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36 BECOMING THE SAILING UNICORN SAILING SAVED HER LIFE 40 EXPERIENCES AND PERSPECTIVES FROM WOMEN IN SAILING

SEPTEMBER 2019

30  THE ARGON COLLECTIVE MINDFUL MENTORSHIP & SERIOUS FUN


NEW

NEW

J/Sport - J/70 J/80 J/88 J/95 J/99 J/111 J/121 J/Elegant - J/97e J/112e J/122e

Shilshole Marina Sales Office www.sailnorthwest.com 206-286-1004

Alerion Express Series Yachts Ae20 Ae26 Ae30 Ae33 Ae38 Ae41

1980 TransPacific 49 $99,000

2000 Beneteau 461 $150,000

1989 J/40 $79,000

1994 40’ Colin Archer $65,000

1994 J/120 $99,500

1978 Cal 39 $35,000

1990 Jeanneau 36 $49,300

2000 J/105 $74,900

1986 Nor’Star 32 $38,000

1997 Farr 30 w/ Trailer $35,000

1985 J/29 $12,000

2012 J/70 $34,900

2014 Circa Marine FPB 64 $2,225,000

2003 53’ J/160 449,000

2011 Bestevaer 45st $499,000

2015 Rustler 37 $365,000

2007 E Sailing Yacht $59,000 Also D e4a8l e º rNsO R T H For

1997 Henderson 30 $23,000

MJM Series Yachts 53z 50z 43z 40z 35z

Sailnorthwest.com - 206-286-1004 BER 2019 2 s a l e s @ s a i l n o r t h w e SsEt P. cT EoMm


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FEATURES 28

Maiden — Go Girl, Wherever You Want to Go!

The historic boat with an important cause makes a special stop.

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The Argon Collective

A story of sailing mentorship, boat partnership, and pure fun. By Cara Kuhlman

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The Sailing Unicorn

Sailing aided her recovery, now she's doing an ocean race. By Lizzy Grim

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Women on the Water

Women of the Pacific Northwest sailing community share stories, advice, and inspiration.

This Summer in Youth Sailing

Catalysts for lifelong sailors, instructors both teach and learn. By Julia Soes

COLUMNS 19

Artist’s View – Secrets of the Salish Sea

Heermann’s Gull: A gull with a highly specific breeding ground. By Larry Eifert

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Halcyon Wandering

I am a sailor, who happens to be a woman. By Becca Guillote

22

Galley Essentials with Amanda

Coconut curry and coconut crabs in Rarotonga. By Amanda Swan Neal

24

How-To: Think About Generators on Boats

Should you have one? If so, what kind and how big? By Alex and Jack Wilken

26

Lessons Learned Cruising

Unexpected outcomes of information exchange. By Behan and Jamie Gifford

48

48° North Race Report

Whidbey Island Race Week, Moore 24 Nationals, Cow Bay, and Shaw Island Classic.

ON THE COVER, Jeanne Currie enjoys a sunset sail aboard the San Juan 24, Argon. Nearly every Argon adventure involves sailors who are experienced and those that are just starting. Everybody has a blast!

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Background Photo by Jan Anderson.

CONTENTS

By Kaci Cronkhite

SEPTEMBER 2019


06

Editor REMARKABLY UNREMARKABLE

For several months now, I’ve known I wanted to put together an issue that highlighted the sailing experiences of some of the women who play an integral role in our community. As I began to plan, I quickly came to the obvious-inhindsight realization that we have so many incredible women who are supremely skilled sailors, leaders in our community, world-class adventurers, and owners of marine businesses—that there are way, WAY too many exquisitely good story options to consider. A long history of female empowerment in our region has brought us to this point, but it’s not just historically true. It’s changing, and fast, and for the better. There is a women’s sailing movement that’s happening in the Pacific Northwest. In the eleven years I’ve worked in the maritime industry in this region, I’ve observed rapidly increasing numbers of women, particularly young women, owning boats; racing competitively; cruising intrepidly; working in positions of leadership and ownership in the maritime sphere; and pursuing all manner of sailing dreams, whether grand or modest. This momentum is building and generating even more inspiring examples to empower women and girls to see that sailing is for them. One shining illustration is the notoriety and success of Race to Alaska’s Team Sail Like a Girl, and its offshoot education program, Race Like a Girl. R2AK is, itself, uniquely successful with 40% female participation. The progress and growing enthusiasm are humblingly impressive to witness. Unfortunately, none of this alters the reality that, in spite of these successes, past and present, we still have a long, long way to go. Sailing is still a maledominated activity and industry. The male-as-skipper, female-as-first-mate dynamic, which admittedly works well for some, is still too prevalent and is far too often the default assumption. Learn to Sail programs and high school sailing, thankfully, boast nearly 50-50 participation between girls and boys; but that ratio dwindles in nearly all sailing activities that take place after graduation and, with very few exceptions, does not recover. Among many positive stories in this issue, you’ll also read about disrespect and misogyny that will likely leave you nodding with understanding if you’re a woman, shaking your head in disappointment if you’re a man, and motivated to advance the cause of equality if you’re a human. If I have one conversation over and over, it has to do with sailing participation— whether it’s decreasing or just changing—and how we might boost it. I’m struck by the fact that if sailing was a safe, accessible, and appealing enough activity to have equal representation between women and men, we probably wouldn’t be having those glass-half-empty discussions about the potential decline of the sport. The longer I thought about and worked on this issue of the magazine, I began to see that this should not be considered a special issue. It is just a great issue of 48° North. Every story in this magazine belongs in any issue of 48° North. So, in that way, it’s entirely unremarkable that this collection of articles about sailing in our region is almost exclusively written by women. On the other hand—since our community has room to improve with regard to inclusiveness and because 48° North is committed to sharing the stories of women sailors hopefully affecting meaningful change and making sailing even more welcoming—it still feels important to illuminate and celebrate the fact that this issue is full of the experiences and perspectives of some of the badass sailors in our community, who happen to be women.

Volume XXXIX, Number 2, September 2019 6327 Seaview Ave. NW Seattle, WA 98107 (206) 789-7350, fax (206) 789-6392 www.48north.com

Publisher Northwest Maritime Center Managing Editor Joe Cline joe@48north.com Guest Editor Andy Cross Art Director Twozdai Hulse Advertising Sales Kachele Yelaca kachele@48north.com Advertising & Design Benjamin Harter benjamin@48north.com Contributing Editor Amanda Swan Neal Photographer Jan Anderson 48° North is published as a project of the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend, WA – a 501(c)3 non-profit organization whose mission is to engage and educate people of all generations in traditional and contemporary maritime life, in a spirit of adventure and discovery. Northwest Maritime Center: 431 Water St, Port Townsend, WA 98368 (360) 385-3628 48° North encourages letters, photographs, manuscripts, burgees, and bribes. Emailed manuscripts and high quality digital images are best, but submissions via mail or delivered in person are still most welcome! We are not responsible for unsolicited materials. Articles express the author’s thoughts and may not reflect the opinions of the magazine. Reprinting in whole or part is expressly forbidden except by permission from the editor.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES One year $25 | Two years $40 (US 3rd Class, not automatically forwarded)

1st Class in US $35 USD Canada Printed Matter $35 USD Over-Seas Foreign Air Mail $65 USD Proud members:

I’ll see you on the water! Joe Cline Editor, 48° North 48º NORTH

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SEPTEMBER 2019


www.nwyachtnet.com

The Northwest’s Premier Yacht Broker Network

Swantown Marina Office 700 Marine Dr. NE, Suite 105 Olympia, WA • 888-219-5485

Tacoma Waterfront Office 1717 Dock Street Tacoma, WA • 888-641-5901

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More Information on over 80 listings at www.NWYachtnet.com 75' Custom Schooner ‘87 $269,000

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SAILBOATS 75' Custom Schooner ‘87 ...... 269,000 $349,000 59' Schooner Pinky ‘90 ........... 99,000 58' Tayana CC ‘02 ................. 349,000 46' Hunter 466 ’02................139,000 43' Saga ‘98 .......................... 179,500 43' Hunter 430 ‘96.................. 94,000 42' Catalina Sloop ‘93............. 94,500 42' Catalina Sloop ‘90............. 95,000 $94,000 41' Morgan CC ‘87.................. 77,900 41' Morgan Giles ‘87............... 86,500 40' Beneteau Oceanis ‘95 ....... 74,700 38' German Frers IOR ‘82..........SOLD 38' Yankee ‘72......................... 38,900 36' Morgan Out Island ‘73 ........SOLD 36' Catalina Sloop ‘90............. 57,900 $77,900 36' Hunter Sloop ‘04............... 92,500 36' Islander Sloop ‘78.............. 39,000 35' Contest Sloop ‘81 .............. 49,500 35' Wauquiez Pre. ‘81............. 59,900 34' Catalina Sloop ‘88............. 39,500 34' Pacific Seacraft ’05 .......... 174,500 $92,500 34' X-Yacht X-342 ‘89 ...............SOLD 33' Hunter Sloop ‘08............... 69,000 33' Tripp Racing ‘92 ............... 24,900 32' Catalina 320 ‘94................ 49,900 32' Islander ‘77 ....................... 29,000 31' Cal ‘79 .............................. 24,500 30' Catalina Tall Rig ‘80........... 17,999 $49,500 30' Catalina Sloop ‘79............. 18,500 30' Catalina MKll ‘88 .............. 24,500 16' Doughdish 12.5 Sloop ’99...29,500 TRAWLERS 70' Monte Fino ‘96................ 749,000 70' Ocean Alex ‘17 ...................SOLD $229,000 54' Seaforth Trawler ’03.......$995,000 50' Grand Banks ‘70.............. 129,900 40' Willard LRC ‘83...................SOLD 32' Nordic Tug ‘08................. 229,000 29' Ranger Tug ‘11................. 193,900

Dealers for: New Fairway Yachts From 37'-72' Please call us for more information! 48º NORTH

Wauquiez Pilot Saloon Yachts From 42' to 58' 2018 PS 42 starting at $450,000

Linssen Dutch Steel Yachts Sedans, Aft Cabins, Pilot Houses 40' & 35' Sedans arriving in September!

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Wauquiez PS Yachts Linssen Steel Yachts Fairway Yachts SEPTEMBER 2019


08 All the Power You Need

Letters

Cruising Cuisine Tip: Farm Fresh Eggs

Hey Joe, Planning food for long cruises can be a challenge. We learned a new trick this year. Several people told us that farm fresh eggs will last several weeks without refrigeration if they have never been washed. Our daughter has a bunch of chickens and lots of extra eggs, so we asked for a few dozen unwashed eggs and put this to a test. If you have never handled unwashed eggs, it can be a little repulsive. Some of them are crusted with some of the other stuff that comes out of the chicken. But don’t wash them yet! Washing the eggs removes a natural protective coating that keeps the eggs from spoiling. Wash the eggs immediately before using them. They are easily cleaned with a small scrub brush and fresh water. Break each egg into a cup or saucer one at a time as an extra precaution. Farm fresh eggs can sometimes have some imperfections and you don’t want to drop a bad egg into an otherwise good omelet without inspecting it first.

Model Shown Beta 38

Engineered to be Serviced Easily!

Does it work? Yes! Our recent trip to Desolation Sound lasted almost six weeks, and we had fresh eggs every week during the entire trip, all from the batch we took with us from Olympia on the first day of the trip.

Beta Marine West (Distributor) 400 Harbor Dr, Sausalito, CA 94965 415-332-3507

Jim Larsen S/V Tya, Hunter 36

Pacific Northwest Dealer Network

Sea Marine Port Townsend, WA 360-385-4000 info@betamarinepnw.com www.betamarinepnw.com

Thank you for sharing so many inspiring articles. I am particularly fond of the recipes, which leave me salivating and dreaming of what life is like on a yacht. For the past 10 years, my dad and I get in quality father-daughter time each summer by cruising the Pacific Northwest on Sway, his Spencer 35, which is equipped with an icebox and single burner. For sailors with similar galleys, I’d like to share our go-to recipe when we go gunkholing around the Salish Sea.

Deer Harbor Boatworks Deer Harbor, WA 888-792-2382 customersupport@betamarinenw.com www.betamarinenw.com

WILD WEST COAST OATMEAL Ingredients: Oatmeal Whatever else you can find

Emerald Marine Anacortes, WA 360-293-4161 www.emeraldmarine.com

Instructions: Pre-cook oatmeal in your home kitchen. Store in container in the boat’s icebox. When hungry, remove cold oatmeal and eat from container. If it doesn’t taste satisfactory, then wait until you’re more hungry. If you are feeling fancy, row ashore in your dinghy and forage for salmon

Oregon Marine Industries Portland, OR 503-702-0123 omi@integra.net Access Marine Seattle, WA 206-819-2439 info@betamarineengines.com www.betamarineengines.com 48º NORTH

WILD WEST COAST OATMEAL

Hi Joe, staff, and contributing writers,

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SEPTEMBER 2019


MARINE SERVICENTER

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2020 Lagoon 42: $649,854 - SAVE $10,500 Aft mast w/ big self tacking jib, Code 0 & more!

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49' Trans Pac 49 ’86.............$169,000

46' Jeanneau 469 ’15...$349,000

45' Jeanneau 45 DS ’08...$254,000

45' Jeanneau SO ’06...$209,995

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61' C&C ‘72 ................... $164,000

2020 Jeanneau 349 #74670: $189,956 Square-top main, twin rudders. SAVE $15,394 g

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36' Pearson 36 ‘75................$17,500

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35' Trident Voyager ’78..........$59,500

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Anacortes Sales Office 360.293.9521

29' Island Packet 29 ’91.........$59,900

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48º NORTH 9 info@marinesc.com | www.marinesc.com

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38' Hans Christian MK ’80.....$76,000

40' Schucker 436 ’77.............$54,900 d

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40' Beneteau 40 ’11.....$164,900 u

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40' Nauticat PH ‘85.....$139,000

41' Island Packet Cruiser ’09....$274,500 41' Island Packet Cruiser ’07....$299,000

42' SK 42 ’06.......................$124,500

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43' Wauquiez Amphitrite ‘84...$132,500

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44' Bruce Roberts 44 ‘80.....$65,000

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47' Vagabond Ketch ‘83...$184,000

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41' Passport 41 ‘89 ..... $149,900 62' Lagoon 620 ‘20.....Arriving SOLD 51' Alden Skye ‘80..............$139,500 49' Jeanneau 49p ‘07 .........$349,500 46' Lagoon 46 ‘20.......Arriving SOLD 44' Spencer 44 ‘73...............$40,000 44' Bruce Roberts PH ‘93 .....$38,500 44' Jeanneau 440 ‘20....Arrived SOLD 41' Cheoy Lee ‘80.........Sale Pending 41' Jeanneau 410 ‘20..Arriving SOLD 40' Jeanneau 409 ‘13................SOLD 40' Lagoon 40 ‘19.....................SOLD 39' Jeanneau 39i ‘07.................SOLD 37' Truant 37 ‘80 ..................$39,000 36' Sweden 36 ‘85 .................. SOLD 36' Cape George PH ‘77...Sale Pending 36' Tanton 36 ‘81 .................$17,000 35' Nauticat PH ‘00.......Sale Pending 34' Columbia 34 ‘72.............$27,000 34' Jeanneau 349 ‘20.....3 Arrived Sold 34' KMV Grambling 34 ‘74 ...$24,900 32' Jeanneau SF 3200 ‘20...........SOLD 31' Catalina 310 ‘01...................SOLD 20' Laser SB3 ‘08..................$19,500

Jeff Carson

Jim Rard

Patrick Harrigan

SEPTEMBER 2019


10

Letters

berries, blackberries, and/or sea asparagus. Grab a blade of bull kelp while you’re at it and cut into bite-sized pieces. Light the Bunsen burner and heat up oatmeal in the only pot you have on the boat. Garnish with whatever toppings you could find. Serve in the same pot with two spoons so you have fewer dishes to hand wash. Enjoy! This dish is delicious and nutritious; and cheaper than high-end restaurants that charge an arm and a leg for a meal sprinkled with the same coastal delicacies! Kailee Douglas S/V Sway, Sooke, BC

Good Reading in the South Pacific Hi Joe, The magazine is looking terrific! We really enjoyed the Alaska Issue, and it got passed around the South Pacific cruising community. The image below shows 48° North fans, Walter and Beth from Gig Harbor, at Niue Yacht Club. They sailed with us from Rarotonga to Samoa.

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Happy reading, happy sailing, Amanda Swan Neal

Date Correction for Northwest Harvest Race September 21, not September 14 Hi Joe, The 2019 SARC calendar is correct & lists the race date as September 21. But the calendar in the recent issue of 48° North has Seattle Singles Yacht Club’s NW Harvest Benefit race on the incorrect (September 14, instead of the 21). Please correct the date for the September issue. Thank you, Sue Weiss, Race Committee SSYC

™ ™

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Calendar

R = Race

August 2019

14

30-1 E Victoria Classic Boat Festival Presented by the Maritime Museum of BC, this is the 42nd annual festival in the Victoria Inner Harbor. www.mmbc.bc.ca

R J & J Race Presented by Sloop Tavern Yacht Club. www.styc.org

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R Pink Boat Regatta - Tacoma Presented by Pink Boat regatta. www.pinkboatregatta.org/tacoma

31-1 R PITCH Presented by Bellingham Yacht Club. www.byc.org

14-15 R CRASH Regatta (VIRS 11) Presented by Sidney North Saanich. Yacht Club, www.snsyc.ca

31-1 R Maple Bay Regatta (VIRS 10) Presented by Maple Bay Yacht Club. www.mbyc.bc.ca

14-15 R Howe Sound Regatta (VARC) Presented by Royal Vancouver Yacht Club, www.royalvan.com

31-2 E Puget Sound Cruising Club Rendezvous in Quartermaster Harbor, No RSVP Needed, no telling what kind of sea creatures you may find. www.pugetsoundcruisingclub.org

14-15 R One Design Championships Presented by West Vancouver Yacht Club, www.wvyc.ca

31-2 E British Columbia Multihull Society 50th Anniversary Celebration, A big time in Port Browning, there will be shore-side activities, some fun racing (no rules, no protests) in Plumper Sound, and an epic multihull raft-up. www.pugetsoundcruisingclub.org

14-23 C Captain’s License Class, Sequim Contact American Marine Training Center, www.americanmarinetc.com 20

E “Not A Yacht Club” Night Presented by Puget Sound Cruising Club. Kicking off the season of regular meetings and presentations is an “Open Mic Night” for members and attendees to share their favorite destinations, locally and abroad. www.pugetsoundcruisingclub.org

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R NW Harvest Benefit Race Presented by Seattle Singles Yacht Club. NOTE this date is correct, it was mis-printed last month. Proceeds go to benefit Northwest Harvest Food Bank. www.seattlesinglesyc.org

September 2019 2-5

E Deer Harbor Wooden Boat Rendezvous, presented by the Wooden Boat Society of the San Juan Islands, with rowing and sailing races, potlucks, music, and a BBQ in Deer Harbor on Orcas Island. www.woodenboatsocietyofthesanjuans.org

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E NW Multihull Sailing Photos Presentation, members share photos or recent sailing adventures, favorite destinations, or boat builds or refits. Potluck at 6:30, presentation at 7:30. At Puget Sound Yacht Club, 2321 N. Northlake Way, Seattle. www.nwmultihull.org E Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival Bring your wooden boat, volunteer, or join the hoards who live for this weekend! www.nwmaritime.org

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R Pink Boat Regatta - Seattle Presented by Elliott Bay Marina. www.pinkboatregatta.org

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R Fall Regatta Presented by the Milltown Sailing Association. www.milltownsailing.org

9-19 C Captain’s License Class, Tacoma Contact Flagship Maritime. www.flagshipmaritimellc.com 12-15 E Boats Afloat Show Lake Union It’s the 41st annual edition of the West Coast’s largest floating boat show. Find a boat for every budget; or enjoy free sailing or power boat rides, seminars, and women’s docking classes. www.boatsafloatshow.com 14

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E 48° North/Fisheries Supply Swap Meet, One of the biggest and best swap meets in the country. 7:00am - 1:00pm at Fisheries Supply, N. Northlake Way, Seattle, WA. (206) 632-3555 R TransPuget Race Presented by Shilshole Bay Yacht Club. Proceeds go to benefit Footloose Sailing Association, the Northwest’s premiere sailing program for people with disabilities. www.shilshole-bayyc.org

48º NORTH

21-22 R Dale Jepsen One Design Regatta Presented by Bellingham Yacht Club www.byc.org 21-22 R All-Women’s NWISA High School Regatta and VOLUNTEER Opportunity Olympia Yacht Club presents this allwomen sailing event. The organizers are looking for an all-women Race Committee. If interested, email oychighschoolsailing@gmail.com 21-1 E 48° North/NW Maritime Center Flotilla in Croatia, The trip is presently sold out. Keep your eyes out for more fun international travel in the future! www.nwmaritime.org/croatia-flotilla/ 28

R Rum Run Presented by the fun-loving Duck Dodge crew, this race sends participants in a triangle course and finishes with a Raft up in Port Madison. www.duckdodge.org

28-29 R Port Ludlow Double Dipper Race A NEW double-handed fun race, presented by Seattle Yacht Club. www.seattleyachtclub.org 28-29 R Around Bainbridge Island Race Presented by Port Madison Yacht Club, this race provides fun sailing, along with a mid-way overnight stop in Bremerton, where there’ll be a BBQ and a beer keg. www.portmadisonyachtclub. wildapricot.org 28-29 R Tequila “Race” Presented by Puget Sound Cruising Club, this fun race tradition involves no ratings and a host of hilarious and odd rules. This year, it’s headed for Port Ludlow. www.pugetsoundcruisingclub.org

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C = Class

t = Talks

E = Event

28-29 E S’Ale Fest Presented by Anacortes Yacht Club. Sailing and beer, what’s not to like? www.anacortesyachtclub.org 28-29 E Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival Produced and hosted by the Center for Wooden Boats, with music, vendors, activities, and, of course, BOATS! www.cwb.org 28-29 C America’s Boating Course, Poulsbo Get your Washington State Boater’s Card, which is required for all boaters born after April 1, 1955. Also, learn about safe operation of boats on the water. 9:00am at Poulsbo Yacht Club, 18129 Fjord Drive NE, Poulsbo. Please pre-register, www.abcpoulsbo.com

October 2019 3 t We, the Voyagers, Our Moana

Presented by NW Multihull Association. This event features Mimi George, Captain Luke Vaikawi, and Meph Wyeth from vaka.org. Potluck at 6:30, presentation at 7:30. At Puget Sound Yacht Club. www.nwmultihull.org

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R Foulweather Bluff Race Presented by Corinthian Yacht Club of Edmonds, www.cycedmonds.org

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R Benson Cup Presented by Orcas Island Yacht Club. www.oiyc.org

5-6

R Puget Sound Sailing Championship, Small Boats, Presented by Corinthian Yacht Club of Seattle. www.cycseattle.org

5-6

R Scott Cline Memorial Regatta Presented by the Oak Harbor Yacht Club. www.ohyc.org

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C Handsewing Skills of the Ditty Bag The Artful Sailor Whole Earth Nautical Supply present a one day workshop on basic palm and needle canvas work. At The Artful Sailor in Port Townsend. www.theartfulsailor.com

12-13 R Puget Sound Sailing Championship, Large Boats, Presented by Corinthian Yacht Club of Seattle www.cycseattle.org 12-21 C Captain’s License Class, Sequim Contact American Marine Training Center, www.americanmarinetc.com 21-31 C Captain’s License Class, Tacoma Contact Flagship Maritime, www.flagshipmaritimellc.com 25-27 R Grand Prix Regatta Presented by the Seattle Yacht Club. By qualification or one-design, it’s always a great event. Buoy and distance racing courses, and the best competition and camaraderie around. www.seattleyachtclub.org

November 2019 9-10 R Round the County Presented by Orcas Island Yacht Club and Friday Harbor Sailing Club. Always one of the year’s most anticipated events. This year, the race is counterclockwise, but as always, begins off of Lydia Shoal and stops overnight in Roche Harbor. www.roundthecounty.com SEPTEMBER 2019


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low tides

News & Events

41st Annual Lake Union Boats Afloat Show September 12-15, 2019

43rd Annual Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival September 6-8, 2019 From schooners to paddleboards, and everything in between... Every year, more than 300 wooden boats of all shapes and sizes gather in Port Townsend for North America’s largest wooden boat festival. With special demonstrations, presentations, plays, music, dancing, and no shortage of great food, the Wooden Boat Festival is a weekend of endless fun for all ages. In addition to the array of boats, a group of more than 100 presenters from all around the world will share their grand adventures, impressive talents, and expertise on four indoor stages and four outdoor stages. All of this is tied together by a steady stream of live music, drinks, artisan food, and the unbelievable scenery of the Salish Sea. 2019 HIGHLIGHTS: • Japanese boat building will be a central theme: exhibits and experts will share this rich and unique tradition. • Legendary sailor and author of 12 books—Lin Pardey—will present on how to live your best life on the high seas. • Modern boat adventure lovers, Theresa and Ben Carey, will share their experiences and feature film: One Simple Question • Ziska, a restored wooden boat that recently completed the R2AK, will be present along with captain Stanford Siver. www.woodenboat.org

The 41st annual Lake Union Boats Afloat Show, the West Coast’s largest floating boat show, gets underway on South Lake Union in September. For the newbie looking to get into boating, or the boater just back from a summer of cruising and lusting after a bigger boat, Boats Afloat is the place to kick some anchors. Tour more than 225 new and used boats on display and explore 40 shore side exhibitors with professional services from marine finance and insurance to electronics, marinas, shipping, accessories, gear and yacht maintenance. Additional attractions include free family boat rides, kids sailing lessons, toy boat building, and women’s docking clinics. BOATS OF NOTE: Making a West Coast debut is the Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 410. Named “2019 Boat of the Year - Best Midsize Cruiser” by Cruising World Magazine, she features Jeanneau’s “walk around” side decks, a skow bow full chine hull, and a twocabin, one-head interior. – Displayed by Marine Servicenter The Beneteau Oceanis 51.1 boasts taut lines, a new stepped hull, and a stylish deck plan. Below decks is a three-cabin, twohead layout with a master stateroom with split shower/head compartments forward. – Displayed by Signature Yachts www.boatsafloatshow.com

48° North/Fisheries Supply Swap Meet September 14, 2019 Back, as always, by popular demand, the twice annual extravaganza of deals and boat goodies. It’s time again to get that box of stuff out of the garage, empty the lazarette and head to the 48° North Boater’s Swap Meet. Hundreds, even thousands, of your fellow boaters will be there selling those items that you’ve been yearning for but couldn’t find, and buying those items you’ve stored forever. It’s a bargain hunter’s paradise. And it’s FREE! Get there early, stay a while, and leave better outfitted (or better offloaded) than you’ve been in years. Fisheries Supply is more than a host, they're a participant too! 48º NORTH

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Fisheries Supply Mariner’s Square Parking Lot (across from, but not in, Gasworks Park) 1900 N. Northlake Way, Seattle, WA, 98103 7:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. (206) 632-3555

SEPTEMBER 2019


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SEPTEMBER 2019


low tides >>

Product News

FURUNO FM4800 VHF RADIO WITH AIS, GPS AND DSC If you’re in the market for an all-in-one VHF that won’t break the bank, the Furuno FM4800 might be the VHF/AIS receiver that you’ve been looking for. Featuring a commercial grade 25W VHF with an integrated AIS receiver, it comes in a compact housing that enables it to be installed in a variety of vessels, even where space is limited. With its built-in 72 Channel GPS receiver, the FM4800 does not require an external GPS to enable its DSC function and can be used as a backup source of GPS positioning for other onboard electronics. DSC calling can be easily initiated by tapping a connected TZtouch2 multifunction display AIS/DSC target and selecting “DSC Call”, and the system’s MOB can also be activated via the TZtouch2 MFD. The unit's NMEA0183 and NMEA2000 connectivity make it easy to network with an array of different devices and the internal AIS receiver can be used to display and overlay AIS targets when networked with GPS Plotters or MFDs. The FM4800 can also act as a 15W PA/loud hailer with intercom that features eight different alert sounds, and is waterproof to an IP68 standard, which means it can withstand full immersion for over 30 minutes. Retail: $695. Find out more at furunousa.com

CLARION CMS4 “BLACK BOX” DIGITAL MEDIA RECEIVER For many sailors, having the ability to play music onboard is a must. And with most music being played wirelessly through Bluetooth devices, long gone are the days of the old boat CD player. Knowing full well that most boaters stow music in their phone or on other portable devices, Clarion’s CMS4 marine digital media receiver is like a source unit and a multimedia hub all in one. The compact package includes a 3.5-inch color LCD controller that gets mounted on your electronics panel or helm station, along with a hideaway “black box” that can be installed out of sight, making it perfect for smaller vessels. The CMS4’s hideaway box contains a built-in global AM/FM/Weather Band tuner, plus a USB port for your iPhone, an auxiliary input, and a camera input. Built-in Bluetooth gives you hands-free calling, interactive Pandora radio and music streaming with just about any phone. NMEA 2000 connectivity requires an optional MW6 module and the SiriusXM Satellite Radio Ready requires an optional tuner. Retail: $549.99. Find out more at ClarionMarineSystems.com

DOMETIC PLB40 PORTABLE LITHIUM BATTERY When we recently saw this new portable lithium battery pack from Dometic, we thought, “That would be perfect for small boat cruisers, R2AK adventurers, or weekenders with a limited battery bank.” Powered by LiFePO4 battery cells, the rugged design is made to withstand harsh environments yet is remarkably lightweight. Chargeable by solar panel, AC power, or via 12 V socket, two USB ports and two 12 V DC sockets allow for numerous devices to be charged simultaneously. And with 40Ah of power, it is more than capable of keeping phones, tablets and other electronics topped up, and is specifically designed to run the Dometic CFX and other powered coolers. Also, a user-friendly, integrated LCD display allows the user to monitor battery capacity, charging/ discharging status and output status. Retail: $849.99 at Dometic.com

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SEPTEMBER 2019


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SEPTEMBER 2019


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DID YOU KNOW? by Bryan Henry

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George Washington once owned a fishery on the Potomac River, shipping fish along the Atlantic seaboard.

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John F. Kennedy was an avid sailor and owned two sailboats while in office: his elegant 62’ Sparkman and Stephens design, Manitou; and a 25’ Wianno Senior gaff-rigged sloop that he had owned since he was 15, Victura.

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Joseph P. Kennedy, father of John F. Kennedy, was once a shipbuilder and in 1937 became the first chairman of the United States Maritime Commission.

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27 Christmas song 29 Paddled 31 Wide open space 33 Late evening time

Solution on page 58

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Jimmy Carter served as an engineering officer on America’s second nuclear submarine, the Sea Wolf.

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Charles Joseph Bonaparte, a grandson of 1 Secure a line to a cleat with a Down Napoleon’s younger brother, Jerome, served hitch, 2 words as Secretary of the Navy under President 2 Line leading from the 1 Secure a line to a cleat with a hitch, 2 words Theodore Roosevelt. temporary tack of the 2 Line leading from the temporary tack of the spinnaker sail spinnaker Theodore sail Roosevelt became the first president 3 San Juan ____ to travel abroad while in office when he sailed 4 Rolled out, as a flag 3 San Juan ____ on the USS Louisiana to Panama in November passengers an 5 Tidal in motion 4 Rolled out,1907. as a flag 6 _____ boat, hired for exclusive use 5 Tidal motion Theodore Roosevelt became the first 7 Puts up president to submerge in a submarine, in New _____ boat, hired Connecticut, for exclusiveinuse 11 Barricades on the edge 6of the London, 1905. deck 7 Puts up 13 Activity center Franklin D. Roosevelt was an avid fisherman, 16 Cut in two 11 Barricadesand onspent the edge the deck timeof fishing in the Florida Keys. 19 Hang 13 Activity center 21 Modern navigation system, Ancestors of Franklin D. Roosevelt owned abbr. 16 Cut in twoclipper ships and were involved in the Chinese opium trade in the mid-to-late 19th century. 22 Apple state 19 Hang 23 Helmsman for a boat racing George H. system, W. Bush abbr. was an avid flyfisherman, 21 Modern navigation sails crew and especially liked fishing for bonefish. 24 A in radio talk 22 Apple state 25 Openings to allow fresh air to trout, circulate below 23 HelmsmanThe for aRoosevelt boat racing crewfound in rivers in northern California, was named for Theodore 26 Moves up and down, like a buoy in 1910. 24 A in radioRoosevelt, talk 28 "The Hunt for ___ October" 30 Equip with sails and a25 mast Openings to allow fresh air to circulate below 32 Visit

1 Brightness of a star Across 6 Finishing piece 1 Brightness 8 Small island of a star 9  Small sturdy boats to save 6 Finishing piece passengers in an emergency 8 Small island 10 A long way 12 Direction 9 Small sturdy boats to save 14 Thanks, for short emergency 15 Function long wayfor example 10 17 A Spinnakers, 18 Sets off on a voyage 12 Direction 20 Not on the level for short 14 23 Thanks, Material used for making sails 15 27 Function Christmas song 29 Paddled for example 17 31 Spinnakers, Wide open space 18 33 Sets Late evening time off on a voyage 34 Communicates by hand onasthe level 20 35 Not Lifted, a flag

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Eleven years before becoming president, Abraham Lincoln became the only president granted a patent. He was granted patent number 6,469 for a “manner of buoying vessels”. His device never became practical, however, and obviously his career took him in other directions.

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Artist View

Sketches and story by Larry Eifert

These birds pretty much only nest on ONE island off Baja— Isla Rasa—with a couple of smaller colonies nearby. So, of the 150,000 or so pairs, 90% of this species are born on one very vulnerable island in the Sea of Cortez that is basically a rock and a couple of lagoons southeast of Bahia de los Ángeles. It’s not much of a place for an entire species to call home, but it somehow works. Because all birds are in one place, the Heermann’s gull is listed as possibly threatened. After nesting and when it gets so hot even the cruisers leave, these birds head west over the mountains to the cooler and foggier west coast. Eventually, a few work their way north to see us. Some go as far as British Columbia. Then when winter closes in, they begin the return journey to Isla Rasa. You might pause and compare these birds with another species that lives on ONE small rock. Us!

Most Salish Sea gulls are only one species, the glaucouswinged gull, a big gray-to-brown bird. Glaucous means dull gray. However, there are many other types of gulls around our waters; and in late summer and fall, we commonly see Heermann’s gulls. They’re worth watching, with dramatic white or gray clothes. It’s unlikely to be confused with any other gull species as it’s the only white-headed gray-bodied gull on the West Coast with a bright red beak. Like most other gulls, the Heermann’s take several years to grow their final dark and white plumage. They go from dark sooty brown the first year, then to a lighter shade the second, and finally full-on white and dark the third year when they’re ready to breed. This is a medium-sized gull, about the size of a crow. Still, it’s big enough that they can steal food from brown pelicans, around whom Heermann’s gulls can often be found.

Larry Eifert paints and writes about the Pacific Northwest from Port Townsend. His large-scale murals can be seen in many national parks across America, and at larryeifert.com 48º NORTH

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SEPTEMBER 2019


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Halcyon Wandering

I AM A SAILOR

by Becca Guillote Becca and John Guillote are young Seattle-based cruisers exploring the world aboard their Valiant 40, Halcyon. In the last few months, they made passage to far side of the Pacific, where they are now actively and enviably adventuring.

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hen I learned that this edition had a thematic focus on “women on the water”, I assumed this would be the easiest article to write yet. After all, I am a woman on the water every day. Anything I write would be relevant, wouldn’t it? But as I sat down to form the words on the page, I was at a loss. What, exactly, should I write about? What is my perspective, as a woman? How is my experience different from that of a man’s? After discussing my dilemma with a few cruising friends, I realized the root of my struggle. I do not want to be defined as a woman who sails; I am a sailor who happens to be a woman. There is a big difference. I do not want my abilities or my limitations to be delineated according only to my female-ness, and I am conscious not to use my female-ness as an excuse to get out of dirty work or heavy lifting. It is not that I am ashamed of being a woman; far from it, in fact. It is just that being a woman does not describe my abilities as a sailor. Being a sailor does. Among the cruising couples we meet, there are many who have imbalanced responsibilities, knowledge, and confidence onboard. Often, “she” has tagged along on “his” dream and finds her contributions limited to food preparation and cleaning. She lacks the desire or sometimes the self-assurance to learn the ropes and participate on the boat. While this works well for some couples, many others feel the weight of this inequality.

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He carries the full burden for keeping the boat running, while she feels dependent on him and somewhat powerless. The best advice I can offer couples in this position is for the less knowledgeable partner to branch out and learn how to sail from someone else. Find a safe environment to build skills and confidence without the more knowledgeable partner nearby. Learning from your partner, while seemingly the easy route, often magnifies an already tangible power and experience imbalance, and can end poorly. In retrospect, I was fortunate in this regard because my husband, John, and I learned to sail at the same time. Both of us joined the racing community in Puget Sound and learned to sail while sprinting (or sometimes drifting) between West Point and Meadow Point every Monday night of the summer. This kept us on an even playing field. We learned on the same boat but in very different roles. John spent his time staring up at the mainsail, making tiny adjustments until the boat felt just right, while I scampered about on the bow hoisting spinnakers and keeping the lines running free. In this manner, we gained different perspectives of the same maneuvers, a very advantageous setup for a cruising couple. John and I are co-captains aboard Halcyon. We have the same level of experience, so why would one of us always make the final decision? We share the responsibilities of maintenance

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I often learn something new, and that feeling of success­—the pride in myself for figuring it out—is always worth the dirty fingernails. and troubleshooting, of cleaning and cooking, of reading the weather and researching where to go next. It feels natural for us to share these tasks, but co-captaincy is rare among the cruising couples we meet. One reason it works on Halcyon is that each of us has always been driven to build the comprehensive knowledge and skill necessary to operate the boat without assistance. With this breadth of proficiency, we have complete trust in each other’s abilities. I want to understand every system, think through every problem, and trim the sails for every condition. I feel that need because I am a sailor, and that is what is required of a sailor. In some areas, such as reading weather or rebuilding plumbing, this knowledge has come relatively easily. But in other areas, particularly in the engine room, it has been a long learning curve. John is significantly more mechanically-inclined than I am. He grew up around diesel engines and power tools, while I had never changed the oil in anything before owning Halcyon. It is innately easier for him to diagnose issues and fix problems in the engine room. But that does not mean I sit back and let him do it. I often elbow him out of the way and climb into the engine room myself to literally get my hands dirty. For many years, once crouched in the tight space, I would then stare at the foreign hunk of metal with tubes and wires sticking out of it, completely overwhelmed; but over time, I became more familiar with how that big hunk of metal worked and where it leaked and which bits were likely to fail. Now, I can change out filters, check oil levels, detect a sound or smell that isn’t quite right and diagnose what it is. I don’t do it as easily or quickly as John perhaps, but I can—and do—do it. My advice to the less mechanically-inclined half of a sailing partnership is to just stick with it. Read books and watch others and then snuggle up to that engine and start tinkering. Even on the days when I really don’t want to get sweaty and splattered with engine oil, when it feels like I will never be strong enough to wrench that bolt on tight enough, I dig deep for a little extra perseverance and keep at it. I am always glad I did. I often learn something new and that feeling of success – the pride in myself for figuring it out – is always worth the dirty fingernails. Of course, there are times I lose confidence and feel completely overwhelmed and incapable. I mess up a few times or fail to notice something that in retrospect seems obvious. A few of these little mistakes in a row and I start to question my own abilities. I wonder if I am strong enough or smart enough to get the job done, to be out here sailing the world. In the moment, it feels imbalanced, like everyone around me is more capable than I am. But they are not. I often have to remind myself that everyone has insecurities, everyone questions their own strengths from time to time. 48º NORTH

Out here, we are all at the mercy of the wind, waves and corrosion. Sailing humbles even the saltiest of sailors. It tests our grit and determination, it pushes our patience and skills. So, I know I am not incapable or inferior; far from it. I am a sailor, who happens to be a woman, and I am damn proud to be both.

Becca and John are cruising near Avatoru, which is the chief town in Rangaroa. Follow their adventures at www.halcyonwandering.com 21

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September Galley Essentials

by Amanda Swan Neal

TROPICAL ISLAND Amanda, Parua and coconut crabs

DELIGHTS & DIFFICULTIES

Riding into a strong easterly wind, a large southerly swell is causing us to roll about so much that last night I ended up sleeping athwartships in the main saloon. There’s not a speck of sand to be found on the sea floor in this area—only hard, flat coral—so every now and then when a large set of rollers arrive, Mahina Tiare shoots forward, dragging the chain under a coral head after which it snaps up short, causing a large jerk. A safe moorage is often the conundrum here in of our homeport of Rarotonga, in the Cook Islands. We love it, but it’s one of the most challenging places to moor between expeditions. The only harbor of Avatiu, located on the north coast, is currently incredibly windy and surgie; hence we’ve taken shelter in the lee of the island. It’s possible to get ashore through a shallow channel dredged through the coral, so this morning we took a respite from the rolling and visited the local church to hear the unique, powerful singing and admire the ladies in their white finery that includes wonderful hats woven from young coconut leaves. Thankfully, the wind and seas are forecast to decrease soon, but in the meantime I’m reminiscing about the tranquil conditions of our previous island home. A week ago we arrived at Mopelia, a tiny atoll 130 miles west-southwest of Bora Bora in French Polynesia, laden with supplies. A 100-pound sack of flour had been wedged between the V-berth, 120-pounds of rice was stuffed into the forward shower, while box after box of supplies filled both showers and our crew's hanging lockers. This surplus left the dog food cans sitting on the bunk room floor, a plastic drum of green mangoes 48º NORTH

lashed to the granny bars, and a sack of pamplemousse lashed to the stern pulpit. Within a few minutes of entering the pass and anchoring off the northern village, we’d swiftly sorted through the supplies before lowering them into our friend Marcello’s waiting skiff. Knowing that we also had goods to deliver to the other eight people living three miles away in the southeast village, Marcello invited us to return the following afternoon for a barbecue. After crossing the lagoon, Teraitua and Parua arrived to collect their packages and invite us to a beach barbecue that evening. Since the sun goes down quickly in the tropics, Parua suggested we visit ashore mid-afternoon. He eagerly showed us his small garden and pet coconut crabs that he keeps in plastic barrels, feeding and watering them daily for months until they’re needed. With swift skill, he then husked and grated numerous coconuts making a killer curried coconut sauce to accompany the crabs. Meanwhile, Tera kept us supplied with young drinking coconuts while tending the fire that held boiling pots of lobsters he’d caught to add to Parua’s coconut crabs. As the sun set behind the outer reef, a full moon rose slowly above the palm trees spreading a magical light on our beach gathering. Our dear friend, Hina, joined us and instantly trounced our crew member, Falko, at several games of chess— to his amazement. I contributed chicken cacciatore, curry and naan to the feast, and John had baked brownies...it’s best to bring Hina chocolate if you wish a warm welcome. Hina was soon strumming away on her ukelele and on familiar tunes we all joined in singing. 22

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NANN BREAD 2 cups plain flour 2 teaspoon sugar ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon baking powder ½ cup milk 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 garlic cloves - minced handful of coriander - chopped knob of butter - melted In a bowl, mix together flour, sugar, salt and baking powder. Make a well and add milk and oil. Slowly mix the ingredients together to form dough. Tip out onto a floured surface and knead 10 minutes. Place dough in an oiled bowl, cover with saran wrap and leave 30 minutes. Preheat grill to medium-high and place a baking sheet under to heat. Divide dough into five balls, roll out into thin circles, scatter with garlic and coriander and gently roll over again to press them down. Grill three minutes, until golden. Brush with butter and serve.

In a large bowl, mix together 1 tablespoon oil, 1 tablespoon garlic, zest, chili, thyme and shrimp. Season to taste, marinate 30 minutes, then grill shrimp. Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan heat stock and keep warm over low heat. In a large skillet heat remaining oil and sauté onion and remaining garlic five minutes. Add rice and stir until coated and opaque. Stir in wine and cook until nearly evaporated. Add 1 cup of broth bring to a simmer and stir until liquid is

absorbed. Continue adding both, 1 cup at a time, until risotto is creamy but slightly firm; about 20 minutes. Stir in Parmesan, seasoning to taste, add shrimp and garnish with scallions. Serves 4.

Amanda is currently sailing from Fiji to Vanuatu then on to the remote Banks Islands. To see if she gets to share laplap with village friends sail to www.mahina.com

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SEPTEMBER 2019


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How-to

by Alex and Jack Wilken This month, we will look at how we can generate power away from the dock, which begs the question: At what point do you need a generator? And if you do, how big of a generator do you need? The answer to these questions depends on various factors particular to your boat and how you use it. Everything affects everything, of course, but therein lies the road to madness. So, let us go over the factors and options and try to break them down into manageable parts. A reminder of electrical terms: Watts = total power used = amps x volts. A 1500 watt heater at 120 volts is a 12.5 amp draw. AC = alternating current = electricity that is easier to conduct over distance, also easier to generate. DC = direct current = electricity that can be stored and is used to power most electronics. Amp hours = how many amps a battery stores at a given voltage. Watt hours = amp hours x voltage. A 100 amp hour 12 volt battery = 1200 watt hours. GENERATORS EXPLAINED The goal of any generator is to generate electricity from fuel. The reason generators are still a viable addition to a cruising boat is because it is still more efficient to store a great deal of fuel on a boat than a great deal of electrical power in a battery bank. Most cruising boats that use a generator are set-up to burn the diesel that’s in their fuel tanks; however, you could use a portable gasoline generator if you have a safe place to store it and the fuel. If you’re thinking about a generator, you will have some options to consider. First, let us note that a generator is only efficient when fully 48º NORTH

What About a Generator?

loaded. If you have a 5 KW (Kilowatt) generator and you are only using 1.5 KW, it is not good for the generator and it uses almost as much fuel as when it is fully loaded. Generators, like electric motors, have a continuous and a peak KW rating. The peak rating can be as much as twice the continuous rating, depending on the make and model of the generator. So, while you do want the generator to be fully loaded, if you size the generator to the maximum possible load, you will probably not be able to load it sufficiently during long run times. The battery chargers (more on those in a moment) will demand a lot of power initially, then taper off as the batteries fill. To determine the size of generator that would fit your needs, first calculate the total power demand for your planned run time, and then size the generator so it is not over or under loaded. Example: A 50 amp 12 volt charger running for an hour consumes 600 watts, but battery chargers are between 50% and 85% efficient. Let’s assume 50% efficient in this case, which means this charger will draw 1200 watts in that hour. A 2 KW generator should cover the demand easily with power to spare. Different generator models can produce either AC or DC current. If all the big loads are DC, like battery charging or a DC-powered watermaker, you can go with a DC (Figure 2) instead of an AC generator for better efficiency. In that case, you don’t need to worry about battery chargers, just a good regulator for the alternator. DC generators normally cost more than AC generators, but it can be hard to find a small AC generator. If you have a lot of AC loads that you want the generator to run, then 24

an AC generator would be the best option. Mase has the smallest AC diesel marine generator we know of, at 2 KW continuous. Most AC diesel generators start at 5 KW which is a lot of power, unless you are running air conditioning and/or a lot of electrical appliances. Aquamarine Inc. makes a 2 KW DC generator in 12 or 24 volt. Polar Power makes a range of DC generators. Fisher Panda and Whisper Power have a range of AC and DC generators, and Northern Lights carries a series of AC generators. Almost all of these are 5 KW or bigger. BATTERY CHARGERS Charging the batteries is one of the most important things a generator can do, and the proper battery charger is an important part of this function with an AC generator. The battery chargers should be big enough to fully charge the batteries during the planned run time. Normally, a charger needs to have an output of at least 10-20% of the capacity of the battery bank. If you only plan to run the generator for an hour a day, you could probably use a charger with an output of the max charge rate for the bank. LiFePo4 batteries normally can be charged at 100% of their capacity; whereas an AGM can be charged at 40%, gel at 30%, and flooded at 25%. Individual batteries can vary, so check with the manufacturer. We covered battery chargers more in depth in our article “Choosing and Mounting a Battery Charger” from the October 2011 issue of 48° North. OTHER CHARGE SOURCES Of course, a generator is not the only way to generate power away from the dock. Most commonly, an enginedriven alternator off the main engine SEPTEMBER 2019


refills your battery bank. Renewable energy sources like solar panels or a wind generator may contribute greatly to this process too. If these combinations reasonably cover all of your power needs, you don’t need a generator. We discussed these charging sources in our November 2016 article – “Understanding Alternative Energy Sources”. Refilling the batteries is not simply a matter of amps out and amps in. As we mentioned last month, almost all lead acid batteries will “sulfate up” if not fully charged for long enough, and this will reduce the batteries’ performance and life. Unfortunately, fully charging lead acid batteries can take as much as 16 hours (Figure 1). Fortunately, the later portion of that 16-hour window requires much less amp current, much less total watts. Modern three-stage charging is broken down into bulk charging, absorption charging, and float charging (Figure 1). Bulk charging fills the batteries up to 70% of their capacity. Absorption charging then lowers the amperage

as the battery fills to near capacity. Float charging then fills up the last of the capacity and then maintains it to compensate for normal battery self discharge. All this means that, unless you wish to run your generator for at least 10 if not 16 hours every time you want to charge them, you need to have enough charging capacity from other sources to take care of at least absorption charging. Solar alone will have a hard time fulfilling this role, since it will only be contributing a significant amount of power for about five hours a day, if all goes well. With this in mind, if you have solar and need to supplement it with other charging such as a generator or an alternator off the main engine, it is best to do so first thing in the morning before the solar panels start really charging (typically around 11:00 a.m.). If the panels have enough output, they may be able to fill the batteries the rest of the way, completing a bit of the absorption or float charging.

Figure 1: This chart shows the charge voltage and amperage current for charging a 2 volt cell. A 12 volt battery would have 6 of these cells. In this chart they refer to bulk charging as ‘constant current charge’, absorption charging as ‘topping charge’, and float charge as ‘float charge’. This cell can be charged in 12 hours. Other cells can take up to 16 hours. 48º NORTH

Life is governed by three simple directives: 1. Seek pleasure 2. Avoid pain 3. Expend as little energy as possible. In other words, we all want to do more with less, we just need to make sure we don’t do less with more. Making whatever you already have work is often the cheapest option. Some cruisers, however, have specific needs and desires that demand more resources. We know of a couple where one partner said they would only go cruising if they could take a hot shower every day. So, her spouse installed a watermaker, a generator, and a water heater so they could—and off they went. Just keep your eye on the goal, which is often to go sailing as soon as possible for as long as possible. Alex and Jack Wilken are lifelong cruisers, professional shipwrights, USCG licensed captains, and are the owners of Seattle Boat Works.

Figure 2: This is a 7 kw 48 volt DC generator that charges the drive bank on an electric sailboat. 25

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26

Lessons Learned Cruising Unexpected Outcomes of Information Exchange

by Jamie and Behan Gifford

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haring information comes naturally to cruisers. We share exponentially more, and more often, than we did in our land lives, whether we know the recipient of the information or not. It’s partly because we have more time; it’s partly because our everyday life depends on the neighbors we may only have just met. Sometimes, an information exchange grows into something beyond imagination, like in this case, when a typical cruiser interaction literally exploded. After leaving Australia, where we had stopped to top-up the cruising kitty, we spent our next three months sailing through Papua New Guinea (PNG) before pointing toward Southeast Asia. PNG’s archipelago has a dangerous reputation among Aussies, and for legitimate reason: parts of the country are truly unsafe. But just as Mexico has a dangerous reputation among many Americans while remaining entirely safe for most visitors, many parts of these western Pacific islands are also perfectly safe for travel. Admittedly, it does require some understanding of local culture and knowledge of the spots to avoid, which is exactly the kind of information that gets shared from cruiser to cruiser. It’s not unlike sharing waypoints to find a safe path through waters that are quite literally uncharted. A friend sent a young, hopeful circumnavigator our way to glean those tips for safe passage through PNG. 48º NORTH

Jesse Smith had left his home in the Chesapeake a few years ago on the Skye 51, Obelisk, with a patchwork crew of friends and family. We shared tips, recommendations, and waypoints with him; and hoped he’d pass news on our behalf to the families on those islands who remained dear in our memories. Rabaul, the former provincial capital in a basin ringed by 19 active volcanoes, was among our most memorable stops and was one of our must-see recommendations for Jesse in PNG. Charted depths in the bay never matched reality: years of volcanic eruptions had changed the profile. We’d hoped to “see” the WWII plane wrecks littering the bottom using our fish finder, but layers of ash obscured the curve of a fuselage or wingtip. It was from Rabaul that we next heard from Jesse. Totem was tied to the dock in Puteri Harbor, Malaysia when we received Jesse’s update. It was a tale of narrow escape. Waking in the early hours to close hatches during a sprinkle, it became apparent those were pumice pebbles— not raindrops! Nearby Mt. Tavurvur was erupting, and they needed to leave FAST. Jesse attached a portrait snapped by his crew, Rosalie Pepin: it shows a wildly grinning sailor exultant to have gotten away, clutching the helm in one hand and a VHF in the other. In the photo, the once white decks are covered with gray ash, as is Jesse’s tee shirt; Mt Tavurvur’s 26

firey eruption is over his left shoulder, lightning steaking from clouds behind is to his right. We reveled along with Jesse at how spectacular his experience was, gained permission to post Rosalie’s photo, and shared his wonder on Totem’s Facebook Page. Nearly 2,000 shares and a link from the New York Times later, the dramatic view captured untold imaginations. That exchange could have been the end of the story, but the next twist is astonishing. Later that year, Totem was on the hard in Thailand to prep for crossing

This is Rosalie Pepin's now-famous snap of Jesse escaping Rabaul. SEPTEMBER 2019


the Indian Ocean. Over Facebook came a message from a stranger in Bali: Googling the name found in the wallet of an unidentified and unconscious victim in a motorcycle accident, our post about Obelisk’s Rabaul escape turned up. Jesse’s likeness matched their patient. Did we know him, or know how to reach his family? An expat volunteer was helping the hospital seek any known connections, to gain permission for surgery (and payment) for his fractured skull and jaw. Though we had yet to meet Jesse or his crew, we helped eventually connect his care providers with other contacts, including his family, and successful surgery was performed. In spite of this hiccup in his circumnavigation plan, Jesse healed and continued on after a couple of months. We finally met Jesse a little over a year later when Obelisk arrived in the South African port from which Totem was preparing to depart. I’m a hugger, so you can imagine how that went! What fun to encounter each other in person and review our rather unlikely history. We last

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waved goodbye from St. Helena, hoping that—like with so many other cruising farewells—we’ll meet again someday. This tale of the internet shrinking the world is powerful, but it reminds us of how easily you can go missing as a traveler. Jesse’s identity was confirmed through remarkable happenstance. If it’s that easy to go missing on land, how much easier is it to go missing on the water? It might seem trivial at a time when communications are nearly instantaneous. But stuff happens, and things go wrong. It’s important amid the hyper-connectedness of our world, not to lose track of two things: fundamentals and redundancy. This week, Jamie and I helped a couple of our coaching clients with their first offshore passages. In both cases, creation of a float plan—one of the most fundamental elements of a safety plan— felt like an afterthought. Had we not pressed, they may not have been created. This summer, multiple boats in the Caribbean went missing, and two are now presumed to be lost. SV Salacia activated two EPIRBs; SV Trinavis activated a PLB.

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Search & Rescue was initiated for both vessels, but at the time of this writing, nothing was ever found; not even debris fields to hint at the outcome. Satellite beacons like the EPIRB are critical pieces of safety equipment, but they weren’t enough. What missing pieces might have prevented these losses? An EPIRB shouts “I need help here, now” to international, inter-governmental monitors; but like an unconscious accident victim lying in a ditch, the EPIRB ping lacks context and details. Perhaps instantaneous two-way offshore communications, such as those enabled by devices like InReach and Iridium GO!, would’ve produced a different result by facilitating conversation. Information shared between cruisers is a wonderful part of cruising life. By sharing freely and frequently with one another, occasionally something incredible, and perhaps lifesaving, can result.

The Giffords are now enjoying the electric blue waters of Bahia Marquer on Isla Carmen. Follow them at www.sailingtotem.com

SEPTEMBER 2019


MAIDEN Go Girls, Wherever You Want to Go

by Kaci Cronkhite

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ack in 1993, when the internet was new and I was a firsttime sailor, I typed in the words “woman” + “sailing.” There were only a handful of names that showed up. One was British-born Tracy Edwards. In her mid-20s, Edwards had sailed into the record books as captain of the first all-woman team to enter and finish the most grueling ocean race—the Whitbread Round the World. In the powerful new documentary, Maiden, Edwards describes with spunk undaunted by decades, how she went directly to the boats’ skippers and asked to join the crew. Men laughed at her, refused her with disparaging remarks, and sent her away. She didn’t give up. Instead, she turned her formidable energy and engaging spirit toward pulling together the first all-woman team in the world, bought the 58’ aluminum Farr-designed Maiden, and entered the race. Not one step of the journey was easy. “The ocean’s always trying to kill you,” Edwards says to open the movie. It’s clear that men in the industry, media, and sponsors tried to kill her dream, too. But, Edwards and the impressive Maiden crew just got stronger. They sailed right into the history books and the hearts of thousands upon their return. More importantly, their courage and accomplishment inspired a 48º NORTH

world of women watching to dare their own journeys, too. Last Fall, I read that Tracy Edwards found Maiden languishing in the Seychelles, bought her again, and crowd-funded the restoration of the boat with a mission to inspire girls that “Anything is Possible” and to raise funds for educating girls worldwide. “Cool. Right on.” I thought, finding them on Instagram. The charitable organization was called The Maiden Factor. I began to follow their journey. Fast forward to July, 2019. The restored Maiden, with the first woman captain to win an around the world race­—Australian Wendy Tuck—as skipper and nine women crew, departed Honolulu bound for Vancouver and Seattle. “Seattle?” I mused, frantically looking at the website for their itinerary. After Seattle they planned stops in San Francisco and Los Angeles. I couldn’t believe it. The storied yacht Maiden—THE Maiden— was going to pass Port Townsend twice! A legendary all-woman boat was going to pass what I’ve long posited as our community with the most woman captains and boat owners per capita of any in the USA. Immediately, I started crafting a message to Tracy Edwards. The opportunity for Maiden, on her inspiring mission with 28

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The Maiden Factor, and our deeply committed community of women leaders, educators, marine tradespeople, sailors, and girls education advocates to meet was just too golden an opportunity to miss! I called it a “Pit Stop in PT.” Seven hours later, I got a response. “Sounds fun! Contact…” I did. It took another three weeks to sort out logistics before I got the message, “Let’s do this! Remember, just 2-hours.”

beaches, and upper decks of the NW Maritime Center cheering them in with horns, whistles, applause, then patiently got in line to tour Maiden, meet the crew, and donate funds to support a mission we, too, hold dear: “Educate a girl. Change the world.” As I hopped aboard Raven—a wooden powerboat built in Port Townsend and captained by Karen Sullivan—with Hasse and our families to escort Maiden to Point Wilson and wave her

"My heart was brimming with gratitude for all the women and men who inspired and supported us as woman mariners." Port Townsend rallied in all the ways a girl can dream and more. Rocky held over the movie and got New York to send posters. Team Sail Like a Girl escorted Maiden out of Seattle, Schooner Adventuress generously cleared the NWMC dock for their entry (then saluted them in a full-sail sailby), boat owners organized a welcome flotilla at Marrowstone Point (complete with pizza delivery), kayaks and SUPs and Optis surrounded them as they got close, representatives of James Sk’lallam led the welcome, Carol Hasse added words of support from our maritime and ocean-loving community (giving them a handsewn burgee—PT LOVES YOU), women from our sailing and marine trades community took Maiden’s lines, and more than one thousand people—all ages and genders—lined the docks,

off with a bon voyage to San Francisco, my heart was brimming with gratitude for all the women and men who inspired and supported us as woman mariners—many of whom live here now. We must dare, more than ever—as Tracy did then and again 30 years later—to do whatever we can here and around the world to be sure all girls know: Go girls, wherever you want to go!

Kaci Cronkhite is an author, former Wooden Boat Festival director, the luckiest cowgirl circumnavigator to call Port Townsend home, and the forever grateful instigator of the Pit Stop in PT. kacicronkhite.com Photos by Steven Mullensky and Twozdai Hulse

"Maiden" Crew for the Seattle to San Francisco leg: Lauren Strand, Gabriela Amato, Belinda Henry, Courtney Koos, Danae Hollowed, and Mackenzie Marmol (left to right). (Not pictured: Matilda Ajanko, Amalia Infante and Guest Skipper, Wendy Tuck)

Members and friends of Team Sail Like a Girl and Race Like a Girl touring "Maiden". 48º NORTH

Kaci and representatives of James Sk'lallam tribe gifting "Maiden" with local goods. 29

SEPTEMBER 2019


The Argon COLLECTIVE Mindful Mentorship & Serious Fun

by Cara Kuhlman 48ยบ NORTH

"Argon" owners Jasmine Wornstaff, Sam Morin, Libby Borchert, and Calla Ward (left to right) enjoy Lake Union with Jasmine's sister, Jessica. SEPTEMBER 2019 30


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oing sailing starts with a decision. A decision to learn to sail, to join a crew or to buy a boat–so many choices lead you down the dock. Sometimes you don’t even realize you’re making that decision. The morning after I agreed to buy into a partnership for Argon, a 1979 San Juan 24, I was hungover and second-guessing myself. The combination made me feel like I had a pit in my stomach. My reservations weren’t about the boat (70s charmer) or the other owners (amazing humans whom I adore) or even the dollar amount (I split a one-quarter share so really I own one-eighth). It was the idea of being responsible for a second sailboat and all that entails. What I underestimated was how rewarding both boats could be, and in such different ways. Boat number one is a 1994 Catalina 34 named Capi, which I liveaboard and and use to explore Washington’s amazing waters. I purchased Capi after a year-long search, it was the most terrifying and exhilarating thing I’ve ever done. Capi has certainly kept me busy and there’s always more I could do. So, why would I spontaneously buy into Argon and take on a second sailboat? Mom, I hope you’re reading. HELLO, ARGON Argon came into our lives when Samantha “Sam” Morin and her partner Charlie Patnoe decided to learn a new skill. The two had spent the summer borrowing his parents’ 14’ dinghy, making trips to Blake Island and loading the inflatable with coolers, dogs, and camping gear. They loved the “skiff life” and soon began the search for their own boat. Charlie, a Whidbey Island native with liveaboard parents, already knew a thing or two about boats, while Sam was a novice with plenty of enthusiasm. Both hoped to learn more through the Center for Wooden Boats and others in the sailing community. At the time, Sam thought, “We’re going to be sailors! We’re going to sail on the Sound all the time! We’re going to be so cool!” After buying Argon in January of 2017, Sam and Charlie were in high spirits when they moved the sailboat from Salmon Bay to Elliott Bay Marina. During the move, which included going through the Ballard Locks for the first time with a crew of five, plus a one-month old baby (something they would not recommend), the new boat owners encountered their first setback. On the approach to their new slip in Elliott Bay Marina, Charlie was at the tiller and, in a moment, docking got complicated. Turning into the slip, the tiller hard over, he heard a “snap!” The wooden tiller had broken at the base, leaving Charlie with a useless 3-foot stick in his hand. The situation could’ve been worse, but they were close enough to the dock to jump on and make it into the slip. All adults and the baby made it safely ashore. With a broken tiller and soon-to-be out-of-commission engine, Argon stayed in Elliott Bay for about a year without much use. That’s where this story could end, but luckily it doesn't.

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ONE MORE TRY Sam’s skills know few limits: she kayaks, hikes, and scoots around on her Vespa; she cooks amazing vegetarian meals; she shows up with homemade apple butter, hot sauce or bread. A veteran of the beverage industry, she knows her way around beers and wines from all over the world. This list only scratches the surface but illustrates what I’ve learned: If Sam wants to learn how to do something, she will. Sam, Charlie and I met through Fremont Brewing, where I had a reputation for being loudly enthusiastic about sailing. Already eager to get to know these two better, I was thrilled when they first bought Argon. When I didn’t hear about the boat again for several months, I was bummed but not surprised. Walk down any dock and you’ll see your fair share of “sad” boats. “We went back and forth a lot of times” Charlie said, who eventually decided that his excitement couldn’t counter the cost. Sam wanted to give it one more try: “I have to learn how to sail!” she said. So, Sam took over full responsibility of Argon on her own. In March 2018, Sam texted me that Argon was fixed and relocated to Lake Union at one of my favorite marinas on the north side of the lake. Would I trade her tasty dinners for sailing lessons? I love a good meal, but that wasn’t why I quickly agreed.

“When experienced boaters engage with those new to the water, our sailing community is a better place.” SAILING 101 Learning how to sail isn’t easy and neither is teaching someone how to sail. I struggled when I first became a sailing instructor because I knew how to sail but I didn’t know how to explain it. US Sailing’s Level 1 certification gives you tools for teaching, but becoming a better instructor is an ongoing process. It requires a person to be thoughtful, invested in the student’s success, and prepared with different approaches that can be customized to the student. Unfortunately, I’ve observed new sailors struggle to learn from more experienced sailors they know socially or meet through the community. It is not from a lack of good intentions, but rather a lack of teaching experience from which you learn to stay calm and be patient; to recognize when someone is listening but not comprehending; to foresee potential problems before they arise; and try to ensure that the overall experience is positive, even if there are some hiccups along the way. I wanted to teach Sam how to sail because I wanted her to become a confident, happy sailor, and I knew I could help with that. Plus, when she asked me what sources I use to check the wind, her curiosity made me even more excited. Before our first sail I texted Sam: “Sailing is the best. Please join the cult :)” She responded, “Where do I sign?!”

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SAM, JEANNE, AND CARA GO SAILING I have a number of close friends with a wide range of sailing experience, all of whom share an intense passion for being on the water. We’ve known each other for years, working together, racing together, and empowering one another to keep pursuing that passion. Most of us are former sailing instructors who raced dinghies in college, and are women. When Sam asked for sailing lessons, I immediately wanted to bring Jeanne Currie along. Jeanne can be both laid-back and a ball of energy. Growing up sailing at Sail Sand Point, she wouldn’t have been called competitive but now, on a casual afternoon sail, she can’t help but fine tune sails or steering, pushing for a new personal speed record. You can always count on Jeanne to bring fresh veggies to snack on, point out something outrageous you overlooked and, most importantly, to say “yes” when there’s a chance to go sailing. As I’d hoped, Jeanne quickly hopped on board. That spring, the three of us tried to go out as often as possible. Jeanne and I were thrilled by how easy it was to get out and sail Argon around Lake Union. Even better, Sam was a quick study. Jeanne and I enjoyed decoding a boat we’d never been aboard before, and we all enjoyed the way teaching was interspersed with laughter, booze, and “nerding out” over all things sailing. The momentum built from there. SAILING SENSEI The first time Sam called me her “sailing sensei” I laughed and blew it off. However, as I introduced her to more of my friends who sail, I saw others helping her in a similar way. In turn, it brought to mind several of the generous people who have guided me on my sailing journey, and deepened my appreciation for her creation of that moniker for me. A “sailing sensei” is simply a mentor, and can provide crucial experience. Like teaching someone how to sail, being a good mentor is more than just being a good boater. When experienced boaters engage with those new to the water, our sailing community is a better place. “People with no sailing experience going for it and feeling confident in an environment where there’s somewhat of a safety net,” Charlie said, “that’s very cool to watch.” And that’s the opportunity I first saw with Argon, and still see today. Trust is essential. It’s easy to give recommendations when you won’t see the outcome. It’s also overwhelming when you have a problem and five recommendations on how to solve it. What has happened with Argon is we brought more sailors into the equation, but none have dominated the dynamic. Part of this can be attributed to our experience as sailing instructors, where we learned to avoid jumping in right away. We explain things when there is clearly confusion, but otherwise try to step back and let the learning process happen.“You’re great at explaining everything and not being condescending about it,” Sam said. “I learn something every time we go out, every single time.” We also have a blast, every single time.

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THAT ONE TIME WE WENT TO POULSBO In June 2018, I realized a dream of organizing an overnight sailing trip for women; one full of learning, laughs, food, and wine. I didn’t want it to be only women with sailing experience, either. Soon, it became clear that Sam and Argon should be part of this trip. Aboard two boats, nine women cruised to Poulsbo. It’s difficult to explain what that weekend felt like then, and what it still means today. The energy, friendships, and lessons from that weekend have carried us farther than we ever anticipated. There were silly moments we laughed too hard to breathe; serious moments in which we listened and learned about each others’ challenges and fears; and confidence-building moments when we set sail and docked safely. Everyone took immense joy in being together on the water and in a safe space. One great outcome was that two friends who were newer to sailing, Jasmine Wornstaff and Libby Borchert, got out on the water and eventually both became part of the Argon co-op. Libby always brings great energy and was described to me by Charlie as someone who “lives on mutual stoke.” Jasmine’s stoke and growth has been fun to watch; advancing from appreciation to active participation. She’s ready to race Argon and planning for R2AK. The Argon collective was coming together. Calla Ward—also a former instructor, liveaboard, and driver for the J/80 Taj Mahal—was jealous about our early spring sails on Argon. She wanted in. It was her idea that the two of us buy in when the opportunity arose. She said it was the easiest decision she made this year. “If you care about something, if you want to support it, you put some fucking dollars behind it” Calla said. “I didn’t just want to make a cameo as a helper, I wanted to be involved with something that amazing.” Recently, on a clear evening with a gorgeous Shilshole sunset in the works, we sat on the bow of Calla’s 1977 Islander Freeport 41 as she finished a coat of varnish on the rail. She spends a lot of time on boats, so I wanted to know what was the big deal about sailing on Argon? “The draw was people being bold,” Calla said. “As someone who knows how to sail, I’ve thought, ‘I would never do this as an adult.’ I would never try and learn, it looks too hard. It’s like skiing.” I did remind Calla that she learned to ski as an adult, so she must know how to be bold too. In addition to providing comic relief and back up, having Calla onboard helped a lot with teaching the others. “I loved teaching adult sailing at Sail Sand Point and I love teaching adult sailing now,” Calla said, “these just happen to be my best friends.” Calla insists that I’ve done most the instructing, but both Sam and I disagree. Calla explains the wind clock with our miniwhiteboard and windex, giving tips on steering, and sending informative updates when the outboard (aka S.O.B.) started acting up again. Altogether, Sam, Calla, Jasmine, Libby, and I have a great dynamic. We’re still learning about Argon, boat handling, and about one another. Recently, we hauled Argon out of the water, and we kept getting asked, “So who is in charge?” “No one,” we’d answer, “we’re all partners.” 32

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The Argon Crew/Owners: Name: Samantha Morin Years sailing: 2 Next sailing goal: Fly the spinnaker on Argon! As well as solo docking. Being on the water makes me feel: Rejuvenated. Being on the water and messing around with the sails is very meditative. Also, every time I go out I learn something new (about the boat, sailing, or how to fix a problem). Advice for a new sailor: It’s not as scary as it seems. Name: Jasmine Wornstaff Years sailing: <1 Next sailing goal: I really would like to start racing more. *cough cough* San Juan Nationals 2020 lol! Being on the water makes me feel: Like I can conquer any fear/ challenge.

Room for one more? Cara Kuhlman, Molly Utter, Calla Ward, Sam Morin, Jasmine Wornstaff and Jeanne Currie take "Argon" out for some summer fun.

Advice for a new sailor: Don’t be afraid to try anything and to sail as much as you can. Name: Libby Borchert Years sailing: <1 Next sailing goal: My next sailing goal is to expand my knot skills and to race Argon! Being on the water makes me feel: If there is a heaven this must be what it’s like all the time. Pure joy. Advice for a new sailor: With good friends, a bit of knowledge, and a willingness to fail a lot... anything is possible. Name: Cara Kuhlman Years sailing: 19 Next sailing goal: Getting Argon out for a race with the San Juan 24 fleet! And continuing my cruising education aboard Capi. Being on the water makes me feel: Liberated, challenged, and unbelievably happy. Advice for a new sailor: Put in the time to get comfortable and have an amazing sailing day that inspires you to keep coming back. Remember you’ll always be learning and that’s the best part. Name: Calla Ward Years sailing: 13 Next sailing goal: Something lofty. A very large regatta or offshore race. Being on the water makes me feel: Confident. Advice for a new sailor: Get yourself in the door just like you would at your first job. Ask for the tiller. Find your people that make you most inspired and most comfortable and then you just fucking send it. 48º NORTH

Original "Argon" owner, Samantha Morin, shows the Collective's favorite way to forget about the work day. 33

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Jasmine, Sam, Jeanne, and Libby during "Argon's" adoption party. CONFIDENCE We’ve had many idyllic days on Argon but like any good adventure, there have been challenges. “My confidence goes up a 0.5 every single time we go out,” Sam told me, “And then it gets knocked back.” Sam’s biggest knock back to date? Skying the main halyard, having to be towed in, and falling in between the boat and the dock, all in the same evening. The next day she was back down on Argon, trying to sort it all out and get back on the water. I told you she was meant to be a sailor! Calla and I still have setbacks too. She said it well: “The least fun moments are the ones that reflect poorly on you. Sailing is the most humbling thing in my life.” It was humbling when Calla almost t-boned her own liveaboard boat with Argon coming into dock. But for us, all of these humbling moments are lightened by humor. “For a moment, both insurance policies crossed through my mind,” Calla said laughing, “I wonder how that’d play out?” This is Sam’s second summer on the water and you can tell. It’s fun watching her teach Libby and Jasmine things she’s learned and support their own trial and error. Having them aboard “shows me the things I actually do know and can teach someone else,” Sam said. “It also reinforces the things I don’t know.” What happens when they ask about something Sam doesn’t know? Her answer sounds a lot like mine: “Great question! We’re going to have to figure that out.” WHY DOES THIS MATTER? When you finish reading this article, I want you to remember that mentorship is important; to always keep learning new things; and that what we’re doing feels both important and fun. Part of that importance is derived from the fact that sexism still exists in sailing, and as a crew of all women, our gender has come into play. “I’m so sick of hearing that it is taboo for a female to be on a boat,” Calla said, “This is what we were made to do.” Even on Argon’s dock, we’ve heard, “All women going out? That’s bad luck.” On the water there have been cat calls and when we walk into a marine business, there’s a 50/50 chance we’ll be talked down to. “Giving women space to learn and create is very important but it’s so much more than that. It’s not just respecting them 48º NORTH

and giving them room” Calla continued. “It’s letting them sail without knowing their gender.” We fly the rainbow pride flag on Argon because, as a crew, we support our friends and strangers in the LGBTQ community. How many times has someone cheered us on when they see that flag on the water? Only two. Biases are alive and well in this community but changes are coming, especially when it comes to women in boating. “Race to Alaska’s Sail Like a Girl team bumped it up a notch,” Calla said sitting on the bow of her boat, reflecting on these changes between coats of varnish, “I’ve seen more women at the helm the past two summers than ever before. And not just at the helm. I’ve seen more female crew on the race course and females buying boats here at the marina and living on them by themselves. I’ve seen way more women on the water than ever. But I want to see more.” The good news is that the vast majority of the responses to our partnership are enthusiastically supportive, if sometimes surprised. “I tell people I live on a boat all the time,” Calla said, “but when you tell them you own a boat with five women and some of them don’t know how to sail and some of them do and you’re all growing together, people are like, ‘Shit! That’s cool!” Ultimately, the story of Argon is about a cool approach to getting new sailors out on the water. I think it can be replicated and should be encouraged, making the sailing community stronger and more diverse. THE NEXT DECISION Going sailing starts with a decision. I decided I wanted to live on a boat, explore the Pacific Northwest by boat and to be part of the Argon crew. My next goal is to get Argon ready for racing and I’m excited for the efficiency we’ll develop along the way. Collectively, the Argon crew is looking ahead. “I just want to become a really good sailor and become better each time I got out,” Sam said. Jasmine and Libby feel the racing itch and want to become better at knots and docking. Maybe my goal of a San Juan 24 race night before the end of summer will come true! I happily think back to the first days on Argon, early in the season with wind and an empty Lake Union. How far we’ve all come, and the stoke meter is still in the red. “I was jealous and I wanted in,” Calla said. “Even after hauling out and patching sixty blisters on the rudder. I still want in.” For me, Argon compliments Capi. I enjoy both lake and sound, I am inspired and humbled by both. We’re all still learning together and empowering each other, and figuring it out is the best part. Mainly, I’m profoundly happy to share that with my best friends. On the bow as the sun set over Shilshole, I asked Sam, “What do you think, should someone who doesn’t know how to sail buy a sailboat?” Sam said, “With friends, yes.”

Cara Kuhlman is a Seattle-based sailor, writer, and craft beer enthusiast. She lives aboard her Catalina 34. See more of her work at www.carakuhlman.com 34

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SEPTEMBER 2019


THE SAILING

Unicorn

Sailing was Instrumental in Her Recovery, Now She's Using an Ocean Race to Raise Awareness About Mental Health 48ยบ NORTH

by Lizzy Grim 36

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f you’ve read this far into this issue of 48° North, there’s a good chance that you have more than a passing interest in sailing. We all have our reasons for sailing, whether it be for fun, recreation, community, a very fun butt kicking on the racecourse, spending time with family, whatever. My journey into sailing began with my wonderful mother, Elly. She started sailing around my freshman year of college and I could see the positive change it made in her life. She invited me out a few times, and I had some fun but didn’t immediately get bitten by the sailing bug. Mom carried on sailing, and I carried on with college and then marriage. Fast forward a few years and I had the rug pulled out from under me when my marriage came to a screeching halt at the age of 24. Yep, I was part of the club that got married young and then divorced young. I was absolutely shattered and fell into a deep depressed spiral. Eventually one night, I reached a point where I was so depressed that I just wanted to go to sleep and not wake up again. Fortunately, my plan to drift off did not work and I woke up the next day to a profoundly worried mother and circle of friends. Slowly but surely, I started working on a care plan to manage the divorce and the depression, but depression kept pulling on me. Time continued to pass and I continued to go out sailing with my mom from time to time, and was starting to have a bit more fun with it. I found that I was happier when I got off the boat; and that, when sailing, my mind was a bit quieter—because, ”OH MY GOD!” there was so much going on aboard to keep track of! I remember feeling so overwhelmed by trying to understand what to do during a tack that the idea of working on the foredeck gave me incredible anxiety. However, I kept at it since it was great bonding time with my mom and was introducing me to a fun new community. When the summer faded into fall, I was getting sad because I thought sailing opportunities would be coming to an end. Little did I know a little thing called the Rum Run, which would come to be known as the Rogue Rum Run in this particular year, was about to change my life. On the day of the race, the wind was so high that the committee felt it necessary to officially cancel the race. Fortunately for me, I was to be on a gorgeous boat named Earendel, a 47-foot Wauquiez, and she was more than capable of handling the weather. My dear mother was a little worried about how I would do in such high winds and waves, as I had never been out in anything like that, but I had the time of my life. Since the Rum Run fell on Halloween that year, I had elected to wear a costume of a vintage ski onesie and goggles so I was nice and cozy up on deck. At one point, the skipper grinned at me and asked if I would like to take the helm, and after allowing my heart to jump back out of my throat, I took the chance and had an amazing time steering through the waves of the beautiful Salish Sea. I have since come to pinpoint this as the day I fell in love with sailing and am so grateful to be able to point to it on a calendar! The following spring, perhaps inspired by my enthusiasm for heavy weather sailing at Rogue Rum Run, my mother invited me to a chat at Corinthian Yacht Club to check out something called the Clipper Round the World Race (she’s quite the enabler, isn’t she?). This was my first exposure to something that would 48º NORTH

become a huge part of my life. One of the boats that had just crossed the Pacific Ocean from China was at the yacht club for tours and Mom and I were wowed by what we saw below. These were not luxury cruising yachts by any means; there were pipe berths lining the hallway and the smell of dampness was unavoidable. Within the first five minutes of the presentation, I was hooked. A round-the-world sailing race where average (I won’t dare say normal) people like me can crew on a 70-foot racing yacht? As a fledgling sailor, I was amazed that it was even a possibility. The seed of excitement and opportunity was planted in my brain, and continued to take root over the next couple of years as I sailed more and more, eventually finding a regular crew spot on a couple of really fun race teams including with my beloved crew aboard the J/80, Reckless. As I continued to sail more, I continued to feel better. It turned out that for my depressed and anxious brain, racing sailboats was becoming a perfect part of the treatment plan. There is no time to think about anything but the race while it’s going on, you just have to be in the moment. Racing has both helped form strong bonds with this wonderful community in which I have discovered my own identity, and has taught me that I am stronger than I ever thought I was, both mentally and physically. In fact, as I write this, I am aware that I’m in the best physical shape of my life. I have so much more energy and just feel better knowing I can now do things on the boat that I previously found difficult. Sailing has helped me gain courage and discover more about who I am, especially in the moments when things get real on the boat, the crew dynamic gets challenging, and swimming to shore is not an option. Sometimes things go sideways in a hurry, and a wrapped spinnaker or a tangled sheet have taught me problem solving skills. On the other hand, sailing continues to prove to me that I can trust the people on my team to have my back and root me on, something the divorce had shattered. Two years after that first fateful encounter with the Clipper Race, the boats came back through Seattle in April of 2018. I was very keen to go say hello again. I started to eagerly swap between the tracker on the Clipper Race website and VesselFinder to see which boats were going to make it into Seattle first. As luck would have it, they were coming to our

Lizzy's beloved "Reckless" crew at Whidbey Island Race Week 2019. 37

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yacht club again and I would have the chance to ask current crew many of the questions that were nagging at me. At that point, the whisper of a thought in my head had become a shout. On my 29th birthday, I paid my application fee and was signed up for Legs 7 and 8 of the 2019/2020 edition of the race! At the time, the ports weren’t officially known, but I now know that I will be leaving my home port of Seattle to go down through the Panama Canal, up to New York City, down to Bermuda, across the Atlantic to Derry-Londonderry Northern Ireland, and then finishing the race off by sailing under the Tower Bridge to St. Katherine’s Dock in London. Once I had signed up for the race and done a fair bit of hyperventilating over the huge commitment I’d made, I came to a realization: I didn’t just love sailing, it had become an enormous part of my identity and wasn’t going away any time soon. With this revelation, I decided to follow the example of other women like Team Sail Like a Girl and skippers Wendy Tuck and Nikki Henderson of the 2017-2018 Clipper Race, who use their leadership in the world of sailing to inspire others. They all have inspired me. I was moved to use my sailing experience to inspire others to find their “thing” that can be the lifeboat they cling to in order to come out of their own mental health struggles. As I write this article I am sitting in a cafe in Gosport, England, home of the Clipper Race headquarters. I just finished my final week of training and we’re almost done with preparing the boat for the delivery to London and subsequent race start. I have the good fortune of being assigned to our hometown boat, CV22 Seattle, for the 2019/2020 race and will be helping to share our message of sustainability and protecting our oceans. To say I’m proud would be a gross understatement. The training experience has been unlike anything I could have ever imagined. If you had told me five years ago that I would be traveling to England to go sailing three times in one year, I would have told you you’re out of your mind. Clipper race training is designed to take people who have never sailed before and make them ready to sail an ocean over the course of four weeks. Training has given me my first experiences with being in a watch system and standing on the bow of a boat surging through a choppy English Channel for a practice race start. I got to see the Milky Way with zero light pollution halfway to Brittany and dolphins playing in our bow wave. More importantly, I’ve already made some lifelong friends. Sailing in the Solent reminds me a lot of Puget Sound, yet there are 100% more castles in the Solent and no evergreen trees in sight. These yachts are unbelievable and must be seen in person to truly appreciate the massive amount of power they have. The primary winches are large enough that I can comfortably sit on top of one, the mast is 95’ above the water, the Code 1 is the size of a tennis court and takes 3+ people to pack—it’s nuts! For perspective, the J/80 can practically fit on the foredeck of the Clipper 70. Everything is bigger and heavier than I could have ever imagined, and yet at the end of Training Level 4, I feel at home and comfortable on my boat. Waiting until the fleet gets to Seattle and I finally start my race at the end of April 2020 is going to be torture! Reflecting on my journey to get to this point, I have had more 48º NORTH

than a few tearful moments on the boat in which I have been so grateful to be alive to get to experience this. Since I was a little girl, I have always loved unicorns. By embracing all of the parts of who I am, especially through sailing, I have undergone a magical transformation—I have become the Sailing Unicorn. My mission is to share my story, to help other people know that there’s a way out of dark times, and raise awareness for mental health recovery and suicide prevention. Sometimes, we need a bit more magic in our lives, and by being the Sailing Unicorn I hope to bring that to those who need it. Most people who meet me might have no idea that I struggle

Lizzy trimming on a Clipper 70. with anxiety and depression. It’s not always possible to tell who is struggling. By spreading this message, I hope to encourage others to check in on their loved ones and take it seriously if someone says they need help. It’s important to know that nobody is truly alone. If there’s a friend you haven’t seen out in a while, check in to let them know they are dearly loved and missed. You never know if checking on someone might save a life. After taking the time to find myself, in large part through sailing, I have since remarried and am so grateful to have an adventure buddy who loves the outdoors as much as I do. To all of the skippers and wonderful people I have crewed with or hung out with at Duck Dodge raft ups, The Sloop, CYC, and countless other sailing haunts, thank you from the bottom of my heart for being a part of my recovery journey. I couldn’t do this without you and remain eternally grateful. I look forward to many, many more on and off water shenanigans for years to come.

Lizzy Grim lives in Seattle, WA. Follow her adventures at www.SailingUnicorn.com or on Instagram @SailingUnicorn426 If you or someone you know might be at risk of suicide, here’s how to get help: In the United States, call or text the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 24 hours a day at 1-800-273-8255. We recommend saving the phone number as a contact in your phone, you never know when it might be crucial to have it. 38

SEPTEMBER 2019


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SEPTEMBER 2019


WOMEN on the

WATER

Over the years, we’ve been continually inspired by the many female friends we have in the Pacific Northwest who sail their own boats, race on local crews, teach friends or the next generation of young sailors, and empower other women and girls. In this article, local sailors share how they got into sailing; their inspirations, experiences, and perspectives as women on the water; and how we can all better support the women who sail the Salish Sea, now and in the future.

CAROL HASSE, OWNER OF PORT TOWNSEND SAILS How were you introduced to sailing? I was introduced to sailing in 1972 when I left my home town of Camas, WA, with family friends aboard their Cascade 42. I learned celestial navigation while sailing to Mexico and began crewing on other boats in need of a navigator. Those boats included a Chinese junk, a Sparkman & Stephens yawl, a gaff rigged ketch, and a Jim Brown trimaran. I was 21, sailing to Costa Rica, the Galapagos, Marquesas, and Hawaii when 48º NORTH

I fell madly in love with cruising under sail. The blessing of this adventure inspired my life’s work as a sailmaker and my involvement in sail training and education. What’s a women-on-the-water story that speaks to you? I have met many inspiring women sailors in the South Pacific and closer to home. Among them are single-hander, Betty Pierce, circumnavigating instructor, Nancy Erley, and competent cruiser and teacher Carolyn (“Ace”) Spragg. I am especially inspired by Ernestine Bennett, a Kansas native who decided to take her McMinnville, OR, Girl Scout troop on a sail training tall ship. Undaunted by the fact that no East Coast sail training vessels would take her girls, “Mrs. B” discovered the 1913 schooner Adventuress at Doc Freeman’s dock. While motoring around Lake Union with an ill-fitting used genoa and a 40

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trys’l set on a truncated rig, Mrs. B saw the power and potential of sail training. She bought the schooners Adventuress and Zodiac and the light ship Umatilla. Mrs. B later sold the Umatilla and Zodiac, but went on to restore Adventuress’ rig and counter stern. She took hundreds of youth from Seattle to the San Juan Islands and Victoria for decades. Her vision continues as Sound Experience, with environmental education aboard the completely restored schooner Adventuress—currently sailing in the San Juan Islands. Why aren’t there more women involved in sailing today? I believe sailing is elemental to our souls and that its beauty resonates with everyone, even if they are not drawn to go to sea, to adventure on a tall ship, to race around the buoys, or to cruise in protected waters. If I could decree it, all children would have the opportunity to sail as part of their basic education. Every Washington state youth should sail in our beloved Salish Sea to feel the inspiration of moving under sail, learn the history of “discovery” and colonization (and exploitation) of our region, and to understand the fragile beauty of our precious environment. I believe nature humbles and informs and inspires us best under sail. That opportunity, along with making sure girls learn about the accomplishments of other girls and women should open some doors to finding or creating opportunities in sailing and the maritime trades.

DANA BROOKS, LIVEABOARD AND SOLO SAILOR How were you introduced to sailing? I had never lived in a place where sailing was even a thought, so when I moved to Seattle in 2007, I decided that I was going to learn to sail. I joined a meet-up group initially and had a rather terrifying outing. I not only feared for my safety, but felt chagrined that I didn’t know more. After that, I joined a sailing club and took lessons. I can’t recommend that enough if you are new to sailing. I received so much knowledge in class that I would not have gotten by just sailing with other people. The club (not a yacht club, but a sailing/chartering club, using curriculum like US Sailing or ASA) provided support and access to meet people who were in the same learning place as I was. It also gave me the opportunity to sail with more experienced people, who subtly tutored me. Why aren’t there more women involved in sailing today? There is a pervasive intimidation issue. I fell into leading a women’s group in the club. Although my goal was to help women gain confidence so that they could sail with anyone, I found that the women that joined me just stayed with me. Knowing how to sail did not come with the gift of empowerment and I was disappointed that women didn’t move on. 48º NORTH

As in any sport, starting early gives girls the best opportunity to be a true force. A friend told me that when he was a teen, a good female friend would smoke him any time they sailed. She became a captain of a very large vessel. He always thought girls could sail, and so should we all. I also believe you can start at 40 and kick ass, too. What can the average sailor do to make sailing feel more welcoming and accessible for women coming into the sport? Stop yelling, stop being a dick, stop grabbing asses, stop with the insulting language, stop taking lines out of our hands, stop making us fetch beers, give us a freaking chance on a boat, and the list goes on. There also needs to be more media showing women in America’s Cup or Volvo Race or even R2AK. It also does help to know great guys who understand the differences in learning and teaching people how to sail...Andy Cross, Trey McDonald, Scott Pitroff, Andy Brooking, Jim Thompson. I got lucky. What other thoughts about women in sailing, or insightful anecdotes, would you like to share with 48° North readers? This is what I tell women that sail with me: You will find that the “experienced” person doesn’t know as much as you think they do. Green as grass, I went on a race where we were knocked down twice and I was sure I was going to die. I remember thinking as I was a few inches from the water as the boat was on its side...’I just turned 41 a few days ago, and now I am going to die.’ The boat righted and I was shocked. I didn’t know about keels, I didn’t know how to ease the sails or turn the engine on. I didn’t know a sheet was caught. I didn’t know why I was being yelled at. I didn’t know why the spinnaker was in the water trailing behind us. I didn’t know the captain was not as experienced as I had thought. During the trip back, I thought, ‘If I survive, this is never going to happen to me again. I will not be at the mercy of someone else to know how to get the boat to safety.’ Empower yourself, no one will do it for you.

KRISTIN PEDERSON, R2AK FINISHER ABOARD TEAM KELP How were you introduced to sailing? My family had a Catalina 27 that we kept in Kirkland that we’d mostly sail around Lake Washington. Once or twice a summer we’d take the seemingly ambitious weekend trip with the four of us through the Locks to Blake Island. We also chartered power boats out of Anacortes for a few weeks most summers growing up, so I got to explore up into Desolation Sound, and beyond, from the water. When I was 18, I became the proud owner of a Byte sailing dinghy, which I kept at UW and Sail Sand Point and sailed all over Lake Washington 41

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For women with basic skills wishing to improve or solidify their sailing skills, I can’t stress enough how great teaching is to build confidence, validate how much you already know, and continue learning. in college. Over the years I’ve worked at various schools in the area, formalizing my hobby into a profession by getting my captain’s license and instructor certifications in 2013. What’s a women-on-the-water story that speaks to you? Being a part of the team, I’m a bit biased toward Team KELP from R2AK 2017, who not only hold the record for smallest allfemale team to complete the race, but also won the coveted Dirtbag Award that year. Why aren’t there more women involved in sailing today? I actually find myself sailing with a lot of women. I don’t specifically seek out the women sailing groups or teams, but seem to often find myself with a pretty even ratio of men and women. It probably has a lot to do with the people that I choose to surround myself with. Although I race on some well regarded race boats, I’m not personally super competitive and so tend to prioritize positivity, learning, and fun over winning (although don’t get me wrong, winning is fun!). When you really get into the high-level of competition, that’s where you see the amount of women dropping off, and I actually think a better question would be why aren’t more women taking leadership roles in sailing—skipper, tactician, owner—and not just in the context of racing but in general boat ownership as well. Having worked in sailing education and program management for the last five-plus years, I find that there are far fewer women working professionally than I normally encounter sailing and racing casually. I wonder if it has to do more with external social pressures or norms where men might be questioned less in general and thus feel more confident taking chances or teaching others. What other thoughts about women in sailing, or insightful anecdotes, would you like to share with 48° North readers? For women out there with basic sailing skills (and yes, I mean the most basic of understandings of points of sail, sail trim, etc) wishing to improve or solidify their skills, I can’t stress enough how great teaching is to build confidence, validate how much you already know, and continue learning. The Center for Wooden Boats in South Lake Union is always looking for women to volunteer as sailing instructors to teach their learn-to-sail classes. It is such a wonderful, supportive environment, there is no need to feel intimidated. New instructors should already have basic skills, but they will teach you how to teach and you’ll get loads of training and time in the boats. More info can be found here: www.cwb.org/volunteer

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CARA KUHLMAN, TWO BOAT OWNER AND 48° NORTH CONTRIBUTOR How were you introduced to sailing? My father originally started sailing on the Chesapeake Bay and later raced on the San Francisco Bay. When I was growing up, my older brother lived aboard a sailboat we’d go out on. I went to sailing camp pretty young but had a fear of deep water and didn’t enjoy it. A couple of years later, I asked to go back to sailing camp and that time it stuck. What’s a women-on-the-water story that speaks to you? M. Wylie Blanchet aka “Capi”, who I named my boat after, inspires me as a boater and writer. Her memoir The Curve of Time communicates moments on the water that we all experience while also a capturing a moment on the British Columbia coast we will never see. She was on the water decades ago, doing a lot with a little, learning what she needed to keep exploring and appreciating wildlife, geography, and cultures along the way. Why aren’t there more women involved in sailing today? As a pastime, sailing is bogged down by traditions and legacies. At yacht clubs, trade groups, and conferences, people ask, “How can we get more people on the water?” I’ve thought a lot about that and considering the barriers which include cost, time commitment, learning curve, and social hurdles, I am amazed that people even manage to get into sailing today. These barriers are amplified for women, who are often paid less than men, and whose time may be dedicated to caregiving or “unpaid work” at home. Women have been limited to specific roles in boating, if allowed on the water at all, for centuries. In youth sailing and racing, I repeatedly see male sailors advance when their female counterparts do not. In college sailing, varsity skippers are almost all male, often with a female crew. These patterns point to a systemic problem where even from a young age, women have been less likely to keep sailing than men; and if they do, it is less likely to be at the helm. Part of this legacy often makes the sailing community feel like a “boy’s club”, which is perhaps why many women have embraced all-female crews, women-only sailing courses, and are being more vocal about seeing other women on the water.

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What can the average sailor do to make sailing feel more welcoming and accessible for women coming into the sport? Question everything and take action. Do you speak to a male crew differently than a female crew? When there is an opening on the boat, do you reach out to crew members of both genders? Are there women in your life who have expressed interest in sailing? If so, how have you tried to help them pursue it? Every sailor should become a better sailing instructor. Knowing how to sail is not teaching how to sail. If you got better at teaching new crew, she or he is more likely to comprehend the lesson, improve and ultimately, stick with sailing. Step forward and take an active stance supporting women on the water. Volunteer at a women’s regatta, talk to women about their experiences and, above all, do whatever you can to help one, two or more women overcome those barriers and get on the water. What other thoughts about women in sailing, or insightful anecdotes, would you like to share with 48° North readers? I’m inspired and optimistic about women on the water right now but I want to talk to more men about it. I’ve been having conversations for years with other women, we’ve seen some change but there needs to be more, and it should be lasting. In the end, we’re all sailors and stoked about the same thing.

JEANNE ASSAEL GOUSSEV, SKIPPER TEAM SAIL LIKE A GIRL How were you introduced to sailing? I began sailing when I moved to Boston, MA, after college in 1999. I did not know many people at that time. “You need a hobby,” my dad said, and he took me to the Boston Sailing Center to sign up for a learn to sail class. I fell in love. My sailing relationship was cinched when I did an offshore delivery of a BT Global Challenge boat my first year of sailing. We sailed from Boston to Savannah, GA, in January in the remnants of a hurricane. We broke ice in Buzzards Bay, sailed in 30 foot waves and 60 knot winds for days, I was washed by green water to the end of my tether. We found the reward in the Gulf Stream: warm bathwater filled with dolphins and calm brought us to a garden party happening in our destination port. The discrepancy was astounding—the challenge and intensity that mother nature could throw, juxtaposed with the beauty, calm, and care that she could hold. I hit the dock in Savannah knowing that this was an adventure I wanted to continue. What’s a women-on-the-water story that speaks to you? Goodness, have you learned about Maiden yet? If not, it is a must see. They faced so much doubt; not only from the public, but you see the vulnerability in Tracy’s self-doubt about racing around the world. It must have been amplified by hearing her own fears reflected back ten-fold from the community. The fact 48º NORTH

that they came in first place in legs and second overall really bucked the notion that women could not be capable sailors. I love that they made this point, maybe without it being their primary goal. Starting a women’s movement may not have been on her radar when she began, but she and her team became an iconic representation. I have respected their story for decades. When I put a women’s team together for the Race To Alaska, their story reverberated in my mind. Not realizing how our story would parallel theirs 30 years later with the doubt that we heard before the race, I realized after we had won the race that there was still a great deal of work to be done in our sport to change the sentiments of women at the helm and together on a boat. Why aren’t there more women involved in sailing today? I believe that the opportunities exist for women to get to the water. The barriers begin when they step onto a boat. When women sail with men, they are put into traditional roles— foredeck, for example. Sometimes this makes sense if they are the smallest or lightest on the boat, however, these limitations start early in their sailing experience, and moving from there to the back of the boat to drive, do tactics, or trim main, is difficult. All female teams exist, but are few and far between. In my experience, sailing with all women, we have the opportunity to trade positions around because our strength and size are closely matched. This makes us good generalists first, with the ability to specialize as our sailing qualities emerge together. With women still earning less than 80% of what men earn, financial barriers persist. Also, the traditional roles and expectations of women as mothers, partners, and in their homes have not yet reached enough of a tipping point and remain a factor. As roles between men and women continue to shift in society, I hope to see limits and barriers fall away. What can the average sailor do to make sailing feel more welcoming and accessible for women coming into the sport? Ensure that women are given the same opportunity as men to be in leadership roles on boats. Move your crew around the boat so that there is opportunity for all to learn each position. Listen to women’s contributions equally to the contributions of male crew. Check in with them to see if they are feeling a gender gap. What other thoughts about women in sailing, or insightful anecdotes, would you like to share with 48° North readers? I had the opportunity to escort Maiden with our Sail Like A Girl boat for their Seattle departure last week. It was a historic event for our region, and a day I will not forget. Spending the time with another team of female sailors further impressed on me the strength and support that women provide to each other in this sport. There is a care and an unsaid coordination among women where we take care of the boat, but also each other. When Wendy Tuck, the first woman to win a round the world race and current skipper of Maiden, proudly introduced her crew—the engineer, the medic, the first mate—I felt my pride well up. 2% of the maritime industry in the US is women. Here were strong, smart, very capable women demonstrating with their actions what they can do. 43

SEPTEMBER 2019


THIS SUMMER in Youth Sailing

by Julia Soes

Julia Soes is a sailing instructor for Orcas Island Yacht Club in the summers and has an active leadership role with Western Washington University's Sailing Team the rest of the year. After a great summer on the water, she was curious to hear about the experience of other sailing instructors around the Pacific Northwest. 48ยบ NORTH

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“We sail to fun destinations like “Clam Island,” an elusive sandbar in the middle of the inlet, which is a fun spot to set anchor. We find geoducks, sea urchins, sea cucumbers, moon snails, and more.”

S

unscreen? Check. Radio? Charged. Fourth La Croix of the day? Half finished. Patience required to teach 12 kids how to rig a boat? We’ll see…. Working for a learn to sail program brings new challenges daily. For every kid you cheer on as they complete their first successful hand exchange with the tiller, there’s another who insists that lying chest down on the bow and paddling is the fastest, and only, way to propel their boat through the water. As the 2019 summer sailing comes to a close and the wind is deciding to return to us, I like to reflect on what I learned as an instructor as well as what my young sailors learned. I sent some questions to sailing instructors from around the Northwest, and asked if they’d share some of what they experienced with their students this year. BELLINGHAM YACHT CLUB: Lauren Wittkopf, 19, has been sailing for five years. She learned to sail by joining the high school race team that spans the three high schools in Bellingham. Now, she works as head instructor at the Bellingham Yacht Club’s Learn to Sail program. With Bellingham being one of the Northwest’s outdoor meccas, it doesn’t come as a surprise that many of the students here view sailing as another means to get outside. In talking about what gets her students out on the water, Lauren said: “Many of our students’ families own boats that are moored here in Squalicum Harbor, but many others still have little to no experience on boats. The majority of kids are here because they love being outdoors and they love the challenge and complexity of learning to sail. Most students’ parents encourage them to be here and make the most of it, but we see very few who are here only because of their parents’ wishes.”

Bellingham Yacht Club's youth program gives kids a chance to sail keelboats as well as dinghies. 48º NORTH

Sailing is both fun and empowering for kids, particularly when they don't try to play Pokemon at the same time. One of the biggest challenges new sailors face is fear. Like many other outdoor sports, sailing can be dangerous and intimidating at times. For veteran sailors, these risks and fears have been faced, overcome, and almost forgotten over the years; but with beginners, it’s still an obstacle to overcome. Lauren offered the following on how to help young sailors get past there fears and enjoy the new sports, “There are definitely a few kids that we see who don’t like sailing camp for a variety of reasons, such as fear of the water, feeling overwhelmed when the weather gets bad, or just disliking outdoor pursuits. With these kinds of fears and worries, I find that it is best to clearly acknowledge the students feelings as completely valid, while also encouraging them to remember that we will keep them out of dangerous situations, we will listen when they say no, and that they have the power to overcome those fears.” As for what she hopes the kids will take away from their time in her program, Lauren says, “Mostly I want my students to love sailing as much as I do. I think there are a lot of things about it that can appeal to a wide variety of types of people, and I hope that kids never feel excluded from the sport.” The BYC program is unique in that they offer keel-boating for older kids and have a variety of active race teams, from a 29er fleet down to Optis. OAK HARBOR YOUTH SAILING: Anna Morrow, 19, has sailed her entire life. She started out in the Anacortes program and instructed there before becoming the head instructor for Oak Harbor Youth Sailing. Considering her bubbly attitude and humorous outlook on life, I asked what the funniest thing to happen to her this summer was. “I noticed two beginning Opti sailors that kept barging and sailing really close to each other. When I got a bit closer, I 45

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realized they were trying to simultaneously play Pokemon and sail. I never thought I’d have to say, “Put the Pokemon cards away!” while on the water. “It was funny, and I found myself trying not to laugh the whole time I was explaining to them the many reasons why we can’t play Pokemon while sailing right now.” One of the best parts of the job for many, aside from being on the water all day, is having a great team to work with. Most programs consist of three to four instructors. With their own experiences and techniques for teaching, kids will naturally relate more to some instructors than others. When asked if there was a favorite instructor at Oak Harbor Anna replied, “Yes, of course. Often, the kids aren’t too subtle about it either. They will walk right up to you and tell you who their favorite is. Usually the wilder kids and/or young boys like Coach Ben the best, he’s a 16-year-old that likes to go fast and do tricks. Coach Kat is the favorite of the timid or scared sailors, as she is very good with calming them down and convincing them to get out on the water. The middle ground sailors or slightly older sailors often like me.” A common problem programs face across the Pacific Northwest is how to convince kids to transition from a learn to sail program to a racing program. Oak Harbor has tried to make this process easier by offering a once weekly Open Sail for kids to get more comfortable and hopefully inspire them to move into the next level up, eventually leading to racing. KITSAP SAILING FOUNDATION: Lina Fowler, 19, learned to sail by joining the Central Kitsap Sailing Team. One thing unique to the program is their incorporation of non-sailing skills into camp. All sailors interact with the natural environment and learn to read it and, at times, protect themselves from it. Yet, at the Kitsap Sailing Foundation they teach the students to value and protect it as well. They teach not only the surface level information of sailing, but

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incorporate the how and why­­—the science behind it—as well. When asked what her students are like she says, “We teach a mix of beginners and experienced sailors from ages 8 to 18, who are very excited, energetic, and ready to learn. In all our programs, we integrate fun STEM activities that connect to what the students do on the water. With our Sailing + STEM curriculum, campers explore remote-operated vehicles (ROVs), marine life, and environmental science.” How do they take science and make it fun? Lina said, “We sail to fun destinations like “Clam Island,” an elusive sandbar in the middle of the inlet, which is a fun spot to set anchor. We find geoducks, sea urchins, sea cucumbers, moon snails, and more. We empower our students to vocalize the activities, play sailing games, and explore STEM topics that interest them. And we tailor each week to explore our students’ curiosities.” This exploration has come with a few drawbacks, recalling one fateful day this year when she told the story of how one camper got a little more than he bargained for playing in the mud: “On a particularly hot and sunny day, we set anchor near the public beach. Soon, after the campers jumped in to cool off and swim to shore, one camper yelled gleefully, “I’m stuck!” We all looked over and there he was, knee-deep in mud with a big grin on his face, trying to wriggle out to no avail. We all doubled over laughing, and it took an entire crew of campers and a whole lot of teamwork to figure out how to free him without getting stuck themselves.” Thankfully, camper and instructors managed to get free. Isn’t it funny how it’s the unexpected that often produces the most memorable experiences for all involved?

Julia Soes grew up in Anacortes, WA, and now calls Bellingham, WA home. She’s an instructor for Orcas Island Yacht Club and a leader on the Western Washington University Sailing Team.

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POINT ROBERTS MARINA Deep Water Entrance • US Fuel Prices • Laundry & Showers Convenience Store • US Customs Clearing • Pet Friendly

SO CLOSE YOU ARE ALREADY THERE...

HOME TO POINT ROBERTS RACE WEEK - STARTING 2020 -

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Factory Trained & Authorized Servicing Fully Stocked Parts Department

• Factory trained technicians • Repower or rebuild • Extensive inventory of Westerbeke & Yanmar parts • Mechanical service for sailing & power vessel • Annual maintenance • Troubleshooting • Free estimates • Our dock or yours

• Mercruiser • Crusader • Cummins • Volvo • Hino • Lehman

The Northwest Maritime Center is seeking tax deductible donation of vessels in good condition to raise money for our programs. We will consider boats of all types and sizes, though most appealing would be fiberglass boats on trailers or ones with a proven track record for cruising. Contact Kris Day at kris@nwmaritime.org or 360.503.8874

717 NE Northlake Way Seattle, WA. 98105

your boat – Support programs DONATEDonate YOUR BOAT

206-547-2477 • www.gallerymarine.com 48º NORTH

SUPPORT PROGRAMS 47 The Northwest Maritime Center is seeking tax deductible donation of vessels in good programs. condition to raise money for our programs We will consider boats of all types and

SEPTEMBER 2019


Whidbey Island Race Week

A Fabulous Farewell to Oak Harbor

Class winner, Chris White on "Crazy I's" proves you don't have to win the boat to win the race in Penn Cove.

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rom the opening welcome party to the awards ceremony send off, this year's Whidbey Island Race Week was special. As most everyone knows, this was the final Race Week in Oak Harbor, before the event begins a new chapter in Point Roberts in 2020. Roughly sixty participating boats made the docks, the race course, and the shoreside party area abuzz with activity and excitement as always; enhanced with a splash of end-of-an-era enthusiasm added this year's tasty Race Week cocktail. It's easy to forget—what with the music, the dancing, kids camp, the rum punch, the morning yoga, the fresh crab and the Penn Cove Mussels— that Race Week is a regatta first and foremost. And in this capacity in particular, 2019's Race Week was one for the ages. Each day of racing got progressively windier, from a light air nail-biter in Saratoga Passage The closely competitive J/105 class marches down Penn Cove in a bunch.

In PHRF 2, only four points separated the top five boats after four days of racing. 48º NORTH

Wednesday, into champagne sailing conditions that are pure Penn Cove Thursday and Friday, to rip roarin' fun with gusts above 20 knots on Saturday. Thursday and Friday in particular were so full of perfect summer sailing conditions and warm sunshine that many racers took the opportunity to swim on the way back into the marina. Building breeze throughout the afternoon and the typical downwind finishes made for the perfect opportunity for the quintessential and spinnaker run home, usually with beer in hand, that is always a favorite part of the Race Week experience. 48

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As the sailing each day seemed to get better and better, the hundreds of racers in attendance felt an ever-deeper sense of gratitude for Penn Cove, Oak Harbor Yacht Club, and the 37 years of fun and tradition that this location had given to them and so many others. At the awards ceremony after the final day of racing, the celebration could have gone on for hours as everyone was happy to linger and reminisce and hold-up the racers and boats and organizers who have given life to Whidbey Island Race Week over the years. Race Week has evolved over the years, from casual sailing to highly competitive racing to today's options for either, from the years of unspeakably epic parties to its more recent focus on being both fun and family-friendly. The venue change is a big step, but an important one in the next phase of its evolution. The Whidbey Island chapter of Race Week ended on a high note, and will be a fond memory for everyone lucky enough to be there. While that's clearly true, it's an exciting prospect to envision a new Pacific Northwest sailing tradition taking shape! I hope that many of you have already put Point Roberts Race Week on your calendars for 2020. Nobody knows quite what it will be like, and that's the most thrilling part! Tom Kerr's J/105 "Corvo" fights for clear air. The book on Penn Cove is well known, but there were certainly times when outcomes bucked the conventional wisdom. The middle/left of the course paid some dividends on the first beat in early races on several days, and all areas of the course paid on a many of the downwinds. Winning the boat and getting right usually paid, but not always, and there were races where you wanted to get right, but not too soon. As always, the race committee did a masterful job managing the fleets and keeping the starts running quickly to maximize the number of races. Some might even say they cycled too quickly, occasionally leaving crews scrambling: "Everybody only gets a half a sandwich and wolf it down, we're in sequence again!" As he has in recent years, PRO Charlie Rathkopf and his committee experimented with some fun reaching-leg courses on Friday, a great way to keep the sailors on their toes. The racing was great across the board. Top spots were up for grabs, often separated by a point or two coming into the final day, among the J/105 and J/80 one-design fleets, as well as the two fastest PHRF fleets. Wider deltas had been established by other handicap fleets with David Jackson's Dash 34 MadDash, Chris White's Martin 242 Crazy I's, and Ben and Jennifer Braden's More Uff Da running away with their divisions. In the more hotly contested fleets, WIRW experience paid off as all four winners made a return to the top of their respective class podiums. Jerry Diercks' Delirium narrowly edged out Jaded and Moose Unknown in the J/105 division, making two consecutive years at the top of that competitive class. In the up and coming J/80 fleet, class stalwart David Schutte and crew on Taj Mahal, put together a very consistent week, sealing their fate as victors with bullets in the final two races and defending their class win as well. In the two big-boat PHRF classes, Shrek and Elusive returned to the top of the podium in their classes, after a couple years of near misses. 48ยบ NORTH

By Joe Cline Photos by Jan Anderson Results at www.48north.com/raceresults

The bow team on Jeff Whitney's C&C 115 "Elusive" work to keep the kite dry.

Kids Camp was another huge success in 2019! 49

SEPTEMBER 2019


MOORE 24 National Championship

"Immortal" skippered by Dan Kaseler fends off Joe Grieser's "Spoon Man" down a run. "Immortal" finished on the podium overall.

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he 2019 Moore 24 Nationals proved to be a hard-fought contest, with a range of sailing conditions contributing to a diverse score card for most of the competitors. Fourteen teams hailing from Seattle, Hood River, Victoria, Santa Cruz, and the Bay area attended the event, which was sailed out of Corinthian Yacht Club of Seattle on Shilshole Bay. An experienced race committee led by PRO Charlie Rathkopf made the most of the conditions, with a couple strategic dock postponements (anticipating afternoon northerlies). The result was some classic Puget Sound racing with sunshine, relatively flat water, and wind speeds ranging between 5 and 12 knots. A change in the weather Sunday brought a switch to a somewhat shiftier decreasing southerly. Hood River’s Bruzer emerged at the top of the leaderboard. Per Moore 24 Fleet tradition, winning co-skippers Erik Hauge and Mark Harang offer the following insights. FROM ERIK: Moore 24 Nationals in Seattle, Hell Yeah! Sign me up. I love sailing in Puget Sound. It is slightly different than the Gorge, but fun it its own right. Morgan and Christa Larson, some of the most generous boat owners and huge supporters of the Moore 24 class and sailing in the Hood River community, lent me their boat Bruzer. My first call was to Mark Harang, who I sailed dinghies and keelboats with in college, and also with whom I have sailed Hawaii races, Round the County, South Sound and Center Sound races. We added Terry Williamson as a trimmer and Brad Speidel, my bow man from the Express 27, up on the pointy end. Low and behold we were 121 pounds shy of max weight. We just happen to have a keen 14-year-old junior sailor, Leif Hauge, who weighs 120 lb and helps Brad on the bow of the Express. The crew was complete. Looking at the entry list and the talent that was on hand, it was obvious that almost any boat was capable of winning races. CYC ran a few practice races where we had a chance to line up, 48º NORTH

tune, and see how we stacked up against the competition. The idea was to switch off helming between myself and Mark, so Mark and I each drove a practice race. The results were the same: we were pretty much dead last in both of them. That night at dinner, there was a bit of concern hanging in the air, and I think we were all thinking the same thoughts... “What the hell did we get ourselves into, this is going to be a long weekend”! FROM MARK: It is Bruzer tradition that we have a “Shot of the day” before we go out on the water. Respecting tradition was on the list of our goals, so for the first day, Goldschlager it was. During the briefing on the way out of the harbor we talked about doing our best, sailing as fast as we could, and having fun. We did not have high expectations. Since day one started out patchy and light, we made the call to put the light guys on the ends of the boat and center our weight in the middle, with Leif up on the bow and me at the helm. The conditions were tailor-made for my self-proclaimed “foot to the next shift” approach. While we surprised ourselves with a win in Race 1, it was the Hood River team onboard Space Toaster that set the tone for the day. As the northerly built, David Gee and the Space Toaster team sailed most consistently, never finishing worse than third. The steady breeze and relatively short lines led to aggressive starts. Race 3 saw five of the favorites picking up an OCS (not a good thing in a no throw-out series). At the end of the day, Space Toaster held a four-point lead over Bruzer, with More Uff Da, Mooreitican, More Cowbell, and Immortal tightly grouped a few points back. After all that racing, most sailors had worked-up a powerful thirst. Fortunately the locals had a plan. Ballard-based Moore Ambassadors and reigning Moore 24 National Champions, Ben and Jennifer Braden, organized a fleet BBQ at their beautifully remodeled home. They are always the masters of fun and good times. How cool is it that the whole 50

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fleet comes together for the parties? The Moore fleet is very special and we don’t take it for granted! DAY TWO, BRUZER SHOT OF THE DAY: JÄGERMEISTER! Day two featured similar conditions; however, lady luck did not smile equally on everyone. Space Toaster began the day with a dominating performance. For the second race, they recovered from a restart to motor through the fleet and cap off back-toback wins. On Bruzer, we were on a steady improvement cycle, finishing the first two races mid-fleet, but then ending with a third and a first. Saturday’s final race turned out to be the “distance race” and featured a long run into Shilshole bay with a final beat along the marina breakwater. When the scores were tallied, Space Toaster led Bruzer by three points, with Immortal, More Uff Da, and Spoon Man closing the gap. With one day of racing to go, it looked like several boats had a solid shot to win the championship. DAY THREE, BRUZER SHOT OF THE DAY: FIREBALL As it turns out, day three was ruled by the Seattle weather. Things started off in a solid southerly, with rain showers threatening. The first race was won by Mooretician, with Immortal, More Uff Da, Flying Circus, and Space Toaster rounding out the top five. At this point, Space Toaster’s lead over Bruzer had swelled to five points with Immortal just six more back. The last race started in decent breeze, but it decreased rapidly as the fleet rounded the weather mark. Flying Circus led the way with Bruzer, Morphine, Firefly, and Mooretician all

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Passing lanes were hard to come by in this talented fleet. occupying the second spot at one time or another. The race committee shortened course at the ensuing weather mark where Mooretician once again took the win. On Bruzer, we were able to sneak by Flying Circus, then hold off a hard charging Ray to finish second. The shakeup in finish positions left Bruzer on the top step, and with no wind anticipated for several hours, the regatta was over. It was a tough finish, but not unusual in these parts. Special thanks to the Seattle Moore Fleet and CYC for a great regatta, and thanks again to Morgan and Christa for loaning us such a well-prepared boat.

By Erik Hague and Mark Harang Photos courtesy of Sean Trew Results at www.48north.com/raceresults

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Shaw Island Classic For the 48 sailboats in the 49th annual running of the Shaw Island Classic, the currents were strong and the winds light and temperamental. Hosted by the San Juan Island Yacht Club, the race is a highlight of the summer boating season, drawing sailors from throughout the region to circumnavigate Shaw Island. Racers can circle the island in either direction, factoring in shifting winds, variable currents, narrow rocky channels, and ferry traffic. The wind decided to die right at the race start, but then freshened enough for most racers to make the dash for Upright Channel. 90% of racers chose to do a counter-clockwise route, hoping for favorable currents most of the way. However, half the cruising class could not get past Turn Island where a two knot adverse current trumped four knots of wind. For the majority of racers that made the turn, light wind made for a stately pace up Upright Channel, into Harney Channel and Wasp Passage on the northern side of Shaw. Just as many racers thought crossing the finish line before the deadline was out of reach, 10-12 knots greeted them as they entered San Juan Channel with a favorable ebb tide allowing a fast run across the line. After the race, racers and guests enjoyed a hearty lasagna dinner prepared by San Juan Island Yacht Club, followed by the awards ceremony. Best overall on corrected time this year went to the monohull Hydra, a King 40 skippered by Sam Richardson.

Ray Pingree's Raven "Shilelagh" edges out Christopher Rosinski's Moore 24 "Moore-on" at the finish. Ben Colwell with his Formula 18 multihull, Rum Line, continued his winning record and took home awards for Fastest Elapsed Time and 1st place in the Multihull division. By Chris Reed Photo courtesy of Bill Waxman Results at www.48north.com/raceresults

Cow Bay Regatta The Cowichan Bay Regatta has to be among the few pop-up regattas in existence. Want to join the Cowichan Bay Sailing Association? It’s cheaper than buying dinner, and you get a burgee to go with it. The trailer rolls in on Friday, the boats arrive and the volunteers assemble, and the regatta is on! The crazy thing is that it’s the best-attended PHRF regatta that I know of in the Pacific Northwest! Seventy boats, and only the Martin 242s and Hotfoot 27s had one design fleets. What gives? It’s warm, and the wind blows nearly every afternoon, and the scenery is fantastic. And the Canadians still know how to have fun! This year, a system came in from the wrong direction and threatened to mess with our regatta. On Thursday night, it rained and the wind blew from the north; what were we to do?! Never fear, it eventually straightened out. On Saturday morning, the local thermal breeze they call the “Doctor” waited until afternoon to arrive. On Wild Rumpus, we joked that it wasn’t really the doctor, but maybe instead it was just the nursing staff. The wind was patchy and from the north, coming directly 48º NORTH

from the mountains and through the bays, and not from either of the predictable directions in a long bay that stretches west to east. The courses are all pre-determined and run in an east/west direction, so the first race was a series of headsail reaching legs. By early afternoon, the wind filled from the east and we got off two solid races. In true Cow Bay form, the steak dinner turned into dancing, and the cement dance floor on the beach was full of sailors kicking up the dust in the dark and reveling well into the wee hours of the morning. "Don’t Stop Believin’" sent the campground to bed at 1:30 in the morning. On Sunday the wind filled in a bit quicker, the weather was a bit warmer, and the swimming was pretty popular after racing. Thanks Cow Bay for delivering the awesomeness! I can't wait to come back next year... hopefully the Doctor will be in. By Stephanie Campbell Results at www.48north.com/raceresults 52

SEPTEMBER 2019


CLASSIFIEDS

S&S YANKEE 30 MK I (1971) - $13,499 Located in Puget Sound, Washington. Structurally sound, engine runs well. Interior needs paint and varnish. Interior cushions and fabric in great shape. Exterior needs paint. All offers considered, have two boats now. New fuel and aft water tank. Iverson’s Designs dodger. Atomic 4 updated just short of overhaul with electronic ignition & new fresh water heat exchanger, propeller and much more. Call or text for more info: (360) 900-9909.

J29 MASTHEAD COMPETITIVE RACER 1984 J29 Masthead w/outboard - $12,500. Has been in an active racing program since 2000. Has performed very well and is very competitive. Head sail and spinnaker bought in 2015 used only for major regattas, #3 lightly used and new in 2013. Main new in 2011. Standing rigging replaced in 2004. Located in Seattle. Contact Pat for more info (206) 719-1157. Info: themanwiththehex@gmail.com

1980 IRWIN CITATION 30 Roller furling, 3 headsails, cruising spinnaker, 15 HP Yanmar diesel, 9' inflatable with 4 HP outboard, fridge, propane, stove, and heater charger inverter. Hardtop dodger, solar panel, anchor, winch, autopilot. Safety equipment, harnesses, wet weather gear, charts and cruising guides for Tacoma to Cape Scott. 60 gallon water, 30 gallon diesel. Ready to cruise. $18,000. For more info, (250) 656-3188 or sailing for2@telus.net

FAST PASSAGE 39 - SEATTLE Pax Vobiscum is a Fast Passage 39 built in 1979 at Philbrook’s Boatyard in Sidney, B.C. She is a 39-footsix-inch cutter designed by Bill Garden to be safe, sea-kindly, and easily handled by a couple. She is a well-maintained, fully-equipped bluewater cruiser that has taken us from Seattle to French Polynesia and back. See https://www.fastpassage39.com for details and photos. For sale by owners at $82,000. fastpassageforsale@gmail.com - (971) 319-0850.

1981 DASH 34 2018 Vancouver Island Racing Series winner. Fractional rig racer/cruiser with symmetrical spinnaker, tapered Yachtspar mast, safety gear, Yamaha 9.9 outboard on bracket. New epoxy bottom and faired/templated rudder from 2017. Optimized for cruising with aft head, two burner stove with oven, swim ladder and extra large v-berth. Racing sails in fair to excellent condition; cruising/delivery sails in fair to good condition. $17K USD OBO. Will deliver anywhere in PNW. For more info, please contact via email at dash34@hotmail.com or via phone at (250) 758-2506.

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ISLANDER FREEPORT Illness forces sale. Owner built sailboat with excellent carpentry. Interior is in fantastic condition. Includes 4 person dinghy 10 HP OB. Great liveaboard and ready to cruise. Roller furling with complete set of sail covers. Canvas covers for all external woodwork. Full cockpit enclosure. Engine is Nissan MN633. Boat has not had any rough sailing. Radar R10X raster scan. Hot water heater and dryer. $79,000. For more info contact or (206) 579-0187or via email at rexcnanw@msn.com

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1981 CATALINA 30 Asking $14,500, Negotiable. CUSTOM solid teak interior. New roller furling, all new electric and panel. Many upgrades! Anacortes moorage available. Tripolyurethane paint. Never a blister! CALL for details (360) 540-7070.

HARBOR 20 - SWEET SAILING 2015 Harbor 20 #390 with blue hull and custom wood look transom. Toast canvas includes full boat cover, tiller, jib sock, mainsail, companionway. Electric motor, auto bilge pump, pop up cleats, full cushions. Professionally maintained, clean and no damage. Perfect day sailor for Lake Union, Washington, etc. Located at Poulsbo Yacht Club. One owner. $29,000. Contact: garrywillis@gmail.com

1981 38’ ERICSON SLOOP 4 cylinder diesel. 750 hours. 54 gallon fuel, 90 gallon water. Roller furling, full batten main. self-tailing winches, lines lead aft. Electric windlass, 200’ 5/16 Hi-test chain. Freshwater wash down. 33lb. claw anchor. New Garmin radar, Garmin chartplotter, AIS, below deck autopilot. VHF. New AC panel, 2000 watt inverter. Microwave, Force 10 stove/oven, double propane tanks. New freezer/refrigerator. Head with separate shower. 25 gallon holding tank. Dodger, teak floors, Berthed at John Wayne Marina, Sequim, WA. $55,000. For more info, call (360) 774-0915 or (360) 774-0912.

J/35 FOR SALE The J/35 Taking Off is for sale. Put up the spinnaker in some big air and you'll think that you are "Taking Off". Too many details for this small ad, so contact me at engbrechtrj@gmail.com, if you're interested. Asking $18,000. Yes, I think it can still beat a J/109.

SEPTEMBER 2019


BOATS FOR SALE

BOATS FOR SALE

BOATS FOR SALE

CAL-36 Equipped and ready to cruise the Salish Sea. LPG stove/ oven, rail mounted BBQ, 75 amp alternator, 1000 watt inverter/charger, 2-8D house batteries, H&C water, microwave, diesel cabin heater, holding tank, nice interior, Yanmar diesel, 140 genoa on Profurl, main w/2 reefs, E-Z Jacks, dodger, radar, autopilot, VHF w/ DSC & GPS, windlass, 35# Bruce on 150' chain and 200' rode, Danforth stern anchor, stern tie on removable reel. Located on Vashon Island. $19,900. For more information email: svtaaroa@gmail.com

1979 30' NEWPORT MK2 Well maintained racer/cruiser with very comfortable interior: Universal M25 diesel with Vetus exhaust system and dripless shaft seal; wheel steering; Raytheon ST 4000 plus autopilot interfaced to Garmin GPS; Garmin depth/temperature/speed; Horizon Intrepid VHF; SmartPlug and galvanic isolator; internal halyards; rainbow genoa on Schaefer furler; spinnaker; gimballed Force 10 range with Xintex sniffer; Webasto hydronic heat; hot and cold pressure water; LED lights. Located at Roche Harbor Marina. $25,000. For more info, please contact SAIL4FUN@ROCKISLAND.COM or call (360) 378-6792.

PASSPORT 40 1985 Famous bluewater cruiser. 46 HP Westerbeke. All systems updated: electrical and refrigeration. TV/DVD, stereo with outside speakers. All new canvas: Stack Pack and full boat cover. New latex mattresses. Current Raymarine chartplotter/navigation. Hydrovane. Neil Pryde sails. Andersen electric secondary winch. 400 watt solar panels. 10-ft dinghy included. Maxwell windlass. 55 lb Rocna anchor. Currently located in San Carlos, Mexico. $120,000. Contact owner for more information at glouisiv@gmail.com or (707) 290-1637.

46 FT CUSTOM STEEL KETCH Professionally designed/built fast cruiser. Safe/Kindly world veteran. Round chine, flush deck. Treadmaster nonskid. 5 Cabins/2heads. Sleeps 8. Finishing major restoration. Masts/boom rigging by Brion Toss. Extensive nearly new equipment list for adventure cruising. Low hour Perkins 4-108. 2 Nearly new full batten cruising sales. Roller furling, Solar/wind. New LED lights, insulation, ceiling panels. W-H Electric/ hydraulic A/P w/remote. Spectra 16 gal/hr watermaker. Isolation transformer. Frigoboat refrigerator w/ keel cooler. More. Transferable slip Sequim, WA. $114,950. For more information, please call (619) 537-6078 or email wallyweez@gmail.com or check out www.ogigiona.com

CRUISE READY BENETEAU 423 Cruise ready 2004 Beneteau 423: 2 cabin layout, deep keel, aluminum davits arch with 400w solar panels. Boat is located in La Paz, BCS, Mexico. Asking price $154,000 For full specs please contact: Tom Murray at La Paz Yachts. Cell: +52 612-123-1948. Toll free: (855) 335-2729. E-mail: lapazyachts@aol.com More info available at www.lapazyachts.com

41' MORGAN CLASSIC SAILBOAT 1991 Morgan classic very good condition. 2 new 4D house batteries, new refrigeration system, newer autopilot, newer radar, new lines. Call (503) 396-1183 or text. Asking $79,900 or OBO.

26 FT CUSTOM FLUSH DECK SLOOP 1978 sloop in Richmond, CA. $10,500 OBO. Great cruiser or racer. 2000 lb. Jake van Heeckeren design. Built by Hank Jotz. Bruynzeel plywood and epoxy. Always dry sailed and garaged. Nearly new condition. Comfy varnished interior, gimbaled stove, double bunk under cockpit. 2 HP Honda, SS rod rigging, Barient winches, solar panel,VHF,depth,compass, 10 ft Avon dinghy, trailer. Hank Jotz - (530) 623 7830 or hankjotz@gmail.com for photos. Fast and easy to sail in all weather!

1992 CREALA 40

45' CUSTOM ALUMINUM PH 2006 - $269,000

Professionally constructed in BC, cruise loaded with electronics, 100HP Isuzu Diesel, 500 gal fuel, 250 gal water, watermaker, solar panels, windvane, AP, lot of upgrades and spares. Newer sails w/ furling mainsail and genoa, new RIB dinghy and OB w/ davits, liferaft, hydraulic windlass, refrigerator w/ freezer, two cabins. A great NW equipped, long range cruising pilothouse. San Juan Sailing - Bellingham, WA brokerage@sanjuansailing.com 360-671-0829 48º NORTH

Designed by Crealock with lines similar to the Pacific Seacraft 40. Cutter rig, aft cockpit, fin keel, Skeg hung rudder, 44 HP Yanmar. Offshore equipped. Teak deck and teak interior in good condition. 2 cabin, 1 head. Liveaboard and cruising ready. Well maintained and cruised by one owner. Organized, clean, and comfortable. Located in the western Caribbean yachting community of Rio Dulce. $88,000. More info at tillsonds@yahoo.com FENIX MAXI 28' SLOOP 1984 Excellent racer/cruiser/family boat with Volvo Penta MD-3 sail-drive. Only 1446 engine hours. Fine teak interior, excellent upholstery, holding tank, auto-pilot, radio, etc. Original sails with genoa and self-tacking jib in good condition, no mildew or wear. Recent engine overhaul by Volvo specialist produced an excellent report. We are only selling the boat because of our advancing age. It's a strong, very well-built, quality European boat. (604) 883-2341. $22,000 CAD.

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2006 CATALINA MORGAN 440 44’ Very clean, 75 HP Yanmar 1300 hrs, Gen set 600 hrs, bow thruster, windlass, anchor washdown, watermaker, full dodger/Bimini, 12” Raymarine, instruments, radar, 4 HP kicker/ dinghy, 900 amp house bank new 2018, bottom painted / zincs 2019. Asymmetrical sail, shore, TV, water hookups. Cruised PNW for 8 weeks each summer, docked at our home, lightly used. Non smoker, no animals, and shoes off in cockpit! Sail away ready!! $235,000. Call or text (360) 731-7165. Bristol condition throughout!

SEPTEMBER 2019


t . . . e , , r l

BOATS FOR SALE

BOATS FOR SALE

BOATS FOR SALE

1982 CATALINA 27 SALE OR TRADE Are you ready for a bigger boat? We are ready for smaller. Well appointed and maintained Catalina 27, freshwater last 20 years, custom tandem axle trailer, Universal Diesel, tiller, roller furling North 150%, full batten North main, newer interior cushion, pull out full berth in salon. Will trade for good condition Catalina 22 2000 or newer. Sale price is $14,500 or trade straight across. Boat is in Boise Contact Dave (208) 861-5428, parinama@hotmail.com

J24 - LUCKY JIM $9,500.00 - 1982 International J24. Extensive sail inventory. All in good condition, a Ray Marine autopilot and a galvanized tandem trailer. Lucky Jim is a proven race winner and ready to go One Design or PHRF. Two Genoa Lopez lead blocks, GPS, digital depth sounder, Pro Start and mast bracket. 5HP Tohotsu outboard motor. Located in Oak Harbor, Washington. For info, please contact Jim McAlpine at (360) 679-4825 or via email at Melusine@hughes.net

1981 J24 # 2363 FOR SALE J24 race/cruise ready. Needs nothing. New epoxy Baltoplate bottom 2018 (CSR). Three North spinnakers, three north mains, one North jib, three North genoas (1 new 2018), 3 HP Nissan (2 stroke), EZ Loader 2 axle steel trailer, 2015 refit with all thru deck holes re-drilled / sealed, lazarettes sealed / faired, non-skid deck, keel faired to class template. Asking $11,800. Contact Scott at (206) 849-5044 / srvokey@comcast.net

CHESAPEAKE 32 - PRICE REDUCED!!! Peregrina, a beautiful Rhodes designed sloop, proven cruiser. Hasse & Company sails. Yanmar3GM engine. Monitor windvane and Autohelm ST4000. Dickinson propane fireplace. Ranger sailing dinghy. For more details call (206) 714-2074. $12,500 OBO!

J-35 FOR SALE J-35 Recent major refit, excellent sails. Newly faired and Painted inside and out. Still in the shop ready to ship. Located in Gig Harbor, WA. Contact Dave Stafford at dstafford.fish@gmail.com or (253) 225-5304 for details. This one is for racing. $44,500.

CAPE DORY 28 28 foot Cape Dory sloop. Fair condition. Good sails, extra jib. Bronze Barlow winches, Volvo diesel, rebuilt recently. Bottom paint one year old. Drip-less stuffing box. Good marine batteries. Alcohol stove. Moored in Anacortes, WA. We have owned and sailed this boat for 29 years. Great sailer and handles a stiff breeze with ease. $13,525. Contact Mark Burpo at (360) 661-6442 or via email at mark@markburpo.com

48Âş NORTH

1989 PACIFIC SEACRAFT 37 PRICE REDUCED! $107,500. Well maintained Crealock 37 with newer Lifeline AGM batteries; Xantrex 2kw inverter/charger; wind generator; solar panels; watermaker; liferaft; Data Marine knot, depth, wind instruments; Alpha Marine autopilot; Garmin HD radar, AIS 600, GPSMAP74XS chartplotter, VHF 200; ICOM M802 SSB; Pactor III modem; Custom computer; Monitor windvane; EPIRB; Yanmar 40hp; 40 gallons fuel; 80 gallons water; MaxProp; 8 sails; standing rigging replaced 2013. And more! In Portland, OR. Contact: Robert.curry@yandex.com; (904) 728-9199. 1978 CAL 39 MK II Race or cruise, 6'2 headroom, hot/cold pressure water, propane stove and oven. 6 cf 110v refer/icebox. 1 head with shower and vaccuflush head with 40 gal holding tank. Sleeps 7. Electronics- VHF, wind-speed etc, plus autopilot. Maxwell windlass with 200' chain and 200 rode. sails--2 main, 3 genoas, 2 jibs and 3 spinnakers. Harken double track furling. Engine- 50 hp Perkins 4-108 1983, 2000 hrs, 3 new 12V batteries. $29,950. Jim (425) 744-8045.

35' YAWL - BITTERSWEET Bittersweet is a 35' yawl built in 1940 at Graves Shipyard in Marblehead, Mass. Mahogany planks on oak frames. Atomic-4 closed cooled auxiliary. 3 headsails, main and mizzen in good condition. Spruce spars. Interior is as original, very spartan. Small galley, head locker with porta-potti, v-berth and two quarter berths. 8'6" beam, 25' waterline, draws 5 1/2'. Needs refinishing, some refastening. $15k , reasonable offers. (208) 610-3077.

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CASCADE 42 SLOOP 1971 Cascade 42, center cockpit, bow, main and aft cabins. Heads and lavs in main and aft cabin. South Pacific veteran. Great bluewater boat. Includes inflatable, kayak, autopilot, main, jib, genoa, storm sail, spinnaker, drogue, radio + handheld. Furuno radar, solar panel, 100 gal water tank. Propane stove and oven. Sleeps 6. 7â&#x20AC;&#x2122; headroom in main cabin. Comfortable liveaboard. Shower. Westerbeke diesel. $20,900 OBO. Was $25,900. Call Wayne at (435) 772-5394. CRUISE READY SAN JUAN 24 1975 w/ Caulkins trailer...Main, Jib, genoa on a Selden Furlex Furler, and spinnaker w/ pole. Long shaft Yamaha 8 HP outboard w/ electric start and tilt, battery charger, extra thrust large prop, and 6 gallon fuel tank. 35 gallon fresh water bladder w/ deck fill. Two deep cycle 6V marine batteries and 120V dock power w/cord and cabin outlets. New 3" vinyl/ foam cushions. Titles are clear. $6700. Contact Barney at (360) 640-0046 for more information.

1963 32' ISLANDER Completely refinished classic glass, new sails, AWLGRIP paint job, re-powered with Yanmar 3GM diesel, propane stove and heater, new stanchions, lifelines, bow pulpit and stern pulpit, solar panel. Interior completely insulated and refinished. We have had this boat for 25 years and have completely gone through it. Very comfortable liveaboard. Incredible cruiser. Boat has been to Alaska twice. Must see to appreciate. For more info, please call or text (360) 888-6662. Asking $28K OBO.

SEPTEMBER 2019


BOATS FOR SALE

BOATS FOR SALE

BOATS FOR SALE

41' OCEAN GOING SLOOP Rebel X is beautifully designed by Van de Stadt and built by Southern Ocean Shipyard in U.K. in 1968 and, given the many years of extensive ocean and local cruising, is in beautiful condition. A few key features include the solid layup construction, integral lead long fin keel, balanced rudder, cutter or sloop rigged, Aries windvane, diesel heat and autopilot. . There is extensive additional equipment. Email isrebelx@hotmail.com to receive specifications. $52,000 USD or C$68,800.

29' DUTCH MASTHEAD SLOOP A lovely and well-found diesel auxiliary sloop, built, 1968. This is a Trintella 1a (Hull #509), fiberglass, in excellent condition and finely fitted out with teak decks, electronics, sails, Kubota diesel with under 500 hours, galley, heater, AC/DC power, autohelm, and charm to burn. A delight to sail. $23,000. Now lying Quartermaster Harbor, Vashon. Contact Howard Ford, (206) 930-2351 or via email quintain@mac.com

1983 J30 FOR SALE Well maintained and upgraded. All running rigging has been replaced mostly with high tech double braid. Wallas diesel forced air heater, refrigeration, new Lewmar self tailing winches, sails are in good shape, newer UK #1, Ballard dacron main with two reef lines, #2 and #3 and decent and never used #4. Two spinnakers. New drippless seal, drive shaft, cutlass bearing and 2 blade Max-Prop. $22,000. theosingelis@gmail.com or (360) 790-2018.

1994 J/130 1994 J/130 sailboat. North main and jib. Spinnaker. Winches fully rebuilt with backing plates. New bottom paint. New PYI dripless shaft seal. New rudder bearing, two blade gori prop, serviced. New depth transducer. Hull and topsides buffed and waxed. Mast, spreaders and boom stripped and repainted with AWLGRIP. Rig completely gone through. New windex decks repainted with AWLGRIP. New main sheet, traveler, jib track and lines. Rebuilt injectors. Lots of other upgrades. Asking $109,000. malcolmm16@me.com or (206) 910-4418.

NEWLY CONSTRUCTED SID SKIFF New construction Sid skiff. Traditional copper riveted lapstrake Port Orford Cedar planks on steam-bent White Oak frames. Mahogany keel, stem, transom. Clear vertical grain Doug Fir thwarts. New spritsail rig and hand-made oars. New trailer. The builder is an alumnus of the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding in Port Townsend, WA. The plans for the boat were developed by Ray Speck, a boatbuilder, respected nationally as well as internationally. Price: $15,000 contact: skessler1@mac.com

1981 "ONE TON" 39' SAILBOAT 1981"One Ton Class" IOR 39'Sailboat. $15,000. Offers considered. Began overhaul; didn't finish. NEW Volvo Penta D240, throttle control, tanks, Racor setup, electrical panels, and more! No upholstery. No sails, rigging or winches. Have mast, no spreaders. Located in Portland, OR. Call (503) 737-1651 or email moorage@myharbor.com

26’ THUNDERBIRD SAILBOAT Moving on and want to find her a good home. Hull #117. One of the original Thunderbird class of sailboats designed/ built in the Pacific Northwest. Well loved, well sailed, successful racer and cruiser, ideal for new or downsizing sailors. Complete refit, West System epoxy hull, well maintained, set up to cruise for two or a young family. Current survey available, lots of accessories. Asking $5,800 obo. Located in Nanaimo, BC. Contact Paul (250) 755-5151 or p_steele@shaw.ca

1974 WESTSAIL 32’ Factory offshore layout. New sail suit. Cutter rig. New Lewmar skylight, updated propane system. All necessary items. Ready to be used and enjoyed. Presently on hard in Anacortes. Perkins 4-108 runs fine. Hurth, dripless. Owner since '01. Hitting road on rubber tire yacht...$29,500 OBO. Dan at (360) 202-8611 call/text or danjuan.sanjuanenterprise@gmail.com

48 TAYANA DS - 2002

The nicest on the market! Highly maintained with records. Many recent upgrades. CRUISE LOADED and turn key ready! Easily sailed by a couple. Located in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. Cruise Mexico now and start your adventures. Surveyed, hauled and bottom painted. Boom furling, furling foresails, elec. winches, watermaker, gen set, custom hard dodger w/ full enclosure, 2 cabin & Contact Wes Koenig (360) 201-2459 heads. $319,000. Shown by appointment. Owner available for orientation. wes@sanjuansailing.com 48º NORTH

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87 HUNTER 26.5 SHOAL DRAFT 2009 Tuff trailer, electric brakes, tongue ext, new tires & bearing repack 3/19. 2012 Yamaha 8 hp, generator, electric trim with remote controls. Stepable mast raising system. Tiller steering with wheel steering kit available . Interlux bottom paint applied 6/2019. Bimini top, Bluetooth stereo with outside speakers. Main, conventional jib and asymmetrical spinnaker. Wonder boat dinghy with weighted bottom available, $10,000 OBO. Contact Ron at (208) 891-2586. Boat is located in Twin Falls, Idaho.

42 CASCADE HISIDE - $35,000 For pics and info email propman@live.com -- can be seen at Astoria mooring basin slip A-48 anytime.

SEPTEMBER 2019


BOATS FOR SALE

BOATS FOR SALE

BOATS FOR SALE

2007 CATALINA 320 MK II The perfect PNW sailboat. Sleeps 6, engineer-owned & maintained, low 382 hours on Yanmar 3YM30 engine. Bimini, Iverson dodger, ultra-leather interior, Raymarine instruments, chart plotter/radar/AIS, Wallas diesel heater, new house batteries, wired for solar, wash down pump, dual refrigeration, TV antenna, LCDTV/ DVD player, Bose speakers. Recent bottom paint, hull waxing. This boat is loaded, well-maintained, and ready for extended PNW cruising or daysailing. $99,950. Call/ Text (425) 508-7971.

44-FT CATALINA-MORGAN 440 $235,000 -Fully equipped and meticulously maintained cruising DS sloop w/ AC/Heater, Yanmar 4JH3TE with 2,000 hrs, E120 plotter, Radar, ST60 instruments, auto-pilot, 270W solar, 8KW FP Gen, 8D AGMs, 3000W inverter/charger, Spectra 400 19gph, 9' Caribe HB, 9.9 Nissan, 6-person Winslow Offshore (cert 10/18), UK Flasher Spin, Icom 810 HF radio w/ Pactor Modem. Leisure Furl main, hard dodger w Lexan windows. Many extras. In Mazatlán, MX. For complete inventory call (626) 353-3858 or email sailcub@gmail.com

1980 GLOBE 41, CENTER COCKPIT Offshore cruiser. Fiberglass with beautiful teak interior and deck. 2 cabins, large aft Masters' cabin. 2 heads/ showers. Sails in excellent condition, roller furling jib, mainsail, staysail, spinnaker / others. 75 HP Volvo Penta. Raymarine C Series (radar, GPS, depth sounder, fishfinder) EPIRB, Autopilot, Spectra watermaker, Monitor windvane, Lewmar electric windlass, Winslow life raft. 140 gal. water, 120 gal. diesel. $38,000. Call (360) 477-3675 or (360) 477-3678. Moored Olympia, WA. May offer partial financing to local buyer.

CUSTOM SAILING KAYAK TRIMARAN Built from double sea kayak, Hobie 14 hulls, aluminum pipes/fittings and fully cambered sails. NOT a thrown together “attempt” but a well thought out and overbuilt vessel. Paddles at 2-3 knots, motors at 6 knots and sails at 2-12 knots. Travel up to 60 miles per day and camp out at night. Many successful trips completed. No moorage. Boat, sails, masts, leeboard, Honda 2hp outboard, akas, amas, spray skirts, etc. NO trailer. $5000. More info at (206) 747-4586.

PACIFIC SEACRAFT MARIAH 31 Beautiful blue-water ocean cruiser! Liveaboard, explore the San Juans, then the world! Custom built, 36' LOA, 6'5" of cabin head room, sleeps 6, full keel, deep draft, double-ender, Westerbeke 4 108, new Lukas starter and solenoid, Trimble GPS, Furuno Radar, QUAD CYCLE, SIX SAILS, over-sized standing rigging, Norseman fittings, Barlow winches, Harken traveler, 4 anchors, Tigerhorse windlass, 90 gal fuel,150 gal water, wind generator, solar, self-steering, great condition, contact jessicalundie@msn.com for more photos.

ALAJUELA 33 Alajuela 33, 1979, she is a boat made for cruising. Been to Hawaii twice. Will always bring you home. Well maintained and loved. 1,200 hours on rebuilt engine, 400 hours on rebuilt transmission. Extensive upgrades. Ready to sail north today. Complete list of all equipment available and video of interior. Maintained by Port Townsend Shipwrights. List of new additions, dodger, all standing rigging, new windlass, new GPS, autohelm, wheel, solar, Lexmark hatches, etc. (360) 265-2856. $44,500.

BABA 30 Sausalito, CA. Ocean going 30' pocket cruiser. Very stable and dependable. 4'9'' draft. 1981 Robert Perry design. Beautiful Art Nouveau teak interior; marble counter in head. Sleeps 5. Teak decks and cabin top. Hydrovane self steering, roller furling, 4 sails, wheel steering, radio, depth finder, Volvo 29 hp diesel engine, full boat cover and individual hatch and sail covers. $49,000. Call Dale: (415) 868-2401 or (415) 328-2853. Email Dale: roushpottery@hotmail.com

1987 34’ NORDIC YACHTS SLOOP Beautiful, Robert Perry design built in Bellingham by Nordic Yachts. Westerbeke diesel with 1300 hours. New sails and new Standard Horizon GX2200 VHF with integrated GPS/AIS and remote mic. Located in Bellingham. The Nordic 34 is one of Perry’s better designs. A great cruiser that has also performed well in club racing. Perry said it is a “sweet sailing boat.” Only four in PNW. Asking $49,900. For more info/photos call/ text (360) 820-3369 or email Gary.Eerkes@gmail.com

CT41 PROVEN CRUISER WITH EXTRAS Classic Bill Garden Ketch (Formosa, SeaWolf) made with modern materials and long equipment list. Cruise or liveaboard in this proven voyager. New masts, sails, motor, rewired, Garmin740 / radar sonar, VHF, Alpine, electric head, forced air diesel heat, 4 burner propane stove. Headroom is 7’4” in Salon with double settees, stateroom with Pullman berth forward. New samsons, chainplates, and sole make this a dependable gunkholer. Attractively priced at $28,500. Serious only please. Email adelorunbi@gmail.com for more info.

Kettenburg PC32 -$15,900

Launched in San Diego in 1948, Orion #68 underwent a large restoration by Baird Boat Works of Port Townsend WA in 2006. Orion is as competitive today as she was 60 years ago. Mahogany planks--some new, over steamed oak frames-all sistered. Updated rigging with Schaefer and Harken blocks. Lots of bronze hardware and varnish. Very minimal systems, but she makes up for it with volumes of class. Needs paint, varnish, and a new halyard to be out racing again. Contact Kris at 360-503-8874 - kris@nwmaritime.org 48º NORTH

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SEPTEMBER 2019


BOATS FOR SALE

BOATS FOR SALE

PARTNERSHIPS

GULF 27 1984 Gulf 27 pilothouse sloop. Diesel, 1400 hours. Full batten main with Dutchman system. New roller furling jib. Upgraded wiring and panels. Charger. Galvanic isolator. In and out steering. VHF, DF, GPS, Autohelm. Webasto hydronic heating. H & C pressure water. Achilles dinghy. New barrier coat and bottom paint. New coupler, shaft and log. Extras. $14,000. Getting out of boating. Boat is turnkey. Leave message at (360) 466-1071 or email clinegz@frontier.co Photos available upon request.

2001 CATALINA 18 This Catalina 18 is well maintained and ready to sail. Includes mainsail and jib, 5 HP Mercury outboard, and trailer. The boat is an excellent choice for learning to sail. It features a fixed keel for stability, and, with a tiller in hand, you will quickly and safely get the feel of the wind and water. In slip at Shilshole Marina. $5,500. Call Jim at (206) 696-8423.

42' GARDEN PORPOISE KETCH Featured at the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival, September 6-8! BLACKBEARD II is a 42’ William Garden designed Porpoise Ketch. This is an excellent opportunity to own a gorgeous vessel, at 1/2 the cost! BLACKBEARD II is currently available for a 1/2 SHARE CO-OWNERSHIP! She has been extremely well taken care of by her long-time owners. BLACKBEARD II lives in the Port Hadlock Marina. Current survey Available. Email oliversteve263@gmail.com for more information.

YOUR AD HERE! Do you have a vessel or equipment or moorage or property or....anything marine oriented that you would like to sell? Advertise here. We have a new reduced rate for classifieds. Simple, easy and effective! Cruise over to www.48north.com and check out the options we offer!

CAPE GEORGE 36' Rare 1978 Cape George 36’, $64,000. 1 owner, immaculately maintained, all systems continuously upgraded. Yanmar 4JH4E, (3) AGM batteries, (2) 100A alternators, ZF30M reduction gear, 1 ¼” shaft 18” prop. (2) Balmer multistage reg, Xantrex 40A charger. Maxwell 2200 windlass, robust anchoring system. New sails, sail covers. New all weather full boat winter awning. Haynes turnbuckles, Murray winches, Garmin electronics, new radar, Standard Horizon radio AIS/ GPS. See www.bit.ly/sailboat4sale for pics and info. 2jsarmstrong@gmail.com - (425) 244-1115.

PARTNERSHIPS

1980 CATALINA 30, NEWER ENGINE Catalina 30 ft, 1980. Most popular sailboat made! Wish to explore ½ partnership. Getting older and didn't use it much! Newer engine. Good running order but needs some TLC. Currently in San Juans sailing , back Labor Day. Looking for $5,900, OBO. Willing to moor or store anywhere in Seattle- Everett area. Will contract to sell to Partner later. Email Bill at rowlands@whidbey.com or (425) 248-023.

SAILOMAT 601 WINDVANE (2003) This Windvane was used in a 2006 trip from Seattle to Hawaii. All components are present and in excellent condition. You can research this windvane at http://www.sailomat.com Photo shows the main structure of the vane. Priced to sell at $1200 plus shipping (was $1,600). Contact L. Norman if interested at normanleslie@hotmail.com

EXQUISITE HINCKLEY 42 SLOOP Looking for 1/4 interest partner in exquisite, extremely well equipped Hinckley Sou'Wester 42 sloop. SkiPilot99@msn.com or via phone: (206) 853-8811.

FORESPAR WHISKER POLE Forespar expandable whisker pole. 13-24 feet with end fittings. Never used. Still in cardboard tube. Value $3,500. Asking $2,500 in Richland, WA, or $2800 if delivered to Seattle. Contact at (509) 375-0224 or ed.mcclanahan1@hotmail.com

CROSSWORD SOLUTION

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

JEANNEAU SO 45.2 OWNERS VERSION - $149,500 Bristol condition, built in 2000, E97 Raymarine chartplotter, fish-finder, 20m color radar, sea talk, wind. LaFabrica dodger, bimini, Strataglass windows, 316SS frames. Windows and winch covers, Teak cockpit table and stainless dorades. Harken winches, Mediterranean rear entry with twin leather covered helms, fresh Pettit Trinidad bottom paint, Prop Gold on shaft and folding Max-Prop. Extra sails, full-batten main, 130 Genoa, Tri-Radial spinnaker. Call (360) 306-0953 or email a64me@yahoo.com for more information and photos.

48º NORTH

EQUIPMENT

ADVENTURE CHARTER COMPANY Aging owner of a well-established and profitable adventure charter company seeks retirement. Two classic wooden yachts. Totally turn-key, including training, seller work back with buyer, permits in Glacier Bay, SE Alaska and Baja California Sur, spare parts, client list, routes and shore support. See Wooden Boat 154 & 255, or visit our website at: www.pacificcatalyst.com Inquiries to: bill@pacificcatalyst.com

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SEPTEMBER 2019

A d C


EQUIPMENT

EQUIPMENT

INSTRUCTION

• Basic through Advanced Sailing Lessons • Week-long Cruise & Learn lessons • Spinnaker, Intro and Advance Racing Classes AVON 6-PERSON OCEAN LIFE RAFT Avon Ocean - ISO 9650 type 1 6-person life raft, with boarding ladder and ramp, stored in valise with vacuum bag. Includes log book with service record; last certificate of re-inspection in March 2018, included cylinder hydro test. Purchased new in 2009 ($2558); asking $975. Located in Olympia, WA. Call for further information and potential delivery options. (360) 561-8144.

SHADETREE BOAT AWNING Shadetree freestanding boat awning, rectangular aft model, size 172” long X 180” wide. Quality construction of coated (UV resistant, heat reflecting) 9 oz Dacron; double lock stitched seams, with 1.5” webbing reinforced hems. Support wands are flexible carbon / fiberglass tubing sections. Nylon storage bag. Excellent condition - lightly used. Shadetree price $965; asking $425. Located in Olympia, WA. Call for further information & delivery options. (360) 561-8144.

SAYE'S RIG AUTOPILOT FOR SALE Windvane autopilot. Complete and in good condition. $1,925. For info or questions, contact (360) 531-0327. Calls only please.

MOORAGE

ROANOKE REEF - LAKE UNION MOORAGE New 44’ slip, max beam 13’6”. Floating dock. Gated, pump out. No liveaboards. $750/month includes power and water. On Eastlake in Seattle, open to south, downtown view. For more info, call Herb at (206) 909-0903.

Great Opportunity to own premium slips in Skyline Marina Division 22, easy access to the San Juan Islands. Slip TDO90 Division 22, 48’LOA (44’+ 4’x18’) $150,000. TDN38 and TDN39 are 44’LOA (40’+4’x18’) $140,000 each. Full service marina w/ secure gate. Amenities include bathroom/shower, laundry, parking, power and water!

48º NORTH

www.seattlesailing.com info@seattlesailing.com

TARTAN 37 LIGHT #1 SAIL - $575 Light #1 headsail cut for a Tartan 37 . Sail is in excellent condition. It was cut for my boat. Sail is either Keylar or Nylar, don't know for sure. Sail specifications (approximate) for consideration: I=47 J=16 P=41.5 Sailboat specifications (approximate): L.O.A. 37' 3.5" beam 11' 9" draft 6' 7". Contact (425) 753-2128.

MOORAGE/ANACORTES, WA

AUTOHELM ST 50 WIND Autohelm ST 50 Wind instrument display - $125. Located in Olympia, WA. Call for information/delivery options. (360) 561-8144.

206-782-5100 7001 Seaview Ave NW Suite 130 (Shilshole Bay Marina in Port of Seattle Building)

ANACORTES MOORAGE FOR SALE For sale, Skyline Anacortes Moorage, Condominium #18. 50 feet long, 16 feet wide. Excellent shore facilities and security. $149,000. For more info, please contact (954) 579-1616.

GARMIN GEAR GPSMAP 4212 (w/power cable) - $300 GSD Sounder Module (w/ cables) - $100 Located in Olympia, WA. Call for further information and potential delivery options. (360) 561-8144.

Gill foulweather gear & Dubarry footwear

Caroline Baumann - (360) 202-7327 caroline@windermere.com

Windermere Real Estate - Anacortes Properties

59

Tethys

Offshore Sailing for Women Nancy Erley, Instructor 206.789.5118

nancy@tethysoffshore.com www.tethysoffshore.com

• Up to 50% off US Sailing leSSonS on Brand new 2018 Capri 22’S • “BaSiC to BareBoat” Sailing leSSonS * US Sailing Certification * Learn to Sail in 5 Days!

• loweSt inStrUCtor to StUdent ratio in Seattle • HigHeSt qUality fleet in tHe paCifiC nortHweSt At Shilshole Bay Marina www.windworkssailing.com 206.784.9386 SEPTEMBER 2019


EMPLOYMENT

MARINE EQUIPMENT

SAILING DONATIONS

DEER HARBOR MARINA We are currently accepting applications for all seasonal staff positions!

Dockstaff • Dockstore • Restaurant

DONATE YOUR BOAT TODAY!

Full and/or part time. Must be 18 or older and have a good work ethic and work well with others. Please email resume to mbroman@deerharbormarina.com

All donated vessels and equipment help raise funds that support CBC youth programs. Donated vessels and equipment are eligible for itemized charitable tax deductions.

Please include the job you are applying for.

for more info, or to donate

MARINE EQUIPMENT

(360) 714-8891 or info@boatingcenter.org

Mac’s CUSTOM CANVAS & MARINE UPHOLSTERY

Boat Cushions & Canvas CLEANING & REPAIR

• 30+ years of experience •

Resew • Zippers • Clear Plastic Foam • Water Proofing • New Free Estimates • Fast Quality Work

5015 15th Ave. NW, Seattle, WA 98107

www.taylorsails.com erictaylorsails@gmail.com

(206) 783-1696 - www.MacTops.com

CLUBS 1945

2019

The Best Racing in the Northwest • On the Lake or Sound • Active Cruising • Reciprocal Rights Corinthian Yacht Club of Seattle 7755 Seaview Ave. NW, Seattle, WA 98117 Phone (206) 789-1919 for information www.cycseattle.org

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

V E SS E L M OV I N G

No ocean too big, no Ave trip NW too small, 6327 Seaview no ship too large, no mast Seattle, WA 98107 too tall, sail or power, we move them all!!! When you are ready, give us a call. Professional service since 1967. Phone (206) 789-7350 Fax (206) 789-6392 CappyTom@aol.com email (206)jen@48north.com 390-1596

FREE unlimited day sailing on the club boats.

• Sail on Puget Sound out of Shilshole Bay Marina • Full Service Sailing Club/Pro Shop/Brokerage • All the advantages of ownership w/out the hassles

206-782-5100 www.seattlesailing.com info@seattlesailing.com 7001 Seaview Ave NW Suite 130 (Shilshole Bay Marina in Port of Seattle Building)

Nancy Anderson - Seattle 206/669-0329 • sureritesigns@gmail.com www.sureritesigns.com

Full service shop =$60/month serving the Puget Sound 1.5riginch

Business Classified ad 2016 March issue PROOF SLOOP TAVERN YACHT CLUB 2442 NW Market St. #94, Seattle, WA 98107 “Established in Ballard since 1976” $90 Annual Dues - Reciprocal Moorages High quality sailing at the lowest cost For more info call Mike at (206) 265-9459

48º NORTH

60

Cliff Hennen - (206) 718-5582 www.evergreenrigging.com - (360) 207-5016

SEPTEMBER 2019


PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

MARINAS

See us for a Better way to Heat Your Boat

the NW San Juans 6327Gateway SeaviewtoAve Seattle, WA 98107

34’ - 50’ slips for lease/purchase Free Wifi, Pumpouts & Showers, Fuel, Store /Café

Specializing in Marine Heating, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration

Phone (206) 789-7350

• semiahmoomarina.com (360) 371-0440 Fax (206) 789-6392

Cliff Valentine

Email calla@48north.com

cliff@nwmarineair.com

LIBERTY BAY MARINA

Check Us Out at

40’ - 48’ - 60’ open slips. Great location in Poulsbo, WA Restrooms, Showers.

(206) 548-1306

www.nwmarineair.com

We specialize in marine heat pumps, A/C systems, refrigeration, and watermakers. We also carry an assortment of portable freezers and wine coolers for your entertainment needs on the go!

Espar by Parts • Sales • Service (206) 548-1306 Eberspächer www.nwmarineair.com

Adler Barbour

360-779-7762 or 360-509-0178

ANACORTES MARINA

Annual moorage available now: 32’ to 80’ Open and 32’ to 60’ Covered slips. In town rental slips w/security gates, mini storage, full service boat yard, fuel dock & pump out on site. Anacortesmarina.com or (360) 293-4543

ition bumper ed d ite m Li t? ha W ! th on M e Bumper Sticker of th of 48ºNorth es pi co ed ct le se e sid in EE FR stickers with your grandparents.) not (It’s like a golden ticket, but we’re

e to share a bed Willy Wonka, and you don’t hav

Found one? You win! Slap it on something and send a picture to Joe@48North.com Didn’t? Cut along the dotted line or buy one at 48north.com 48º NORTH

61

SEPTEMBER 2019


Brokerage Sailboat Listings Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

Broker

Pg

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

Broker

Pg

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

Broker

Pg

16' Doughdish 12.5 18' I550 w/Trailer 19' Com-Pac w/trailer 19' W. Wight Potter w/tr 20' Laser SB# w/Trailer 21' Com-Pac Eclipse 22' J/70 22' J/70 22' Capri w/Trailer 22' US Yacht w/trailer 25' Fisher Potter Ktch. 25' Herschoff 25' Catalina w/trailer 25' Seaward w/trailer 26' Hake 26' MacGregor w/Trailer 27' Pacific SeaCraft Orion 27' Catalina 28' Cape Dory 28' Ericson 28' Herreshoff 28' Hunter 280 w/trailer 29' Island Packet 29 29' J/29 29' J/88 29' Kirie 850 29' Carrera 290 30' Baba 30' Beneteau Oc. 30.1 30' Catalina 30' Catalina MKII 30' Catalina Sloop 30' Catalina Tall Rig 30' Farr 30' Fisher 30' Henderson

99 16 O 87 O 97 O 08 18 O 12 G 19 G 07 G 78 O 77 D 05 D 87 O 99 D 12 D 89 G 79 D 84 D 79 D 81 95 D 98 D 91 D 85 G 19 D 84 D 93 G 84 D 20 D 86 D 88 D 79 D 80 D 97 D 79 D 97 G

NW Yachtnet Passion Passion Passion Mar Servic Passion Sail NW Sail NW Passion Passion Signature Swiftsure Passion Passion Yachtfinders Passion Swiftsure Passion West Yachts Seattle Yachts Yachtfinders Passion Mar Servic Sail NW Sail NW Mar Servic Passion Yachtfinders Signature Signature NW Yachtnet NW Yachtnet NW Yachtnet Sail NW Yachtfinders Sail NW

7 66 66 66 9 66 2 2 66 66 71 69 66 66 68 66 69 66 70 65 68 66 9 2 2 9 66 68 71 71 7 7 7 2 68 2

30' J/95 30' Olson 30' Yamaha 30 MKII 30' Catalina Sloop 31' Beneteau Oceanis 31' CAL 31' Cape George 31' Hunter 31' Cal 31' Hallberg-Rassy 32' C&C 32' Gulf PH 32' Islander 32' Islander 32' J/97e 32' J/99 3' Laurin Koster 32' Nor’Star 32' Tayana Vancouver PH 32' Fuji Ketch 32' Hunter 326 32' Kyrie Elite 33' Ericson 33' eSailing Yacht 33' Hans Christian 33T 33' J/100 33' Larson 33' Legendary Ketch 33' Luguna GT 33' Mason OS Cutter 33' Nantucket 33' Nauticat PH 33' Tartan 101 33' Tripp Racing 33' Wauquiez 33' Beneteau 331

19 D 84 G 84 D 93 D 19 D 79 D 81 D 84 D 80 D 75 D 80 D 88 D 77 D 78 D 19 D 19 D 65 D 86 D 00 D 78 D 03 D 85 D 82 D 07 D 84 D 07 D 07 D 00 D 86 D 86 D 84 D 85 D 19 D 92 D 83 D 02 D

Sail NW Yachtfinders Rubicon NW Yachtnet Signature West Yachts West Yachts West Yachts West Yachts Passion West Yachts West Yachts NW Yachtnet Mar Servic Sail NW Sail NW West Yachts Sail NW Rubicon West Yachts Passion Signature Signature Sail NW NW Yachtnet Swiftsure Seattle Yachts Waterline NW Yachtnet Waterline Seattle Yachts Mar Servic Seattle Yachts NW Yachtnet West Yachts Passion

2 68 64 7 71 70 70 70 70 66 70 70 7 9 2 2 70 2 64 70 66 71 71 2 7 69 65 66 7 66 65 9 65 7 70 66

33' Hunter 33' Yamaha 33' Freedom Cat Ketch 34' Beneteau 343 34' C&C 34' Catalina Sloop 34' Catalina Sloop 34' Catalina Sloop 34' Columbia 34 34' Ericson 34-2 34' Gambling 34 34' Gemeni 105Mc 34' Hunter 34' Hunter 356 34' J/105 34' Jeanneau 349 34' Pacific Seacraft 34' Tartan 345 34' Alsea Bay 34' Ericson 35' Beneteau 35' Beneteau OC 35.1 35' Cheoy Lee 35' Contest Sloop 35' Elan E4 35' Hallberg Rassy 35' Hunter Legend 35.5 35' Nauticat 35 35' Trident Voyager PH 35' Wauquiez 35' Young Sun Sloop 35' Beneteau 350 35' Beneteau Oc. 35.1 35' EndurancePH 35' Young Sun Cutter 36' B. Roberts Spray

11 D 78 D 81 D 07 D 78 D 86 D 88 D 88 D 72 D 90 D 74 D 05 D 98 D 02 D 00 D 19 D 05 D 19 D 85 D 88 D 89 D 17 D 80 D 81 D 17 D 89 D 90 D 00 D 78 D 82 D 81 D 88 D 20 D 78 D 79 D 01 D

Passion Passion Signature ElliottBYS Signature NW Yachtnet NW Yachtnet NW Yachtnet Mar Servic West Yachts Mar Servic ElliottBYS Yachtfinders Seattle Yachts Sail NW Mar Servic NW Yachtnet Seattle Yachts Passion Passion Yachtfinders Signature NW Yachtnet NW Yachtnet Seattle Yachts Swiftsure NW Yachtnet Mar Servic Mar Servic NW Yachtnet Rubicon Passion Passion Passion Passion Waterline

66 66 71 67 71 7 7 7 9 70 9 67 68 65 2 9 7 65 66 66 68 71 7 7 65 69 7 9 9 7 64 66 66 66 66 66

48º NORTH

29,500 7,900 7,900 7,900 19,500 39,900 34,900 ~ 12,500 6,800 19,500 89,000 7,800 24,900 64,000 5,900 29,000 12,900 29,900 12,000 39,500 27,900 59,900 12,000 ~ 8,999 12,900 49,500 166,252 22,500 22,500 17,500 17,999 35,000 34,500 23,000

62

~ 14,000 22,000 8,900 169,000 24,500 34,000 19,500 24,000 39,900 29,500 55,000 29,000 17,900 ~ ~ 23,000 38,000 129,000 44,900 49,900 19,500 24,900 59,000 95,000 76,500 79,950 180,000 24,900 89,000 178,000 89,900 199,900 19,500 49,000 74,900

99,900 21,900 21,500 85,000 29,900 36,500 39,500 36,900 27,000 59,900 24,900 109,000 48,000 78,000 74,900 189,965 174,500 278,655 53,900 Pending 45,000 169,900 34,500 49,500 249,900 99,000 44,900 149,500 59,500 59,900 42,000 Pending ~ 34,900 31,500 55,500

SEPTEMBER 2019


• Sailing School • Guided Flotillas • Charters • Sales

San Juan Sailing 2615 South Harbor Loop Dr. #1 Bellingham, WA • (360) 671-4300

48' tAyAnA DS - 2002 $319,000 - Puerto VAllArtA, mX

Cruise loaded, full enclosure, hard dodger, boom-furling main & furling staysail, genoa, dinghy/OB/davits, priced below survey value. Turn Key!!!

47' Selene 2006 - $470,000

30' norStAr 2000 - $97,500

Desirable ocean trawler, full electronics, recent survey, charter revenue in 2019.

T-volvo 260 HP diesels, Honda kicker, elec. downriggers. Priced below recent survey value.

32' norDiC tug 2010

45' CuStom Aluminum PH 2006

Ready for comfortable cruising! Cruise loaded, watermaker, Isuzu Bow/stern thruster and diesel heat. 100 HP diesel. Many upgrades, two Charter revenue 2019. $254,000 cabin model. $269,000

www.sanjuansailing.com • brokerage@sanjuansailing.com

Brokerage Sailboat Listings Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

Broker

Pg

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

Broker

Pg

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

Broker

Pg

36' Cal 36' Cape George PH 36 36' Cascade 36' Catalina Sloop 36' Catalina Sloop 36' Cheoy Lee 36' Colvin Pinky Schooner 36' Hunter 36' Islander 36' Islander Peterson 36' Islander Sloop 36' J/111 36' J/112e 36' Jeanneau SO 36' Lapworth L-36 Sloop 36' Pearson 36 36' S-2 36' Sweden 36 36' Tanton 36 36' Valiant 36' Islander 37.5' Hunter 37' Banjer PH MS 37' Beneteau 37' Endeavour 37' Hunter 37.5 37' Island Packet 370 37' Nautor Swan 37' Pac. Sea. Crealock 37' Rustler 37' Tartan 37' Tartan Blackwatch 37' Truant 37 37' Pacific Seacraft 37' Tayana

66 G 73 D 72 D 90 D 91 D 85 D 93 D 04 D 79 D 79 D 78 D 19 D 19 D 90 D 60 D 75 D 79 D 85 D 81 D 85 D 82 D 90 D 70 D 15 D 80 D 92 D 08 D 80 D 82 D 15 D 77 D 65 D 80 D 99 D 78 D

Yachtfinders Mar Servic West Yachts NW Yachtnet Seattle Yachts Yachtfinders Mar Servic NW Yachtnet Yachtfinders Yachtfinders NW Yachtnet Sail NW Sail NW Sail NW Rubicon Mar Servic West Yachts Mar Servic Mar Servic Yachtfinders Passion West Yachts West Yachts Signature Yachtfinders Passion Mar Servic West Yachts Seattle Yachts Sail NW Seattle Yachts Yachtfinders Mar Servic Passion Passion

68 9 70 7 65 68 9 7 68 68 7 2 2 2 64 9 70 9 9 68 66 70 70 71 68 66 9 70 65 2 65 68 9 66 66

38' Beneteau Oceanis 38.1 38' Beneteau Oceanis 38.1 38' Block Island 38' Bluewater - Ingrid 38' Cal 38' Catalina 38' Catalina 380 38' Hans Christian 38' Pearson 385 38' Sabre 386 38' X-Yachts 38' Yankee 38' Catalina 387 38' Catalina S&S 38' Catalina S&S 38' Hans Christian 39' C & L Europa 39' Cal 39' Cal 39 39' Fast Passage 39' Fast Passage 39' Hunter 39' Jeanneau 39i 39' Beneteau 393 39' Cal 39-II 39' Catalina 390 39' Freedem Cat Ketch 40' Beneteau 40 40' Beneteau Oceanis 40' Beneteau Oceanis 40' Colin Archer Ktch. 40' Custom Acapulco 40' Elan Impression 40' Hinckley Bermuda 40' Islander Peterson

20 D 19 D 60 D 78 D 82 D 80 D 00 D 85 D 85 D 05 D 94 D 72 D 04 D 83 D 83 D 78 D 79 D 78 D 78 D 79 D 79 D 15 D 07 D 02 D 80 D O2 D 83 D 11 D 94 D 95 D 94 D 78 D 17 D 70 D 81 D

Passion Passion Yachtfinders West Yachts Yachtfinders Yachtfinders ElliottBYS Passion Passion Seattle Yachts Yachtfinders NW Yachtnet Passion Passion Passion Passion Seattle Yachts Sail NW Waterline ElliottBYS Passion Signature Mar Servic Passion West Yachts Passion Passion Mar Servic ElliottBYS NW Yachtnet Sail NW Seattle Yachts Seattle Yachts ElliottBYS Yachtfinders

66 66 68 70 68 68 67 66 66 65 68 7 66 66 66 66 65 2 66 67 66 71 9 66 70 66 66 9 67 7 2 65 65 67 68

40' J 40 40' J/121 40' J/122e 40' J/40 40' Marlow Hunter 40' Najad 405 40' Nauticat 40 40' Nauticat PH 40' Panda 40' Perry 41 Sloop 40' Perry Bella 40' Schucker 436 PH 40' Beneteau Oceanis 40' J/120 40' Pearson 40' Fount. Pajot Lucia 41' Beneteau Oc. 41.1 41' Beneteau Oc. 41.1 41' C&C 41' Cheoy Lee Offshore 41' Ericson 41' Finngulf 41' Hatteras 41' Island Packet SP Cruiser 41' Island Packet SP Cruiser 41' Island Trader 41' Islander Freeport 41' Jeanneau 410 41' Jeanneau 410 41' Morgan Classic CC 41' Morgan Giles Classic 41' Morgan O/I 41' Passport 41 41' Sceptre Pilothouse 41' Tartan 4100

90 D 19 D 19 D 89 D 13 D 07 D 85 D 85 D 81 D 85 D 94 D 72 D 97 D 94 D 80 D 18 D 19 D 19 D 86 D 80 D 68 D 03 D 67 D 07 D 09 D 77 D 76 D 20 D 20 D 87 D 87 D 87 D 89 D 89 D 06 D

Mar Servic Sail NW Sail NW Sail NW ElliottBYS Signature Mar Servic Waterline Swiftsure Seattle Yachts Swiftsure Mar Servic West Yachts Sail NW Passion Signature Signature Signature Yachtfinders Mar Servic West Yachts Seattle Yachts Seattle Yachts Mar Servic Mar Servic Yachtfinders Yachtfinders Mar Servic Mar Servic NW Yachtnet NW Yachtnet Passion Mar Servic Seattle Yachts Seattle Yachts

9 2 2 2 67 71 9 66 69 65 69 9 70 2 66 71 71 71 68 9 70 65 65 9 9 68 68 9 9 7 7 66 9 65 65

48º NORTH

19,900 52,500 45,000 57,900 55,000 29,500 79,000 92,500 34,500 34,500 32,000 ~ ~ 49,300 39,500 17,500 47,500 61,000 17,000 99,000 36,900 58,000 63,000 182,500 19,000 69,900 229,000 84,750 57,000 365,000 34,900 15,000 39,000 145,000 65,000

63

~ Pending 119,500 54,000 53,000 29,900 104,900 94,900 Pending 209,000 39,000 38,900 134,900 Pending 27,900 85,000 49,000 35,000 29,900 82,000 85,000 149,900 139,500 112,900 68,000 94,900 65,000 164,900 85,000 74,700 65,000 99,500 $995/mo 129,500 47,500

89,500 ~ ~ 79,000 219,000 264,950 139,000 139,000 95,000 69,000 95,000 54,900 90,000 99,500 52,900 529,900 315,000 315,932 58,500 39,900 37,500 239,000 29,900 299,000 299,000 69,000 63,500 324,413 319,758 77,900 86,500 59,900 149,900 110,000 279,000

SEPTEMBER 2019


Featured boat

1960 36' Lapworth L-36 Sloop • $39,500 San Francisco, CA • (206) 602-2702

Brokerage Sailboat Listings Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

Broker

Pg

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

Broker

Pg

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

41' Beneteau Oceanis 41.1 41' Beneteau 411 42' Brewer Pilothouse Cutter 42' Cabo Rico PH 42' Catalina 42' Catalina Sloop 42' Catalina Sloop 42' Island Packet 420 42' Tayana Vancouver CC 42' Catalina 42 mkII 43' Beneteau 443 43' Gulfstar 43' Hans Christian (Christina) 43' Hunter 430 43' Luengen Offshore 43' Saga Sloop 43' Shannon 43' Wauquiez Ampritrite 43' Polaris Cutter 44' Beneteau 445 44' Bruce Roberts Offshore 44' Bruce Roberts Offshore 44' C&C Custom 44' Catalina 44' Cheoy Lee 44' Jeanneau 440 44' Jeanneau SO 44 44' Mason 44' Nauticat 44' Nauticat 44 44' Norseman 44' Spencer 44 44' Tanton 44' Worldcruiser 44' Nuaticat Pilothouse

20 D 00 D 85 D 03 D 89 D 93 D 90 D 00 D 82 D 02 D 05 D 77 D 86 D 96 D 87 D 98 D 88 D 84 D 78 D 93 D 93 D 80 D 73 D 05 D 80 D 19 D 90 D 89 D 83 D 80 D 88 D 73 D 83 D 79 D 84 D

Passion Signature Seattle Yachts Swiftsure Yachtfinders NW Yachtnet NW Yachtnet Swiftsure Seattle Yachts Passion ElliottBYS Yachtfinders Swiftsure NW Yachtnet Waterline NW Yachtnet Swiftsure Mar Servic Passion Seattle Yachts Mar Servic Mar Servic Swiftsure Seattle Yachts West Yachts Mar Servic Passion Seattle Yachts Swiftsure Mar Servic Yachtfinders Mar Servic Swiftsure ElliottBYS Passion

66 71 65 69 68 7 7 69 65 66 67 68 69 7 66 7 69 9 66 65 9 9 69 65 70 9 66 65 69 9 68 9 69 67 66

45' Bestevaer 45st 45' Brewer 45' Bruce Roberts OS 45' Formosa Cutter 45' Hunter 45' Jeanneau 45 DS 45' Jeanneau 45.2 45' Jeanneau SO 45 45' Morgan 45' Sparkman & Stephens 46' Beneteau OC 461 46' Beneteau Oc. 46.1 46' CAL 2-46 46' Hunter 466 46' Jeanneau 469 46' Kanter Atlantic 46' Beneteau Oceanis 46.1 46' Spindrift CC 46' W. Indies Heritage 47.7' Beneteau 47' Beneteau 473 47' Bowman 47 47' Catana 472 47' Chris White Atlantic 47' Vagabond Ketch 48' Chris White Atlantic 48' J-145 48' Tayana 48' Tayana DS 48' Waterline 49' DeFever Pilothouse 49' Elling E4 49' Goetz/Taylor 49' Hunter 49 49' Jeanneau 490

11 D 78 D 83 D 81 D 98 D 08 D 02 D 06 D 94 D 60 D 00 D 19 D 73 D 02 D 15 D 88 D 20 D 84 D 77 D 05 D 06 D 97 D 01 D 13 D 83 D 10 D 1 D 05 D 02 D 97 D 84 D 14 D 97 D 09 D 19 D

Sail NW Yachtfinders Waterline Rubicon Yachtfinders Mar Servic Swiftsure Mar Servic Yachtfinders Rubicon Sail NW Signature West Yachts NW Yachtnet Mar Servic Yachtfinders Passion Passion Signature ElliottBYS Signature Mar Servic Swiftsure Swiftsure Mar Servic Swiftsure Signature Seattle Yachts San Juan Swiftsure Seattle Yachts Swiftsure Yachtfinders Passion Mar Servic

2 68 66 64 68 9 69 9 68 64 2 71 70 7 9 68 66 66 71 67 71 9 69 69 9 69 71 65 63 69 65 69 68 66 9

49' Jeanneau SO 49 49' Jeanneau SO 49P 49' Trans Pac 49 49' Transpacific 49' TransPacific Marine 50' Baltic 50' Beneteau 50' Jeanneau 50DS 50' Lavranos 51' Able Apogee 51' Alden Skye Ketch 51' Beneteau 51' Formosa Ketch 52' Santa Cruz 53' J/160 53' Simonis 53' Tartan 5300 54' Hylas 55' Tayana 55' Tayana CC 55' Tayana Cutter Rig 56' Herreshoff Marco Polo 58' Tayana CC 58' Tayana Deck Saloon 59' Outremer 5X 59' Schooner Pinky 60' Mariner 61' C&C 63' Mason Ketch 64' Frers 65' Bruce Roberts NY 65' Sparkman & Stevens 75' Custom Schooner 83' Cust. Sty’sl Schooner

05 D 07 D 86 D 80 D 80 D 99 D 88 D 11 D 90 D 00 D 80 D 93 D 78 D 99 D 03 D 01 D 19 D 03 D 87 D 92 D 86 D 56 D 02 D 06 D 12 D 90 D 78 D 72 D 82 D 78 D 97 2D 68 D 87 D 34 D

48º NORTH

~ 112,900 125,000 349,000 69,900 94,500 95,000 249,000 130,000 129,900 119,500 54,500 89,000 94,000 79,500 179,500 189,000 132,500 69,900 98,500 38,500 65,000 227,458 245,000 134,900 399,985 129,000 139,500 169,000 185,000 195,000 40,000 139,000 218,000 172,000

499,000 69,000 62,000 82,500 124,500 254,000 225,000 209,995 139,000 79,500 150,000 489,859 77,500 145,500 349,000 99,900 ~ 138,000 59,990 179,000 225,000 215,000 420,000 759,000 184,000 595,000 295,000 359,000 319,000 375,000 199,000 ~ 64,000 299,900 499,796

64

Broker

284,500 Mar Servic 349,500 Mar Servic 169,000 Mar Servic 99,000 ElliottBYS 99,000 Sail NW 499,000 Swiftsure 124,900 Yachtfinders 299,999 Mar Servic 169,900 Swiftsure 475,000 Swiftsure 139,500 Mar Servic 99,000 Yachtfinders 147,000 Seattle Yachts 395,000 Yachtfinders 449,000 Sail NW 549,000 Swiftsure 1,048,630 Seattle Yachts 495,000 Swiftsure 169,500 Yachtfinders 299,000 Seattle Yachts 245,000 Seattle Yachts 215,000 Waterline 349,000 NW Yachtnet 575,000 Seattle Yachts 1,190,000 Swiftsure 99,000 NW Yachtnet 500,000 Yachtfinders 164,000 Mar Servic 289,500 Seattle Yachts 377,000 Swiftsure 295,000 Waterline 375,000 ElliottBYS 269,000 NW Yachtnet 175,000 Waterline

Pg 9 9 9 67 2 69 68 9 69 69 9 68 65 68 2 69 65 69 68 65 65 66 7 65 69 7 68 9 65 69 66 67 7 66

SEPTEMBER 2019


48ยบ NORTH

65

SEPTEMBER 2019


SALES + S A I L I N G L E S S O N S

Jeanneau 44 Sun Odyssey 1990 $129,000

Nauticat 44 1984 $172,000 Po r t l a n d

PASSION-YACHTS.COM 503.289.6306

Brokerage Trawler Listings Boat Type

Yr

Broker

Pg Boat Type

Yr

Aux Price

Broker

Yr

Aux Price

Broker

Pg

22' Sea Sport Sportsman

00 G

38,500

West Yachts

70 33' Cooper

87

D

79,000

Yachtfinders 68 43' MJM 43z

19

G

Sail NW

2

22' Surf Scoter

92

G

45,000

West Yachts

70 33' SeaRay 330

08

G

142,500

West Yachts

70 43' Sabreline Aft Cabin

95

2D 279,000

Waterline

66

24' Maxum 2400 SCR

95

G

19,900

West Yachts

70 34' PDQ Catamaran

03

D

219,000

West Yachts

70 45' Grand Mariner 45

81

2D 115,000

Waterline

66

25' Four Winns Vista

19

G

139,564

Mar Servic

9

8

D

89,000

Swiftsure

69

81

D

225,000

West Yachts

70

25' Lyman

64

D

20,000

Swiftsure

69 34' Wellcraft

82

D

44,900

Yachtfinders 68 47' Selene

06

D

470,000

San Juan

63

25' Ranger Tug

12

D

105,000

Swiftsure

69 35' Four Winns Vista

18

D

349,807

Mar Servic

9

49' Grand Banks

85

D

249,500

NW Yachtnet 7

25' Tollycraft Sedan

79

G

25,000

Elliott Bay YS 67 35' MJM 35z

19

G

~

Sail NW

2

50' Grand Banks

70

D

129,900

NW Yachtnet 7

26' Cascade Lobster Boat

02

D

129,000

West Yachts

70 36' Albin 36 Tri-cabin

79

2D 39,000

Waterline

66

50' MJM 50z

19

D

~

Sail NW

2

26' Nordic Tug

82

D

71,900

West Yachts

70 36' Covey Island

97

D

189,000

Swiftsure

69

53' Aluminum LRC

74

2D 159,500

Waterline

66

26' Tollycraft 26 Sedan

77

G

28,500

Waterline

66 36' Grand Banks Classic

84

D

135,000

Rubicon

64 53' MJM 53z

19

D

Sail NW

2

27' Ranger Tugs

15

D

150,000

Elliott Bay YS 67 36' Monk

88

D

109,000

West Yachts

70 53' Nordlund 53

79

2D 125,000

Waterline

66

27' Ranger Tugs R-27

17

D

154,900

Waterline

66 36' Stanley (LobsterBoat)

67

D

45,000

Swiftsure

69

54' Kady Krogen 54 PH

91

D

349,000

Waterline

66

29' BACK COVE

06

D

145,000

West Yachts

70 37' Hershine Trawler

79

2D 39,500

Waterline

66

54' Seaforth Custom

03

D

995,000

NW Yachtnet 7

29' Four Winns Horiz.

19

G

225,572

Mar Servic

9

37' L. Nelson Victory

88

D

169,000

West Yachts

70 57' Alden Trawler Ketch

64

2D 79,500

Waterline

29' Ranger Tug

11

D

193,900

NW Yachtnet 7

38' Bayliner 3818

89

D

45,000

Rubicon

64 58' Vicem

05

D

795,000

Yachtfinders 68

29' Ranger Tugs R-29

12

D

159,900

Waterline

66 38' Helmsman 38E

17

D

439,000

Waterline

66

84

D

394,500

Waterline

31' Camano

04

D

117,500

Signature

71

84

D

59,500

Yachtfinders 68 65' Circa Marine FPB64

14

D

2,225,000 Sail NW

2

31' Camano 31 Troll

93

D

92,500

Waterline

66 38' Wellcraft

84

G

28,500

Yachtfinders 68 65' Malahide PH

72

D

795,000

66

31' Camano 31 Troll

92

D

78,500

Waterline

66 38' Golden Star

86

D

39,900

West Yachts

70 66' Seaton PH Trawler

97

D

1,200,000 Rubicon

31' Helmsman Sedan

15

1D

239,000

Waterline

66 39' Bayliner 3988

98

G

128,000

West Yachts

70 70' Monte Fino MY

96

D

749,000

NW Yachtnet 7

31' Ranger Tugs R-31CB

15

D

234,500

Waterline

66 39' Carver

93

G

59,000

West Yachts

70 72' McQueen CPMY

77

D

525,000

West Yachts

70

32' BC 32 Tri-Cabin

86

D

59,000

Waterline

66 40' Davis Trawler

87

D

79,900

NW Yachtnet 7

76' Conv. Wallace Tug

1906 D

130,000

Waterline

66

32' Grand Banks

72

D

37,500

Elliott Bay YS 67 40' MJM 40z

19

D

~

Sail NW

2

78' Converted Hist. Tug

1890 D

79,500

Waterline

66

32' MDI Downeast

97

D

109,500

Elliott Bay YS 67 40' Ocean Alexander

83

D

114,900

West Yachts

70 85' Cusom Research Yacht 62

D

360,000 Rubicon

64

32' Nordic Tug

08

D

229,000

NW Yachtnet 7

19

D

499,000

Waterline

66 100' Steel Bushey Tug

44

D

300,000 Waterline

66

32' Nordic Tug

10

D

254,000

San Juan

89

D

205,000 Elliott Bay YS 67

150' Custom Ferry

36

D

1,495,000 NW Yachtnet 7

32' Nordic Tug

95

D

124,500

Yachtfinders 68 42' Californian Trawler

77

2D 59,000

Waterline

66

33' Back Cove

8

D

259,000

Swiftsure

77

D

Mar Servic

9

48ยบ NORTH

Aux Price

34' Red Wing

38' Marine Trader

41' Bracewell Flybridge

63 42' Grand Banks Cl. 69 42' Grand Banks Cl.

66

89,900

Pg Boat Type

46' Nielson Trawler

60' DeFever/Angel

~

~

Waterline

66 66

64

SEPTEMBER 2019


48ยบ NORTH

67

SEPTEMBER 2019


Professionally staffed! Open 6 days, Sun by appt.

(619) 224-2349 • Fax (619) 224-4692 • 2330 Shelter Island Dr. #207 San Diego, CA 92106 www.yachtfinders.biz • Toll-Free (866) 341-6189 • info@yachtfinders.biz

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A Leader in Brokerage Sales on the West Coast

52’ SANTA CRUZ ’99..........$395,000 “BODACIOUS IV” A highly modified SC52 that is VERY fast and easy to handle. On a shipping cradle in heated storage.

45’ MORGAN 45CC ’94.......$139,000 “SAIL LA VIE” Luxurious cruising yacht. Exceeds performance and handling requirements of experienced sailors.

44’ NORSEMAN 447CC ’88...$195,000 “KAILANI” Upgrades include new rigging, new electronics, Volvo D2-75 diesel engine, Spectra Watermaker, and much more.

41’ ISLAND TRADER ’77.....$69,000 “MS SC” Classic full keel cutter in excellent condition with many recent upgrades including all new standing rigging and sails.

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40’ ISLANDER PETERSON ’81...$ 47,500 “REINDEER” Looking for the finest and most loved Islander Peterson on the water today? This is the boat for you.

38’ CATALINA 38 ’80.........$29,900 “CRUSADER” A fine example of how a boat of this vintage should look. A good opportunity to step aboard and enjoy the sailing life.

35’ BENETEAU 35S5 ’89.....$45,000 “VIKKTOREUS” The perfect blend of racer cruiser. For cruising the coast or racing the competition this boat is ready to go.

39’ CAL MK III ’82 ..........$53,000 “TUMBLEWEED” A fast boat that has been sailed and raced. Used for the Sea Scouts. Priced extremely well.

38’CUSTOM BLOCK ISLAND..$119,500 “SCRIMSHAW” Double-ender with good handling qualities. Great for short-handed sailing. Impeccably maintained.

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41’ C&C ’86...................$58,500 “WHIRLWIND” A delightful reminder of what a cruiser can be. All new wiring, LED lighting, new plumbing and windows.

34’ HUNTER 340 ’98.......$48,000 “GOOD FEEL’N” Spacious below and in the cockpit. Well-rigged for single-handed sailing. Your guests can sit back and enjoy.

28’ HERRESHOFF ROZINANTE ’95 $39,500. “EDITH “ Ideal for daysailing, club racing or simple compact cruising. Call for an appointment to see this beautiful vessel.

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48º NORTH

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48ยบ NORTH

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SEPTEMBER 2019


40' BENETEAU OCEANIS 1997

info@west-yachts.com 1019 Q Ave. Suite D, Anacortes, WA

At West Yachts you pay only 8.7% sales tax. Why pay more?

46' CAL 2-46 1973

44' Cheoy Lee 1980

41' Ericson 1968

39' CAL 39-II 1980

38' Ingrid 1978

37.5' Hunter 1990

37' Banjer PH Motorsailer 1970

37' Nautor Swan 1980

36' Cascade 1972

36' S-2 1979

34' Ericson 34-2 1990

33' Wauquiez Gladiator 1983

32' Gulf Pilothouse 1988

32' Laurin Koster 1965

32' C & C 1980

32' Fuji Ketch 1978

31' CAL 1979

31' CAL 1980

31' Cape George Cutter 1981

31' Hunter 1984

28' Cape Dory 1979

46' Nielson Trawler 1981

26' Cascade Nor’easter Lobster 2002

26' Nordic Tug 1982

(360) 299-2526 • www.west-yachts.com


SUN ODYSSEY

NEW 319

349

389

NEW 410

NEW 440

NEW 490

JEANNEAU YACHT

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September 12-15 South Lake Union Seattle, WA

AT SHOW! 2 Cabin, 1 Head 2020 JEANNEAU SO 410 #73972 - $324,413

SAVE $24,885

JUST ARRIVED! 3 Cabin, 2 Head 2020 JEANNEAU SO 410 #74565- $319,758

Life at sea reinvented

SAVE $21,090 440 & 490

Scow bow full chine hull & twin rudders

Walk-around decks & split shrouds

Central galley & low storage cabinetry

Asymmetric cockpit w/convertible lounge

Jeanneau has led the way in modern yacht design by embracing innovative thinking and modern technology. The all-new Sun Odyssey 410 joins the 440 & 490 in the next generation of Jeanneau sailboats completely reimagined to meet the needs of today’s cruising sailor. From the walk-around side decks & revolutionary “Scow Bow” full chine hull to the gentle companionway slope, life aboard has never been so comfortable.

2019 JEANNEAU SO 490 #73996 - $499,796 Show Special - SAVE $39,265

2019 JEANNEAU 440 SO #73995 - $389,985 Show Special - SAVE $28,775

(206) 323-2405 Seattle • (360) 293-9521 Anacortes www.marinesc.com • info@marinesc.com

2020 JEANNEAU SO 349 #74670 - $189,956 Show Special - SAVE $15,394

jeanneau.com

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