingency plans of representative programs in China, Singapore, Germany, and the United States. We will encourage attendees to share their facility preparations, experiences, and thoughts regarding COVID-19. Target audience include those in animal care and use program management, veterinarians, technicians, and IACUC and environmental health and safety personnel.

Retirement of Nonhuman Primates from Research Facilities: Rewards, Challenges, and Considerations q

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 207D

Leader/Moderator: Peter C Smith Facilitator: Ellen Cho Panelists: Scott Kubisch, Laura A Conour, Lisa C Halliday, Rudolf P Bohm

Retirement of nonhuman primates from research institutions to sanctuaries is not a novel concept, but it is one that has generated recent discussion among laboratory animal veterinarians, animal caretakers, research scientists, and even legislators. Many agree that, in principle, retirement is a good option for the animals and those who care for them. However, before relinquishing the care and

oversight of nonhuman primates to a sanctuary, there are many questions to consider in determining if it is, in fact, in their best interest. Will the sanctuary be able to meet the healthcare and behavioral needs of the animals? How sustainable is the business model of the sanctuary? What level of oversight exists to ensure that the sanctuary meets an appropriate standard of care? Will placing nonhuman primates in sanctuaries have undesirable consequences for your institution? These questions and more will be addressed by our panel, which is composed of laboratory animal veterinarians who have been involved in the retirement of nonhuman primates, a laboratory animal veterinarian who provides veterinary care for a nonhuman primate sanctuary, and the founder of a nonhuman primate sanctuary who has partnered with research institutions to provide a home for retired research baboons and macaques. Ample time will be reserved for what we hope will be a robust discussion with the audience regarding the pros, cons, and logistics of retiring nonhuman primates from research facilities. The target audience is anyone who has or is considering retiring nonhuman primates from a research institution, or anyone who is interested in learning more about this topic. q

The Future of the Guide

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM/Room: 213B

Leaders: Margaret S Landi, Robert C Dysko Moderator: Margaret S Landi Facilitator: Bruce W Kennedy Panelists: Caroline J Zeiss, Anne Maglia, Robert C Dysko, Steve M Niemi

It has been almost 10 years since the 8th edition of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals was published by the National Research Council. Based on subsequent advances in laboratory animal science, and recent legislative and animal use discussion, there is a need to update the Guide and consider expanding it to include other disciplines of animal research. This moderated listening and audience participation session is sponsored by the Institute of Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR), part of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine. The session will revolve around the following questions. If the Guide was to be updated in phased approaches, what areas should be prioritized? Should any revisions go beyond laboratory animals and include agricultural animals and wildlife/field work? What about basic and applied research using pets? Should professional judgement, performance standards, and harmonized approaches be replaced by more engineering standards? Should a new format for the Guide be considered? Classic hardback or more of a Wikipedia model? This Panel Discussion is sponsored in part by Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR).

qAnimal Welfare, Regulatory Compliance, and Public Education vBiomedical Research, Medicine, and Methodology uFacility Design, Management, and Operation m Overcoming Challenges


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46

MEETING NEWS & EVENTS

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

REGISTRATION REGISTER EARLY AND SAVE Attendees who submit the registration form and payment for the 2020 National Meeting before September 1 will receive a $100 discount off the advance registration fee. Attendees, who submit the registration form and payment between September 2 and October 5, save $100 off the onsite registration fee. In person (onsite in Charlotte) registrations will include access to the virtual meeting platform. The virtual platform will be available through December 31, 2020. Another advantage to registering early is the time you’ll save once you get to Charlotte. You will receive your badge and registration materials by simply showing your photo identification at the registration counter. Completing an early workshop application is also recommended—these sessions fill up fast. You can register online at www.aalas.org/national-meeting.

YOUR NAME BADGE AND MEETING CARD Name badges are issued to all registered attendees to access education sessions, access the exhibit hall, and to record your contact information at vendor booths. You will be issued a card if you have registered for a workshop. Each card will be encoded with your contact information, but each card serves a different function. Please keep track of both cards. Your badge holder, which is issued with your card(s) at the registration booth, is a great way to store and display your cards.

LOST BADGE FEE There is a $50.00 fee to replace a lost, misplaced, or forgotten badge.

MEETING DETAILS FIRST NATIONAL MEETING? START HERE! Attending your first National Meeting can be an overwhelming experience. Join us for the National Meeting orientation session on Sunday, October 25 from 2–3 p.m. This session is for first timers, new members, international members, and anyone else who wants to get the most from the National Meeting. You’ll receive tips on how to plan your week as well as information on AALAS programs and opportunities.

AVOID HOTEL PENALTIES Before you reserve your hotel room, be sure to finalize your travel plans! Fees may apply if you cancel your reservation or check out early.

AIRLINE WEBSITES Air Canada: www.aircanada.com American: www.aa.com Delta: www.delta.com Frontier: www.flyfrontier.com JetBlue Airways: www.jetblue.com Lufthansa: www.lufthansa.com Southwest: www.southwest.com Spirit: www.spirit.com United: www.united.com

INTERNATIONAL ATTENDEES VISA APPLICATIONS AND INVITATION LETTERS

International registrants who plan to attend the AALAS National Meeting are urged to research visa application requirements for their country and to apply early. AALAS cannot assist with visa applications or with the embassies but will gladly provide invitation letters to attend the meeting. To request an invitation letter, send an email to stacie.townsend@aalas.org; include in the request the applicant’s full name and complete mailing address. Submit your request by August 15 to allow for timely visa application, facilitate advance registration for the meeting at the lower rate, and increase chances of booking a hotel in the AALAS block. Invitation letters will be mailed via regular U.S. post; if expedited delivery is desired, you must prepay for this service.

DON’T MISS THE NATIONAL MEETING ORIENTATION

International attendees are invited to join us for the National Meeting orientation on Sunday, October 25, from 2–3 p.m. See the Final Program for location.

MEETING APP/VIRTUAL PLATFORM Partnering with one of the leading conference app providers, our app/platform provides users with the following features, plus many more. • • • • • • • • •

general meeting information schedule by day, tracks, session type, and speaker posters and platforms exhibitor listings by name and category interactive maps social media access QR scanner speaker listings interactive attendee list

App users can review the National Meeting schedule, bookmark events to attend, set reminders, and create a personalized meeting schedule.Users will have the option to log in and access even more features, or to use the app from a non-logged in status. Stay tuned for directions on how to download the app for your device.

TECH EVENTS BEGIN YOUR TECH WEEK PLANNING The 22nd Annual International Laboratory Animal Technician Week will be held January 31 to February 6, 2021. Don’t miss out on the opportunity while at the AALAS National Meeting to pick up and order special items of recognition for the technicians at your facility. Complimentary Tech Week materials will be displayed at both the Technician Fun Fair booth sponsored by the Committee on Technician Awareness and Development (CTAD) and the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS) booth. All Tech Week items are also available at the AALAS Bookstore. For those facilities wanting to do a little something extra for their technicians, additional International Laboratory Animal Technician Week gifts will be available for purchase in the AALAS Bookstore. Let your technicians know you appreciate them. Be sure to visit these booths during the meeting!


MEETING NEWS & EVENTS AALAS Foundation ATTN: Biplane Battle Contest 9190 Crestwyn Hills Drive Memphis, TN 383125

CTAD & VETERINARY TECHNICIANS

Each decorated biplane entered into the contest will be assigned a unique registration number by the AALAS Foundation. All entries must be assigned into one of the following contest categories: Individual Category, Corporate Category, Branch Category, or Institution / Organization Category. Note: AALAS Foundation reserves the right to make final category selections for all entries.

The Committee on Technician Awareness and Development (CTAD) supports veterinary technicians! In honor of National Veterinary Technician Week, CTAD will be offering information to National Meeting attendees. Stop by the Technician Fun Fair booth to learn more about: • Role of the Veterinary Technician • National Meeting Events • Networking within the Field • Opportunities in Lab Animal Science • Outreach in the Vet Tech Community

CAREER CENTER Post resumes and job openings on the Career Center bulletin board. Looking for a job? Post your resume and check back for notes from potential employers. Looking for new employees? Post your openings and browse resumes to find the perfect candidate. If you cannot attend the National Meeting, we’ll post your job opening ad for you. Please send your poster to Mary Kathryn Billings, AALAS, 9190 Crestwyn Hills Dr, Memphis, TN 38125-8538. Your document should be no larger than 11 × 17 inches and must be received no later than September 20, 2020.

AALAS FOUNDATION BIPLANE BATTLE

All who register for the contest and pay the $25 contest registration fee will be provided a unique contest registration number and provided with a link where they may purchase the official 8 x 7.5 inch wooden biplane. Complete contest guidelines are available at https://tinyurl.com/AF-Biplane-Battle

AALAS FOUNDATION APPRECIATION RECEPTION & LIVE AUCTION Join the AALAS Foundation for an evening of fun as we celebrate the generous donors and volunteers who generously support the Foundation. The Appreciation Reception & Live Auction, sponsored by Charles River, will be held on Wednesday, October 28, from 6:30–8:30 p.m. All AALAS National Meeting attendees are invited to attend.

AALAS FOUNDATION SILENT AUCTION: AUCTION DONATIONS NEEDED The AALAS Foundation is holding its annual silent and live auction at the AALAS National Meeting in Charlotte. Proceeds from this fun-filled event support the Foundation’s efforts to educate the public about the essential role of animals in research. You can help these outreach efforts by contributing an auction item to this year’s event. To donate to the AALAS Foundation Silent and Live Auction, complete the online pledge form, located at http://tinyurl.com/AF-2020-Auction , or email your donation pledge to foundation@aalas.org. Auction item donations must be received by the AALAS Foundation office no later than October 2, 2020. Alternatively, auction donations may be dropped off at the Foundation booth in Charlotte. Donors contributing silent auction item donations by August 1, 2020 will be acknowledged in the 2020 National Meeting Final Program.

DONATION ITEMS SHOULD BE MAILED TO: Attn: AALAS Foundation Silent Auction AALAS Foundation 9190 Crestwyn Hills Drive Memphis, TN 38125

AALAS FOUNDATION AALAS FOUNDATION “BIPLANE BATTLE” CONTEST Be part of an exciting and creatively challenging contest to benefit the AALAS Foundation! The AALAS Foundation is challenging individuals to enter its “Biplane Battle” contest where entrants will creatively paint/decorate an 8 x 7.5 inch wooden biplane. To enter the contest a $25 contest entry fee and a 2020 “Biplane Battle” contest entry form must be completed and received by the AALAS Foundation no later than September 8, 2020. Entry fees and registration may be made online via the official online registration form https://tinyurl.com/AF-Biplane-Battle, or, by check, money order, or credit card. Mailed registration forms and entry fees should be addressed to:

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS Silent Auction SUNDAY, October 25 MONDAY, October 26 TUESDAY, October 27 WEDNESDAY, October 28

9 AM – 5 PM 8 AM – 5 PM 8 AM – 5 PM 8 AM – 1 PM

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The Charles C Hunter Lecture will take place on Monday, October 26 from 11:00 a.m to 12:00 p.m. The topic is “Rational Design of Novel Treatments for Psychiatric Illnesses” presented by Dr. Flavio Frohlich from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

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Learn about recent actions taken by the AALAS Board of Trustees and provide feedback to AALAS national leadership by attending your district membership meeting, conducted by your district trustees. They will lead discussion on recent board decisions, issues, policies, and procedures. Check the list to see which district you’re in and who your trustees are; for example, individuals living in Maryland belong to District 3. District membership meetings will be held Monday, October 26, from 5:15–6:15 p.m.; room assignments will be listed in the Final Program. International members of AALAS will have a designated meeting room as well and will meet at the same time as the districts.

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District 3

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Metro New York New England Northern Mountain Southern New England Upstate New York

Delaware Valley New Jersey Three Rivers

Greater Virginia National Capital Area

Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont

Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, West Virginia

Maryland, Virginia, Washington, DC

Robert Quinn

Pamela Straete

Lisa Secrest


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Jason Villano Theresa Woodger Sonja (Scout) Chou James Macy

Central Ohio Indiana Kentucky Michigan Southern Ohio

Central Illinois Chicago Iowa Minnesota Nebraska

Arkansas Kansas City Louisiana Mid-Missouri Mile High Oklahoma Texas

Arizona Hawaii Northern California Northern Rocky Mountain Oregon Sacramento Valley San Diego Southern California Mountain West Washington

Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, US Commonwealth of Puerto Rico

Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio

Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas

Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington

Mark Sharpless

Lisa Brossia-Root

Marilyn Watson

Lindsay Holmes

Tom Chatkuptt

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POSTERS ANIMAL WELFARE, TRAINING, AND 3RS POSTERS P1 A Pilot Program Using Positive Reinforcement and Target Training in Ported Yucatan Pigs JL Zorge*, G Arnold, W Gately, S Perrotta P2 Rehoming of Research Animals: Program Implementation, Development, and Benefits A Anguiano-Rosales* P3 Initiative to Promote the 3Rs LM Stanislawczyk*, MC Kundu P4 Improving the Quality of Continuing Reviews: One IACUC’s Journey ML Budda*, AL Burke P5 Lavender Essential Oil Infusion Can Help Reduce Pacing in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) B BoWell* P6 Validation of Mouse Jugular Venipuncture for Serial Blood Collection CR Deugan, NC Masterson* P7 Five-year Outcomes after Implementation of a Critical Incident Reporting System SJ Bischoff*, D Trietschel, A Enkelmann P8 Patency of Jugular and Femoral Vein Catheters Attached to Transcutaneous Buttons in Sprague Dawley Rats with Weekly Maintenance V Karicheti*, L Luciano, SG Camaya, M Koubaitary, MC Pledger, TR Gleason, A Evans, SE Gledhill, PM Sparks P9 Carprofen Delivery via Water-based Gel J Finlay*, L Saganek, J Palmer, TW Adamson, R Ermel P10 Success of a Nonhuman Primate Training Core S Combs*, A Dillard, KR Lambert P11 Harmonizing Recommendation for Enhancing the Care and Wellbeing of Research Pigs across Global Sites E Moreau*, T Bryant, M Wilkinson, PV Turner P12 Development of Standardized Assessment Tools for Evaluation of Animal Care and Use Programs at Contract Research Organizations HN Burr*, A Zuvich, A Lange, W West, NA Bratcher P13 Training and Low Stress Handling Procedures to Reduce Fear during Restraint for Blood Collection in Sprague Dawley Rats C Moody, E Moreau, PV Turner* P14 Evaluating In-cage Resources for Mice: Nest Materials and a Cardboard Cage Semi-divider for Improving CD-1 and C57BL/6 Mouse Welfare C Moody, E Paterson, PV Turner* P15 The Blues of Teaching Retroorbital Injections: A Refinement to Using Dye as a Validation Technique in Mice JL Ludwig* P16 Technical Refinements in Assisted Reproductive Technologies for the 3Rs P Qi*, OL Franco Mahecha, T Chavarria, E Umana, S Erdman, JG Fox P17 An Innovative Method for Confirming Sexual Maturity in Male Macaques (Macaca fascicularis) C Rosales* P18 A Survey of Laboratory Animal Veterinarians Regarding Mouse Welfare in Biomedical Research J Marx*, K Jacobsen, N Petervary, D Casebolt P19 Identification of Humane Endpoint Markers in Naturally B6 Aged Mice N Ogiso*, K Tomita, K Takano, S Tamura, H Kawasaki, N Morikawa, J Almunia P20 Using Positive Reinforcement to Build Compliance in Sinclair Mini-Pigs JN Perez*, RL Collins, KR Lambert, JW Vaughan

P21 Serial Survival Cerebrospinal Fluid Collection and Intrathecal Dose Administration in Intact Rats S Wills, M Krueger*, J Relph, C Gocker, D Lunde, A Larson, V Walsh P22 Species-specific Training Strategies for Vervets C Scott*, KR Lambert, B Frye, D Bissinger, C Copeland, S Wise-Walden, P Valure, H Register, C Shively P23 Use of a Collaborative Housing Tracking System to Increase Rate of First-choice Housing for Large Animal MA Burns*, C Wilbourn, A Lange, S Scott, JL Lofgren P24 Characterization of a Novel Stereotypic Behavior in Laboratory Gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) Housed in Individually Ventilated Caging L Habenicht*, BM Clancy, CA Manuel, DL Fong, A Klug, JK Leszczynski P25 Successful Repairing of Adult Female Mice with Specialized Feeding Jars V Forck*, K Vandeloecht, M Haney P26 SLAVT/BRAD Partnership: Accelerating Public Awareness and Acceptance of Animal Research AL Murray*, LK France, J Champion, AA Bedwell, PA Clifford P27 Developing a Human-derived iPSC Cerebral Organoid Model for Studies of Pediatric Anesthetic Neurotoxicity C Krall*, M Schaefer, H Hogberg, R Johns P28 When It Comes to Mouse Blood Collection for Inexperienced Users Chin Up, Don’t Get Cheeky DS Tu*, K Nolan, AD Pavan, J Stewart, CL Freed P29 Driving the 3Rs in the Outsourced Space: Innovation and Collaboration MA Burns*, JL Lofgren P30 Refining Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Rhesus Macaques M Klores* P31 Refinements to Intermittent Intravenous Infusion Procedures in C57BL/6 Mice to Achieve Study Endpoints and Improve Animal Welfare TR Gleason, A Evans, M Stamen, G Murphy, V Karicheti* P32 Sales, Inventory, and Operations Planning Supports the 3Rs TJ Receveur*, N Bartlett, J Lohmiller

CLINICAL POSTERS P100 Using a 14-day Flash Glucose Monitoring System as a Clinical Management Tool for Cage-Housed, Diabetic Nonhuman Primates E Jackson*, E Mitchell, K Black, V Collins, N McInnis P101 A Novel Treatment for Rodent Rectal Prolapse A Bland, F Moore, T Heather, H Pisharath, A Funk* P102 Increased Incidence of Corneal Ulcers in 5xFAD Mice D Lovell, M Hendren, S Rankin, H Pisharath, T Heather, A Funk* P103 Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma in a Hamadryas Baboon (Papio hamadryas) C Sella Paranzini*, MG Tamimi, K Rivas-Wagner, A Ellis, PR Morales P104 Three Dog Night: Managing 28-Hour Survival Anesthesia in Canines A Brown*, J McGrath, C Mitchell, GW Salyards, M Niekrasz P105 Lipid Bound Extended-release Buprenorphine Effectively Attenuates Postoperative Hypersensitivity in an Incisional Pain Model in Mice (Mus musculus) K Navarro*, K Jampachaisri, M Huss, C Pacharinsak P106 Peripheral Blood Vessel Diameter and Systolic Blood Velocity in the Yorkshire Swine Animal Model: A Report of Normals Data for Size and Age S Gabriel*, WA Spinks, B Bellamy, K Szymczyk, CZ Cannon P107 Mycobacteriosis in an Adult Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata) SJ Mangosing*, S Monette, C Echeverri, LL Diaz


POSTERS P130 The Effects of Increased Therapeutic Doses (20 Mg/kg) Of Meloxciam and Carprofen on the Welfare of Laboratory Mice AL Bailey, B Singh, BJ Smith, W McGee, LV Kendall* P131 A Novel Presentation of Mouse Urologic Syndrome In Lpgat1 +/- Male Mice M Klores*, S Rasmussen, S Peneyra P132 Reducing Stress in Rabbits during Multiple Noninvasive Ocular Imaging Procedures E Tolley*, M MacMillan, M Ortega, K Krueger P133 Isolation of Jeotgalicoccus spp. from the Tail Lesion of a Laboratory Mouse TE Whiteside*, MD Johnston, M Cesta, DM Kurtz P134 Degenerative Myelopathy Secondary to Aberrant Engraftment of Intracranially Injected, Human-origin Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (ipsc)-derived Microglia In Nsg-csf1 Mice D Annamalai*, S Carrasco, OL Franco Mahecha, S Maddur Ganesan, A Aguilar, JG Fox, S Muthupalani P135 Atypical Clinical Presentation of Ferrets (Mustela putorius furo): Same, Same, but Different V Mrotz* P136 Spontaneous Basal Cell Tumor in a Laboratory Rat (Rattus norvegicus) C Si* P137 Whonet Surveillance Facilitates the Identification of Multidrug Resistant Pathogens, Including Meropenem Nonsusceptible Enterobacteriaceae from Macaque Cephalic Implants A Garcia*, EM Buckley-Jordan, JG Fox P138 Pregnancy-associated Thrombocytopenia and Bone Lesions in a Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) S Maddur Ganesan*, OL Franco Mahecha, S Muthupalani, JL Haupt, JG Fox

HUSBANDRY/MANAGEMENT POSTERS P200 Post-transport, Maintance, and Postoperative Care of Geriatric Care of Rats Using a Novel Commerically Available Feeding Device H Maxwell* P201 Low-cost Alternatives for Group Housing Rabbits on the Floor T Humbird* P202 Effectiveness of Hybrid Hydrogen Peroxide in Decontamination of Isolators, Their Contents, and Their Filters FM Grinstead*, D Holland, L Watkins P203 Edible Nail Polish as a Novel Enrichment Strategy for Singly Housed Nonhuman Primates J Martin, E Liebl, W Williams* P204 Where Do You Place Your Hydrogel? J Locklear* P205 Husbandry and Management of Breeding Colonies of Jamaican Fruit Bats (Artibeus jamaicensis) for use in SARS-CoV-2 Research E Houston*, C Lovelace, T Schountz, LV Kendall, JD Ayers P206 Assessment of Opaque Tubing Enrichment to Reduce Stereotypic Behaviors and Promote Breeding Efficiency in Gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) L Habenicht*, S Bozan, BM Clancy, CA Manuel, DL Fong, JK Leszczynski, A Klug P207 The Genetic Diversity of Diversity Outbred Mice H He, V Philip, KL Brackett* P208 Individual Tracking of LPS- or Chlorpromazine-induced Changes in Locomotion of Pair-housed Mice in Smart Cages J Ramirez*, E Defensor, C Liu, LR Schaevitz, JE Fenyk-Melody

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P108 Exercise and the Overweight Research Beagle: Will it Succeed when a Controlled-calorie Diet Has Failed? S Tyhuis* P109 Histiocytic Sarcoma with Bone Marrow Involvement in a NaĂŻve CD-1 Mouse G Mendoza*, S Kelly, A Michel, LL Diaz P110 Assessment of a Novel Procedure to Reverse Mouse Penile Prolapse SM Setter*, IF Choi, PW Setter, HR Goold, M Fink, L Habenicht, DL Fong, LK Jori, CA Manuel P111 Necrotizing Fasciitis of the External Genitalia in a Male Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) RE Cooper*, SM Birch, MS Vermillion P112 Evaluation of Therapeutic Interventions for Rectal Prolapse in Mice Leads to Reduction in Early Euthanasia CM Mitchell*, GW Salyards, BR Theriault, G Langan, KR Luchins P113 Perioperative Care in an Adult Male Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) KR Strait*, J Amilcar P114 Burkholderia gladioli Infection in an Immunocompromised Rat Strain BT Adedeji*, F Noto, S Moody, C Dunn, E Baldwin, D Scott, J Stanley, H Stills P115 Unilateral Renal Nephroblastoma with Ovarian Adhesion and Peritoneal Metastasis in an Adult Female Wister Rat OL Franco Mahecha*, S Carrasco, HR Holcombe, JG Fox, S Muthupalani P116 Hot Bead Sterilization of Rodent Surgical Instruments J Holdridge*, M WHEATON, W Dupont, CP Jones, K Shuster P117 Rectal Prolapse in a Female Cotton Rat (Sigmodon hispidus) TA Collins*, A Sparks, D Coble P118 Nasal Dermatitis in Small Ruminants E Houston*, J Helbling, M Burton, AR Personett, LV Kendall, JD Ayers P119 Unexplained Abdominal Distension in an Aged C3HeB/FeJ Mouse J Walton*, J Eggenschwiler, MA McCrackin, SB Harvey, U Blas-Machado P120 Transient Hyperlipidemia in a Closed Specific-Pathogen Free Cat Colony (Felis catus) M Burton*, E Houston, AR Personett, J Helbling, JD Ayers P121 Comedocarcinoma with Severe Skin Ulcerations: A Unique Presentation in a Retired Sled Dog J Draper* P122 Metastatic Hemangiosarcoma in a Young Lewis Rat Ă„ Sipos*, J Brazzell, JA Scholz P123 A Well-differentiated Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Pale Cytoplasmic Bodies in a Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) M Stair*, JL Haupt, JG Fox, S Muthupalani P124 Branchiobdellidans Parasitization of a Laboratory Crayfish Colony D Savson*, EK Daugherity P125 Unexpected Tumor Regression in Multiple FVB/N Mice following Orthotopic Inoculation with HER2-positive Mammary Gland Tumors JA Herrod*, K Mulka, K Gabrielson, P Korangath, R Ivkov, JS Villano P126 Continuous Glucose Monitoring in the Diabetic Ossabaw Pig: Sensor Placement M McIntyre*, GE Geist P127 Factors Affecting Hematologic and Serum Biochemical Parameters in Healthy Common Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) RM Kramer*, A Sheh, SC Artim, C Toolan, MA Burns, JG Fox P128 Idiopathic Bone Disease in a Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) J Brockhurst*, C Peterson, S Beck, JM Izzi P129 Refinement of Standardized Care of Ocular Lesions in Mice C Hunter*, A Skorupski, J Lawrence, PS Allen

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POSTERS P209 Introducing and Troubleshooting a Sealed Positive-pressure Rack System to House Germfee Mice J Yamada, E Chua, K McEachin, R Garcia-Gonzalez*, C Sohn P210 Accessible Caging for Mice with Partial Paralysis PB Hutchison*, NL Herndon P211 Is More Really Better? A Reevaluation of PPE Practices in a Barrier Rodent Facility TA Collins*, CL Freed, E Brooks P212 Handling and Husbandry Technique Adaptations Involved in the Assessment, Blood Drawing, Euthanasia, and Dissection Of Juvenile Wild-caught Alligators RK Banks* P213 Establishment of a Shared Database to Facilitate a Reduction of Animal Use at a Large Academic Institution A Meyer*, DL Hickman P214 Operational excellence, risk management and compliance supports the integration of an insectary into an established research vivarium C Mateo, L Magee*, J Keding-Casey, M Fishbaugher, C Osborne P215 Tox in a Box: Enhancement of a Closed Restraint Chair for Laboratory Macaques CE Ferrecchia*, LF Matney P216 Assessment of Existing and Novel Tissue Sample Collection Methods for Standard and Automated Rodent Genotyping RC Dysko*, FC Hankenson, F Benavides, LA Colby, PC Smith, DK Taylor, N Nowak, DE Hoskins P217 Evaluation and Implementation of Bagged, Crinkle-cut Paper Strips as Environmental Enrichment for Mice JC Rodgers*, C Cheleuitte, NS Lipman P218 Influence of Feeding Frequency and Brine Shrimp (Artemia salina) on the Growth on Zebrafish (Danio rerio) R Giallella, D Garrity, P Robison, J Owiny* P219 Rearing and Vaccination of the Neonatal Muntjac Deer (Muntiacus reevesi) J Helbling*, E Houston, M Burton, AR Personett, E McNulty, C Mathiason, JD Ayers, LV Kendall P220 Norovirus No More: The Power of Dry Heat Sterilization to Stop the Transmission of Murine Norovirus in Dirty Bedding J Lee*, WA Bidot, EA Nunamaker P221 Implementation of an Electronic Abnormal Conditions Monitoring System E Green*, J Brooks, V Stanton P222 Ammonia Levels in Rat Double Decker Individually Ventilated Cage system P Kowal*, m Defeo, M Mooney P223 Is Your Disaster Plan Ready for Post-pandemic Normal? J Brooks*, S Kirchain, R Thompson, G Cronin, J Nichol, P Holly P224 Finding an Alternative Approach when Critical Medical Supplies Are in Short Supply during the COVID-19 Pandemic RA Byrum*, MC St Claire P225 The Effect of Environmental Enrichment on Stress, Behavior, and Production in Gestating and Farrowing Sus scrofa Sows C Peck*, J Kieffer, S Moeller P226 The Cryodropper: A Novel Device for Mouse Embryo and Sperm Vitrification B Stone*

LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS POSTERS P300 Serum Pharmacokinetics of a Highly Concentrated Buprenorphine Formulation in Female Sprague Dawley Rats (Rattus norvegicus) K Galang*, H Knych, R Oates P301 Development of a Noninvasive Transdermal Technique for Serial CSF Collection from Cisterna Magna In Rats A Fiorenza*, P Lopez, H Masakazu P302 Comparison of Two Isolation Techniques for Macaca fascicularis Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Cell Recovery, Cell Viability, and Purity DR Rodriguez* P303 Age-related Changes in GFAP-Immunoreactive Astrocytes in the Mouse Cerebellar Molecular Cell Layer C Tyszkiewicz*, ID Pardo, C Liu, CJ Somps P304 The Relationship of Body Temperature to Noise-induced Hearing Loss C Yancey*, M West, W Williams P305 Longitudinal Characterization of Ladder-climbing Behavior in Young Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy MDX Mice: A Smart Cage Study S Hwang*, C Liu, J Pang, M Montgomery, B Manickam, H Zhang, LR Schaevitz, R Goldstein P306 Hepatocellular RECK Overexpression Attenuates Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Susceptibility R Dashek*, R Cunningham, M Moore, V Jepkemoi, G Meers, B Chandrasekar, R Rector P307 The Effects of a Decreased Light Adaptation Time on Electroretinogram (ERG) Results in Nonhuman Primates KJ DePlancke*, R Boyd P308 Chronic Systemic Injection of DREADDs Agonists Clozapine-n-oxide and Compound 21 Does not Change Behavior Relevant to Locomotion, Exploration, Anxiety, or Affect in Male Mice SL Spears*, F Tran, K Ahn, AJ Eisch, S Yun P309 Isoflavone Intake Causes Adrenal Dysfunction Resulting in the Delayed Puberty In Prepubertal Male Rats S Caceres*, A Alonso-Diez, B Crespo, G Silvan, M Illera, PC Carlos, D Inmaculada, JC Illera P310 Reduction of Corynebacterium bovis Viability following Freeze-thaw in Tumor Cryopreservation Media G Mendoza*, RJ Ricart Arbona, K Lertpiriyapong P311 Impact of Thermal Support Systems on the Physiologic and Recovery Parameters of Anesthetized Common Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) AL Cates, JL Haupt*, JG Fox P312 Evaluation of Hot Bead Sterilizers Used for Rodent Surgery JL Haupt*, H Nam, S Lackeyram-Owen, RM Kramer, JG Fox P313 Efficacy of a Commercial Primate Diet Containing Fenbendazole in Treating Trichuris trichiura Infection in a Captive Baboon Colony (Papio sp.) JW Dutton*, LL Condel, JB Jimenez, SE Price, DB Elmore P314 Evaluation of Topical Treatment Regimens for Ulcerative Dermatitis in C57BL/6J Mice BL Kick*, B Lyons, R Doty P315 Size of Cage Used for Euthanasia Can Affect the Welfare of Rats During Euthanasia DL Hickman* P316 Evaluation of Animal Welfare of Socially Housed Aged Male Sprague Dawley Rats B Skiles, S Kulkarni, DL Hickman*


POSTERS P334 Cannabidiol and Cannabidiolic Acid-rich Hemp Oil for the Treatment of Diarrheal Disease in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis) TN Johns*, AI Cameron, WM Burnside P335 Inhibition of Fibroblast Activation Rescues Cardiac Dysfunction Associated with Inherited Dilated Cardiomyopathy KA Zabrecky*, K Kooiker, D Bugg, A Martinson, J Davis P336 The Superfund Chemical, N-nitrosodimethylamine, Induces an Early Onset Pattern of Mutations AL Armijo*, S Chawanthayatham, BI Fedeles, RG Croy, JG Fox, JM Essigmann P337 Prevention of Corneal Opacities during Ocular Imaging in Rats HB Culp*, M Ault, X Ping, L Yang, C Nunes, J Destefano, L Gichuru, L Chen, I Petrescu, C Johnson, L Handt, S Bellum, N Li, S Motzel, X Shen P338 Impact of Social Housing on Long-term Patency of Jugular Catheters in Rats (Rattus norvegicus) L Krueger*, SE Chang, M Motoc, M Chojecki, ZT Freeman, SB Flagel P339 Effects of Isoflurane on Engraftment Rates and Cytokine Release In Humanized Mice M Harris*, m chen, J Yang, G Yang P340 Fecal Microbiome Monitoring in Colony and Sentinel Mice PC Smith, J Gu, C Zhou, CJ Zeiss, S Compton, PA Cirillo, H Wallace, J Macy* P341 Optimization of Superovulation Hormone Injection Intervals JA Cayton*, C Bethune, C Piotter, J Walls, D Davis, H Men, CL Franklin P342 Postsurgical Recovery Assessment of Mice Treated with Extended- or Sustained-Release Buprenorphine M Saenz*, E Bloom-Saldana, PT Fueger, R Ermel, J Finlay P343 Reducing Inter-operator Variability Using a Novel 3D and Thermal Measurement System when Measuring Subcutaneous Tumors in Mice A Smith, K Turley* P344 Inactivation of Amplicons Using Gaseous Chlorine Dioxide K Lorcheim*

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P317 Comparison of Gut Microbiota from 2 Different Colonies of Guinea pigs D Chadalavada*, P Subramanian, J Perez-Chaparro P318 The Impact of CO2 EuthanRsia on Sperm Quality, In Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Development Tates S Gerb*, L Stevey, C Agca, Y Agca P319 Functional Analysis of Novel Genetic Factor for Chronic Kidney Disease in Mice GLAS: Yes Y TAKAHASHI*, H Sasaki, K Hiura, M Watanabe, K Nakano, T okamura, N Sasaki P320 Tensin 2 Suppresses Intestinal Tumor Progression via Inhibiting the Wnt/β-catenin Pathway K Hiura*, Y TAKAHASHI, M Watanabe, K Nakano, T okamura, S Kakuta, H Sasaki, N Sasaki P321 A Unique Uncoupling of Cell Death and IL-1 Release in a Mouse Model of Meningitic Escherichia coli K1 Infection C Chambers*, JA Skyberg P322 Age- and Sex-related Changes in Hematologic and Biochemical Parameters of Dunkin Hartley Guinea Pigs AR Personett*, MF Afzali, SB Bork, LH Burton, LB Radakovich, CA Seebart, KS Santangelo P323 Effect of Social Housing on Changes in Monocyte Expression in Pigtail Macaques (Macaca nemestrina) during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection N Castell*, S Guerrero-Martin, E Shirk, J Brockhurst, S Queen, M Li, B Bullock, B Carlson, R Adams, L Gama, D Graham, C Zink, J Clements, J Mankowski, KA Metcalf Pate P324 Effects of Oxygen Supplementation on Ketamine/Xylazine Anesthesia in C57BL/6 Mice CE Blevins*, NA Celeste, J Marx P325 Use of Entyce in New Zealand White Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) J Draper*, EK Daugherity P326 Comparing the Effects of Irradiation and Mammary Fat Pad Implantation on Patient-derived Xenograft Model Characteristics T Chan*, D VanBuskirk, R Banzon, M Cheng, K Draheim P327 Characterizing the Pathogenesis of Murine Chapparvovirus in CD-1, C57BL/6, and NSG Mice ML Kain*, S Monette, RJ Ricart Arbona, NS Lipman P328 Efficacy of Beta-defensin Derived Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides against Biofilm-producing Bacteria. E Knebel*, Z Shen, S Zhang P329 Evaluation of the Aversive Nature of Carbon Dioxide as Compared to Isoflurane S Kulkarni, DL Hickman* P330 Location of Gas Inlet Can Negatively Affect the Well-being of Rats Euthanized with CO2 DL Hickman* P331 Biocompatibility Testing of a Novel Cranial Implant in a Rhesus Macaque J Schoenberger*, D Mailhiot, N Pach, KR Luchins, M Niekrasz P332 Investigation of the Role of Il-22 In Helicobacter pylori-induced Chronic Gastritis in Murine Models M Stair, E Bryant, HR Holcombe, S Muthupalani, Z Ge, Z Shen, D Puglisi, A Aguilar, JG Fox* P333 Coagulation Parameter Reference Intervals for Inbred Strain 13/n Guinea Pigs (Cavia Porcellus) and Validation of Low Volume PT and aPTT Sample Analysis JA Condrey*, T Flietstra, K Nestor, E Schlosser, J Coleman-McCray, S Genzer, S Welch, J Spengler

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CHURCH

Park KING

S TR EET

Charlotte Marriott City Center Courtyard Charlotte City Center SIXTH E Hampton InnSTREET Charlotte Uptown Hilton Charlotte Center City Hilton Garden Inn Charlotte Uptown Holiday Inn Center City STRE ET FIFTH E Hyatt Place Charlotte Downtown Omni Charlotte Hotel Westin Charlotte

S

Line

Bearden

ML

3RD ST STATION

Hilton Charlotte Center City

S

Romare

FOURTH

E THIRD STREET

The Knight Theater & Bechtler Museum of Modern Art

Bank of America

E

2

Nearby Convention Center Parking Garage Parking

STREET

Courtyard Charlotte City Center

STREET

W

Epicentre

E FOURTH

W THIRD ST

BB&T BallPark

ARENA STATION

STREET

8

STREET

STREET

S MINT

STREET

Charlotte Convention Center

S GRAHAM

W THIRD ST

FOURTH

Blue

TRADE

Omni Charlotte Hotel

TRYON

W

FOURTH STREET

LYNX

E

TRADE ST

ST R EE T

Spectrum Center

Bank of America Corporate Center

S

W

E.

TH FI F

STREET

ST

W

TRADE ST

Holiday Inn Center City

E FIFTH Blumenthal Performing Arts

STREET

ST

COLLEGE

TRYON

Charlotte Marriott City Center

1 W

Hearst Tower

Hotels

SEVENTH

E

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

E SIXTH STREET

6

N

N

STREET

485

CHURCH

FIFTH STREET

STREET

W

STREET

TRADE

STREET

N

N

7 Miles (15 min)

W

POPLAR

Charlotte Uptown

77

ImaginOn

E SIXTH STREET ET W SIXTH STRE

277

CLT Airport

Levine Museum of the New South

Discovery Place

N

85

85

7TH ST STATION

i

BREVARD

E SEVENTH STREET

W SEVENTH STREET

N

485

Charlotte

N GRAHAM

AAL AS 71 st N AT I ON AL MEET I N G

MECKLENBURG

132 EAST TRADE STREET CHARLOTTE, NC 28202 $209 Single/Double

feet 1,000

500 100

200

300 meters


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2020 AALAS National Meeting Preliminary Program  

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