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SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2018 VOLUME 14, NUMBER 38

22 5500 Adams Farm Lane Suite 204 Greensboro, NC 27407 Office 336-316-1231 Fax 336-316-1930 Publisher CHARLES A. WOMACK III

FASHION WEEK RETURNS

publisher@yesweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor KATIE MURAWSKI katie@yesweekly.com

WINSTON-SALEM FASHION WEEK starts this weekend, and this year it is more local than ever before. Nikita Wallace, founder and director of Winston-Salem Fashion Week, said this year’s designers are all from North Carolina and many are from the Triad.

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Contributors IAN MCDOWELL KRISTI MAIER JOHN ADAMIAN MARK BURGER SEBASTIAN PELLEJERO PRODUCTION Graphic Designers ALEX ELDRIDGE designer@yesweekly.com AUSTIN KINDLEY artdirector@yesweekly.com ADVERTISING Marketing TRAVIS WAGEMAN travis@yesweekly.com

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If you’re like me, the very best thing about a carnival or a local fair is the food. With its endless food trucks of fun and fried treats, both savory and sweet. Well, there’s some buzz about a concept in Winston-Salem that will satisfy your craving for more than just once a year. UNCLE BUZZY’S FRIED FOOD is banking on fair lovers’ fascination with carney cuisine. 10 A/perture Cinema and Sawtooth School for Visual Arts are teaming up for a free (after a $50 registration fee) afterschool filmmaking class called GIRLS AND PRODUCTION. Girls through GAP will be exposed to a feminist film curriculum and technical filmmaking skills so that they can nourish their passion for film at an early age. 11 For the fourth consecutive year, Wreak Havoc Productions is getting a big jump on Halloween festivities, as the Triad-based film consortium presents the WREAK HAVOC HORROR FILM FESTIVAL, opening Sept. 21 in the Crown at the Carolina Theatre in Greensboro. YES! WEEKLY

SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2018

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CRUNK WITCH isn’t in fact, a new twisted club-jam genre taxonomy. It’s a band. A duo. From Maine. They do actually play a giddy hybrid of electronic music that draws on elements of hip-hop, techno-pop, industrial, chiptune, glam, and a flurry of other (mostly) dayglo styles that get flung together in the band’s party-centric musical particle collider. 18 Clearly, clarity (or the lack thereof) is an issue in THE PREDATOR, the latest attempt to again jump-start a franchise that has basically been on life support since the engaging original. 24 Award-winning writer and photographer LEE ZACHARIAS recently published her first novel in over a decade, and it’s hauntingly good. Like her former University of North Carolina at Greensboro colleagues Fred Chappell and the late Jim Clark, Lee is a friend and mentor, and as I did when writing about them, I’ll refer to her by first name.

TRISH SHROYER trish@yesweekly.com JULIE COLEMAN julie@yesweekly.com Promotion NATALIE GARCIA

DISTRIBUTION JANICE GANTT KARRIGAN MUNRO We at YES! Weekly realize that the interest of our readers goes well beyond the boundaries of the Piedmont Triad. Therefore we are dedicated to informing and entertaining with thought-provoking, debate-spurring, in-depth investigative news stories and features of local, national and international scope, and opinion grounded in reason, as well as providing the most comprehensive entertainment and arts coverage in the Triad. YES! Weekly welcomes submissions of all kinds. Efforts will be made to return those with a self-addressed stamped envelope; however YES! Weekly assumes no responsibility for unsolicited submissions. YES! Weekly is published every Wednesday by Womack Newspapers, Inc. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. First copy is free, all additional copies are $1.00. Copyright 2018 Womack Newspapers, Inc.

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ALAN ALDA Author of NY Times Bestseller “If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face?”

9.21.18

9.22-29.18

UCLS.UNCG.EDU

THEATRE.UNCG.EDU

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EVENTS YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS | BY AUSTIN KINDLEY

FRIDAY

FRIDAY WED 19

FRI 21

SATURDAY

SAT 22-23

HURRICANE FLORENCE RELIEF BENEFIT NIGHT

MOONLIGHT MADNESS 5K AND FUN RUN

DRAM & DRAUGHT GREENSBORO

WHAT: In light of this weekend’s devastating storm, we’ve decided to cancel our dinner with Hoots Beer Co. & refocus our efforts to supporting those throughout the state who are seriously impacted by Hurricane Florence. Guests are invited to visit The Katharine to dine on their own on Wednesday evening, and 10% of all food/ drink proceeds will go toward Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina & 100% of Hoots draft brews will be donated as well. WHEN: 6:30-9:30 p.m. WHERE: The Katharine Brasserie and Bar. 51 E 4th St, Winston-Salem.

WHAT: The Moonlight Madness 5k and fun run is a benefit fundraiser for The United Way of Forsyth County.This run is a great way to end the summer. Come run and party with us at Bailey Park. Foothills Brewing and Mellow Mushroom Pizza will be providing beer and pizza for runners after the race. WHEN: 6-10 p.m. WHERE: Bailey Park. 445 Patterson Ave, Winston-Salem. MORE: $20 registration for 1 mile run, $38 registration for 5K

WHAT: It’s time to celebrate the opening of the newest Dram & Draught location! Join us on Saturday, September 22 starting at noon for a grand opening party like no other at 300 West Gate City Blvd. in Greensboro. We will have food trucks all day + live music from local favorites, and of course, whiskey! WHEN: Sep 22 at 12 PM – Sep 23 at 2 AM WHERE: Dram & Draught Greensboro. 300 West Gate City Blvd, Greensboro.

GRAND OPENING

SAT 22 2018 INTERNATIONAL VILLAGE FOOD AND MUSIC FESTIVAL WHAT: Corpening Plaza will showcase the international backgrounds and heritage of Winston-Salem’s local residents. Featuring global cuisine, entertainment by cultural organizations, international crafts for purchase, and education about our international community, International Village is a trip around the world in one park! WHEN: 12 PM – 7 PM WHERE: Corpening Plaza. 200 W 1st St, Winston-Salem. MORE: Free event.

pa r t n e r s

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SAT 22 GODSMACK/SHINEDOWN WHAT: Godsmack exploded onto the album charts with their latest release, When Legends Rise, the band’s seventh studio album and their first in four years, available now via BMG. Shinedown are at the top of their game and the charts with their critically acclaimed sixth studio album Attention Attention, out now on Atlantic Records, which is being called their best work yet. WHEN: 7 p.m. WHERE: Greensboro Coliseum Complex. 1921 W Gate City Blvd, Greensboro. MORE: $39.50 - $59.50 tickets.

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[SPOTLIGHT] BIRD IS THE WORD

BY SEBASTIAN PELLEJERO Walk through the streets of WinstonSalem, and you might come across an unfamiliar vehicle. It’s a scooter, and it’s there for anyone to ride. Bird, the dockless scooter-share company, has arrived in Winston-Salem, and for just $1 for the first minute and 20 cents for each minute after, smartphone users can rent freestanding electric scooters to ride around the streets and sidewalks, reaching speeds up to 15 miles per hour. With cities and their residents looking for both cheap and energy-efficient transit options, scooters have become en mode. Billed as travel for “last-mile” journeys, and recently valued at over $2 billion, according to Business Insider, Bird, along with other electric scooter-share companies such as Lime and Skip, have made it to cities nationwide. Though enjoyed by some, electric scooters have proven to be a divisive issue in other cities, producing battles akin to those prior between governments and the ridesharing service Uber. Go to Washington D.C. or Los Angeles, and one can find tarnished scooters in the streets, if not for deliberate reasons. In Santa Monica, Bird’s headquarters, the city government took the company to court after accusing it of failing to acquire a proper business license, only to later settle for $300,000. On Instagram, one can visit the Bird Graveyard (www.instagram.com/birdgraveyard), where pictures and videos of scooters being destroyed abound. In many cities across the country, scooters are appearing more and more at the haste of their owners. In Winston-Salem, Bird scooters landed overnight in late August. An assistant city manager Damon Dequenne told the Winston-Salem Journal’s Scott Sexton in an article on Sept. 8 (www.journalnow.com/news/columnists/ scott_sexton/bird-electric-scooters-havelanded-in-a-big-way/article_729b04425782-55b3-aa56-b1937e961c7d.html) that they had been hoping to collect data from other cities with scooters to present to the city council and its Public Safety Committee, before the arrival of them on the streets. Other public officials have sought to gain their own footing on the industry. WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

NCDOT TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETING SEPT. 20 FOR THE PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS AT THE U.S. 29/N.C. 150 INTERCHANGE IN GUILFORD COUNTY TIP PROJECT NO. U-5898 Councilman Jeff MacIntosh asked city staff for information on how other cities were addressing the matter. “You don’t want to be draconian about it,” Councilman MacIntosh told the Winston-Salem Journal. “We’re competing with other cities for jobs. I don’t mind a little weird, just as long as it’s not dangerous.” For those looking for added revenue streams, Bird offers the opportunity to become a charger for them. In becoming a charger, one agrees to collect, charge and distribute scooters from across town. Chargers are paid daily, by the scooter. Some students in the area have seen Bird as a gilded opportunity. “Birds are super convenient, and the way they integrate into smaller campuses is ideal for students,” said Muhammad Anmar, a 22-year-old Master’s candidate at Wake Forest, who has considered signing up as a charger. “Being a charger is a really convenient opportunity to gain some extra funds.” For Bird, it seems Wake Forest was in mind when choosing to bring their scooters to Winston-Salem. In a statement sent to the Winston-Salem Journal, a Bird spokeswoman expressed how the company was “especially happy to see students and faculty of [Wake Forest] taking advantage of Bird as a way of connecting with the community. Whatever the national climate, for now, scooters have taken to the streets. Ride carefully and wear a helmet. !

The N.C. Department of Transportation will hold a public meeting regarding the proposed improvements at the U.S. 29/N.C. 150 interchange in Guilford County. The primary purpose of this project is to improve traffic operations and upgrade the interchange to meet interstate standards for U.S. 29, which has been designated as the future I-785. The meeting will be held on Thursday, September 20, 2018 at the Crooked Tree Golf Course located at 7665 Caber Road in Browns Summit from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The public may attend at any time during the meeting hours. Please note there will be no formal presentation. At the meeting there will be maps of the proposed plans as well as project team members who will be available to answer your questions and receive feedback. All comments will be taken into consideration as the project progresses. The opportunity to submit written comments will be provided at the meeting or can be done via phone, email, or mail no later than October 22, 2018. As information becomes available, it may be viewed at the NCDOT Public Meeting Webpage: https://www.ncdot.gov/news/public-meetings/. For additional information please contact NCDOT Project Manager, Jennifer Evans, P.E., by phone at (336) 487-0075 or by email at jenniferevans@ncdot. gov or Consultant Project Manager Brandon Johnson, P.E., by phone at (919) 322-0115 or by email at brandon.johnson@summitde.net. NCDOT will provide auxiliary aids and services under the Americans with Disabilities Act for disabled persons who wish to participate in this meeting. Anyone requiring special services should contact Lauren Putnam via email at lnputnam1@ncdot.gov or by phone at (919) 707-6072 as early as possible, so that arrangements can be made. Persons who speak Spanish and do not speak English, or have a limited ability to read, speak or understand English, may receive interpretive services upon request prior to the meeting by calling 1-800-481-6494. Aquellas personas que hablan español y no hablan inglés, o tienen limitaciones para leer, hablar o entender inglés, podrían recibir servicios de interpretación si los solicitan antes de la reunión llamando al 1-800-481-6494. SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2018

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From the Midway to Winston-Salem: Uncle Buzzy’s Fried Food

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f you’re like me, the very best thing about a carnival or a local fair is the food. With its endless food trucks of fun and fried treats, both savory and sweet. Well, Kristi Maier there’s some buzz @triadfoodies about a concept in Winston-Salem that will satisfy your Contributor craving for more than just once a year. Uncle Buzzy’s Fried Food is banking on fair lovers’ fascination with carney

cuisine. It might actually be a new thing by now. Uncle Buzzy’s is a collaboration of Dave Hillman, who owns Burke Street Pizza and Quiet Pint, and celebrity chef Brian Duffy, of Spike T.V.’s Bar Rescue. The two worked together previously when Duffy consulted Quiet Pint’s menu several years ago when it opened just a block away from Uncle Buzzy’s. Uncle Buzzy’s is a take-out place chocked full of “creative carnival fare.” Funnel cakes, hot dogs, smoked turkey legs, and more fried fare than you can shake a battered stick at. But if you’re worried about all the heart-stopping fryer action, there’s no need. The restaurant is more than just fried items. You’ll find burgers and chicken wings, but Hillman

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likes to think the stars of the show are the roast beef and pork sandwiches. “The pork and roast beef cook all night in the smoker, and we slice the beef to order. Everything we do is something you love, but with a twist.” I tried “The Meat Cone” in Carney Town. My choice was the porchetta, which was layered on top of hand-cut fries then drizzled with pepper gravy. I considered it a hand-held entrée or poutine, and it was superb. There are other meat cones as well, with chicken fingers and the aforementioned roast beef. Local podcaster, blogger and foodie, Tim Beeman, was one of several who checked out the menu early on. “I know the fried food is the draw, but it’s not my scene. I liked the foot-long Chicago Dog and the Italian Beef. The flavors were hearty and fresh. Chef Brian Duffy’s touch is definitely on it.” Hillman is a native New Yorker, who moved to Winston-Salem in 1998 after working in Boston for some time. He’s enjoyed success as restaurateur after opening Burke Street Pizza on First Street 15 years ago. “I worked for a day trading firm, and after 9/11, the market changed,” he told me. “I had to figure to what I wanted to do, and I have a background in bars and restaurants. The only action was on Burke Street back then, and I wanted to open up a pizza place that stayed open late.” Hillman said he did a little research, but

he let his life experience guide him. “I am from New York, and I know what pizza is supposed to taste like.” (The original location just completed a renovation. A second Burke Street Pizza, located on Robinhood Road, will be undergoing a renovation soon.) Hillman opened Quiet Pint on First Street almost six years ago. “I wanted to build a place where I’d like to hang out,” he said. “A local neighborhood place that felt comfortable and inviting.” Hillman brought Chef Duffy in as a consultant on the menu which consists of a new spin on pub food. The gastro burgers, flatbreads, Wings-3-Ways, and the macaroni and cheese skillets remain popular items. And Chef Victor Ramirez is working on new items for the fall.

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TAPPING PARTY

Hillman said he and Duffy have remained friends since the opening of QP, so when he approached him with the concept of Uncle Buzzy’s, the chef thought the idea was fun and came on board for a partnership. “I watch all the food shows. I love to try new things. People love to try crazy food at the fair and so do I. I wanted to open up a place to see how it flies.” Duffy, who returns every six to eight weeks, was just in town last weekend working on new menu items. He and Hillman were not unlike school kids battering just about anything to see how it would turn out. From a battered ice cream sandwich to fried cheesecake to deep fried giant gummy bunny? “What the mind can conceive, the fryer WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

will achieve,” Hillman joked. Well almost... The bunny lost its head (it was only for fun anyway). “You can’t be too gimmicky. You have to have real quality food. So I throw out ideas to Brian, and he makes it happen.” Popular items are the Philly Cheesesteak, and Hillman said he loves the smoked macaroni and cheese. Of course, any roast beef item is one he recommends, particularly the Beef on Weck, which is dipped in au jus, topped with horseradish whipped cream with a salt-crusted caraway roll. It’s not a day at the fair without an order of funnel cake or an ice cream waffle taco for a departure. Plans are in the works for themed nights such as taco night, a smoked meat night and even seafood night. Hillman has enjoyed taking advantage of a slow opening to work out any kinks. “So far, the response and feedback have been positive, and they can’t believe how good the food is,” he said. “And I’m really happy about that. I’m passionate about a quality product.” ! KRISTI MAIER is a food writer, blogger and cheerleader for all things local who even enjoys cooking in her kitchen, though her kidlets seldom appreciate her efforts.

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Uncle Buzzy’s Fried Food is located at 1510 W. First Street, Winston-Salem.

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Bridging the GAP: Getting girls in film *Editor’s note: This article first appeared online Sept. 7. It has been updated and edited for print.

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n 2017, women only represented 18 percent of Katie Murawski all writers, directors, producers, executive producers, editors Editor and cinematographers working on the top 250 domestic grossing films, according to the 20th annual Celluloid Ceiling report of the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film from San Diego State University. Two local institutions in Winston-Salem are working to change that statistic by starting with high school girls in the community. A/perture Cinema and Sawtooth School for Visual Arts are teaming up for a free (after a $50 registration fee) afterschool filmmaking class called Girls And Production. Girls through GAP will be exposed to a feminist film curriculum and technical filmmaking skills so that they can nourish their passion for film at an early age. The overall goal of the program is to get more women and representation in the film industry. Gray Gordon, education director and special programming coordinator at A/ perture Cinema and Alex Klein, the vice

president of operations at Sawtooth are both spearheading the program. The two got together and realized that they both had similar visions for the program. Gordon said he drew inspiration from his former employer, the Belcourt Theatre in Nashville and its afterschool program called Strong Leads. Gordon said Strong Leads was more of a scholarly and discussion-based program whereas, GAP will focus on discussions as well as production. He said a key difference between Strong Leads and GAP was the technical aspect that Sawtooth provides. “Ours is a different topic every week and more formatted like a college course rather than a film club,” Gordon said about the GAP program. “It doesn’t look like anything else that exists in the country. Arthouse and indie cinema all have robust education programming, but the reason why our partnership with Sawtooth is so great is because there really isn’t anywhere else in the country that is doing this or doing it in a way that looks like GAP.” Klein said GAP is broken up into two semesters. The first semester will focus on watching various feminist films and clips at A/perture while Gordon instructs and moderates the discussion. While Gordon admits that he is a cisgender white man teaching a class on feminist film studies, he invites and encourages any women who have studied in the film industry field or who have taught film studies before to come by, sit in and participate to be part of the discussion. (As a film studies minor myself, I plan to

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Gray Gordon and Alex Klein sitting in the seats of A/perture Cinema for a promotional video by Micah Brown Media.

accept his invitation enthusiastically.) The curriculum will look at Laura Mulvey’s “The Male Gaze,” the construction of gender, masculinity as a spectacle, female characters in films, and the intersectionality of identity and gender in film. The second semester will take place at Sawtooth and will have a “filmmaking 101 crash course,” where the girls will learn composition, directing, editing and sound design. “The really awesome thing about this program is that it will culminate with a film festival so that these girls can all screen the movies they made during the spring semester,” Klein said. “This is the pilot program; our hopes are that it is super successful and that we can do another one next year at a different level. So next year, we can offer GAP intro and then like an intermediate level so that girls that graduate from the first level have something else to do.” Klein said since this is the pilot program, GAP will only accept 12 students. Klein and Gordon agree that finding a diverse group of students is a top priority for GAP. “We are trying to get at least 50 percent of our students from lower-income families and schools—like from Title I high schools, which is a pretty big percentage,” Klein said. “We felt that it was important to have a really good mix of backgrounds so that these girls can learn from each other’s experiences and make films that

represent women from all walks of life.” “The program is targeted to serve girls that have an interest in film that needs to be nourished and cultivated,” Gordon said of the importance of diversity in GAP. “Because a student that is already in this world is going to have nourishment, and we want to include them to a capacity, but like we said, the majority of the students we want are the ones that need the program to nourish their interest in movie making.” Klein believes this program is essential to potential future filmmaking students because of her own experiences in the field. She went to the University of North Carolina School of the Arts for filmmaking and said that many of her female colleagues wanted their concentration to be in directing but they did not apply because they felt like they couldn’t compete with the men. As of Sept. 7 around 6:30 p.m., GAP has reached its goal of raising $5,000 for the program via crowdfounding. According to the classy.org page, there were 41 donors that actually raised $5,474 or 109 percent of the goal of $5,000 to support the GAP program. GAP (after a $50 registration fee) is a free afterschool program and the fall semester begins on Sept. 26 at A/ perture Cinema and the spring semester takes place on Jan. 6, 2019, at Sawtooth. For more information about GAP, visit the Sawtooth website, www.sawtooth.org/ introducing-girls-production-in-collaboration-with-a-perture-cinema/. ! KATIE MURAWSKI is the editor of YES! Weekly. She is from Mooresville, North Carolina and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in journalism with a minor in film studies from Appalachian State University in 2017.

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Wreak Havoc rocks the Carolina Theatre with fourth annual horror festival For the fourth consecutive year, Wreak Havoc Productions is getting a big jump on Halloween festivities, as the Triad-based film consortium presents the Wreak Havoc Horror Film Festival, Mark Burger opening Sept. 21 in the Crown at the Contributor Carolina Theatre in Greensboro. “One of the things I love about the Wreak Havoc Horror Film Festival is just how brilliant it’s become in a relatively short period of time,” said Wreak Havoc president Dan Sellers, who co-founded the Wreak Havoc Film Buffs Podcast with Sammie Cassell. “For only being its fourth birthday, it has already established a solid reputation as a rising genre festival on the circuit. It showcases not only the best and brightest of independent horror filmmaking from around the world, but it also gives a special nod to some of the movie magic being made right here in our own North Carolinian backyard.” Of the record-breaking 172 films submitted this year, the 2018 festival boasts 24 short films and three features. “We were very pleased by the quality of submissions this year,” said Sellers, whose latest short – the true-crime short Trouble Will Cause – will have its world premiere 4 p.m. Saturday. “I was surprised and thrilled at the response we had last year, as our event sold out,” he continued. “It was a beautiful sight to see a full theater! I hope we can sustain that level of success this year, and possibly plant the seeds to grow in the years to come. “We have eight judges who meticulously screen each submission and we deliberate, sometimes painstakingly, on which films make the cut and which films are awarded prizes. This year we’ve actually expanded our awards category to include Best Horror Comedy, Best Production Design, Best Score and Best Cinematography, (and) we’re also bringing back our awards for Best Feature, Short Film, Director, Actress, Actor, North Carolina Film, Foreign Film, Special FX, and Audience Choice.” Competition and awards are a part of the Wreak Havoc Horror Film Festival, WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

but equally as important is the collective spirit of celebration that surrounds it. It offers a showcase for independent filmmakers, many of whom will be in attendance (schedules permitting), and also a way to gauge potential audience reaction. That certainly applies to Jaysen Buterin, creative director (and resident mastermind) of Greensborobased Mad Ones Films, and the maker of Killing Giggles, a satirical shocker in which clowns are not the monsters but the victims of a deranged serial killer. The short, which is something of a “preview” for Buterin’s proposed feature Kill Giggles. (The production of the short was covered in this column last December.) According to Buterin, for Mad Ones Films and the festival, the third time is definitely charmed. “This marks the third year of Mad Ones Films being able to screen at Wreak Havoc, and I’m particularly excited about it,” he said. “Not only is three a magic number – according to ‘Schoolhouse Rock’ – but this year will also be the hometown premiere of Killing Giggles—a proof-of-concept for the feature-film version Kill Giggles that we’ll be shooting in and around the Triad next year. It’s essentially the first scene of the film, but what gets me so excited is the audience reaction to it, because no one has ever really told a story like this one before. “Yes, I know that nearly every filmmaker says that about their movie – and rightfully so – but we actually mean it,” Buterin boasted. “We’ve all seen the movies where the monsters and serial killers dress up like clowns to spread murder and mayhem, but we’re going to do is tell the tale of a serial killer of clowns instead. The proof-of-concept has been doing really well on the festival circuit, with audience reaction both during and afterward, being everything we could have wanted. So to have our hometown screening at such an amazing festival as Wreak Havoc, in such a brilliant building as the Carolina Theatre, well, that’s just the icing on the clown-killing cake!” As an independent filmmaker based

in a state starving for film incentives, Buterin lauds the festival for its continued support of those filmmakers who ply their trade in the Tarheel State. “Yes, the film ‘industry’ may have jumped ship, but the film ‘community’ has never been stronger. We don’t need remakes of reboots of recycled franchises being churned out of Hollywood because we have more than enough unique visions and voices of filmmakers right here. I think that’s part of the inspiration behind Wreak Havoc. That comes from the people involved in making it happen, especially Dan Sellers and Sammie Cassell and the die-hard volunteers and judges and committee members of Wreak Havoc. Not only are

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they horror film lovers, but quite a few of them are horror filmmakers as well. That gives them an added insight, I think, into the inner workings of the movie-making mindset, which they use to assemble one hell of a program each and every year!” ! See MARK BURGER’s reviews of current movies on Burgervideo.com. © 2018, Mark Burger.

WANNA

go?

The fourth annual Wreak Havoc Horror Film Festival takes place 6 p.m. Friday and 4 p.m. Saturday in the Crown at the Carolina Theatre, 310 S. Greene St., Greensboro. Tickets are $20 and are good for both days of the event. For advance tickets or more information, call the Carolina Theatre box office: (336) 333.2605, or visit the official Carolina Theatre website: https://carolinatheatre. com/ or e-mail wreakhavocproductions@gmail. com. The official Wreak Havoc Horror Film Fest website is http://www.wreakhavochorrorfilmfest. com/, and the official Facebook page is www. facebook.com/wreakhavochorrorfilmfest.

29

Jaycee Park • 9 am

5K Competitive Race • Awareness Walk

GreensboroRunWalkforAutism.org

Greensboro

RUN/WALK

FOR AUTISM SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2018

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tunes

12

HEAR IT!

Y

Crunk Witch to play Winston-Salem

ou could reasonably assume — given the bubbling petri dish of pop-culture nomenclature and the state of rapidly evolving names for John Adamian genres, subgenres, @johnradamian micro-genres and nano-genres — that Crunk Witch is some Contributor new permutation of dark hip-hop house and regional electro all fused together in a tangle of melted circuitry and pulsing subwoofers. You’d be partly right. Crunk Witch isn’t in fact, a new twisted club-jam genre taxonomy. It’s a band. A duo. From Maine. They do actually play a giddy hybrid of electronic music that draws on elements of hip-hop, technopop, industrial, chiptune, glam, and a flurry of other (mostly) dayglo styles that get flung together in the band’s partycentric musical particle collider. Crunk Witch play a show in WinstonSalem on Sept. 20 at Monstercade. The duo are a couple, and that seems to allow them to live the full-on roadwarrior traveling-band lifestyle that they maintain, spending much of the year on tour, traversing the country, playing gigs all over, without suffering the pangs of

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isolation and romantic ping-ponging that makes the life of the gigging musician so excruciating for many. The pair, made of up of Brandon Miles and Hannah Collen, just released their fourth full-length record earlier this year. The album, simply called Crunk Witch, is bursting with hyper arpeggiations, twitchy beats, bottomed-out synth bass sounds, and the big ecstatic and dramatic vocals of Miles. The music draws on the slightly retro-futuristic visions of Tron and Knight Rider, but the singing tips its spangled hat to arena belters like Freddie Mercury and Jon Bon Jovi. Miles and Collen are not afraid of kitsch and humor. Over-the-top is basically right where they aim everything. Crunk Witch operate out of Presque Isle, Maine, which is only about 20 miles from the Canadian border. Not only is it really far North, it’s remote, giving Miles and Collen a peculiar vantage point from which to view the rest of America. The location might help shape their idiosyncratic approach. “Being removed from a big music scene has helped us to be more creative and willing to explore styles of music we might not normally touch,” wrote Miles in an email exchange with me last week. “I would also say it’s inspired a better work ethic, as there is a lack of opportunities. We instead have to create our own.” One of the opportunities Crunk Witch has created for themselves is a cyclical schedule built around writing, recording and touring. Their professional calendar is programmed like one of their tunes, with its own drops and double-time surges. “Finishing an album takes a huge mental toll, as we do all of the recording, mixing, and mastering ourselves,” Miles wrote. “So it’s like a year focused on touring, a year split writing and touring, then a heavy six months wrapping it up, rinse and repeat.” Their other releases — Heartbeats in Hyperspace, Faith in the Thief, and The Legends of Manicorn — have all maintained that mix of video-game aesthetics with a whoosh of otherworldly Star Trek-style dystopian pizazz. Crunk Witch can go from vaudevillian crooning to warp speed barking, all of it sounding as if it were remixed by ultra-caffeinated androids. If there were pagan robot strip joints, this might be the music that would get blasted there. The effervescent vibe of Crunk Witch’s music and their visual style — a protein shake of fake-fur onesies, encrusted jewelry, Golden Girl-ish rayon wind suits — masks a straight-up commitment to the core principles of showbiz. The duo works to radiate their own energy and enthusiasm. WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

“We like to keep it light, but real. We live for passion,” Miles wrote. That’s another theme that their status as romantic partners allows Crunk Witch to explore: the subject of self-contained and fully realized attraction and gratification. If a lot of pop music is about longing or loss, yearning, lust or heartbreak, Crunk Witch often write songs about having someone and being satisfied. It’s not as blase as it might sound. They still generate heat and intensity, but there’s more of a sense of certainty to the dynamic. Though even when they conjure the sparks of attraction, like on “Drive,” off the new record, they do so using the language of delirium and losing control. The two met — in true retro-futuristic fashion — on Myspace, originally coming together to swap nerdy song ideas, and only forming a band three years later. Crunk Witch’s music is made for a fizzy virtual setting. They’re riffing on the world in which they were spawned. With their DJ-ish setup of backing tracks and preconfigured backgrounds, Miles and Collen can abandon the confines of the stage if need be, taking their show directly to the dancefloor for maximum crowd connection. “The job of performing isn’t to fill time or inflate your ego. It’s to entertain.” ! JOHN ADAMIAN lives in Winston-Salem, and his writing has appeared in Wired, The Believer, Relix, Arthur, Modern Farmer, the Hartford Courant and numerous other publications.

WANNA

go?

See Crunk Witch at Monstercade, 204 W. Acadia Ave., Winston-Salem, on Thursday, Sept. 20. (336) 893-8591 SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2018

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Submissions should be sent to artdirector@yesweekly.com by Friday at 5 p.m., prior to the week’s publication. Visit yesweekly.com and click on calendar to list your event online. home grown muSic Scene | compiled by Austin Kindley

ASHEBORO

FOUR SAINTS BREWING

218 South Fayetteville St. | 336.610.3722 foursaintsbrewing.com Sep 21: Jakobs Ferry Stragglers Sep 22: Nobody’s Fault Sep 28: Highstrung Bluegrass Band Sep 29: Abigail Dowd

clEmmOnS

VILLAGE SQUARE TAP HOUSE

6000 Meadowbrook Mall Ct | 336.448.5330 Sep 21: Dj Bald-E Sep 29: Smash Hat

dAnBuRy

GREEN HERON ALE HOUSE 1110 Flinchum Rd | 336.593.4733 greenheronclub.com Sep 22: Jack Marion and The Pearl Snap Prophets

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September 19-25, 2018

ElKIn

REEVES THEATER

129 W Main St | 336.258.8240 reevestheater.com Sep 20: Che Apalache Sep 22: Red Molly Sep 28: The Get Right Band Sep 29: Corey Hunt Band Oct 5: Lindsay Lou Oct 6: Sam Baker

gREEnSBORO

ARIzONA PETE’S

2900 Patterson St #A | 336.632.9889 arizonapetes.com Sep 19: Neck Deep: The Peace and Panic USA Tour 2, Trophy Eyes, Stand Atlantic, WSTR Sep 21: 1-2-3 Friday Oct 3: Arch Enemy, Goatwhore, Uncured Oct 13: After The Burial & The Acacia Strain

ARTISTIkA NIGHT CLUB 523 S Elm St | 336.271.2686 artistikanightclub.com Sep 21: DJ Dan the Player Sep 22: DJ Paco and DJ Dan the Player

BARN DINNER THEATRE 120 Stage Coach Tr. | 336.292.2211 Sep 20: Ms. Mary Goes Gospel Sep 22: Ms. Mary Goes Gospel

BEERTHIRTY

505 N. Greene St Sep 21: Chad Barnard Sep 28: Bend in the River Trio feat. Geoff Clapp Oct 5: Mark Wingerter Oct 12: Mix Tape Oct 19: Doug and Deland Oct 20: Craig Baldwin Oct 26: Starstruck Nov 2: Chad Barnard Nov 9: Gerry Stanek Nov 10: Craig Baldwin

THE BLIND TIGER

1819 Spring Garden St | 336.272.9888 theblindtiger.com Sep 19: Blind Tiger Beach Bash Sep 20: The Young Dubliners Sep 21: The Eric Gales Band with Travers Brothership Sep 22: Colony House w/ Swim In The Wild Sep 25: Fozzy, Adelita’s Way, Stone Broken, The Stir Sep 27: The Infamous Stringdusters Sep 28: George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic Sep 29: The Frights: Hypochondriac Tour Oct 5: A Light Divided album release party w/ Reason Define, Raimee, Vices & Vessels, Fear the United Oct 6: Cosmic Charlie Oct 7: Joey Fest Oct 8: Terror Oct 9: The Early November & Dangerous Summer Oct 10: Tribulation Oct 12: Ana Popovic

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THE CORNER BAR

Sep 28: Low Key Sep 29: gipsy danger Oct 6: Radio Revolver Oct 12: Southbound 49

COmEdY zONE

SOmEwHERE ELSE TAVERN

1700 Spring Garden St | 336.272.5559 corner-bar.com Sep 20: Live Thursdays 1126 S Holden Rd | 336.333.1034 thecomedyzone.com Sep 21: Valarie Storm Sep 22: Valarie Storm Oct 5: Corey Holcomb Oct 6: Corey Holcomb

5713 W Friendly Ave | 336.292.5464 facebook.com/thesomewhereelsetavern Oct 6: SoulSeason

COmmON gROuNdS

THE IdIOT BOx COmEdY CLuB

11602 S Elm Ave | 336.698.3888 Sep 22: AshV, Quarter Roys Sep 28: Bigdumbhick

502 N. Greene St | 336.274.2699 www.idiotboxers.com Sep 28: ultimate Comic Challenge Sep 29: Improv Saturday

CONE dENIm

THE w BISTRO & BAR

117 S Elm St | 336.378.9646 cdecgreensboro.com Sep 26: Kaleo Oct 25: Andy grammer Nov 3: Lewis Black Nov 4: Lewis Black Nov 10: midland dec 15: The Lacs

324 Elm St | 336.763.4091 @thewdowntown Sep 20: Karaoke Sep 21: Live dJ Sep 22: Live dJ

high point

gREENE STREET CLuB

AFTER HOuRS TAVERN

113 N Greene St | 336.273.4111 Sep 22: K.A.R.m.A music Festival Sep 29: Noriel “Trap Capos II Tour” Oct 1: K.A.R.m.A music Festival

1614 N Main St | 336.883.4113 afterhourstavern.net Sep 22: Black glass Sep 29: Louder, Fair warning, and west Haven

HAm’S NEw gARdEN

BAR 65

1635 New Garden Rd | 336.288.4544 hamsrestaurants.com Sep 21: Jukebox Revolver Sep 28: Second glance

LEVENELEVEN BREwINg 1111 Coliseum Blvd | 336.265.8600 Sep 19: william Nesmith Sept 20: Piedmont Old Time Jam Session Sep 24: Farewell Friend Sep 26: doug Baker Oct 3: Jamie Anderson Oct 10: Karen Novy

LISTEN SPEAKEASY 433 Spring Garden St

LITTLE BROTHER BREwINg

348 South Elm St | 336.510.9678 Sep 21: Seph Custer Sep 23: The Retrovales Sep 28: Otis Oct 13: Seth Brand Acoustic duo Oct 20: Paleface

ROdY’S TAVERN

5105 Michaux Road | 336.282.0950 rodystavern.com Sep 21: Jukebox Rehab www.yeSweekly.com

235 Cornell Dr | 336.543.4799

HAm’S PALLAdIum

5840 Samet Dr | 336.887.2434 hamsrestaurants.com Sep 21: The dickens Sep 22: Splash Sep 28: Freddy Adkins Band Sep 29: Cory Luetjen & The TBB

jamestown

THE dECK

118 E Main St | 336.207.1999 thedeckatrivertwist.com Sep 21: The Plaids Sep 22: gypsy danger Sep 23: david Revis band Sep 28: Jukebox Junkie Sep 29: Spare Change Sep 30: Rockit Science

kernersville

dANCE HALL dAzE

612 Edgewood St | 336.558.7204 dancehalldaze.com Sep 21: The delmonicos Sep 22: william willards Country Storm Band Sep 28: The delmonicos September 19-25, 2018

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BREathE CoCktail loungE

221 N Main St. | 336.497.4822 facebook.com/BreatheCocktailLounge

lewisville

old niCk’S puB

191 Lowes Foods Dr | 336.747.3059 OldNicksPubNC.com Sep 21: karaoke w dJ tyler perkins Sep 22: kenny & henry Sep 28: karaoke w dJ tyler perkins Sep 29: Confusion

THOMAsville

CoaCh’S nEighBoRhood gRill

1033 Randolph St. Suite 26 | 336.313.8944 coachsneighborhoodgrill.com Sep 22: darrell hoots

winsTOn-sAleM

SECond & gREEn

207 N Green St | 336.631.3143 2ngtavern.com

Bull’S tavERn

408 West 4th St | 336.331.3431 facebook.com/bulls-tavern Sep 28: Souljam Sep 29: Fruit Smoothie trio oct 26: Souljam

BuRkE StREEt puB 1110 Burke St | 336.750.0097 burkestreetpub.com

CB’S tavERn

3870 Bethania Station Rd | 336.815.1664 Sep 21: karaoke

Finnigan’S wakE

620 Trade St | 336.723.0322 facebook.com/FinnigansWake

FoothillS BREwing

638 W 4th St | 336.777.3348 foothillsbrewing.com Sep 19: Bluegrass Sweethearts Sep 22: whiskey Foxtrot Sep 26: hazy Ridge Bluegrass Band

JohnnY & JunE’S Saloon

2105 Peters Creek Pkwy | 336.724.0546 johnnynjunes.com

MaC & nElli’S

4926 Country Club Rd | 336.529.6230 macandnellisws.com

MillEnniuM CEntER 101 West 5th Street | 336.723.3700 MCenterevents.com

MilnER’S

630 S Stratford Rd | 336.768.2221 milnerfood.com Sep 23: live Jazz Sep 30: live Jazz

MuddY CREEk CaFE & MuSiC hall

5455 Bethania Rd | 336.923.8623 Sep 20: open Mic w/ Country dan Collins Sep 20: the local honeys, grits & Soul Sep 21: Celtic ConFusion Sep 22: Russell lapinski Sep 22: lonely heartstring Band Sep 23: Elliott humphries Sep 23: the honey dewdrops Sep 23: Emily Scott Robinson, abigail dowd Sep 27: open Mic w/ Country dan Collins Sep 27: the way down wanderers

thE RaMkat

170 W 9th St | 336.754.9714 Sep 19: old 97’s, Crenshaw pentecostal Sep 20: the waybacks Sep 21: Cherub, Maddy o’neal Sep 23: Justin townes Earle Sep 27: perpetual groove Sep 28: Friday night Music Club

wiSE Man BREwing

826 Angelo Bros Ave | 336.725.0008 Sep 19: Shiloh hill Sep 22: oktoberfest with wise Man & the Ramkat feat. piedmont wind Symphony polka Band, Magnolia green wS, the hollirockets, Marvelous Funkshun YES! WEEKLY

September 19-25, 2018

www.yeSweekly.comw


[CONCERTS] Compiled by Alex Eldridge

CARY

BOOTH AMPHITHEATRE

8003 Regency Pkwy | 919.462.2025 www.boothamphitheatre.com Sep 20: Old Crow Medicine Show w/ Dawes Sep 27: Vince Gill Sep 28: Jason Isbell & the 400 Unit Oct 4: Tracy Lawrence, Phil Vassar, Little Texas, and Cledus T. Judd Oct 11: Chris Tucker w/ D.L. Hughley

CHARLOTTE

BOJANGLES COLISEUM

2700 E Independence Blvd | 704.372.3600 www.bojanglescoliseum.com Oct 4: Queen City Music Fest ft. RBRM

CMCU AMPHITHEATRE

former Uptown Amphitheatre 820 Hamilton St | 704.549.5555 www.livenation.com Sep 23: Jason Isbell & the 400 Unit Oct 2: Troye Sivan w/ Kim Petras Oct 3: Breaking Benjain Oct 9: Maxwell

TWC ARENA

Oct 5: Uncle Watson’s Widow Oct 10: Eddie Reyes Oct 12: PLC Land Jam

333 E Trade St | 704.688.9000 www.timewarnercablearena.com Oct 4: Maroon 5

RALEIGH

GREENSBORO COLISEUM

1921 W Gate City Blvd | 336.373.7400 www.greensborocoliseum.com Sep 22: Godsmack & Shinedown Sep 28: Chris Young w/ Kane Brown, Morgan Evans, & Dee Jay Silver Sep 29: Romeo Santos Oct 24: J Balvin

DURHAM

CAROLINA THEATRE

309 W Morgan St | 919.560.3030 www.carolinatheatre.org Sep 25: Toad The Wed Sprocket Sep 26: Squirrel Nut Zippers Oct 4: Steven Churtis Chapman Oct 11: Buika

WHITE OAK AMPITHEATRE

DPAC

1921 W Gate City Blvd | 336.373.7400 www.greensborocoliseum.com Sep 30: Lost 80s Live Oct 16: The Doobie Brothers

123 Vivian St | 919.680.2787 www.dpacnc.com Sep 25: Sarah McLachlan Sep 29: Joan Baez Sep 30: Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons

500 S McDowell St | 919.996.8800 www.redhatamphitheater.com Sep 28 & 29: Wide Open Bluegrass Oct 12: Umphrey’s McGee

WINSTON-SALEM

WINSTON-SALEM FAIRGROUND

220 E Commerce Ave | 336.883.3401 www.highpointtheatre.com Sep 21: SteelDrivers Sep 28: Tannahill Weavers

310 S Greene St | 336.333.2605 www.carolinatheatre.com

RED HAT AMPHITHEATER

1400 Edwards Mill Rd | 919.861.2300 www.thepncarena.com Oct 14: Nicki Minaj & Future

HIGH POINT THEATRE

CAROLINA THEATRE

3801 Rock Quarry Rd | 919.831.6400 www.livenation.com Oct 4: Lady Antebellum & Darius Rucker Oct 12: Chris Stapleton

PNC ARENA

HIGH POINT

GREENSBORO

CCU MUSIC PARK AT WALNUT CREEK

421 W 27th St | 336.727.2236 www.wsfairgrounds.com

THE FILLMORE

1000 NC Music Factory Blvd | 704.916.8970 www.fillmorecharlottenc.com Sep 20: Borns Sep 21: Kaleo Sep 22: Old 97’s Sep 25: All Tiem Low w/ Gnash Sep 25: Father John Misty Sep 26: Dreamers Sep 26: Father John Misty Sep 27: Future Islands Sep 27: Jay Rock Sep 28: Chromeo Oct 3: John Mark McMillian Oct 5: Appetite For Destruction Oct 6: Kali Uchis Oct 7: In Real Life Oct 8: Nother But Thieves Oct 10: Goo Goo Dolls

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OVENS AUDITORIUM

2700 E Independence Blvd | 704.372.3600 www.ovensauditorium.com Sep 26: Daughtry Oct 9: Alice Cooper WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

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SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2018 YES! WEEKLY

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flicks

18

F

SCREEN IT!

A crying Shane: Black is back with a disappointing sequel

BY MATT BRUNSON

ar be it for me to engage in spoilers right off the bat, so let’s keep this vague and just state that a particular character in The Predator ( ), the latest in the stop-start series that began back in 1987, dies. Obviously, a lot of people bite the bullet in a movie such as this, but this is a major character — among the five or six top-billed performers — and this particular death should be a major event. Yet the sequence in which he/she meets his/her demise is so badly edited and ridiculously rushed that I didn’t realize until much later that this person actually kicked the bucket. And neither did my buddy who accompanied me to the screening. And neither did the other two media friends seated next to me in the critics’ row. And neither did the other reviewer who caught up with me after the screening and asked (paraphrasing Fred Willard in A Mighty Wind), “Hey, wha’ happened?” Clearly, clarity (or the lack thereof) is an

FOX

issue in The Predator, the latest attempt to again jump-start a franchise that has basically been on life support since the engaging original. That nifty action flick found Arnold Schwarzenegger squaring off against an imposing extra-terrestrial hunter who, thanks to Oscar-nominated visual effects, was able to shimmer in and out of sight at will. Since then, there have only been a smattering of Predator pictures, and this latest entry more or less falls into line as yet another series entry that blows its potential.

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SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2018

Shane Black is primarily known in some circles for appearing in a supporting role in the original Predator, better known in other circles for penning such action romps as Lethal Weapon and Last Action Hero, and mainly known in my circle for writing and directing the underrated gems Kiss Kiss Bang Bang and The Nice Guys. He takes on scripting and helming duties here as well, but the result is ultimately a disappointment. Black is known for his he-man casts and quip-heavy dialogue, and both are on full display in this new film, which finds Army Ranger sniper Quinn McKenna (Boyd Holbrook) squaring off against more than one predator with the help of his autistic young son (Room’s Jacob Tremblay), a courageous scientist (Olivia Munn) who got the call to study these predators because (I’m sure I heard this right) she once wrote the U.S. president when she was a little girl and told him she wanted to meet aliens, and a group of ex-army inmates who seem to have escaped from a dinner theater production of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. There’s the Jesus freak (Augusto Aguilera); the mutually combative BFFs (Keegan-Michael Key and Thomas Jane), one of whom high-lariously suffers from Tourette’s; the suicidal sort (Moonlight’s Trevante Rhodes); and one nondescript guy played by a British actor named Alfie Allen (making me want to ask — with apologies to Michael Caine — “What’s it all about, Alfie?”). This motley crew of PTSD soldiers is meant to represent the heart of the picture, but, frankly, their juvenile antics and moldy humor (lots of “your momma” jokes) quickly wore me out. Far more engaging is Sterling K. Brown, who’s cast as the primary (human) villain and seems to relish playing such a transparently odious character. From a narrative standpoint, the script by Black and Fred Dekker (they made the dopey kid flick The Monster Squad

together back in the ‘80s) might be the worst in the entire franchise — did I mention there are Predator dogs, one which becomes man’s best friend after someone throws it a ball to fetch? — but a talented cast and some exciting interludes during the first half compensate for the rampant idiocy. Still, enough is enough. Alas, the ending hints at a sequel, but unless they come up with a new angle, what’s the point? Alien vs. Predator didn’t quite do it in the past — might I suggest Smurf vs. Predator as an innovative way to goose the proceedings? FAR FROM A cookie-cutter comedy that rolled straight off the Hollywood assembly line, A Simple Favor ( ) is basically Gone Girl if it had been played for laughs instead of thrills. Yet, even that description doesn’t hint at the dark depths occasionally found in an invigorating effort that doesn’t quite maintain its high-wire act yet deftly avoids a fall and a splat. Anna Kendrick stars as Stephanie Smothers, a widowed single mom who operates a cooking vlog. Her online videos already maintain a solid following, but they become even more popular once she uses it to relate the sordid tale of how her newly acquired best friend, the confident and no-nonsense Emily Nelson (Blake Lively), suddenly goes missing. Emily’s husband Sean (Henry Golding, currently enjoying great success as Nick Young in Crazy Rich Asians) claims not to know the whereabouts of his wife, a stance also taken by her boss, fashion designer Dennis Nylon (a funny Rupert Friend). Concerned about Emily, Stephanie opts to do a little sleuthing on her own — an unwise decision since it brings such unpleasantries as incest, adultery and murder floating to the surface. Directed by hitmaker Paul Feig (Bridesmaids, Spy) and written by Jessica Sharzer (working from Darcey Bell’s novel), A Simple Favor is outstanding for about an hour, thanks to its unexpectedly dark themes, its mordant humor, and a knockout performance by Lively. But if the first half is mostly about the characters, the second part is chiefly about the mystery, and the movie isn’t quite as compelling as it works through its convoluted plot (some of which relies on happenstance) and employs dramatic devices that were already growing hoary back in the 1940s. Still, as a robust way for viewers to welcome the fall film season, A Simple Favor easily gets the job done. !

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theatre

STAGE IT!

The Little Theatre of Winston-Salem Announces Auditions for An Old Salem Christmas Carol

T

he Little Theatre of WinstonSalem will hold auditions for An Old Salem Christmas Carol on Monday, Oct. 1 and Tuesday, Oct. 2 at the Winston-Salem Journal Building, 418 N. Marshall St. Auditions will begin at 5:30 p.m. for actors 6-15 and at 7 p.m. for actors 16 and up. No appointment is necessary, and everyone is welcome to audition. A passing stranger is welcomed into Salem Tavern by a cheerful group celebrating Christmas Eve. The story he tells them is magical, and yet vaguely familiar… It’s 1887, and hard times have fallen on the people of Winston and nearby Salem. Tobacco rolling machines are replacing manual jobs, and bad rains have hurt farms. Making things worse is Ebeneezer Scrooge, a lender who’s foreclosing on mortgages and ruining the holidays for everyone. In the heart of Old Salem, can three spirits teach him the true meaning of Christmas? Adapted by Stephen P. Scott and based on the classic tale by Charles Dickens, this heartwarming world premiere adaptation was written exclusively for The Little Theatre of Winston-Salem.

Lane Fields will direct An Old Salem Christmas Carol. There are roles available for men, women and children, ages 6+. Auditions will consist of reading from sides in different groupings. Actors are encouraged to bring their calendars to the audition, so they can advise of any conflicts with the rehearsal schedule. Performance dates for An Old Salem Christmas Carol are Dec. 7-9, 13-16 and 20-22. Two daytime matinees for schools will be held at 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 11. All performances will be held at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art. For character descriptions and further information, please visit www.LTofWS. org. !

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EVERY WEDNESDAY yesweekly.com WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

Sep 21-27

[RED]

THE HOUSE WITH A CLOCK IN ITS WALLS (PG) LUXURY SEATING Fri - Thu: 12:10, 2:40, 5:15, 7:45, 10:10 SEARCHING (PG-13) LUXURY SEATING Fri & Sat: 12:15, 2:35, 4:55, 7:15, 9:35, 11:55 Sun - Thu: 12:15, 2:35, 4:55, 7:15, 9:35 OPERATION FINALE (PG-13) LUXURY SEATING Fri & Sat: 12:10, 2:55, 5:40, 8:25, 11:10 Sun - Thu: 12:10, 2:55, 5:40, 8:25 FAHRENHEIT 11/9 (R) Fri - Thu: 12:15, 2:50, 5:20, 7:55, 10:20 THE PREDATOR (R) Fri & Sat: 12:00, 2:20, 4:40, 7:20, 9:40, 11:55 Sun - Thu: 12:00, 2:20, 4:40, 7:20, 9:40 A SIMPLE FAVOR (R) Fri - Thu: 12:00, 2:35, 5:10, 7:45, 10:20 THE NUN (R) Fri & Sat: 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:50, 11:55 Sun - Thu: 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:50 JULIET, NAKED (R) Fri: 12:20, 2:40, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40, 11:55 Sat - Thu: 12:20, 2:40, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40 RETURN OF THE HERO (NR) Fri & Sat: 12:05, 2:25, 4:50, 7:05, 9:20, 11:35 Sun - Thu: 12:05, 2:25, 4:50, 7:05, 9:20 ELIZABETH HARVEST (R) Fri: 12:00, 2:20, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15, 11:30 Sat: 12:00, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15, 11:30 Sun: 12:00, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15 Mon - Thu: 12:00, 2:20, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15

[A/PERTURE] Sep 21-27

PEPPERMINT (R) Fri & Sat: 12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:10, 9:35, 11:55 Sun - Thu: 12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:10, 9:35 THE MEG (PG-13) Fri - Thu: 12:20, 2:45, 5:10, 7:35, 10:00 CRAZY RICH ASIANS (PG-13) Fri - Thu: 12:45, 3:30, 7:25, 10:05 MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE FALLOUT (PG-13) Fri - Thu: 12:35, 4:10, 7:15, 10:20 HAIKYU!! THE MOVIE: BATTLE OF CONCEPTS (NR) Sat & Sun: 2:20 PM THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (R) Sat: 11:55 PM

FAHRENHEIT 11/9 (R) Fri: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00 Sat: 9:45 AM, 12:15, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00 Sun: 9:45 AM, 12:15, 3:00, 5:30 Mon: 5:30, 8:00, Tue: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00 Wed: 5:15 PM, Thu: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00 LOVE, GILDA (NR) Fri: 9:00 PM, Sat: 1:30, 6:30 Sun: 10:30 AM, 1:15, 7:45 Mon: 8:45 PM, Tue: 3:45, 8:45 Wed & Thu: 8:45 PM PICK OF THE LITTER (NR) Fri: 4:00, 6:30, Sat: 11:00 AM, 4:00, 9:00 Sun: 3:15, 5:45, Mon - Wed: 6:15 PM Thu: 3:45, 6:15 THE WIFE (R) Fri: 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 Sat: 11:15 AM, 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 Sun: 11:15 AM, 1:45, 4:15, 6:45 Mon: 6:30, 9:00, Tue: 4:00, 6:45, 9:00 Wed: 6:30, 9:00, Thu: 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 BLACKKKLANSMAN (R) Fri: 3:15, 6:00, 8:45 Sat: 9:45 AM, 12:30, 3:15, 6:00, 8:45 Sun: 10:00 AM, 1:00, 8:30 Mon: 5:45, 8:30, Tue: 3:15, 9:00 Wed: 5:45, 8:30 Thu: 3:00, 5:45, 8:30

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leisure

[NEWS OF THE WEIRD] NEW WORLD ORDER

NCDOT TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETING SEPT. 25 REGARDING THE PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS TO THE NC 109/I-40 INTERCHANGE IN FORSYTH COUNTY STIP PROJECT NO. I-5880 The N.C. Department of Transportation will hold a public meeting to provide information on the proposed improvements to the NC 109/I-40 Interchange in Forsyth County (NCDOT Project No. I-5880). The meeting will take place on Tuesday, September 25, 2018 at First Waughtown Baptist Church from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. First Waughtown Baptist Church 838 Moravia Street Winston-Salem, NC 27107 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. The public may attend at any time during the hours mentioned above. NCDOT representatives will be available to answer questions and listen to comments regarding the project. Please note that no formal presentation will be made. The public will have an opportunity to submit written comments at the meeting. The deadline to submit comments via phone, email, or standard mail is Wednesday, October 24, 2018. Comments received will be taken into consideration as the project develops. Project information and materials can be viewed as they become available online at https://www.ncdot.gov/projects/publicmeetings/. For additional information, contact one of the following individuals: Connie James, PE Division Project Engineer NCDOT Division 9 375 Silas Creek Parkway Winston-Salem, NC 27127 336-747-7800 ckjames1@ncdot.gov

Steve L. Brown, PE Senior Transportation Planner HDR 555 Fayetteville Street, Suite 900 Raleigh, NC 27607 919-900-1647 stevebrown@hdrinc.com

NCDOT will provide auxiliary aids and services under the Americans with Disabilities Act for disabled persons who wish to participate in this meeting. Anyone requiring special services should contact Fredrick Haith, fdhaith1@ncdot.gov or by phone (336) 747-7800 as early as possible so that arrangements can be made. Persons who speak Spanish and do not speak English, or have a limited ability to read, speak or understand English, may receive interpretive services upon request prior to the meeting by calling 1-800-481-6494. Aquellas personas que hablan español y no hablan inglés, o tienen limitaciones para leer, hablar o entender inglés, podrían recibir servicios de interpretación si los solicitan antes de la reunión llamando al 1-800-481-6494. YES! WEEKLY

SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2018

Kimberel Eventide, 36, believes her purpose here on Earth is to help other humans become elves, just like herself. A resident of Illinois, Eventide identifies Chuck Shepherd as a Pleiadian Starseed, an Otherkin who first realized she was an elf after reading and watching the “Lord of the Rings” series by J.R.R. Tolkien. She spends her time dressing as an elf in silk, velvet or nature-inspired clothing and pointed elf ears — but she doesn’t wear them all the time because “my own ears have a slight point to them.” Eventide’s husband supports her elfdom but “he does not understand it and does not watch many of my videos,” she said. “I am an Elven spiritual teacher who offers personal Skype online sessions to help individual souls,” she explained to the Daily Mail. Her mission, called “Projectelvenstar,” is specifically to help humans transform themselves into High Elves — “ears are optional but can become a byproduct of becoming extrasensory and hearing better over time.”

EASY MARKS

Three men in Westborough, Massachusetts, are out $306,000 after falling victim to a scam, MassLive.com reported on Aug. 29. Joseph Boakye, 31, of Worcester is one of two suspects wanted by Westborough police for allegedly selling 15 kilograms of counterfeit gold dust. In July, the victims met Boakye and his accomplice at an Extended Stay America hotel and tested the gold dust for authenticity. Apparently satisfied, they paid $26,000 in cash and transferred $280,000 into a Bank of America account, after which they received a locked Sentry safe that supposedly held the gold dust. Boakye told them they would get the combination to the safe after the transfer cleared. But two days later, when they were unable to open the safe, the victims called a locksmith. Inside — shocking! — was counterfeit gold.

OOPS!

An Orlando, Florida, home will need more than roof repairs after a crane parked outside tipped over on Sept. 4, splitting the house in half so cleanly daylight could be seen through it. United Press International reported the roof was under construction when the machinery fell over, likely because the ground underneath it was wet, said Ivan Fogarty, cor-

porate safety director for crane operator Beyel Brothers Crane & Rigging. No one was inside the home at the time, and no one on the roofing crew was injured, but the house has been declared unlivable.

FOOLED YA!

University of Houston student Jehv M. looked at a blank wall in his local McDonald’s and saw opportunity. Hoping to boost Asian representation in the burger chain’s advertising, Jehv created a poster featuring himself and a friend touting McDonald’s french fries. They bought used McDonald’s uniforms at a thrift store as disguises, then boldly hung the poster in a Pearland, Texas, location as customers ordered and ate around them. United Press International reported that 51 days later, the poster still hung on the wall unnoticed, as shown in a photo on Jehv’s Twitter feed. As of Sept. 4, it was not clear whether management at McDonald’s knew of the poster’s origins.

INEXPLICABLE

On Sept. 3, as an unnamed woman drove through Columbia Park, Washington, she witnessed a beaver being struck by a car. She stopped and tried to help the animal, wrapping it in a towel before going home to find a container to put it in. When she returned to the scene about 30 minutes later, YakTriNews reported, she found 35-year-old Richard Delp sexually assaulting the dying beaver. Unsurprisingly, Delp was also found to be in possession of methamphetamine; police charged him with possession and animal cruelty. The beaver didn’t survive.

QUESTIONABLE JUDGMENT

Billy Warren Pierce Jr., 44, an inmate of the Pasco County (Florida) Jail, already awaiting trial on charges of capital sexual battery of a child, compounded his problems by trying to hire a fellow inmate to kill his victim and her family. WFTS reported the unnamed inmate told detectives Aug. 22 that Pierce offered him $9,000 and instructed him about how to get into the house, even suggesting using a gas line fed through a window as the murder method. Jail staff also obtained a contract signed by Pierce, detailing the targets of the killing and the agreed-upon price. When told on Sept. 4 he would be charged with solicitation of murder, Pierce objected, “But I haven’t paid him any money yet.” !

© 2018 Chuck Shepherd. Universal Press Syndicate. Send your weird news items with subject line WEIRD NEWS to WeirdNewsTips@amuniversal.com.

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[KING Crossword]

[weeKly sudoKu]

ALIVE PARTNER

ACROSS 1 6 12 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 28 29 30 32 37 38 40 41 42 45 46 49 50 51 52 53 55 60 63 66 67 68 70 72 74

Elite names in show biz Food-cooling chest Impetus Make allusion (to) Long rant Evenly paired French cabaret figure IRS probe Acey- — All right Three-time Frazier foe Airport area Using a blast furnace for Mia Hamm, for one “— Rose” (“The Music Man” song) Old brand of hair remover Calhoun of old Westerns Get sour Bronco Singer Zadora Wear for nighty-night Movie units Suffix with trick Rant, maybe “That feels ni-i-ice!” Duncan toy Unborn child In the capacity of “Jay — Garage” (CNBC series) Seasonal tunes Hawaiian goose Boxers and briefs, briefly Something associated with eight answers in this puzzle Squirrels’ cheekfuls Vast time stretch

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75 76 78 79 83 85 86 87 90 94 95 96 100 101 102 103 104 109 111 112 113 115 116 119 123 124 125 126 127 128

Dashing actor Flynn Proclaims, in the Bible Australian Open unit Fifth-degree black belt, say “The Daily Show” host Trevor Ending for Peking Graph line Island with Pearl Harbor Sporty 1980s Pontiac Rouge color Barber’s job It’s just been fired Yuletide tree Richard of “Chicago” Victim of Cain — Ana County, New Mexico One giving up gambling, maybe With all in agreement “Jenny” actor Alda See 96-Down She clucks Associated with bribery Rolling Stone interviewee Laced holiday quaff String in a sneaker Family divisions, in taxonomy French for “queen” Donations Attached with rope, e.g. X-ray, e.g.

DOWN

1 2 3

Pigskin path Source of element #82 In case it’s necessary

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 24 28 30 31 33 34 35 36 39 43 44 45 46 47 48 51 54 56 57 58 59 60 61

In a way not related to religion Piece of land “— be my honor” What a U.S. spy may be “Cubesmith” Rubik Spine sites Lyric work Kid of a boomer Of varied character TV studio alert Oaxaca loc. Plato’s “H” Nutty treat The present time Put together Taxi fixture TLC series about a tattoo studio Land division Bit of slander Liam of films Bobby of ice hockey Bus. entities Go to press Reluctant Over — top “— Mio” (Italian tune) Ball in space Bic buys Superheroes have them Actress Dru Most mousy Russian river “Of course” Low joint Young guy, in hip-hop Cravings Composer Brian Giant in oats Disquiet

62 64 65 69 71 72 73 75 77 80 81 82 84 88 89 91 92 93 96 97 98 99 100 101 104 105 106 107 108 110 114 117 118 119 120 121 122

Truly loved Sticky pods Dated letter opener Win — walk Military bed From — Z Irritate Let out Hardens (to) Left unsaid Wealthy outlying area Mythical flier Secret treasure “I get it now!” Very hot pepper Self-esteem to a fault Skedaddle Put — act With 112-Across, blind alley Irritate Get the point Mitten’s kin Snitched Sci-fi and mystery, e.g. Strident Lanai “Hi!” Brunch meat Jerk the knee, e.g. Ruhr’s outlet Pola of silent films Barely made, with “out” — -pitch softball Plato’s “T” SFPD rank Architect I.M. — Fouts of football “Hot diggity!”

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September 19-25, 2018

YES! WEEKLY

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The Fourth Annual Winston-Salem Fashion Week returns to the catwalk

W

instonSalem Fashion Week starts this weekend, and this year it is more local than ever before. Nikita Wallace, founder and director of Winston-Salem Katie Murawski Fashion Week, said this year’s designers are all from North Editor Carolina and many are from the Triad. Wallace started Winston-Salem Fashion Week in 2015 after she pitched the idea for her senior project at Salem College. She said at the first Fashion Week; there were only eight designers, about 80 models and an attendance of about 200-250. This year, there are 13 designers, around 80 models and an expected 300 in attendance. The designers include Puja Aura, LaTosha Bell, Iris Cole, Melissa Coleman, Tiffany Flowers, April Gilliam, Ahmad Johnson, Jane Murrow, Anne Pembaur, Jayson Sloan, Taylor Wallace and Kimberly Yontz. “We are not exclusive to just North Carolina- in the past, we have had some [designers] from Virginia, Georgia, New York- but this is the first show that we can say they are all from North Carolina. We are excited about it,” Wallace said. “I’ve always had a huge passion to do something in fashion. Growing up in Virginia, I didn’t really have an opportunity; there were no platforms where you can flourish in anything for fashion.” Wallace’s passion for fashion dates back to when she was 8 years old, however, she wasn’t able to study it in college. She had an opportunity later in life to move to New York and work with her friend as a designer. She spent a few years in New York City but then moved back to Winston-Salem in 2007. She then worked with Forsyth County School students that had the same passion for working in the fashion industry (whether it be as a model, designer, artist, photographers, etc.). As she experienced, YES! WEEKLY

SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2018

the fashion industry in major cities such as New York and Atlanta are very competitive markets, “especially for freshman straight out of high school.” “So, I thought, let’s create a platform here,” she said. “For these kids or for creatives, why not have a small Winston-Salem Fashion Week on a smaller version?” Which is exactly what Winston-Salem Fashion Week has become, a “high energy and exciting” gathering of diverse creatives in the city to celebrate art, apparel and fashion. Wallace said the theme of this year’s Fashion Week is transformation and will be presented at the Sept. 29 showcase. “We are still celebrating our accomplished history that we have in so many areas of the industry, but also how we are transforming from that into innova-

tion and technology,” she said. “A few of the designers have chosen to create an unconventional look that will represent the history of Winston-Salem-- like Old Salem, R.J. Reynolds, Dewey’s Bakery and Hanesbrands.” To go along with the theme, Wallace said Winston-Salem Fashion Week is in its second year of collaboration with Goodwill Industries of Northwest North Carolina. Goodwill will be presenting six local designers at the Saturday night showcase as apart of their line called “Diva, Dapper on a Dime.” These designers go to various Goodwill retail stores to recreate and transform apparel to walk down the catwalk. Wallace also mentioned designer Jane Gillian who used technology to create “3D Design” apparel designed online and then transformed into a reality. “We actually have a [designer/vendor] who is presenting a collection and her fabric is made from recycled plastic bottles,” Wallace said of Do Good Artist, which according to the website (www. wsfashionweek.com), is “an innovative company creating social impact through multi-sector collaborations between the arts and other industries.” Iris Cole is the director and designer of the collaboration for Do Good Artist, and

she said fashion is a big part of the company because of its growing industry. Do Good Artist will present its line at the Sept. 29 showcase. Cole has created a special line just for Winston-Salem Fashion Week that highlights some work that is being done within the community and local fashion industry. For instance, Do Good Artist is launching a line of T-shirts that are made of 50 percent recycled plastic bottles and each design carries a social empowerment message addressing numerous issues such as domestic violence, self-awareness/love, and poverty. “Our skirts for Winston-Salem Fashion Week are also made out of fabric that is made out of recycled plastic bottles,” she said. “[The skirts] are canvases for appliqués from upcycled fabric from Goodwill, and were made by refugee women in Winston-Salem.” These women are apart of the YMCA’s refugee literacy program and are taught English and skills such as sewing. Cole said volunteers from UNCSA’s dance costume shop made the skirts and volunteers from Winston-Salem’s FEARLESS helped out as well. Cole said Do Good Artist’s models are dancers from UNCSA, and their hair/ makeup will be done by a professor at the school who has a program that teaches students how to make medical wigs for cancer patients. “Lots of amazing things that are going on in our community that are making a difference that is all being visually presented through a fashion line,” Cole said. “We have had a really fantastic time doing it; I would

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generally tell you this has been a story about women helping women because it has literally been all of these ladies and amazing companies all over the community that have helped together. It has been nothing but fun and joy to be a part of this.” Cole said Fashion Week is significant to Winston-Salem because of its own history with textile production in North Carolina. She said fashion can be an agent in change and is something that helps people express their individuality. “We have choices that we can make about what we buy and what it is doing and how it is helping,” she said. “Fashion is an industry that can create economic development.” Cole said it has been an amazing experience to be apart of “connecting the pieces of the puzzle” in the community and to launch this line so that it could be as impactful for others as it has been for her. Winston-Salem Fashion Week kicks off with the opening night reception on Sept. 21, 6:30 p.m. at the Winston Cup Museum Special Event Center, located at 1355 N. Martin Luther King Jr. Dr. The reception will have live music, food, beverages, a silent auction, designers, models, and Councilwoman and Congress candidate D.D. Adams, who will give the welcome address followed by the introduction of the designers. Christy Spencer is a sponsor of WinstonSalem Fashion Week and the co-owner of the Winston Cup Museum Special Events Center. Wallace and Spencer were connected through a mutual friend, and Spencer said she hit it off with Wallace the moment they met. Spencer attended Fashion Week last year, and after attending she knew she wanted to get involved this year. “It is exciting to give local designers an

RILEY PHILLIPS PHOTOGRAPHY

opportunity to show off their talents,” she said. “Obviously, to showcase a Fashion Week, it normally takes a lot of money, and you have to know somebody, but most small designers don’t have that opportunity. This is a way to get our local talent exposure. I am really excited about that and to meet the designers in person, and just get them in front of other people to appreciate what they are doing.” Spencer said her special event space is a good place to have the opening night reception because it’s inclusive for car or racing enthusiasts as well as fashion enthusiasts. Spencer said there are 21 race cars in their space and people get to literally “have a party with race cars.” “They are like additional guests that are included,” she said with a chuckle. “So it is kind of a fun take of the idea of fast and innovative and thinking outside the box. I hope that is inspiriting to the designers.” On Sept. 27, Venture Café will host the workshop “Fashion & Economics/Social Impact” from 5 to 8 p.m. and is open to the public. From Sept. 29-30, (ticketed events) there will be the emerging designers and retailers/boutique showcase featuring 11 designers, four emerging designers and

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numerous retailers from across North Carolina and the East Coast. The showcases will take place at the Wake Forest Innovation Quarter, Biotech Atrium (located at 575 Patterson Ave.) at 5:30 p.m. At the showcase, Wallace said there would be celebrity/special guest appearances by Desiree Ross of the Oprah Winfrey Network drama Greenleaf, host/entertainer Mo Brown, as well as door prizes and vendors. Sunday’s showcase features kid’s/tween’s showcase as well as focuses on collaborating with retailers such as Jewellery Unique Gifts & Accessories Boutique, JCPenney, DXL and Forever 21. These retailers will introduce their looks for the 2018 fall/winter or the 2019 spring/summer. Following the showcase on Sunday, and staying in the theme of transformation for Fashion Week is a sneak peak of Monarch Butterflies, a film by local filmmaker and actor Korrine Meier. Wallace said Meier’s piece is something that Winston-Salem Fashion Week likes to incorporate because it adds to the visual art aspect of Fashion Week as well as a way to showcase “the many talents and arts we have here in Winston-Salem.” “We are excited, and I am just happy to

present them, and I am actually proud to see what we have to offer in the city and what we are bringing to the table,” Wallace said. In the near future (possibly October 2019), Wallace hopes to connect Fashion Week with the University of North Carolina School of the Arts so that more students have the opportunity to get involved. Also for 2019, which will be the fifth annual Winston-Salem Fashion Week, Wallace plans to make the week more about the community by partnering with downtown restaurants and businesses, and for designers to have private events, so they have more time to network with other designers in the community. “I think [Winston-Salem Fashion Week] is extremely important because if you see cities where art flourishes, take New York and Paris, where art is very huge, fashion is right at the center of it,” Wallace said. “Winston-Salem, being the city of art and innovation, is just perfect. We have the opportunity to really capitalize on and bring attention to the retail and the fashion industry that we have here in the city.” Tickets for Winston-Salem Fashion Week are on sale now on Eventbrite (www.eventbrite.com/e/winstonsalem-fashion-week-2018-tickets45499619587?aff=eac2#ticket), and prices range from $25 student tickets, $50 general admission to $200 for packages and two-day VIP Swag admission. The opening night reception is free and open to the public, but it is advised that attendees RSVP before on Eventbrite. For more information, visit the website www.wsfashionweek.com. ! KATIE MURAWSKI is the editor of YES! Weekly. She is from Mooresville, North Carolina and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in journalism with a minor in film studies from Appalachian State University in 2017.

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The EPA Human Studies Facility is located on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2018 YES! WEEKLY

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24

Lee Zacharias ferries readers across chill waters

Ian McDowell

Contributor

Award-winning writer and photographer Lee Zacharias recently published her first novel in over a decade, and it’s hauntingly good. Like her former University of North Carolina at Greensboro colleagues Fred Chappell and the late Jim Clark, Lee is a friend and mentor, and as I did when writing about them, I’ll refer

to her by first name. All her life, Lee told me in a recent email, she’s felt “an affinity for exiles.” She was born in Chicago, but when she was young, her family moved to Hammond in the Calumet Region of Indiana at the foot of Lake Michigan. Her Across the Great Lake had its genesis in a long-ago trip to a beach much nicer than Hammond’s polluted one. When Lee was around 12, her family vacationed in Frankfort, near what is now Sleeping Bear National Lakeshore. “With

its pristine beach, the lighthouse, the towering wooded bluff overlooking the beach and the shady streets lined with the big Victorian houses that had been built by the lumber barons, I thought it was the most beautiful place I’d ever seen,” she wrote in an email so evocative it was practically a short story. Seeing teenagers playing volleyball, she imagined being one living in that little town where she’d have the freedom to walk wherever she wanted, “instead of having to ask my irritable father for a ride.” The young Lee started to imagine a novel, but lacking pen and paper, she “never came up against the demands of plot and resolution that had left my previous attempts at girls’ boarding school novels (modeled on The Dana Girls, like Nancy Drew, another product of the Stratemeyer Syndicate) unfinished.” This setting lingered in her adolescent imagination, then faded with adulthood. At least, until she visited it again. A few years ago, Lee, who lives in Greensboro with her husband Michael Gaspeny, was driving from her mother’s house in Hammond to visit Michael’s fam-

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SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2018

ily in Traverse City, Michigan. Realizing that Frankfort was only 10 minutes out of her way, she detoured, and “was blown away by how accurately memory, that notoriously faulty tool, had preserved it.” She recognized the beach, the old house two blocks away, the restaurant of so many family meals. “The only thing missing was the deep, evocative call of the foghorn.” Nobody seemed to remember when the vessels that once docked there had stopped running, so she bought Ninety Years Crossing Lake Michigan. That book by Grant Brown Jr. is a history of the railroad car ferries, huge ships designed to carry entire trains across the lake. “I was immediately plunged into a world of tricky currents, dangerous shoals, fierce storms, and ice, so much ice because unlike ore boats and freighters, these ferries ran year-round.” Fascinated, Lee had to learn more. Her father was a Merchant Marine, “and though he never spoke of his time on the boats to me, I sensed his longing for the lake he had to leave after I was born, and suspect I inherited something of that longing from him.” She returned to Frankfort, researching what she thought would just be an essay because it had been so long since she’d written fiction. “I kept reading everything I could find about the ferries, navigation, the area, the ghost legends associated with the Great Lakes.” That essay was published in Southern Indiana Review, but like the ghost, she says once grabbed her in a hotel on the Outer Banks (more of that below), the lake wouldn’t let her go. “The first line came to me, ‘We went to the ice,’ before I knew who was speaking, though I understood it wouldn’t be one of the sailors.” As she drafted her first

paragraphs, she learned the speaker was “a five-year-old girl whose father was the captain and that, unknown to her, the reason he takes her on his run is that back in Frankfort, her mother is dying.” It took a while to find her protagonist’s name. Lee wrote the first two chapters at the Wildacres Creative Retreat, where “a late friend and I sat on the porch tossing names back and forth.” When one said “Fern,” they knew that was the girl’s name. “I chose the year 1936 because it was one of the coldest winters on record—the lake froze shore to shore—and because there was no radar then, only a ship to shore radio so full of static it was of scarcely any use.” As part of her research, she visited the only remaining car ferry, which is docked in Manistee as a museum, “and each time I toured the S.S. City of Milwaukee, the guide pointed out the walnut paneling in the steward’s cabin where people often saw the face of a ghost.” Lee did not, but has believed in ghosts ever since an incident at the Island Inn on Ocracoke. “There is something about edges, those places where land meets water, that seems to attract restless spirits. The ghost on Fern’s father’s ship, the Manitou, is much like the ghost I encountered at the Island Inn, a silent, invisible presence who took hold of my big toe and did not let go, but I was more than 20 drafts into the novel before I knew who the Manitou’s ghost was.” When she realized that, “it changed everything and immeasurably deepened the book.” And emotionally deep it is, although Lee’s beautifully crafted novel of a headstrong little girl, the vast icy lake and the vividly realized ship carrying one across the other (and yes, that ship’s ghost is) will grab you far longer than Lee described the invisible presence in Ocracoke as gripping her, and you may not shake it off until well after the coming winter is over. However, while (as Shakespeare and M. R. James knew) winter invites ghost stories, there’s no need to wait for the first frost to read this one, which offers a welcome respite from the dying summer’s muggy heat. ! IAN MCDOWELL is the author of two published novels, numerous anthologized short stories, and a whole lot of nonfiction and journalism, some of which he’s proud of and none of which he’s ashamed of.

WANNA

go?

Lee Zacharias will be reading from and discussing Across the Great Lake at Scuppernong Books in Greensboro at 7 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 21. The event is free and open to the public.

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BARTENDERS OF THE WEEK | BY NATALIE GARCIA Check out videos on our Facebook!

BARTENDER: Julia Phelps BAR: CharBar 7 AGE: 29 Where are you from? Danville, VA How long have you been bartending? I started training as a bartender the day after my 21st birthday.

who have shared some of the best stories. What’s your favorite drink to make? I love making Martinis. There’s no limit to what you can do with them and sometimes it’s where you can get the most creative.

How did you become a bartender? I was a server at Outback and had always wanted to bartend so I decided to try my hand at it and loved it.

What’s your favorite drink to drink? I believe simplicity is beautiful so I’m plenty satisfied with a simple cranberry vodka. Maybe a splash of pineapple if I’m feeling adventurous. But typically, I drink IPA’s from all walks of life.

What do you enjoy about bartending? My regulars are my favorite part. I’ve met some incredible people

What would your recommend as an after-dinner drink? Rumchata on the rocks!

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What’s the craziest thing you’ve seen while bartending? I think it’s probably once when a waitress, walking with a tray full of drinks, took a dive and a passing patron grabbed the tray without missing a beat and didn’t spill a drop. She was okay too. What’s the best tip you’ve every gotten? I love when my regulars take a trip out of the country and bring back foreign candy for me. Even if it ends up not being very good, I at least get to try it.

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HALF HOUR FREE

last call

[HOROSCOPES]

[LEO (July 23 to August 22) Your creative side helps gain attention for many of your ideas. But don’t neglect the practical aspects involved in implementing their move from paper to production. Good luck.

[AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) This could be a good time to reassess some of your recent decisions and see if any adjustments should be made based on facts that you might have just uncovered.

[VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) A health problem should not be ignored. The sooner you check it out, the sooner you can deal with it and then move on. Some job advice comes from an unlikely source.

[PISCES (February 19 to March 20) An emotionally charged situation creates uncertainty about the future of your relationship. Best advice: Talk things out while there’s still time to reach a new understanding.

[LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A relationship takes an unexpected shift that could leave you puzzled and hurt. Asking for an explanation could help uncover the reason for this sudden turn of events.

[ARIES (March 21 to April 19) You might need to get more facts to help you work out those problems with your new project. As always, a friendly approach shows the charming Arian at his or her persuasive best.

[SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Your busy schedule has drawn down much of your energy levels. Restore them by spending a well-earned time out enjoying the arts — perhaps with that special someone.

[TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Information is what energizes ambition, and this is a good time for the ambitious Bovine to expand his or her range of knowledge and to be ready for the challenges that lie ahead.

[SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Make that presentation with confidence. Remember: When you show you believe in yourself, it helps persuade others that you truly know what you’re doing.

[GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) This is a good time to consider making some longoverdue decorating changes at home or in your workplace. A splash of color can help raise spirits, even on the grayest day.

[CAPRICORN (December 22 to Janu-

ary 19) Although you usually prefer doing things on your own, a group effort might be advisable at this time. Try to keep an open mind about suggestions from colleagues.

[CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Learn more. Earn more. That’s the formula for Moon Children looking to expand their career horizons. Investigate the best places to get those training courses you’ll need. © 2018 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

[STRANGE BUT TRUE] by Samantha Weaver

* It was 19th-century English naturalist and biologist Charles Darwin who made the following sage observation: “It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.” * In Nazi Germany it was illegal to name a horse Adolph.

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* If you grew up with the Girl Scouts decades ago (as I did), you might be surprised to learn about a new badge they’re offering: cybersecurity. Yep, that’s right. The national organization worked with a security company to come up with a curriculum, and now Girl Scouts everywhere can earn a badge for learning about cyberattacks, online safety and computer networks.

* Between 1960 and 2006, the average American’s production of solid waste — including everything from paper packaging to lawn clippings — increased by 150 percent to 4.5 pounds every day. * Farmers in Turkey marched on both the American and Soviet embassies in 1967, demanding reparations for crops that they lost to floods. Why were the Americans and Soviets to blame for floods in Turkey? The farmers claimed that the flights of spacecraft created “holes in the sky.” Thought for the Day: ”The first symptom of love in a young man is timidity; in a girl, boldness.” — Victor Hugo © 2018 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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[THE ADVICE GODDESS] love • sex • dating • marriage • questions

MOCK LOVE TO ME

My boyfriend has this irritating habit of making fun of my outfits or my spray tan. When I get upset, he says I’m being “sensitive.” I try to look cute for Amy Alkon him, and I just don’t think it’s funny for Advice your boyfriend to Goddess mock your appearance. Is this his issue or mine? If it’s his, how do I get him to stop? — Unhappy It’s probably tempting to give him a taste of his own medicine: “Baby, I did not use the word ‘small’ in describing your penis. I called it ‘adorable.’” The reality is, beyond men’s zipper zone, women are generally more sensitive to jabs about their looks. This makes sense if you look at sex differences in the qualities we evolved to prioritize in a mate. Of course, we all want a hottie if we can get one — just as we’d take the Malibu mansion with the stable, the tennis courts, and the manservants over the basement apartment with all the charm, space, and light of a broom closet in a Dickensian orphanage. But in mating, as in life, we tend to be on a budget. Evolutionary social psychologist Norman Li and his colleagues recognized that, and instead of asking research participants the open-ended sky’s-thelimit! question “So, what do you want in a

mate?” they gave them a limited “mating budget.” This, in turn, forced participants to decide which traits and qualities were “necessities” and which were “luxuries.” The Li team’s results echo a body of cross-cultural findings on mate preferences. Men in their study overwhelmingly deemed “physical attractiveness” a “necessity.” (Consider that the female features men find beautiful correlate with health and fertility in a woman.) Meanwhile, the women they surveyed, under these “budgetary” constraints, overwhelmingly went for “status/ resources” over male hottiehood. This reflects women’s evolved motivation to go for men with an ability to invest in any children who might pop out after sex. Because women coevolved with men, they are, at the very least, subconsciously attuned to men’s prioritizing physical appearance in female partners. This, in turn, leads a woman’s emotions to sound the alarm — in the form of fear and hurt feelings — when her male partner seems to find her less than lookalicious. Explain these sex differences to your boyfriend so he can understand why you feel bad about his taunts in a way he probably doesn’t from, say, putdownfests with his dudebros. Encourage him to tactfully tell you if something in your look isn’t doing it for him (and explain how to go about that). In time — assuming he’s an accidental meanie — he should start showing a little restraint, merely blurting out “You look good enough to eat!” and not (har, har) going on to part two: “... because that spray tan makes you a dead ringer for a giant Cheeto.”

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I’m a woman who’s very feminine and considered pretty. However, I have a deep voice — to the point where I’m sometimes mistaken for a man on the phone. I’ve learned to laugh about it, but it sometimes makes me feel bad, especially when I hear a bunch of other women talking. How do people feel about women with deep voices? — Feeling Low Okay, so you sound like you’ve been smoking unfiltered cigarettes since you were 3 years old. In social situations, nobody’s mistaking you for Darth Vader in a dress. On the phone, however, they’re missing the visual information. There’s only the audio. In other words, those who think they’re hearing a man are not making some sneering judgment about your femininity; they are simply reacting based on averages — how, on average, women tend to have higher, chirpier voices. On a positive note, according to research by social-personality psychologist Joey T. Cheng, women with deep voices are — if not more likely to rule the world — more likely to be perceived as the dames to do

it. In Cheng’s experiments, both women and men with low-pitched voices were viewed as more dominant and higher in social rank. That’s probably why former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, while running for office in the ‘70s, worked with a speech coach to deepen the pitch of her voice. This helped her make the transition from cuddly mummy to “The Iron Lady” — as she was nicknamed by the Soviets. Try to remember that you’re a package as a person. Your voice is just part of the entire “very feminine” you. Maybe relabel your voice “sultry,” like those of some of the sexiest screen babes — for example, Scarlett Johansson and Lauren Bacall. This might help you feel a little better when you have those dismaying “Excuse me, sir. Who’s calling, please?” experiences — as a deep-voiced friend of mine recently did. “MOM! It’s me. Your daughter!” she yelled into the phone. ! GOT A problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com) © 2018 Amy Alkon Distributed by Creators.Com.

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