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F U N D A M E N T A L S O F A R T

V. A. Mogilevtsev

FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPOSITION Textbook

Saint Petersburg 2018


Reviewers: V. S. Pesikov

People’s Artist of Russia, Full Member of the Russian Academy of Arts, Professor, Head of Department of Painting and Composition, Ilya Repin Saint Petersburg State Academic Institute of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture

In 2017 the Russian Academy of Arts awarded «The Fundamentals of Art» series with a gold medal

Y. V. Kalyuta

Honored Artist of Russia, Full Member of the Russian Academy of Arts, Professor, Department of Painting and Composition, Ilya Repin Saint Petersburg State Academic Institute of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture

Academic Editor: E. A. Serova

Associate Professor, Department of Russian Art, Ilya Repin Saint Petersburg State Academic Institute of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture

Mogilevtsev V.A. M74 Fundamentals of Composition: textbook – (Fundamentals of Art series) Saint Petersburg, 4art, 2018. - 88 pp, illustrations ISBN 978-5-904957-08-7 In this book, the author, on the basis of his work as an artist and his experience as an instructor, aims to understand and explain how a painting is born. With the works by the outstanding Russian and international artists as the example, he reveals the process of preparing sketches and discusses the importance of collecting reference material when creating a realistic work of art. V. A. Mogilevtsev introduces the reader to the elements of visual design and talks about the most important of them. The text is accompanied by a large number of illustrations. The book is well illustrated, and it makes it the most understandable and convincing for young artists. I’m sure that this book will be interesting for everyone who wants to learn the secrets of professional artists. V. S. Pesikov People’s Artist of Russia, Professor, Head of Department of Painting and Composition, Ilya Repin Saint Petersburg State Academic Institute of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture, Full Member of the Russian Academy of Arts

In the work of any artist, whether just beginning his way in art or having already walked a long road, composition is of paramount importance. Composition is more than just a competent arrangement of objects, people and events on a paper or canvas surface. Above all, composition is harmony, a choice of the right design elements and techniques for creating an artistic image. This book is highly necessary and useful for teaching young people the basics of such a difficult occupation. In this extensive work, the author attempts a scientific and scrupulous analysis of the rich experience of Russian and world realist painting. He demonstrates the importance of preparatory work, reference material, the choices of color and plastic solutions and many more that are necessary in creating a work of art. Y. V. Kalyuta

Honored artist of Russia, Professor, Department of Painting and Composition, Ilya Repin Saint Petersburg State Academic Institute of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture, Full Member of the Russian Academy of Arts

The author expresses his gratitude to Nicholas Fedotov and Liana Solonkina for their contribution to the publishing of “The Fundamentals of Art” series.

Text, illustrations: Vladimir Mogilevtsev Translator: Anna Edwards Design: Nicholas Fedotov Editing: 4art Cover: K. P. Bryullov, “The Last Day of

Pompeii”, 1833 Reproductions: copies made by students of Ilya

Repin Saint Petersburg State Academic Institute of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture. Printed in Russia All rights reserved. The content of this book cannot be reproduced in whole or in part without the written permission of the Publisher, 4art, St. Petersburg, Russia. The publisher has made every effort to give the correct credit for artworks in this publication. The author, editorial office and the publisher apologize for possible unintentional omissions and will do their utmost to make the necessary adjustments to subsequent editions.

4art 17 liniya V.O., dom 4-6 St. Petersburg, Russia 199034 www.4-art.org ISBN-10 5-904957-08-4 ISBN-13 978-5-904957-08-7 © 2018, English Edition, 4art © 2017, Russian Edition, 4art © 2017, V. A. Mogilevtsev


elements of visual design

DEDICATED TO THE 260TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE RUSSIAN ACADEMY OF ARTS

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What this book is about There is an opinion amongst artists, that it is impossible to write a textbook on composition, and one can not but agree with this. To design is to be creative. Creativity cannot be confined within the boundaries of some rules. If we look into the history of visual art, we can see that styles and movements replaced each other, rejecting the canons established by their predecessors. The art of Neoclassicism rejected the rules established by the Baroque style. In turn, the social changes created new challenges for the art, and led to the rejection of the principles of Neoclassicism, and so on. Nevertheless, since the moment visual art was born and to the present day, despite the changes in styles, tastes and creative preferences, artists used the same elements of design. We shall try to examine these elements in this book. With the works by the outstanding artists as examples, we shall see how an artwork is conceived as a sketch, and we shall follow the process of creating some remarkable works of Russian art.


CONTENTS Color Patch and Plane.............................................8 ELEMENTS OF VISUAL DESIGN IN COMPOSITION

1. Recording the concept ....................................10 2. Variety of shape sizes ......................................12 3. Silhouette of the shape ....................................14 4. The edges of the shapes...................................16 5. Hierarchy of the details. Unity.......................18 6. Rhythm .............................................................20 7. Plastic connection ...........................................22 8. Color Relationships.........................................24 9. Alternation of warm and cool tones. Interpenetration of color ................................26 10. Twelve-part color wheel. Complementary colors ...................................28 11. Textures.............................................................30 DEVELOPING THE SKETCH Composition sketches, value and color studies..........................................34 Michelangelo ..........................................................36 Rembrandt .............................................................40 Rubens ....................................................................44 A. E. Egorov............................................................48 K. P. Bryullov..........................................................52 I. E. Repin ...............................................................56 WORKING ON THE PAINTING Working on the painting ......................................62 A. A. Ivanov............................................................64 V. I. Surikov.............................................................72 E. E. Moiseenko .....................................................80


ELEMENTS OF VISUAL DESIGN


8 elements of visual design

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Color Patch and Plane An artist creating a painting uses two things: a plane bound by certain dimensions, and a patch (patches) of color applied to this plane by a coloring substance (1). The plane is usually a canvas, a cardboard, a paper, a wall and so on. If the work is a relatively small one and portable, then the artist can choose the dimensions most appropriate to their concept. In a mural, on the other hand, the dimensions are given, and the design should be subordinate to the architecture. The patches of color, or shapes, are usually applied with various paints, using brushes or other graphic materials (charcoal, sepia, pencil, etc.). If the artist uses a line, for example, like Matisse, drawing with pen and ink, then the line indicates the boundaries between shapes (2). Artists have learned to express their feelings and thoughts, to create an illusion of a three-dimensional world on a two-dimensional plane, by an artful use of a patch of color (3).

The patches of color, arranged in a variety of ways, constitute the elements of visual design.

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elements of visual design

ELEMENTS OF VISUAL DESIGN IN COMPOSITION 1 Recording the concept 2 Variety of shape sizes 3 Silhouette of the shape 4 The edges of the shapes 5 Hierarchy of the details. Unity 6 Rhythm 7 Plastic connection 8 Color relationships 9 Alternation of warm and cool tones. Interpenetration of color 10 Twelve-part color wheel. Complementary colors 11 Textures

Different artists, depending on their creative preferences and abilities, prefer different elements of visual design.

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10 elements of visual design

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1. Recording the concept A concept is what the artist wants to express in their work. The impetus to the concept is often an emotion, an impression of some events, or one’s own reflections.

us can evoke real feelings, and these feelings will dictate to the artist what means to use for their expression. That is why, as a rule, the first sketches cannot be very expressive.

Life itself provides a conscious artist with an infinite number of themes.

If a feeling or an idea that inspired work is strong enough, it will not let the author go and will make him or her to be constantly thinking about the concept. Tonal value, expressive silhouettes will appear in the sketch; accumulated reference material will help the sketch to become convincing.

Students are given themes for composition assignments, but a theme is not a concept. The same theme can evoke different feelings, different thoughts in different artists. Consequently, this results in different design solutions. Some students start the composition with the decorative approach, without having thought through, without having felt the theme. If there is nothing an artist wants to express in their painting, then it is impossible to find the shape for this emptiness. When an idea comes to mind, it should be recorded on paper as soon as possible, before it is gone. Therefore, the means of recording the initial concept are usually very minimal. Most often, it is a line. Such sketches are not created for display; they are to be preserved for the author to record his or her feelings and thoughts, to awaken imagination in the future stages of work. They often do not look like a finished piece – as a seed does not look like the tree it grows to become. Today, with the possibilities of printing, the Internet, the accessibility of museums and exhibitions, artists subconsciously accumulate visual information. Often, completely involuntarily, a large number of clichés and stamps emerges in the student’s head, and the student begins to make a variation on a theme of other people’s emotions. Only the world around

Rembrandt’s first sketch to “Danae” (1–2) has little in common with the painting and seems a little naïve. But the essence of the event and the idea are already outlined. Rubens, in a sketch for the painting “Martyrdom of St. Stefan” (3–4), attempted to denote the drama of what was happening without being distracted by the search for expressive silhouettes and details. In the first sketch for the painting “The Last Day of Pompeii” (5–6), Karl Bryullov outlined the gestures and the silhouettes of the figures to convey the chaos of the distraught crowd and outlined the large masses of people, architecture. and the sky. Aleksandr Deyneka’s pencil sketch to “The Defense of Sevastopol” (7–8) captures only the emotion. The silhouettes and the rhythm are still absent. In the examples of the sketches above we don’t yet see the final solution, but we already can feel the emotions the artist wanted to convey.


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12 elements of visual design

light values

middle values

dark values

Pure white and very dark black are not used in painting.

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The value structure of Rembrandt’s painting «The Holy Family». Grey and dark areas are close in value, the light values are arranged.

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The value structure of Fra il Beato Angelico «The Annunciation». Grey and light areas are close in value, dark values are arranged.

2. Variety of shape sizes In a composition, as in a world around us, the sizes of shapes should not be repeated. The greater the variety in the sizes of shapes, the more expressive the composition will be.

Some contemporary artists make sketches in two tones, using a pen or a marker. It is implied that the third middle tone refers to either a dark or a light shape.

Working on a composition, a student uses three main values, which can be attributed to all the shapes: light, grey and dark. If the work is designed to be dark (1), the grey areas should be close to the dark. Dark shapes prevail; therefore, design is focused on arranging the light shapes. Examples: “The Holy Family” by Rembrandt (7), “The Flagellation of Christ” by Caravaggio (8), “Earth” by Evsey Moiseenko (11).

It is suggested that students should use three values for a value study. Tempera paint, white and black (umber), is recommended, as tempera makes it easy to make corrections. The whole canvas can be given a coat of grey paint first. The dark shapes are painted first, then the light ones. It is best to use natural bristle brushes for this job; they make it possible to create various textures and soft edges. It is not necessary to try to paint any details at this stage. At the first stage it is necessary to find the masses of shapes, their location and their approximate silhouettes. The approximate location of the large shapes is outlined in the composition sketch that expresses the concept. We can see this in the drawings by Rembrandt (3–4) and Evsey Moiseenko (5).

In a light painting, the grey shapes will be close to the light ones, therefore the dark shapes, which are the most active, are arranged (2). We can see it in paintings “The Annunciation” by Fra il Beato Angelico (6), “Fishermen” by Gregory Soroka (9), “The Reading” by Édouard Manet (10).

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3. Silhouette of the shape A silhouette of a shape has a great importance in an image. It carries the main information about proportions that make a depicted object recognizable. Precisely found silhouette gives expressiveness to a painting. In a 1781 silhouette portrait of E. A. Stroganova by artist G. F. Sideаu (1) the portrait likeness is achieved by the silhouette alone. The silhouettes of the features of the face, the hair, the eye sockets etc. are absent. In a sophisticated work by J. F. Anthing, “Grand Duke Pavel Petrovich and Grand Duchess Maria Feodorovna with Children” (2), the artist conveys, with great elegance, not just the likeness of the characters, but also a peaceful intimate atmosphere within the family. A silhouette composition by F. Tolstoy (3) conveys not only the likeness of the people but also their emotional state.

should be expressive when viewed from a distance.

In many works we see how artists emphasize the silhouette, making the modeling of the form subordinating to it. As a rule, these are large scale murals or decorative works, that

To find lively and expressive silhouettes, it is necessary to collect reference material from life, make quick drawings and sketches, just as our predecessors did.

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This can be seen in these examples: “Our Lady” by Andrei Rublev (4), “The Angry Warrior” by Ferdinand Hodler (5), “Topaz” by Alphonse Mucha (6). Artist Valentin Serov paid much attention to the silhouette. Silhouette was one of the main visual elements he used. In “Peter I on the Hunt” (7) the artist finds expressive silhouettes of each figure, creating distinct characters. He unites them into groups, subordinating small silhouettes to larger ones. Another example of how a character is created with a silhouette can be found in Valentin Serov’s other painting, “Peter I the Great” (9, p. 17). It is the silhouettes that create a juxtaposition of Peter’s greatness against the background of his entourage.


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16 elements of visual design

1. A det ail of the painting

2. A scheme showing variet y in edges

4. The edges of the shapes In a composition, the main information about the form is located on the silhouette of a shape. The information is carried by carefully designed variety of edges of the shape. Within a shape, depending on the tasks, the form may be modeled more freely.

Rembrandt’s sketches from life (5, 6) confirm this.

We have already mentioned Rembrandt’s painting “The Holy Family” as an example of a dark painting in which the light shapes are arranged. Now let’s see how these shapes are given volume. Take the fragment – the head of the Madonna (1). We shall use tempera paint to mix three colors – light, dark and gray.

In his portrait of actress Maria Ermolova (7–8), artist Valentin Serov has found the expressive silhouette that creates a distinct character. At the same time, thanks to a variety of edges, the figure is located in a threedimensional space of the interior and does not look flat. In another Serov’s painting, “Peter I the Great” (9), the silhouettes of Peter’s figure and his companions stand out expressively against the light sky. The most active edges are on the head and the torso of the tsar. His feet are blending with the earth in the background.

First, we adjust the silhouettes, their tonal value and their proportions (3). After that, looking at the silhouette of the female figure as a whole, we create a variety in the edges (2, 4). Here I would like to draw students’ attention to the fact that it will be difficult to do this without working from life.

The silhouettes of the figures in the periphery of the painting are a lot less intense than the main figure. The fortress under construction, the city in the background, and the foreground are painted very loosely, to accentuate what is the most important.

3. A sketch painted with blocks of patches

4. Creating form using the variet y of edges of the silhouet te


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Hierarchy of the details. Unity In a composition, the main detail always tends to gravitate towards the visual center of the painting. Secondary details are located closer to the periphery. It does not matter what it is: a multi-figure composition, a portrait, a landscape, a still-life, whether it is a painting or a drawing. Details visually divide an image into sections. A detail can be an object, a still-life, a part of a person’s figure or a group of figures. A composition is «built» from the details. Details in the composition have a hierarchy which is created with contrasts and a variety in levels of completion. In any classical painting, we can find the most important detail, the second most important, the third and so on.

the draperies (2). The third is a lamp at the head of the bed (3). Then – the figure of Jairus, the head of John (4), and a weeping mother (5). In the foreground is a still life, accurate in color and value, but painted loosely (6). In the foreground, there are loosely painted figures and the interior (7). Here the unity and subordination are achieved by the variety in the degrees of completion and contrasts.

In Rembrandt’s painting “The Holy Family” (1–2), the main detail is the head of the Mother, a part of her torso and the book she is holding (1). This is the center of interest of the painting. The detail number two is a sleeping baby in the cradle (2). The third detail is the angel descending from the sky (3). The fourth is Joseph the carpenter working in the background (4). The least significant detail is the fire in the hearth and the objects next to it (5). In this painting we see how the artist, with the help of contrasts, identified the main details and, by gradually softening and paying less attention to the development of minor details, subordinated them to the major ones. Subordination creates a sense of unity and completion.

In the bright, plein air style painting by Vasily Polenov, “Christ and the Sinner” (5–6), the main detail is the figure of Jesus. He is distinguished by the contrast of light and dark clothes (1). He looks at the sinner as if stopping the movement of the crowd. The “key” to the meaning of the painting are the two figures of the Pharisees, one of which points to the sinner (2). The third detail is the crowd leading the woman to the trial (3). The next in significance is the bright area of the temple with the believers (4). The figures of Jesus’ disciples sitting in the shade (in the foreground on the left) are similar in value and do not interfere with the perception of the main characters (5). In a classical composition, the main details are usually in the middleground. In the lower right corner, there is a figure of a man on a donkey. It is also in the shade and is similar in value. Artists make sure that the angles in a painting, as in nature, are not all the same. Further you can see a cypress lit by the sunset (7) and a landscape in the top right corner of the painting (8).

The second painting we will review here is Ilya Repin’s diploma work “Raising of Jairus’ daughter” (3–4). The main details are, of course, the head of Jesus and the hand that supports the folds of the clothing (1). The next detail is the head of the girl, her hands and the light creases of

In this large, multi-figure painting, we can identify eight elements that have a clear hierarchy. The details within each element also have their own hierarchy. If we look around we can see a similar hierarchy in everything that surrounds us.


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6. Rhythm Repetition, with some variety, of the silhouettes of shapes, creates a rhythm. The rhythm creates a sense of tension and movement. Since the ancient times, artists used rhythm to convey these sensations.

Hodler, in his work “Jena Students Depart for the War of Liberation” (3) and Deyneka in the painting “The Defence of Petrograd” (4) both utilize rhythm to convey the departure of armed units to a battle.

We see how an Ancient Greek master of vase painting, depicting a sports competition, creates a sense of fast movement with rhythm (1).

Matisse creates a sense of dance by depicting various phases of the movement of figures in his “Dance” (7).

The Egyptian mural artist, painting the walls of the pharaoh’s tomb, very convincingly depicts the cry of the mourners by using the rhythms of the movement of hands, the vibration of the hair and the folds of clothing (2). In “The Battle of San Romano” (5), the Italian artist Paolo Uccello depicts the tension and the chaos of the battle by masterfully creating a rhythm with the silhouettes of the horses, the figures of the soldiers, the spears and the weapons.

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Artist Valentin Kurdov in his work “The Copper Samovar” (6), uses rhythm to convey the impression of a boiling, buzzing samovar. In Deyneka’s “The Defense of Sevastopol”, rhythm helps the artist to conveys the tension of a hand-to-hand combat and the juxtaposition of the light silhouettes of the sailors, merging with the white, stony ground, and the dark green figures of the German soldiers against the blood-red sky (8).

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7. Plastic connection In contrast to rhythm, a plastic connection of the silhouettes creates a sense of tranquillity, peace, and harmony. In this case, the silhouette of one shape flows into the silhouette of the other, possibly with some intervals. Here are some examples of outstanding compositions from different eras and countries; next to them are the schemes. The red lines indicate the plastic connections of the silhouettes, and the green lines highlight the rhythm that creates the dynamic. If you follow the red lines, the connection between them becomes obvious. The color relationships in Andrei Rublev’s “Trinity” (12) evoke a feeling of delight and peaceful joy. The plastic connection of the silhouettes and the lines add a sense of harmony, unity, and perfection. A Japanese artist Kitagawa Utamaro employed plastic connections and expressive silhouettes to create an image of a Japanese beauty, and to subtly convey the lyrical state of hope, sadness and expectation in his woodblock print “Reading a Letter” (3–4).

Sandro Botticelli’s “Spring” (5–6) captures the eyes of even an inexperienced viewer by its beauty, harmony and tranquillity. This impression is achieved by uniting all the figures with plastic connections and contrasting them with the rhythm of the tree trunks, which emphasizes the movement of the figures. Even Vasily Kandinsky, the founder of “expressive abstractionism”, whilst rejecting representational painting, could not avoid such an expressive element as a plastic connection. We witness it in his painting “Vague” (7–8) Time passes by, the artistic challenges change, but the elements of visual design remain the same. It is remarkable that different artists, separated by time and space, use the same principles of visual design. Perhaps this is because the soul of a real artist is unwittingly drawn to the beautiful, and they intuitively discover the universal laws of beauty.


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24 elements of visual design

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8. Color Relationships Each color carries an emotional charge, but it is the combination of different patches of color that can evoke emotions in the viewer. This is similar to music, where a combination of sounds can make a person feel delight, sadness, or create a lyrical mood. In painting, the combination of patches of color that evoke feelings is called color relationships. In Fra Angelico’s painting “Coronation of the Virgin” (1), we see how the color relationships convey a sense of joy and delight. The work is light, painted in tempera. A few dark – but not black – shapes highlight the happy mood of the event. Cold blue tones, sitting next to warm gold and pink, enhance the impact of each other. We observe similar color relationships in Andrei Rublev’s “Trinity” (1, p. 22). From the emergence of oil painting and until the second half of the 19th century, color relationships were formed by multiple layers of paint. Each layer, starting with the colored ground, contributed to the colors of the painting. The colors the artist introduced into a painting were harmonized by the previous and subsequent layers (2). In the second half of the 19th century, artists turned to nature and started working en plein air. The color solutions

were usually suggested by nature itself. This gave paintings a sense of authenticity and persuasiveness. Starting with Alexander Ivanov and to this day Russian artists have been using sketches from nature as references for their paintings. A painting like Mikhail Nesterov’s “The Hermite”, in which color relationships convey feelings of enlightenment and peace, would be impossible to paint without the reference material collected from life. The color creates a sense of happiness and joy of life in Alexander Savinov’s diploma work “Bathing Horses on the River Volga”, which was inspired by the sketches the artist made in Saratov. In Filipp Malyavin’s painting, “The Whirlwind” (4) the color solution is inspired by the peasant festive costumes. The active texture of brush strokes, the rhythms and the curves of the folds of the dresses convey the dynamics of a dance. It is impossible to just make up the color relationships in Arkady Plastov’s painting, “Dinner of Tractor Drivers” (6). In “Vast Expanse” by Deyneka (7), the theme of the painting is developed through the color scheme.


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“THE FUNDAMENTALS OF ART” SERIES

DEDICATED TO THE 260 TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE RUSSIAN ACADEMY OF ARTS

“Fundamentals of Composition” is the third book in the “The Fundamentals of Art” series. The two previous books, “Fundamentals of Drawing” and “Fundamentals of Painting” were first published (in Russian) in 2007 and 2010. These books do not claim to provide a comprehensive review of the subject. The author attempted to gather, systemize and present, in an accessible form, the principles that are at the basis of the academic education system. These books are written so that the grammar of the visual art, preserved within the historic walls of the Academy of Arts, could be passed to the future generations of artists.

FUNDAMENTALS OF ART

In today’s art world, we can witness a complete freedom of selfexpression, which conceals an inability to draw and sheer illiteracy. It is often covered up by abstruse theoretical justifications. But for some reason the works by many contemporary artists more often than not cause negative, depressing feelings, or repel by their emptiness. Classical grammar of visual art gives a true freedom of expression, an ability to convey to the viewer both a feeling of compassion and an admiration of the beauty of the world around us. Creating something beautiful is impossible without mastering the grammar of the language of visual art.

Fundamentals of Drawing Author: V. A. Mogilevtsev Publisher: 4арт Pages: 72 Year published (English): 2016 Cover: hardcover Language: English Dimensions (cm.): 24 х 34 х 1 Weight (g): 990 ISBN-10 5-904957-03-3 ISBN-13 978-5-904957-03-2

Fundamentals of Painting

Author: V. A. Mogilevtsev Publisher: 4арт Pages: 96 Year published (English): 2016 Cover: hardcover Language: English Dimensions (cm.): 24 х 34 х 1.2 Weight (g): 1300 ISBN-10 5-904957-02-5 ISBN-13 978-5-904957-02-5

Fundamentals of Composition Author: V. A. Mogilevtsev Publisher: 4арт Pages: 88 Year published (English): 2018 Cover: hardcover Language: English Dimensions (cm.): 24 х 34 х 1.1 Weight (g): 1200 ISBN-10 5-904957-08-4 ISBN-13 978-5-904957-08-7


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В. А. Могилевцев V. А. Mogilevtsev

НАБРОСКИ И УЧЕБНЫЙ РИСУНОК

ОБРАЗЦЫ ДЛЯ КОПИРОВАНИЯ DRAWING SAMPLES FOR COPYING

ACADEMIC DRAWINGS AND SKETCHES

ФИГУРА FIGURE

УЧЕБНЫЙ РИСУНОК В РОССИЙСКОЙ АКАДЕМИИ ХУДОЖЕСТВ XVIII – XIX вв Санкт-Петербург / St. Petersburg

ACADEMIC DRAWING AT THE RUSSIAN ART ACADEMY XVIII – XIX centuries

Academic Drawings and Sketches

Drawing Sample for Copying. Figure

Anatomy of Human Figure

Teaching Drawing

Author: V. A. Mogilevtsev Publisher: 4арт Pages: 168 Year published: 2015, 2011 Cover: paperback with a flap Language: Russian, English Dimensions (cm.): 24 х 34 х 1.4 Weight (g): 1400 ISBN-10 5-904957-01-7 ISBN-13 978-5-904957-01-8

Edited by V. A. Mogilevtsev Publisher: Artindex Pages: 116 Year published: 2015 Cover: hardcover Language: Russian Dimensions (cm.): 15 х 21.5 х 1.1 Weight (g): 450 ISBN-10 5-903733-43-3 ISBN-13 978-5-903733-43-9

Author: V. A. Mogilevtsev Publisher: 4арт Pages: 132 Year published: 2016 Cover: hardcover Language: Russian, English Dimensions (cm.): 24 х 34 х 1.2 Weight (g): 1600 ISBN-10 5-904957-04-1 ISBN-13 978-5-904957-04-9

Editor: V. A. Mogilevtsev Publisher: Artindex Pages: 284 Year published: 2016 Cover: hardcover Language: Russian Dimensions (cm.): 24.3 х 29 х 2.2 Weight (g): 2200 ISBN-10 5-903733-55-7 ISBN-13 978-5-903733-55-2


MOGILEVTSEV Vladimir Alexandrovich 1994

Graduated from the Ilya Repin St. Petersburg State Academic Institute of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture of the Russian Academy of Arts, the workshop of Professor Y. M. Neprintsev, Full Member of the Russian Academy of Arts.

1994–1997 Continued his training at the workshop of Professor A. A. Mylnikov, Vice-President of the Russian Academy of Arts. Since 1994 A member of the Russian Union of Artists and a regular participant of national and international art exhibitions. 1995

Started teaching drawing at the Ilya Repin St. Petersburg State Academic Institute of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture of the Russian Academy of Arts.

Since 2013 Head of the Drawing Department at the Ilya Repin St. Petersburg State Academic Institute of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture. 2017

Awarded Gold Medal of the Russian Academy of Arts for his «Fundamentals of Art» textbooks and contribution as an art educator.

Fundamentals of Composition (Sample 25 pages)  

The only manual on fundamentals of composition approved and recommended by the Russian Academy of Arts (aka Repin Institute).

Fundamentals of Composition (Sample 25 pages)  

The only manual on fundamentals of composition approved and recommended by the Russian Academy of Arts (aka Repin Institute).

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