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BUILDING YAVAPAI

Yavapai County Contractors Association • 2016

Building

YAVAPAI

Yavapai County Contractors Association • 2016

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Smartphones Babysit the Home

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Groomed for Community Growth by Design

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JEDI Masters Survey County’s Terrain

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Tiny Houses Preach Essential Living

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Greening America One Home at a Time


BARENZ

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

A HOME ...

That is Uniquely Yours (928) 778-3343 John Barenz, of Barenz Construction Inc has been building quality handcrafted homes in the Tri-City area since 1980. With extreme attention to detail, Barenz Construction will create a home for you of superior quality and craftsmanship, a home that will be uniquely yours. ROC179391 and ROC179392


PUBLISHER

Building Yavapai ...

Bigger and better in 2016 By Sandy Griffis, Executive Director The YCCA Board is pleased to bring you the 2016 edition of Building Yavapai™. We have endeavored to provide you, our readers with a valuable and informative resource, in addition to giving our members the opportunity to showcase their business in the publication. There is something kind of intoxicating about spending hours upon hours of time, going to extra effort to create a resource to share with the community you love. As this magazine rolled off the press, we all shared a feeling of happy energy and knowledge that our publication is truly much more than just a magazine. It is love and thankfulness for living, working and being a part of a truly wonderful place in the universe. In producing our 2016 edition of Building Yavapai™ at a time in which the world has been nothing short of a roller coaster ride, it set me to ponder the question: What’s next for us? The answer is ... fresh new beginnings. “Just when the caterpillar through life was over, he transformed into a butterfly.” We all need to live to be the best. We live in cities and towns throughout a nation and in a wider world where changes always happen – changes we will continue to see happening as long as there is life on this planet. What a ride it has been so far. We’ve seen men walk on the moon and women, too, launched into space; we’ve grown to love organic produce and exercise. We have embraced green building technologies; we’re watching driverless cars become an item and thousands of new words added to the dictionary such as completionist, slacktivism, esports and breakfunch, something which I do all day – eating small meals between breakfast and lunch. I also love another new word added; sillerious, being silly and serious. Everyone is wearing a smartwatch and an exercise band, that tells us that we have slept well and how many steps we have had during the day. Just imagine what might be next on the horizion ... If anyone has asked me years ago if I thought I would be Executive Director of a

construction industry organization, I probably would have said “are you kidding?” Now it is 2016 and after 10 years as the proud Executive Director of YCCA I am still energized and thrilled to continue growing the promise of YCCA. I continue to love to be the best and remain optimistic about tomorrow, next week, next year and all the years beyond and promote an industry that built America. I especially love the promise of YCCA – where we have been, how we have changed, and where tomorrow may lead us. Throughout our 62 years as an organization, we have remained rock-solid in our representation of our membership and helping to ensure protections and support for our citizens that live in the communities we serve. YCCA is honored to continue playing a key role in promoting a better, safer, more reliable industry for everyone because we know that clear communication and cooperative efforts can make great changes happen. Our YCCA “Ask The Contractor” column made its debut in The Daily Courier 6 years ago and our vision was to help educate our citizens on construction issues, new products on the market, how to hire a contractor, how to protect yourself when hiring a contractor and answer general questions from the community. And thanks to you, our column has been a tremendous success and our column is now appearing in the Prescott Valley Tribune, Chino Valley Review and Verde Independent. Many of you have sent in wonderful questions and without you and your support we would not be your conduit for information. Thank you and thanks to Prescott Newspapers and their team for believing in us. Hammer Time, is another avenue of communication for YCCA. We broadcast a weekly radio show on KQNA 1130 am and 99.9 fm and have been on air for 6 years now, enjoying every minute and every second sharing the show with you. My Radio Wingman, Mike Enders of Benttree Custom Homes is one who fabulizes the program (another new word added to the diction-

ary) To make fabulous. We’re a great team and thanks from the bottom of our heart to ­Sanford Cohen of Arizona’s Hometown Radio Group for believing in us. Hammer Time, your local toolbox talk radio show. As you can see YCCA is extremely proud to be a part of this community and work for you and I am so very proud to represent YCCA. There is no better single source than YCCA for community awareness. And in working closely with our Board of Directors, present and past that have laid the groundwork and structured a clearly defined mission, who give of themselves unselfishly to the community continue to make YCCA a beacon to help you manage and to understand the construction industry – thank you. Our work at YCCA extends far beyond the world of contracting, for us the ultimate goal is to touch and enhance the lives of all those who share our good fortune in calling Yavapai County “home.” For those of you that know me, know that I am an eternal optimist. I am always searching for a glow and a gleam of hope. I know it is a nice outlook, but not always an easy attitude. We have those enthusiastic work weeks, only to be confronted by every hurdle imaginable and then finding ourselves looking down and not up. This is the construction industry in a nutshell. Our industry still faces challenges and obstacles and hurdles, but optimism will reign. So here is to peace and optimism in your world, and our commitment that YCCA will continue our tradition of advocating for you, our industry and Yavapai County.

Sandy


2016 YCCA BOARD OF DIRECTORS/OFFICERS

Dave Barrett Barrett Propane YCCA 2016 President

Mike Enders Benttree Custom Homes

Allan Crary

Ty Scott Builders Wholesale

Haley Construction YCCA 2016 Vice President

Chuck Merritt

DeCarol Company

Chris Welborn Vicente Landscaping YCCA 2016 SecretaryTreasurer

Matt Greenlee Greenlee Designer Surfaces

Ken Coleman Vista de Oro Investments

Publisher

Cover

Design & Layout

Yavapai County Contractors Association

Loft living at its best. Prescott has loft living right in the heart of the action. Located in the heart of downtown Prescott, this available loft is your perfect year round oasis in the middle of the city. In this modern loft you can enjoy the vibrant downtown, can walk to nearby dining, shopping and entertainment and enjoy all of the necessary conveniences to centralized urban living. This contemporary comfortable loft is considered to be truly hip – a new way of living with a design concept that is revolutionary and built as a “green” sealed envelope – sealed against dust, smoke, bacteria because the loft has a micron filtration system. Every room is handicapped accessible. No expense was spared in furnishing this beautiful loft. Proud to say the loft was built by Haley Construction, a long-time local building contractor. Photo by Christopher Marchetti (ad page 33). Janis Best at 928-777-9705 – available for sale at $800,00 through Judy Bluhm/Century 21 at 928-713-6100.

©2016 Yavapai County Contractors Association. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Every effort has been made to provide dependable data in an everchanging market. As a result, the publisher does not warrant the data herein is complete or accurate.

810 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 928-778-0040 Fax: 928-541-9882 ycca@cableone.net www.ycca.org

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2016 Building Yavapai

Sweet Designs, Stephanie Sweet 480-837-3688 Steph@SweetDesignsAZ.com


Brent Chambers Arizona Public Service

John Heisley FANN Contracting

Ty Smith Yavapai Block

Bob Kozak Robert C. Kozak PLLC

Greg Barstad Granite Basin Roofing

Brian Bombardieri B’s Contractors

Wyatt Orr Earth Resources Corporation

The mission of the Yavapai County Contractors Association is to properly manage a construction industry association that transfers and promotes education, safety, political action, services and networking for the benefit of its members, the citizens and the communities of Yavapai County. YCCA Board members continue to lay the groundwork and configuration for a clearly defined mission that not only addresses challenges faced by the licensed and bonded contractor, but also encourages and aggressively provides consumer protections within the same framework. As Yavapai County grows, so does the importance of Yavapai County Contractors Association, proudly serving the communities of Yavapai County for more than 55 years. “We take our responsibility very seriously and our Building Yavapai magazine is just one tool that we use to strengthen and build relationship between government, contractors, suppliers, the consumer and our community. We hope that you are inspired by our magazine, articles and enterprising advertisers. Thank you all for invariably overloading our phone lines and e-mails with your friendship, thank-you calls and warm and tender sentiments for the help that you received by calling YCCA.” Sandy Griffis Happy reading and enjoy the articles and tips within Building Yavapai, and we encourage you to do Executive Director business with our members.

Remember, Don’t Start Without Us! Use Licensed, Local, Bonded and Insured Contractors


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Building

YAVAPAI

Yavapai County Contractors Association • 2016

4

2016 Building Yavapai

15

GET TO KNOW YAVAPAI REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

36

THE FORCE AWAKENED

44

OUTDOOR LIVING BY BELGARD

80

MOTHER NATURE’S ROTOTILLERS


FEATURES 13

Quad City Area Real Estate by the Numbers

15

Get to Know – Yavapai Regional Medical Center

22 28 30

The Grooming of a City Touchmark at The Ranch Prescott Valley’s 10 Best Restaurants: Top Arizona Eats

32 Prescott’s

10 Best Restaurants – Eating Out in Arizona

34 36 38 40 44 46 48 50 53 54 56 57

80 84 86

Mother Nature’s Rototillers How Green is Your Home? Environmentally Friendly Cleaning

88 WHAT?!!

My Home Doesn’t Have a Permit For That?

92 Insulation 94 Is Refinancing Your Home Worth It?

96

New Reverse Mortgage Rules

100 102 104 108

Your Home is Yours

Fall in Love With Your Home All Over Again

110

How to Save Your Home – and Maybe Your Life

Smart Home Technology

113

Ask Your Contractor – Building Costs

114

Fixing a Major Energy Problem that You Can’t Even See

115

Ask Your Contractor – Air Filters

Deck Care The Force Awakened Prescott Area Trails Helpful Hints Outdoor Living by Belgard

Eco-Friendly Kitchens Garages Go Grand Very Cool! Saluting the Flag Is it Time to Replace Your Mattress?

58

Paints Evolve But Basics Remain the Same

60

Steps to Realizing Your Dream Home

62

Downsizing to Tiny House is Latest Building Craze

64 66 68 70

Storage Showpieces

72 76

MEET YOUR YCCA TEAM

Get it in Writing!! Pavers Now Feature ... Composite Decking has Practically Replaced Wood in Prescott Region Green Flooring How to Choose a Contractor

Homeowners Insurance

1 Message from Sandy Griffis YCCA Executive Director

2 YCCA Board of Directors 6 Meet the Writers 8 Contract Requirements 134  Category Index 136  YCCA Membership Directory 155  YCCA Verde Valley Directory

Home Inspections Is Hard Water Causing You Problems?

115 Bedding 116 Xeriscaping is the Way to

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THE GROOMING OF A CITY

Go in Arid Arizona

118

Synthetic Turf Saves Water, Time and Money

120

No Yard for Plants? No Problem!

122

Why Should We Hire an Arborist?

124

Prune for Safety, Plant Health and Pleasing Appearance

128 130

Choosing the Right Toilet

132

Pssst! Can We Talk?

Mold Can be Found Almost Anywhere

120

NO YARD FOR PLANTS? NO PROBLEM!


MEET THE WRITERS

Sue Marceau

Joanna Dodder Nellans

Sue Marceau is a writer, editor and marketing professional who enjoys infusing raw concepts with optimal word pictures to engage the hearts and minds of readers.

Joanna Dodder Nellans has worked as a writer, editor and photographer for newspapers and other publications throughout the Four Corners region. She can’t wait for her husband to follow through on all the home improvement ideas she’s dreamed up while writing for the Building Yavapai Magazine.

Christine James Christine James is a recovering Angeleno whose work has appeared in The Hollywood Reporter and Entertainment Weekly. Her career as a writer, editor and graphic designer spans years in the double digits, though she declines to specify which digits those might be.

YCCA your local go-to contractor organization for referrals, questions, and assistance. Call us anytime (928) 778-0040. We are your tool-box of information. Read our “Ask The Contractor” column every Wednesday in the Real Estate Section of the Prescott Valley Tribune and Chino Valley Review, every Friday in the Real Estate Section of the Daily Courier and every Wednesday in the Verde Independent. Send us your questions and we will answer them in our columns. Visit ycca.org under Ask The Contractor tab and read the most frequently ask questions/answers.

◊ Residential Construction Loans ◊ Commercial Real-Estate Loans ◊ Home Mortgage Loans ◊ Commercial Construction Loans ◊ Home Equity Lines of Credit ◊ Business Loans

Competitive Interest Rates and Flexible Loan Terms Local Decision Making with Fast Decision Times Four Convenient Locations to Serve You Downtown Prescott - 147 N. Cortez St Prescott Valley - 3044 N. Glassford Hill Rd.

Prescott - 1275 Gail Gardner Way Cottonwood - 597 E State Route 89A

countrybankaz.com 6

2016 Building Yavapai

NMLS #422040


Lantana

CUSTOM HOMES

Lantana Cus†om Homes Lantana

CUSTOM HOMES

Lantana Cus†om Homes

Building exceptional custom homes since 1983 and in the Prescott area since 1994 Family run business | Free design consultation throughout building process Excellent reputation within the community | Call for a tour of one of our beautiful custom homes Visit us at our design center in downtown Prescott

Lantana Development Inc. By Hughes Development

Keith, Linda and Doug Hughes

(928) 717-0033

www.LantanaCustomHomes.com 115 East Goodwin Street, Suite I • Downtown Prescott • ROC #097871 B • ROC #149828 B1


CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS In Arizona, all construction contracts greater than $1,000 must contain at a minimum:

WHEN HIRING A CONTRACTOR:

❏ The name and business address of the contractor. ❏ The contractor’s license number. ❏ The name and mailing address of the owner.

 ake sure your M contractor is licensed.

❏ The jobsite address or legal description. ❏ The date the owner and contractor signed the construction contract. ❏ Estimated completion date of the work. ❏ A description of the work to be performed. ❏ Total dollar amount to be paid to the contractor for all the work, including all taxes. ❏ The dollar amount of any advance deposit paid or scheduled to be paid to the contractor by the owner. ❏ The dollar amount and stage of construction for any progress payments to be made to the contractor. ❏ Specific information, prominently displayed, explaining how to file a written complaint with the Registrar of Contractors. ❏ Prompt Pay details for owner, occupants.

Ask for references. P lan your project carefully and make detailed plans if necessary. G et at least three detailed bids. A sk what problems may come up during the project. Get a written contract.

Call Yavapai County Contractors Association First! An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a

Pound of Cure Call YCCA Before You Step on the Scale! Yavapai County Contractors Association

928.778.0040 Remember... “Don't start without us!” www.ycca.org

ycca@cableone.net

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2016 Building Yavapai

 ake sure you M understand the terms of the contract before signing. B e cautious about advancing monies for work not yet completed. P ut all changes into writing. Make frequent inspections.


LEADING PROVIDER OF FINE MASONRY PRODUCTS (928) 772-0828 • ArizonaStone.com • 2601 N. Lake Valley Road • Prescott Valley

Let Arizona Stone help Create Your Vision.


When you combine your own personal style with the beauty of Belgard pavers, the world outside your backdoor takes on an amazing new perspective.


Start creating your kind of beautiful – order your FREE Idea Book today at Belgard.com/YCCA


Small changes. Big savings. INSTANT DISCOUNTS ON LED s Replacing just one light bulb with an LED can save you up to $80 over the life of the bulb. Find instant discounts at a retailer near you.

GET ENERGY EFFICIENCY BUILT IN If you’re looking for a new home, ENERGY STAR® homes are at least 20% more efficient and maximize comfort, energy efficiency and monthly savings.

Find all your options at aps.com/options.

YOUR ENERGY YOUR OPTIONS Programs funded by APS customers and approved by the Arizona Corporation Commission.


Quad City Area Real Estate by the Numbers By Cody Anne Yarnes, Realtor Realty Executives Northern Arizona 2015 was an amazing year in the Quad City Real Estate Market. To best understand the current market though, we need to reflect on the past. 2004 & 2005 are widely recognized as the “boom” years in the Area Market. During these years, ~3854 and ~3906 homes sold respectively. In 2005 in Prescott the median sold price per square foot was $180/sq. ft. At that time there was a total listed inventory of over 3600 properties available on average throughout the year. A few short years later, in 2008, there were only ~2003 total sales in the whole Quad City Area Market but it wasn’t until 2010 when the prices really fell to their lowest in the area. In 2010 the median sold price per square foot in Prescott was only $127/sq. ft. From 2008 – 2015 the listed inventory steadily declined from about 2400 active listings to only 1400 active listings. 2016 has brought the lowest inventory that the Area Real Estate Market has seen in over 15 years with a total listing inventory of only about 1100 properties. (All above statistics are for homes only, not vacant land, commercial sales or multi-family sales.) 2015 was a

healthy year for the Area Real Estate Market. It was the first year in a long time where both Buyers and Sellers felt good on their close date. Buyers felt they were getting a good strong value on their purchase and Sellers were able to make a little money on their sale. About 10 homes closed a day throughout 2015. In 2015, 10 homes sold for more than one million dollars. 72% of the total 2015 sales occurred under $300,000 and only about 6% occurred above $500,000. The most expensive sale was $5,000,000 and the least expensive sale was $14,500. Only 6% of the total sales in 2015 were Foreclosures and Short sales versus 41% of total sales in the years 2008-2011 were “distressed” sales. The Median sold price for stick built homes in Prescott was $360,000 in 2005. In 2010 it was only $250,000. In 2015 we were back up to $328,000! In Prescott in 2015, homes sold in an average of 105 days for about 3% less than they were listed for. In Prescott Valley in 2015, homes sold in less than 65 days on average for only about 1% less than they were listed for. Even though, there is always uncertainty in a Real Estate Market, and 2016 most certainly will face it’s challenges with potential interest rate increase and a new President the Quad City Area Market is healthier than it has been in a very long time and as long as the inventory stays low, there are no market trends predicting any huge changes in the coming months. Be thankful and stay educated!

Prescott

quick facts

• Prescott has seen habitation since about 9,000 years ago • Ancestors of the Yavapai Tribe Yavapai Tribe Spanish explorers and later, the U.S. Cavalry, miners and settlers • With U.S. settlement, Prescott became 100% American town • Given its current name • Territorial capital and county seat in Arizona until 1889 • Prescott occupies a region of stunning natural beauty and open space • Rich in natural resources • Land parcels, custom home sites, room to roam • Nicknamed, “Everybody’s Hometown” • Many pioneering Americans called it home in the past, as many do now • P rovides livability in neighborhoods and homes for a wide variety of lifestyles • P lenty of Things to Do Museums, historic sites, prehistoric artifacts and ruins, fine art exhibits, a variety of festivals, shopping, dining, nightlife, sports events, World’s Oldest Rodeo, zoo and trained animal shows, lakes, fishing, hiking, camping, horseback riding and just living the good life in Prescott real estate • C lose to Other Arizona Towns 1-30 mins from Sedona 1-45 mins from Flagstaff 1-45 mins from Phoenix 2016 Building Yavapai

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Get to Know

Get to Know

Yavapai Regional Medical Center Are you new to western Yavapai County? Or, maybe you’re a long-time area resident?

Either way, you have an excellent healthcare partner in Yavapai Regional Medical Center (YRMC). Come explore all you and your family can gain by getting to know YRMC. YRMC West 1003 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2700

YRMC East 7700 East Florentine Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-2700

Connect with YRMC Connect with YRMC online and through social media to learn more about YRMC’s comprehensive network of healthcare services and new innovative procedures. Website www.yrmc.org Blog www.yrmchealthconnect.org

Facebook www.facebook.com/YavapaiRegionalMedicalCenter www.facebook.com/PonderosaPediatrics

YouTube www.youtube.com/channel/UCZGC2lYqCa4FaM8EWhuK9_g

Twitter https://twitter.com/YRMCquadcities

2016 Building Yavapai

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Get to Know YRMC: Frequently Asked Questions What kind of healthcare organization is YRMC? YRMC is a private, not-for-profit, integrated healthcare provider that offers a wide range of healthcare services to our growing region. YRMC is proud to be both your healthcare provider and the largest private employer in Yavapai County.

How many people comprise the YRMC team? YRMC’s expansive team includes more than 200 accomplished physicians, 1,800 dedicated employees and 700 compassionate volunteers.

What type of healthcare services does YRMC provide? Through two acute care hospitals, a growing network of primary and specialty care physician practices, comprehensive outpatient services, and a Medicare Shared Savings Program/Accountable Care Organization, YRMC supports the health and wellness needs of our growing region.

Where is YRMC located?

The prestigious 2015-16 U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals report recognized YRMC as: ›› Ranked #6 for overall care among Arizona’s 110 hospitals ›› “High Performing” for hip replacement ›› “High Performing” for knee replacement

Here are just a few places you’ll find YRMC throughout our communities:

›› Providing outpatient radiology, medical laboratory and physical rehabilitation services in Prescott and Prescott Valley.

›› Delivering primary and specialty care at 14 YRMC PhysicianCare practices located throughout the Prescott, Prescott Valley and Bagdad areas.

›› Serving patients at two acute care hospitals.

›› Facilitating highly coordinated care to over 28,000 Medicare beneficiaries through North Central Arizona Accountable Care (NCAAC), a Medicare Shared Savings Program Accountable Care Organization.

›› Supporting the health and wellness needs of the region through local health fairs, speaking engagements and symposiums. ›› Providing free healthcare to underserved children through in-school clinics and a state-of-the-art mobile clinic operated by YRMC’s Partners for Healthy Students program.

They Grow Quickly Help them Grow Healthy with Ponderosa Pediatrics

I

nfant, toddler, adolescent, teen–children grow up fast. Parents need doctors that understand children and their ever-changing healthcare needs. The outstanding team at Ponderosa Pediatrics provides high-quality service in a comfortable, friendly setting where children and parents can feel at ease. • Board-certified pediatricians • Certified pediatric nurse practitioners • Caring, child-focused team • Walk-in clinic for minor illnesses and injuries • Hours to accommodate working families

Baby on the way? Schedule a meet and greet with our team.

PONDEROSA PEDIATRICS 2120 Centerpointe West Drive Prescott, AZ 86301 • (928) 778-4581 www.ponderosapediatrics.com 16

2016 Building Yavapai

YRMC: Recognized for Excellence ›› 2015 U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals recognition ›› HealthCare’s Most Wired Award for Information Technology Excellence ›› Top 10 in the Nation for Safe Surgery ›› Top 3 in Arizona for Orthopaedic Surgery ›› 9-Time Consumer Choice Award Winner ›› A Top-100 Hospital Nationally ›› Internationally Recognized for Patient Blood Management


Get to Know You and YRMC: Partners for Healthy Living The phrase – the best of both worlds – is often linked to living in the Prescott area. “We combine small-town friendliness with urban-center advantages, like advanced, high-quality medical services,” said John Amos, President and CEO, Yavapai Regional Medical Center. “We understand we’re caring for our families, friends and neighbors. That’s just one of the reasons the YRMC team is dedicated to providing exceptional healthcare services and developing innovative medical programs.” An integrated healthcare network, YRMC supports the healthcare needs of our growing region with: ›› Two Acute Care Hospitals – YRMC West in Prescott and YRMC East in Prescott Valley serve residents throughout western Yavapai County. ›› 14 Primary and Specialty Physician Practices – YRMC PhysicianCare clinics provide Primary Care, Pediatric Care, Cardiology, Electrophysiology, Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Palliative Medicine, Neurosurgical Medicine, Neurology, Physiatry, Breast Surgery, General Surgery, and Occupational Medicine services. ›› Surgical Services – YRMC surgical teams support a vast array of surgical services that include Cardiothoracic Surgery, Neurosurgery, Orthopaedic Surgery, Breast Surgery and General Surgery.

›› The James Family Heart Center – Personalized, comprehensive heart care that combines adult cardiothoracic surgery, electrophysiology, interventional cardiology and radiology, cardiac catheterization suites, angiography services, critical care services, patient education, cardiac rehabilitation, and peer-to-peer support through YRMC’s Mended Hearts program. Plans are also in place to add Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement, a minimally invasive valve replacement procedure, in 2016. ›› The BreastCare Center – State-of-the-art diagnostic services, patient navigation, community education and Arizona’s first breast MRI designed specifically for breast imaging. ›› The Family Birthing Center – Family-centered delivery, comprehensive obstetrical services and a certified Continuing Care Level II Nursery for newborns needing a higher-level of care. ›› Emergency and Trauma Care – 24/7 emergency and level IV trauma care in Prescott and Prescott Valley. ›› Medical Imaging Services – Comprehensive imaging services at convenient locations throughout our communities. ›› Rehabilitative Services – Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy and Lymphedema Management provide exceptional healing services. ›› Advanced Wound Care Center – Expert wound care services and two hyperbaric oxygen chambers.

The Women’s Health Pavilion AT YAVAPAI REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

Just For You.

You’re busy . . . managing your world and juggling countless priorities. When it comes to healthcare, it’s good to know there’s a place just for you: The Women’s Health Pavilion at YRMC. Designed for the healthcare needs of women at every stage, the Women’s Health Pavilion features:

• The Family Birthing Center –

Comfortable, private delivery suites and the latest in patient-centered obstetrical care, including a Continuing Care Level II Nursery for newborns needing a higher level of care.

• The BreastCare Center –

State-of-the-art digital screening mammography, advanced diagnostics and care coordination tailored to your individual needs.

• Wellness and Education –

Classes that get you ready for baby and support you after delivery as well as a Community Resource Library focused on breast health.

The BreastCare Center at YRMC The Family Birthing Center at YRMC 7700 E. FLORENTINE RD., PRESCOTT VALLEY, AZ

(928) 445-2700 www.YRMCHealthConnect.org

www.yrmc.org

2016YRMC-YCCA_Hp_pavilion.indd 1 4/5/16 2016 Building Yavapai

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Get to Know HealthConnect 2.0: Your Source for Online Health and Wellness Information Are you searching for health information online? Seeking a support group? Looking for healthy recipes? Or wanting to learn more about the latest medical procedures being offered? YRMC has the answer – it’s called YRMC HealthConnect 2.0. (www.yrmchealthconnect.org).

Co

Ex

“HealthConnect 2.0 gives western Yavapai County residents the tools and information they need to support their active lifestyles,” states Robbie Nicol, Executive Director, YRMC Community Outreach and Philanthropy. “People appreciate that YRMC – a local, trusted healthcare partner – is the source of that information.” An ever-growing resource, HealthConnect 2.0 is your source for: ›› YRMC’s Extensive Lineup of Community Events – Tap into YRMC’s lineup of community events, presentations, wellness classes, support groups and more. ›› Healthcare Education – Learn about medications and medical procedures and utilize interactive healthcare decision tools available through YRMC’s extensive healthcare database available free of charge at HealthConnect 2.0. ›› Advanced New Services – Be among the first in the community to know about recent medical innovation at YRMC to include stories, photographs and videos. Excellence Meets cooking ›› Healthy Nutrition – Watch informative Convenience at recipes demonstrations and download healthy from YRMC’s highly acclaimed online cooking show, YRMC’s Outpatient Your Healthy Kitchen. Services Building

ce l lence i e nc e n e nv

Rita Carey-Rubin, a Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator, is the host of YRMC’s online cooking show, Your Healthy Kitchen.

The James Family Heart Center’s state-of-the-art Hybrid Operating Room. The YRMC Hybrid OR – considered to be among the finest in the nation – allows physicians to treat heart patients using permanently integrated imaging equipment to support advanced medical procedures.

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Excellence Meets Convenience at YRMC’s Outpatient Services Building

YRMC PhysicianCare Primary Care • (928) 442-8710 YRMC PhysicianCare Cardiology • (928) 442-8117 YRMC PhysicianCare Breast Surgery • (928) 442-8740 Prescott Valley Cardiac Diagnostics • (928) 442-8195 Prescott Valley Medical Imaging (PVMI) • (928) 759-5930 YRMC Outpatient Clinical Laboratory • (928) 759-5800 www.YRMCHealthConnect.org 18 2016YRMC-YCCA_Hp_PVoutpt.indd 2016 Building Yavapai

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YRMC Outpatient Services Building 7700 East Florentine Road Building B Prescott Valley, Arizona 86314

www.yrmc.org 4/5/16 1:05 PM


For Matters of the Heart There’s No Place Like The James Family Heart Center

W

orld-class cardiac care is a heartbeat from home at The James Family Heart Center at YRMC West. Our latest additions enhance the exceptional care our Heart Center team provides every day. The James Family Heart Center now features:  One of the Nation’s finest Hybrid OR Suites, where advanced, permanently integrated diagnostic imaging meets a state-of-the-art surgical suite  Cardiac Electrophysiology, a specialized and complex area of Cardiology for diagnosing and treating a variety of arrhythmias (irregular heartbeat)

GET T O KNOW OU R HEART PROGRAM :  Cardiologists, Interventional Cardiologists, Heart Surgeons, Interventional Radiologists and other Caregivers Collaborate to Deliver Individualized Care

 Superior Patient Education and Comprehensive Consultations  Cardiac Catheterization and Angiography  Adult Cardiothoracic Surgery

1003 WILLOW CREEK ROAD PRESCOTT, ARIZONA 86301

(928)445-2700

www.YRMCHealthConnect.org

www.yrmc.org

 Interventional Radiology Services  Cardiopulmonary Services  Advanced Patient Blood Management Program  Cardiac Rehabilitation and Preventive Medicine


Get to Know Prescott Medical Imaging

YRMC’s Medicare Accountable Care Organization Expands its Caring Network

Prescott Valley Medical Imaging

Strong partnerships are the foundation of exceptional healthcare. Yavapai Regional Medical Center (YRMC) works to build partnerships with providers, patients, our communities and more.

Outstanding Radiologists. Affordable Service. Convenient Locations. Three reasons to choose us for your medical imaging needs.

That’s why YRMC led the formation of North Central Arizona Accountable Care (NCAAC) in 2015. A Medicare Shared Savings Program Accountable Care Organization, NCAAC focuses on supporting highly coordinated healthcare that emphasizes wellness, disease prevention and chronic disease management for Medicare beneficiaries (people 65 years and older) throughout Northern Arizona. “Enhancing care coordination and communication between NCAAC providers to benefit Medicare beneficiaries is our primary goal,” states Ami Giardina, MHA, BSN, RN, Chief Accountable Care Officer, NCAAC. “We strive to facilitate high-quality healthcare and improve access to healthcare services while at the same time working to enhance efficiencies and reduce costs.” NCAAC’s four-pronged approach has resonated well with healthcare providers. Since its 2015 launch, NCAAC has grown tremendously from 400 provider participants to nearly 850 provider participants in 2016. NCAAC also includes two respected healthcare systems – Yavapai Regional Medical Center and Northern Arizona Healthcare – that support NCAAC’s network of healthcare practitioners (physicians, physical therapists, dietitians and others). “NCAAC is comprised of multiple care entities that are working together to build a high-quality, strong and lasting healthcare infrastructure within the community,” Giardina said. In 2016, Giardina notes that infrastructure will expand to include partnerships with home health agencies, skilled nursing facilities, rehabilitation programs and other community agencies to provide easier transitions across the continuum of care. Additionally, NCAAC will heighten its focus on preventive healthcare. For more information visit www.myhomeforhealth.org.

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Ami Giardina, MHA, BSN, RN, serves as NCAAC’s Chief Accountable Care Officer.

In 2016, Yavapai Regional Medical Center (YRMC) East in Prescott Valley celebrates an important milestone: 10 years of serving residents of western Yavapai County. Since opening in 2006, YRMC East has grown into a robust medical campus with essential programs and services, including: ›› The Advanced Wound Care Center ›› The BreastCare Center ›› The Family Birthing Center ›› The Infusion Center ›› Prescott Valley Medical Imaging ›› YRMC Outpatient Services Building ›› Del E. Webb Outpatient Services Building


Discover Home. Discover Health. There’s lots to discover and decide when you move to a new community. One of the most important decisions you’ll make concerns your healthcare. In western Yavapai County, turn to Yavapai Regional Medical Center for comprehensive, compassionate healthcare. Nationally recognized healthcare services right in your community. That’s a welcome discovery.

• Two Full-Service, Acute Care Hospitals – YRMC West in Prescott and YRMC East in Prescott Valley • The James Family Heart Center MAIN SWITCHBOARD:

(928) 445-2700

www.yrmc.org www.YRMCHealthConnect.org

• The BreastCare Center • The Family Birthing Center • YRMC PhysicianCare – Primary and Specialty Care Clinics • North Central Arizona Accountable Care • Health Education and Wellness


The Grooming of a City By Thomas Liuzzo In the spring of 1864, nearly 88 short years removed from the birth of our nation, the City of Prescott was born. The original townsite would become the Territorial capital of Arizona. The location for what is todays “downtown plaza” was not the original choice of the man tasked to survey what would become the center of “Everybody’s Hometown,” as it is branded by the City of Prescott Chamber of Commerce. Robert Groom, being the only surveyor available at the time, was selected by John Goodwin, the Territorial Governor, to layout the lots and streets. Groom’s first choice for the location was 6 miles to the northeast at a place called “Point of Rocks” on what is known today as the Granite Dells Ranch. For reasons unknown to us, he was overruled by Governor Goodwin, and the choice was made by Goodwin to place the center of the townsite on the banks of Granite Creek where it stands today.

B. H. Weaver Ready Pay Store, Montezuma Street, Prescott, Arizona, C.1870. Courtesy of Sharlot Hall Museum Library & Archives / SHM Photographs / ID: 759 Robert W. Groom, Prescott, Arizona, 1880s Courtesy of Sharlot Hall Museum Library & Archives / SHM Photographs / ID: 5351

The banks of Granite Creek are classified by today’s standards as a flood plain, so maybe Groom knew something that Goodwin did not but he conceded on the location none the less. So Robert Groom got the job because he was the only surveyor around, and he was overruled on his choice of the location by the man that hired him. However, like any good surveyor he didn’t give up and he was going to get his way on something. That “something” was the planning for the widths of the streets and the downtown plaza. The streets would be 80-feet wide and the plaza would cover an entire block of the new townsite.

makeshift office he called “Fort Misery”, a log cabin that once stood on Montezuma Street (Whiskey Row) and is now on the grounds of Sharlot Hall Museum where it was moved in 1936. I would like to think that at times when he had to take a break from his work, he would pay a visit to the Juniper House or the Quartz Rock Saloon which legend claims to have been on the banks of Granite Creek. Ultimately the Quartz Rock would move from the banks of the creek and join the Juniper House to be the first establishments on Whiskey Row. The main reason for the move of the Quartz Rock was that too many drunken patrons would stumble and fall into the creek.

Limited to using a spyglass and a tripod he crafted himself, Robert Groom commenced with his work. Some legends say he used a prospector’s skillet and the North Star to create the street centerlines that were placed in cardinal directions when possible by Groom. He created his map of the town mainly on a table in a

As part of the creative process in the development of his map of the town, a public meeting was held on May 30, 1864 to discuss the progress and finalization of the project. Among the items discussed were the disposition of lots to be placed for sale, and that one entire block should be reserved for the Town’s central plaza. It was

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Surveyor Robert Groom

Map of Prescott town-site drawn by A. F. Waldemar in 1864. Each purchaser of lots in the town-site was provided with a copy of this map for filing with his deed (Map Courtesy Sharlot Hall Museum Call Number: Map# 794).


Prescott is visited by thousands of tourist each year and many are in awe of the stately elm trees that surround the plaza.

also decided at this meeting that at a celebration for the Nations Independence, the Town of Prescott would be dedicated. On July 4th, 1864, Prescott was dedicated. In attendance were Territorial Governor John Goodwin, the Territorial Secretary, Richard McCormick and their staff. At noon, the Star Spangled Banner was played by two violins and a banjo. The celebration was attended by the miners and prospectors in the area. Unfortunately, no women were in attendance. Not because they were not allowed, but there were no women in Prescott at the time. The Fourth of July is a very special holiday that is historically linked with Prescott and it includes the “World’s Oldest Rodeo” every year.

The plaza has been home to the Yavapai County Courthouse since 1878. The majestic courthouse is surrounded by Elm trees that were planted to replace all of the Ponderosa Pine and Juniper trees that had been used for the construction of the buildings in the town, as well as for firewood. In the county records you can find the original vote in April of 1877 to grant the county permission to lease the plaza from the city for one dollar a year. The plaza almost disappeared in 1867. Some of the early residents of Prescott realized that since Groom, having been appointed by the Governor and not the Secretary of the Interior as the law stated may have created the Town and the public land tracts without authorization and thus would make his work invalid and affect the reservation of the plaza to the public. Rather than working together to correct the problem, they made it worse by trying to claim the Plaza for themselves. Subsequently the majority of the townspeople outraged by the attempted claim jumping, filed an injunction to protect the plaza for the public and validated the survey work of Groom. Many improvements took place on the plaza following the completion of the courthouse. The plaza was the site of several scenes

from the 1971 movie “Billy Jack.” In 1972 Prescott and the surrounding areas were the setting for the film “Junior Bonner”

In 1972 Prescott and the surrounding areas were the setting for the film “Junior Bonner” that starred the late Steve McQueen and featured the “World’s Oldest Rodeo.”

Continued on next page

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The Grooming of a City – continued that starred the late Steve McQueen and featured the “World’s Oldest Rodeo.” All in all, the Prescott plaza and Townsite have been home to hundreds of movies since the Lubin Film Company shot their first film in 1912. The area was also the setting for 1992’s “Universal Soldier” and 1994’s remake of “The Getaway.” The names that Robert Groom used for the streets came from most of the original townspeople, explorers, miners, military personnel and statesmen of the time. Whipple Street of course is named after Fort Whipple that is the current site of the Northern Arizona VA hospital. The fort was named in honor of Amiel Weeks Whipple, an early Arizona explorer, who had been killed in action during the Civil War. Willis Street is named for the Major E.B. ­Willis who was in charge of the Fort Whipple Garrison at the time of Prescott’s creation. Carleton Street in named for the superior of Major Willis, General James Carleton who chose the name of Fort Whipple. Carleton being stationed in the New Mexico territory, never made it to Prescott. Goodwin

The City of Prescott Survey & Engineering department developed block maps from Robert Grooms survey.

Street is named for the Territorial Governor and McCormick Street for the Territorial Secretary. Gurley Street was named in memory of John Gurley, the first appointed Governorto-be, who died before ever leaving Washington D.C. to take his seat as ­Territorial Governor. Prescott itself was named for the western historian, William Hickling Prescott, who died in 1859, never having known his influence on “Everybody’s Hometown.” Several years later, Groom would survey an area located southeast of Prescott and name it and a creek that ran through there after himself, that area is Groom Creek. The City of Prescott Survey & Engineering department developed block maps from Robert Grooms survey. The survey itself had a minimum of information since all of the blocks

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LEFT: The plaza was criticized for being a waste of space, Today it is the site of the historic Yavapai County Courthouse.

RIGHT: First Prescott Courthouse, circa 1885

were created at approximate right angles and all of the lots and blocks were equally dimensioned. Over time, all of these lines began to “creep” with the advancements in measurement and the continued development of the area. The city took each block and surveyed the existing centerline monuments and created the individual maps for each block in order for today’s surveyor to retrace the efforts of Robert Groom. They have these maps available to anyone that desires to use them as a tool for the retracement of the 1864 survey.

turn lane and two-way traffic, they are barley wide enough for the ranch trucks that frequent them. The plaza was criticized for being a waste of space, today it is the site of the historic Yavapai County Courthouse. The bandstand has been the place where many couples have exchanged wedding vows. The streets around the plaza are the path of the Rodeo Parade Continued on next page

Over the years, many of the original monuments have been preserved. At a minimum, when modern construction caused the destruction of the original centerline monuments, they were memorialized with a rebar or brass cap in a hand hole above the original monument. The city has also placed geodetic positions on many of these monuments that can be used as a perpetuation of the original survey. What started with a rumored prospector’s skillet is now memorialized with Global Positioning Systems. As we look back on the history of this survey, we see the impact that this early work had on those of us that live in the Prescott area today. I wonder if Robert Groom realized then how beneficial his wide streets have been to us. Upon their creation, they were criticized for being too wide. They only needed to accommodate two horse drawn carriages running side by side. Today with its diagonal parking, middle 2016 Building Yavapai

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The Grooming of a City – continued and are even closed to accommodate the crowds for special events. Prescott is visited by thousands of tourist each year and many are in awe of the stately elm trees that surround the plaza. The historic façade of all of the buildings and the wide streets and sidewalks give one the impression that they are in an east coast small town, not the county seat of a high desert area that is in excess of a mile high. With the natural monument of Thumb Butte to the southwest of the plaza, and majestic Granite Mountain to the northwest, you have to think that these view corridors were the motivation behind the choice of location by Governor Goodwin. I was fortunate to have retraced some of Robert Groom’s footsteps. In the late 1990’s, I surveyed the downtown area for a revitalization project for the City of Prescott. I did not know much about­ Robert Groom let alone the City of Prescott. At that time, I had only lived in Arizona for a few years. From that moment, I had become captivated with Prescott and its survey history. During my research pro-

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Prescott is visited by thousands of tourist each year and many are in awe of the stately elm trees that surround the plaza.

cess, I was not able to find any one document that covered what Robert Groom and his survey did for this central Arizona jewel called Prescott, (pronounced Preskit). I scanned the archives of Sharlot Hall and found many articles that provided honorable mention to Groom but none that made him and his work the focus. Maybe that was part of his makeup as a man and a surveyor. Possibly, like many of us, Groom surveyed for the satisfaction that is obtained from the art of retracing the footsteps of those that came before us. In the case of the City of Prescott, Robert Groom was the first and many of us have retraced his good work that has influenced 150 years of Prescott History.

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Touchmark at The Ranch

Community living in Prescott at Touchmark at The Ranch Situated on a private, 44-acre property, Touchmark at The Ranch is a new activeadult community that will offer the services and amenities of a self-contained village – right here in Prescott. Established in 1980, Touchmark builds, owns, and operates retirement communities throughout the midwestern and western US as well as one community in Edmonton, Canada. The company’s mission – to enrich the lives of others – influences its design, offerings, and commitment to service throughout all communities. Touchmark’s areas of development and operational expertise span the full continuum of lifestyle services, including cottages, apartments, independent living, assisted living, memory care, skilled nursing, home health and home care agencies, health and fitness clubs, and wellness programs. Touchmark at The Ranch, the company’s twelfth property, will include approximately 379 active-adult single-family cottages and lodge homes, a full range of services and care options, and partnerships with local health providers once fully completed. Construction for the project is broken into two phases, the first of which consists of cottages, some independent living and assisted living homes, and a detached clubhouse. Construction for this project began in 2015 and is expected to be completed by the end of 2017. The Weitz Company is the general contractor, while Bancroft Homes is building the community’s cottages. Much of the design throughout the property is drawn from Prescott’s southwestern architecture. 28

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Range of home and lifestyle options Single-family cottages at Touchmark at The Ranch will feature high ceilings and other pleasing architectural details. These quality-built homes offer two or three bedrooms and two bathrooms with attached garages – plus beautiful views. Grand Lodge homes range from studios to two bedrooms plus a den – all of which include fully equipped kitchens, housekeeping, utilities, and TV. For those requiring extra assistance in their daily tasks, all Touchmark communities offer a continuum of services and care. Touchmark at The Ranch will include assisted living homes, with memory care homes planned for the future. Local health providers for home care, home health, and hospice services will also be available on campus. All residents can take advantage of the company’s award-winning Full Life Wellness & Life Enrichment Program™, which focuses on the seven dimensions of personal wellness, and incorporates residents’ interests.

Community amenities in the clubhouse Touchmark prides itself on providing residents with all they need to live a full life, which includes a wide range events, activities, and amenities – something for everyone. The 17,000-square-foot clubhouse will be a central hub of activities, dining, meeting spaces, and the health and fitness club. It will be the first building to open at the community. For large groups or those looking to host a private event, there are several rooms available to reserve.

Open to the public for adults 40-plus, the 12,000-square-foot health and fitness club will feature an indoor heated pool, warmwater spa, cardio- and strength-training equipment, group aquatic and fitness classes, personal trainers, and friendly staff.

A scenic setting Prescott’s stunning scenery and old-west charm provide the backdrop for this property and played an important role in the planning of the community. Nearly 60% of the site land will be preserved as open space – including miles of walking and nature trails. This preservation will provide adventure and opportunity with the great outdoors right in the community’s backyard. There will also be a central park with a neighborhood amphitheater, barbecue area, gazebo, pickleball and bocce ball courts, play area for children, raised planting beds, and grass and trail areas. The community’s convenient location provides residents with easy access to all of Prescott’s offerings, including the Fourth Friday art walk, Yavapai Symphony, Elks Theatre and Performing Arts Center, the 54-mile Circle Trail system, and the growing Prescott airport. Touchmark Executive Vice President and Executive Director Tom Biel will oversee the project all throughout development and once open. Tom has been with Touchmark for over 33 years, including overseeing the development and operation of Touchmark’s community in Bend, Oregon for over 14 years. To learn more about Touchmark at The Ranch, call 928-788-0002 or visit TouchmarkPrescott.com.


PLENTI{FULL} Touchmark at The Ranch is Prescott’s newest active-adult retirement community!

DISCOVER THE {FULL} LIFE. Be among the first to call Touchmark at The Ranch home!

Life at Touchmark will feature: • Maintenance-free living in brand-new cottage and Grand Lodge homes • Community clubhouse with a pub, casual dining options, community meeting spaces, and more • Health and fitness club with indoor heated pool • Private and public golf courses nearby • Full Life Wellness & Life Enrichment Program™

Learn more: 928-788-0002 · TouchmarkPrescott.com/priority TOUCHMARK AT THE RANCH Full-service Retirement Community 3150 Touchmark Boulevard • Prescott, AZ 86301 1612524 © Touchmark, LLC, all rights reserved


Prescott Valley’s 10 Best Restaurants: Top Arizona Eats Prescott Valley is a small, vibrant community, with a gold mining heritage, and is less than a couple of hours’ drive from Arizona’s state capital, Phoenix. A spate of new restaurant openings in the last couple of years has brought new flavors to the town. Read our guide to discover both the established favorites and the best of the new places in Prescott Valley.

Cork & Cuisine 2985 Centre Ct (928) 237-1510 Cork & Cuisine was started by a family who moved from Phoenix to Prescott Valley a few years ago with the intention to serve the kind of food they themselves wanted to eat. The outcome is a creative menu, which changes monthly in response to the availability of fresh seasonal ingredients. Each month also sees a new local winery profiled. Hence, it makes perfect sense to visit Cork & Cuisine on a monthly basis! From breakfast burgers to bourbon berry cream cheese pancakes, the extensive ­Saturday brunch menu offers something for everyone, and be sure to wash it all down with bottomless mimosas.

Blackboard Café 3101 N Robert Rd (928) 772-4004 This family affair with a chef, her mom, her boyfriend and the boyfriend’s mom is a relative newcomer to Prescott Valley but has already established a loyal following from both breakfast and lunch devotees. The Blackboard Café prides itself on true homemade food. Many claim it but few take it as seriously as this place. The chef makes her own yogurt and granola, while her mom is in charge of all the baking. The cozy interior is matched by the genuinely

Blackboard Café

friendly welcome. Favorites include lemon French toast with cheesy hash browns and the breakfast bruschetta. Don’t miss the Sunday brunch!

Jamie’s Waffle Express 3050 N Windsong Dr (928) 772-3131 Jamie’s Waffle Express is a long-time favorite breakfast and lunch destination in Prescott Valley, hiding in a strip mall. The friendly service and relaxed but spotless setting mean the diner attracts plenty of regular customers. The breakfast selection should satisfy even picky eaters. For the health conscious, try the delicious buckwheat waffles and multi-grain pancakes with a large choice of fruit toppings. The lunch menu includes salads, soups and omelets.

Taqueria Guadalajara 8028 E Valley Rd (928) 775-4805 Don’t come here for the décor as neither the exterior nor the interior are likely to win any design awards. But if you are looking for good, authentic Mexican food, then Taqueria Guadalajara is the place to come in Prescott Valley. The menu features all the Mexican standards including enchiladas, chile relleno and tacos. But the fajitas, with a choice of shrimp, chicken or

beef, are the real standout dish. The separate salsa bar is deservedly popular.

Backburner 8400 E Long Mesa Dr (928) 772- 9298 Another popular breakfast and lunch option (closed for dinner) is the familyowned Backburner. The home-style food is delicious and filling, with large servings. Sweet-toothed customers rave about the big and yummy cinnamon rolls. Otherwise, take your pick from the huge assortment of pancakes, biscuits with gravy, omelets or the Mexican breakfast. If you’re feeling ravenous, try one of the specials including the 5 Car with hash browns, chicken fried steak and three eggs. It does get very busy, so go early or be prepared to wait.

Lonesome Valley Brewing 3040 N Windsong Dr #101 (928) 515-3541 Lonesome Valley Brewing is the only craft brewery in Prescott Valley, set up by a passionate home brewer. Try the Glassford Hill Pale Ale or Power Jam Porter. To soak up the beer, try the house specials like the imperial reuben sandwich with homemade corned beef and beer kraut or the ‘not so’ nachos with beer-braised pulled pork. If you fancy having a go at brewing, the owners have opened a home brewing supply store next door to the pub.

Yellow Leaf Coffee 2820 N Glassford Hill Rd (928) 759-8804 Yellow Leaf Coffee is not a restaurant but a drive-through café, with very loyal local fans who claim it makes the best coffee in town. It’s been in business for over ten years, so they must be doing something right. The service is fast and friendly. The lattes are highly recommended – try their homemade pumpkin latte or creamy caramel latte, or if you’re looking for something really different, how about a cherry mocha? Non-coffee drinkers will find a selection of teas and smoothies to keep them going.

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Sushi J Express 7840 AZ-69 A5-B (928) 775-9323

Gabby’s Grill

Sushi J Express is a husband-and-wife operated, hole-in-the-wall type of place. The options include all the usual suspects such as sashimi from salmon, tuna and albacore amongst others. For a house specialty, try the bizarrely named caterpillar role with eel and avocado plus eel sauce on top. But Sushi J Express is not just sushi. Tempura, teriyaki and katsu choices are all on the menu. With only a couple of tables, this is more of a take-out place.

Toi’s Thai Kitchen 7545 E Addis Ave (928) 237-9099 Toi’s Thai Kitchen is a small, non-descript place located in a shopping mall. But it proves the maxim that good things come in small packages with its tasty authentic Thai food. The restaurant has a ‘spicy’ rating, which means you can adjust the degree of heat to your taste, starting from very mild to extremely hot if you dare. The staff is friendly and helpful. Popular choices include coconut soup, green curry, yellow curry with chicken or the pad Thai. To cool down the spice, have some Thai iced tea.

Gabby’s Grill 2982 Park Ave (928) 277-1787 Gabby’s Grill opened earlier in the year by a husband-and-wife team who operate two other locations in Prescott Valley. In a cozy setting with booth seating, the restaurant offers traditional American grill dishes, including chicken wings and ribs. The menu also has a selection of salads from the staple Caesar salad to a more unusual ­Mexican fiesta salad with avocado, black beans, corn, diced chicken and tomatoes. There are plenty of other family favorites, like the chicken club, tuna melt, shrimp scampi or beef steak.

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Prescott’s 10 Best Restaurants – Eating Out in Arizona A city rich with history but still fresh and vibrant today, the best restaurants in Prescott combine both past and present in their food and decor to create some of the most enjoyable restaurants in the state. From restaurants in former train depots to modern craft beer brewpubs, from Cajun classics to cannoli, discover the varied dining scene of Prescott, Arizona’s third biggest city and the glittering jewel in its culinary crown.

The Raven Café 142 North Cortez Street • ( 928) 717-0009

Bin 239 239 North Marina Street • (928) 445-3855

Offering local farm-to-table food alongside local craft beers, the Raven offers casual café eats and coffees during breakfast and lunch, before offering live music and entertainment into the night. So whether you are looking for a chilled, easy start to the morning or are looking to be entertained in the evening, the Raven Café has much to offer. This, plus a menu of mostly healthy and organic fare and an upstairs outdoor patio for al fresco dining, makes this café a must-visit.

Regularly making it onto lists of the best restaurants in Arizona, Bin 239 is a wine café offering an ever-changing menu of ­American and Italian fare and steaks perfectly paired to its great selection of fine wines for any budget. Also unique – certainly for the state and perhaps even for the country – is the fact that all of its wines are available both by the glass or by the bottle, giving diners the chance to sample even their finest wines over their two wine ­tasting menus.

El Gato Azul 316 West Goodwin Street • ( 928) 445-1070

The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 120 South Montezuma Street • (928) 541-1996

Offering the best of world cuisine with a specialty in tapas dishes, El Gato Azul offers casual yet sophisticated dining perfect for dates, catch-ups or any time you want good signature food with international inspirations. The bistro has just celebrated its first decade and is better than ever, with its wide-reaching tapas and a la carte menus, lovely outdoor dining area and a vibrant calendar of live bands and entertainment making this a great destination for a great night out for any occasion.

With a history that begins in 1877, this saloon has seen elections run within it, Wyatt Earp drinking at its bar and a devastating fire which saw the townspeople carrying its ornate bar out of harm’s way. The present Palace is a faithful reconstruction of the regal 1901 incarnation of the restaurant, and offers a combination of new American cuisine alongside favorites from across its nearly 140 year history, for a delicious and historical dining experience.

Prescott Brewing Company (Bashford Courts) 130 West Gurley Street • (928) 771-2795 This restaurant/pub prides itself on what it calls ‘fun and friendly brewpub style’ dining, offering a community-orientated, welcoming atmosphere for all. The menu is one of pub classics, with the best dishes made with the signature ingredients that keeps the customers coming back to Prescott Brewing Company: its beers. Crafted in their nearby brewery, as well as featuring in many of the dishes they are also available on tap, with choices changing regularly to give diners the full flavor of their delicious brews.

The Palace Restaurant and Saloon

The Lone Spur Café 106 West Gurley Street • (928) 445-8202 A cowboy-themed diner serving breakfast and lunch (and dinner once a week), The Lone Spur offers some of the biggest breakfasts in the state and at some of the most reasonable prices. The Lone Spur often sees queues forming before it has opened in the morning, and if reviews of its prime rib are anything to go by, its dinner service will soon be equally popular. Visit now while you still have a chance to get in and experience one of the friendliest dining experiences in the neighborhood.

Bistro St. Michael Hotel St Michael Prescott, 100 South Montezuma Street (928) 778-2500 Located inside Prescott’s historic Hotel St. Michael, the Bistro St. Michael serves the finest of American and international cuisine in a quaint, antique setting that offers old American charm from the turn of the 20th century. Enjoy this restored 1901 bistro over breakfast, lunch or dinner, and enjoy its well-stocked bar of hand selected wines, craft beers and spirits. For the best vintage-style dining in the area, this charming destination cannot come more highly recommended. Visit in the morning when the light streams through its windows and start your day off perfectly.

Iron Springs Café 1501 Iron Springs Road • (928) 443- 8848 Over 35 years of cooking, Iron Springs has perfected its Cajun and Southwestern menu, which it delivers from its historic 1894 train depot location. The menu offers the finest of its cuisine, with a 32

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selection of fresh seafood specials that change daily. The restaurant combines 19th century nostalgia with modern cooking for the best of both worlds, with delicious food served in a fun antiquefilled interior that has made Iron Springs Café a popular dining destination for decades, especially for families in the local area.

Rosa’s Pizzeria 330 West Gurley Street • (928) 445-7400 The owners of Rosa’s Pizzeria have serious pizza pedigree. Growing up in one pizza capital (Sicily) then running a pizzeria in another for 25 years (New York), they have brought their decades of knowledge and supreme family recipes to Rosa’s here in Prescott. Offering a true taste of Sicily, the Anzelmo family welcome each new customer as if they were part of the ever-expanding Rosa’s ­Pizzeria family, and these customers come back to try the perfectly ­balanced meals offered at Rosa’s, using the freshest and highest quality ingredients possible.

Papa’s Italian Restaurant 129 1/2 North Cortez Street • (928) 776-4880 A family-owned venue for over 20 years, Papa’s Italian Restaurant is inspired by many generations of the Benedetto family’s cooking, from Grandma cooking minestrone over a hot stove to Grandpa Benedetto and his long-standing restaurant in Auburn, New York. Prescott’s Papa’s offers a carefully chosen menu of seriously authentic Italian classics honed through generations of family culinary talent, with secret recipe slow cooked sauces and expertly cooked pizza, pasta and meats. Everything is cooked from scratch, and it is clear to see why when the results are so spectacular and authentic.

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Deck Care A deck like the space inside your residence, it needs regular cleaning and maintenance to remain habitable and safe. Decks made of composites require less maintenance than wooden decks, but there’s no such thing as a self-cleaning deck or a deck that lasts forever. By doing what’s good for the wood and avoiding what’s not, however, you’ll get more life from your outdoor living space.

DO clean the deck thoroughly once a year

DON’T clean the deck with chlorine bleach

Your deck needs an annual exfoliation so protective sealers can seep deeper into the wood. When it’s dry and moderately warm – 60 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit – apply an appropriate deck-cleaning solution with a roller or sprayer to kill mold and bacteria. Use a utility brush to scrub the deck where it’s especially dirty and where mold or mildew might lurk. (Power washers and pressure washers are the quickest way to clear residue, but you risk gouging the wood. A garden hose outfitted with any nozzle that has a hard-stream setting will work; a “fireman” nozzle, found in auto-parts stores, delivers an intense spray without the risks associated with a pressure washer.) The power or pressure washer is a time- and labor-saving tool, but in unsteady hands, it can make your deck look like woodboring beetle larvae have been at work. Sweep the nozzle along the wood grain at a slight angle about 8 inches from the deck surface. Move the nozzle at all times while the trigger is engaged.

Unless, of course, you don’t mind stripping the wood of its natural color and damaging its cellular structure. Oxygen bleach is an all-purpose alternative that won’t wash out colors or harm plants, but it’s still not appropriate for redwood.

DO sand your deck before sealing It can take up to 48 hours for the deck to fully dry. At that point, lightly sand the surface to remove splintery or fuzzy patches caused by pressure-washing the deck. A pole sander with 80-grit sandpaper will suffice; a power sander is overkill. Then seal the deck to protect from cracking, cupping, and warping. A clear sealer lasts longer; a tinted stain or sealant fades quickly with lots of foot traffic. Paint looks nice when it’s first applied, but it looks downright distressed before long. If you then decide to refinish the deck with an alternative sealant, you’ll need to first remove all the paint with a stripper or sander. Finishes that leave a film rather than penetrating the wood –

including varnishes and lacquer – will peel and crack. Consider synthetic sealants, as some oil-based products attract mildew and algae. Semi-transparent finishes protect the deck from sun damage and add color to the wood if that’s important to you.

DO clean the deck at routine intervals The room and walls of your home protect its interior from rain, snow, sun, and wind, but the uncovered deck endures whatever Nature delivers. Prevent water damage throughout the season – and during the off-season – by regularly sweeping away puddled water, leaves, branches, and other debris. Use a plastic shovel if you get more snow than a push broom can handle.

DON’T assume that pressuretreated wood is maintenance-free It might resist rot and insect infestation, but pressure-treated wood still needs to be cleaned and sealed to withstand water and solar damage. Use products made for pressure-treated wood.

DO be vigilant about damage Inspect periodically for soft or splintered spots, loose nails and deck attachments, and split or rotten planks. Promptly fix any damage that presents a health or safety hazard. Complete other repairs before your annual deep-clean.

DON’T use natural materials under deck furniture Protect the wood deck from scrapes inflicted by chair and table legs, but don’t use rugs made of natural fibers such as jute and bamboo: These absorb moisture and promote mildew. Rugs made of recycled plastics won’t cause these problems, and they’ll last longer. 34

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The Force Awakened The Making of a JEDI By Thomas A. Liuzzo, RLS In light of the recent rebirth of the Star Wars franchise, you must be thinking what can that have to do with an article about surveying. Well, for one it is a pretty catchy title, and second, a surveyor has to tap the power of the force so that we can become a JEDI master in our own way. We dig holes and uncover secrets that have been locked away for decades or even centuries and we combine all of that with measurements and stick a metal pin in the ground and calling it your property corner. We mark it with our registration number for life. In this context, the word JEDI means “Judgement of the Evidence and Defense of our Interpretation.” So you see, we are JEDI’s and our light saber is a GPS unit that is connected to satellites that orbit 12,000 miles above the earth at 7,000 miles per hour. What could possible go wrong? You

Initial Point – Arizona Professional Land Surveyors represent the point of beginning of all surveys in Arizona, it is located by Phoenix International Raceway on a hilltop at the intersection of Baseline Road and 115th Ave.

1102 Willow Creek Rd. • Prescott, Az 86301

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see, surveyors aren’t just a group of individuals with high tech measuring tools. We are group of professionals that have combined years of training, education and experience in conjunction with a license from the State of Arizona. Our desire is to work for you to determine where your property boundaries are.

Why hire a surveyor You have worked hard for what you have and that includes your home. All of that hard work must mean that your home and the land that it sits upon are important to you. You paid a large sum of money for it, you maintain it, and see it as an investment for you and your family. You don’t want it to be harmed or endangered in any way. These reasons should be enough for you to want to hire a professional surveyor determine where your property boundaries are. That professional will provide you with physical markings on the ground and a map that will be your personal record of your boundary. One of our most important text books is “Brown’s Boundary Control and Legal Principles” 5th edition. In chapter 14 “The Role of the Surveyor” Principle 5 states;

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“the land surveyor locates boundary lines according to the description in the deed and then relates lines of possession that do not agree with these lines and reports the fact to the client, preferably in writing.” Our job is to report the rights on the ground and accompany that field work with the appropriate survey drawing. In the State of Arizona, that drawing must be recorded with the county that the property exists in order for that work to be perpetuated for all time.

Township corner – this point is in Williams Arizona approximately 144 mile north of the Initial Point

I have provided you with several facts as to what a surveyor does and what value their work could be to you. You may be thinking, “Why do I need a surveyor, when I look out my window, I can see my wall and that has to be my property line. The realtor told me that when I bought the property.” I hear this quite often. I can only offer that a Professional Surveyor is trained to tell you exactly where your property boundaries are and how they are related to your neighbors. Realtors are good at what they do and if you ask them where your boundary lies, they are taking an educated guess.

ties anthem “Stairway to Heaven”. Do you think he spoke to a surveyor before writing that lyric? Did he have trouble with his neighbor, as was that the spark of inspiration? We can close our eyes while listening to that lyric and picture the situation. I see a tall 6 foot or 8 foot hedge with an elderly man peaking down to see what is causing it to rustle. As a property owner, the last thing I want is a problem with my neighbor. I like harmony with my neighbors and knowing officially where my boundary lines are a step toward that harmony.

“If there’s a bustle in your hedgerow, don’t be alarmed now” were words sung elegantly by Robert Plant in the early Seven-

As clearly as it is stated in Principle 5 of Brown’s, we just report the facts, simply the facts. A good Record of Survey drawing

will detail the deed lines, the lines of possession and show any objects or improvements within the proximity of these lines with dimensions reporting those positions. This has been a practice that has kept the liability of many surveyors safe from attack. As surveyors, we should be the ones called to answer questions about our drawings because we are the experts when those drawing are concerned. One thing to keep in mind the next time you pick up a printout from the county GIS and try to walk your boundary is that you are assuming that print-out is accurate. Remember … “Assume makes an Ass out of U and Me.” Use a professional surveyor and you will have peace of mind for years to come.

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Prescott Area Trails By Sue Marceau The Prescott area’s trail system traverses diverse ecosystems within Arizona’s Central Highlands, offering unprecedented immersion with nature’s flora, fauna, mountains, skies and sunshine. The network is a gem for hikers, equestrians, runners, bicyclists and other recreation enthusiasts. The non-motorized routes help participants tone muscle, strengthen endurance, and commune with nature, as eyes eagerly scan panoramas, valleys and waterways. The 54-mile Prescott Circle Trail holds court as the crown jewel, meandering through forest, chaparral, grasslands, and rock formations typical from the Colorado Plateau to the north and the Sonoran Desert to the south. The route’s topography ranges from 5,200 feet to more than 6,000 feet and hugs the shores of the region’s Watson, Willow and Goldwater lakes. The City of Prescott considers the completed Circle Trail a “destination” for day trips and multi-day backpacking ventures, said Joe Baynes, recreation services director. He noted that “there are not that many backpacking locations (where) hikers could change their minds” and enjoy city amenities only a few miles away. The City of Prescott’s trails wind through nearly every type of terrain, basking in the high desert sun 5,000 to 6,100 feet above sea level.

There’s also the “opportunity for ­outfitters to supply people and combinations to the Circle Trail,” Baynes continued. “They could do three days and camp out, or be picked up and brought back to town, see Whiskey Row for the evening, replenish calories, and go back out the next day.” The origin of the Circle Trail and other systems in the sparkling crown owe allegiance to the volunteers and groups which have encouraged their creation and ensured their ongoing management.

“Like so many accomplishments in Prescott, a group of citizens came together and worked hard to make a dream come true,” shared volunteers Nancy Nesbit and George Sheats. Thanks to preservation choices by voters, advocacy by city leadership, management by parks and recreation staff, and the dedication of more than 100 citizen volunteers, the community’s trail system has become a significant draw for tourism, economic development, wildlife protection, watershed preservation and quality of life. The City of Prescott’s trails wind through nearly every type of terrain, basking in the high desert sun 5,000 to 6,100 feet above sea level. Natural features from valley floors to rocky heights to clear blue skies and cooling waters bathe the senses. Today, 28 trails cover more than 70 miles of the city’s natural parkland. Many are linked through easements and license agreements with national forest trails, according to Chris Hosking, trails and natural parklands coordinator. In addition to the Prescott Circle Trail System, the over-arching Mile High Trail System (MHTS) includes rails-to-trails projects (along the former Santa Fe Railroad) and the Greenways Trail System (urban passageways serving downtown Prescott along Granite and Miller creeks).

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The way in which the trails are designed and constructed ensure their appeal and longevity, Baynes and Hosking agreed. Every trail is constructed for the type of usage it is going to receive, with optimal design, grade, drainage and aesthetics. The journey is what’s important, Hosking said, not the destination. Proper preparation could make all the difference between an enjoyable sunny morning journey with nature or becoming lost and miserable. Hosking offers several tips to help ensure a safe and comfortable outing on the trails: ›› ›› ›› ›› ›› ››

The 54-mile Prescott Circle Trail holds court as the crown jewel, meandering through forest, chaparral, grasslands, and rock formations typical from the Colorado Plateau to the north and the Sonoran Desert to the south.

­eographically, the MHTS extends as G far north as 89A and Granite Dells Parkway, south to Goldwater Lake, west to Enchanted Canyon and Sierry Peaks subdivisions, and east to the new Sundog Trail.

Get a map online or download the smart phone app at www.prescotttrails.org Wear sturdy shoes Bring a hat for shade Carry plenty of water Adapt to the seasons with protective clothing and reasonable goals Walk or hike with another person. If you do set out alone, let someone know where you are going

Paper maps and guides also are available, according to Sheats, volunteer coordinator for the Over The Hill Gang. Free copies the Recreation Map are available at various city locations, including the parks and recreation department, trailheads and city hall. Produced by the city and various trail groups, with printing funded by advertising sponsors, the map also is sold at the Prescott Chamber of Commerce and bike shops for a $1 handling fee. A more comprehensive Circle Trail Guide has been authored and produced by Nigel Reynolds, vice president of the Yavapai Trails Association. It can be purchased for $10 from the trails association, recreation shops and the Prescott Chamber of Commerce. TrekAbout membership of $18 a year includes two early morning hikes each week: one hour on Tuesdays and two-hours on Thursdays. Hiking boots and water are required. Dogs must be on leashes. Information is available at 928-777-1122.

Multiple area subdivisions include trail systems for residents and guests as part of their developments’ amenities packages. Many of these private or semi-private trails connect with city or county trails managed by the Prescott Recreation Services Department. Residents often take to the trails after work, starting from their own property lines. Within a more urban setting, the city’s downtown trails are popular for commutes to work, school or shopping. Hikers, bicycling enthusiasts, bird watchers and anyone else who enjoys being outdoors will find plenty of trail choices throughout the area. One coordinated group of trail users is the TrekAbout Hiking Club. More than 10 years ago, the Prescott YMCA, Yavapai County Community Health Services and the Prescott Recreation Services Department joined forces on TrekAbout to help improve the health of area residents. TrekAbout boasts that “hikers are more creative and happier people” because of health benefits associated with exercising the body, clearing the mind, and refreshing the soul, noted Nesbit, a volunteer park ranger.

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HELPFUL HINTS Laying a smooth bead of caulk is like playing the piano: You can learn to do it well, but don’t expect applause for your first efforts. It is best to start where perfection is less important and then move on to high-visibility areas. Neatness starts at the top. The biggest mistake homeowners make is to cut too much off the tip. That allows too much caulk to flow out, which leads to a mess. So cut the end at a sharp angle. You can always trim off more if needed. Smooth and round the cut tip with sandpaper. Apply caulk bead. Immediately after laying the bead, drag your finger across it. In order to slide smoothly, your finger needs lubrication. For acrylic/latex caulk, dip your finger in water. With silicone, slip on a surgical-style glove and use alcohol.

CAULK LIKE A PRO

FIND YOUR SHUTOFF VALVES

In just minutes a cracked pipe, burst hose or leaking icemaker line can do thousands of dollars in damage. But if you know the basics about shutoff valves, you can stop the flow instantly and limit the harm. Shutoff valves are located near any device that uses water. Most of them are easy to find they are typically under sinks and toilets, behind washing machines and above water heaters. The main valve which shuts off water to the entire house maybe indoors or out. In most cases the valve flanks the water meter.

FIND YOUR PROPERTY LINES Before you build anything in your yard you should know where your property lines are.

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Electricity and heat caused by over-loaded extension cords. oversized bulbs in fixtures can cause fires. Telltale clues that can tip you off to dangerous concealed wiring hazards: • Electrical cords that are warm to the touch can signal overloading. Charred or plastic burning odors may indicate over-sized bulbs in light fixtures • Warm switch or receptacle plate covers may mean a poor electrical connection • Frequent tripping of circuit breakers may be caused by a defective breaker or possibly a short in the cables buried in walls. • Replace extension cords that are undersized or frayed • Never run extension cords under rugs • Check all light bulbs in your home to make sure bulb wattages don’t exceed the fixtures recommend maximum.

PREVENT HOME FIRES Most fires are caused by ordinary things like stove burners, candles and space heaters. Cooking fires – they mostly occur on the cooktop, usually in the first 15 minutes of cooking. 23% of fires are caused by cooking.

REPLACE SMOKE ALARMS About 60% of house-fire fatalities occur in homes with missing or neglected smoke-alarms. Smoke Alarms do not last forever. After 10 years or so, alarms become unreliable and should be replaced. To check an alarm’s age, just remove it from the mounting plate and on the back is a manufacturers date.

EXTINGUISHERS CAN SAVE YOUR HOME A fire extinguisher can make the difference between a minor fire and total destruction. Experts recommend that you have an extinguisher on each level of your home. Just remember that household extinguishers are meant for small fires.

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HELPFUL HINTS

CUT HEATING AND COOLING COSTS Sealing leaks makes your home more comfortable and cuts energy costs. Electrical boxes that hold switches or outlets are major sources of heat loss. Foam gaskets may not completely seal the boxes, but they will help. They are quick to install. Get an energy audit. An energy audit includes a series of tests that measures the overall leakiness of your house. Fill gaps under sinks. Pull back the escutcheons where pipes enter exterior walls and you will probably see generous gaps around the pipes. Use expanding foam to seal these gaps.

CONSERVE APPLIANCES Make appliances last. Don’t overload your washer or dryer. You may think you are saving time, water or energy bycramming more clothes into your washer and dryer. Overloading can cause damage to motors, belts and other moving parts. Clean fridge gaskets. If you keep your refrigerator door gaskets clean, they will seal properly and last the life of the fridge or freezer. Don’t block air vents. Freezers and refrigerators require proper airflow inside the compartments to keep foods at the right temperature. Blocking vents can cause cooling problems and force the compressor and fans to run overtime. Clean the lint filter. A clogged lint filter means clothes dry slower while the machine works harder and wastes energy. Clean the refrigerator Coils. Dust buildup on the coils underneath or on the back of the refrigerator reduces airflow and wastes energy. Clean Your Dishwasher Screen. If you dishwasher has a filtering screen under the bottom spray arm, clean it regularly. If you don’t food particles degrade into slime that blocks water flow and cleaning performance.

SAVE WATER Shrinking supply and growing demand are driving water bills up. Add the cost of heating water and rising sewer fees and you can see how thousands of wasted gallons turn into hundreds of dollars. You can save water by fixing drips and leaks. But in most homes, replacing water-wasting fixtures results in the biggest savings

USES FOR MICROFIBER CLOTHS To help make cleaning easier, manufacturers have introduced wonderful new cleaning products and equipment. I love microfiber cloths because they are so handy and do a great cleaning job.

NATURAL INSECT REPELLENT Mix 2 drops of oil of peppermint or lavender with 2 teaspoons of almond or sweet oil and dab on the skin. BUG-FREE ROOM • Put a couple of drops of lavender or peppermint essential oil on a cool light bulb to help repel bugs. • Place several drops of oil of lavender or peppermint on a cotton ball or two. Put them into a small jar or margarine container. Poke a few holes in the lid and cover. Put around the room. ANT DETERRENT If you have a problem with ants coming in your door • Take a piece of white chalk and draw a line. The ants will not cross the line. • Ants do not like cayenne pepper sprinkled around their anthills.

ARE THOSE EGGS FRESH? To determine whether an egg is fresh, immerse it in a pan of cool, salted water. If it sinks, it is fresh, but if it rises to the surface, it is not fresh.

ADD COLOR TO YOUR HOME PAINT THE INSIDE OF YOUR FRONT DOOR If you love a good pop of color but aren’t sure about painting an entire room a bright color, try painting the back of your front door. It takes under an hour to throw two coats of paint on the door, which means it can easily be changed out in the future when your décor preferences change or when you decide to move out. You shouldn’t need more than a quart of paint for two coats, which usually runs between $9 and $10 depending on the store and the brand name.

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HELPFUL HINTS WEEDS It’s that time of year when the weeds are popping up everywhere, usually faster than the actual flowers that we take such good care of. Here are some natural weed killers that are safe for you to use and won’t harm the earth or environment. Remember though, if they kill weeds they will also kill flowers and plants so use care.

Lemon Juice and Vinegar Mix 1/2 cup of white vinegar and 1/2 cup of lemon juice and spray or water weeds with it. The acidic combination kills the weeds.

Vinegar-Salt-Dish Soap In a spray bottle or a watering can combine 1 quart white vinegar, 1/4 cup salt and 2 teaspoons of liquid dish soap. Shake or stir this mixture so that the salt dissolves completely. Spray ONLY on weeds. If you have a lot of weeds you can double, triple the recipe and put in a garden sprayer.

Crabgrass Killer This one is for crabgrass. Sprinkle baking soda directly on the crabgrass. Use care with this because it will kill plants, grass, flowers, anything it comes in contact with. It can drift some so don’t sprinkle close to things that you don’t want to die.

BAKING SODA

RUST STAINS Mix equal parts of cream of tartar and hydrogen peroxide mixed together top clean rust stains.

CLEANING Baking soda causes dirt and grease to dissolve in water, so it is very effective in cleaning kitchen counter tops, refrigerators, and stove tops. And sprinkled on a sponge or dishrag, baking soda forms a mildly abrasive scouring powder. Use baking soda dissolved in water to clean and freshen the inside of your refrigerator. For stubborn coffee stains in cups, sprinkle baking soda on the stain, wipe with a damp sponge, and rinse. Believe it or not you can actually clean with things you have in your pantry. Give some of these unusual methods a try.

Baking soda is a sodium bicarbonate, a natural substance that maintains the pH balance. Baking soda neutralizes both acids and bases, so it actually eliminates odors rather than just covering them up. In cooking, baking soda releases carbon dioxide when heated, and this causes cookies, breads or cakes to rise. Baking soda can also act as a very mild abrasive cleaner perfect for removing stains from sinks, counter tops and even fine china.

DEODORIZING Baking soda neutralizes both basics (“ammonia smells”, common in diaper pails) and acidic odors (like the smell from pickles). •  Sprinkle baking soda on your carpet before vacuuming to eliminate food and pet odors. •  After emptying the garbage, sprinkle some baking soda on the bottom of the garbage can; this will neutralize the food odors. •  Keep an open box of baking soda in the back of your refrigerator and in your pantry; replace every 3 months or so. •  Pour baking soda down your garbage disposal while running warm water. 42

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KETCHUP: This is a great cleaner for copper. Simply work it in with a paper towel. Let it sit a few minutes, rub until you see the copper shine and then rinse well. DRY MUSTARD: It’s a great odor remover for plastic storage bowls. Fill the bowl with warm water, add about ½ teaspoon or so or dry mustard and let soak a few hours. Wash, rinse and dry. If you have onion or garlic smell on your hands work dry mustard into wet hands. Rinse and dry. FLOUR: You can use dry flour on a dry stainless steel sink to polish it. Sprinkle in the flour and rub firmly with a paper towel. Rinse and dry well. LEMON JUICE: Mix some lemon juice with cream of tartar and apply to stained countertops or breadboards. Let sit an hour or so or even overnight and then rinse and dry. Light stains can be wiped away immediately with this combination. Do not use on stone. ONION: If you have brown stains on knifes from tomato products or the dishwasher, stick them into an onion. Let sit for a while the then pull out, rub the stain, wash and dry. VODKA: Swish diamond jewelry in undiluted vodka to clean. For heavily soiled pieces let soak 15 minutes. May be used on gold and hard stones.


HELPFUL HINTS

HOW TO CLEAN YOUR IRON 1. Sprinkle a generous amount of salt onto your ironing board 2. Turn your iron to the highest setting, ensuring that the steam option is set to OFF 3. When heated, iron over the salt – what happens is that the dirt sticks to the salt, leaving nothing but a wonderfully, shiny iron!

It is good to do this every so often to prevent debris or dirt from your iron melting or sticking to your articles of clothing!

STUBBORN STAINS Mustard, chocolate and lipstick can be removed by rubbing a few drops of liquid glycerin into the stains first and then rub in stain remover or laundry detergent. Launder as usual in cool water first.

GARBAGE DISPOSALS Garbage disposals are magnificent devices for optimizing the handling of food waste. The problem is all garbage disposals get dirty and the blades become dull. It is best to be careful about what is thrown down the drain to prevent a clog. Things like celery, pasta, and chicken bones will create problems. Regardless, from normal operation bits of food becoming lodged under the blades and create bad odors. The best solution is a homemade solution of ice, vinegar, and lemons. Buy an ice tray and write “Garbage Disposal” on the bottom. I don’t think anybody would like to have a vinegar ice cube in their drinking water. Fill the tray with 8 parts water and 1 part vinegar. Then cut up a lemon and drop a small piece of the lemon rind into each slot to help with odor. Leave the solution to freeze. Remove the tray and drop the ice cubes down into the garbage disposal. Turn on the device and run some water from the faucet to help wash down the bits of debris. Make sure to completely grind up the ice. The ice works well to not only sharpen the blades but also dislodge any pieces of food that may be stuck. The vinegar will clean off all of the surfaces and the lemon will leave a nice smell.

To remove coffee (or tea) stains, rinse area with cold water immediately. Rub in a couple of drops of a mild, white dishwashing liquid and rinse well. Then treat with a mixture of one-part white household vinegar and three-parts water. Rinse again and launder as you normally do. Note: If cream was used in the coffee, you may have to sponge the stain with dry-cleaning fluid. To get rid of candle wax from the tablecloth, let the wax harden – a quick way is to put it in the freezer. Then scrape it off the tablecloth with a dull knife. Place paper towels on both sides of the stain and set the iron on the warm setting, then iron (no steam) over the stained area. Change the towels often to absorb all of the wax. Launder as usual. To remove red-wine stains, pour a big dose of salt on top of the stain to absorb the liquid. Put the tablecloth into cold water and try to rub out the stain. Use an enzyme detergent in the hottest water safe for the fabric, soak for 30 minutes and launder. Many of us use hints passed down from our mothers or grandmothers. They may not be valid today. Products have changed so much that there may be better or different ways of using or caring for them. Here are the latest: BALLPOINT-INK STAIN THEN: Hairspray NOW: Rubbing alcohol Ink formulations, fabrics, and hairspray ingredients have changed today. To get rid of the ballpoint ink from clothing you launder, place the garment on a towel stain-side down. Lightly dampen a cloth with rubbing alcohol and gently dab (do not rub) the stain. CRAYON ON WALLS If your artistic child has shown his talent on painted walls or wallpaper, here’s how to get it off: Dry cleaning solvent, available at drug or shoe stores. Pour a bit on a terry cloth towel to safely remove crayon from almost any (except antique wallpaper) surface.

DISHWASHER A dishwasher can be cleaned with household vinegar or citric acid powder. Pour a gallon of vinegar in the bottom, let set for an hour or so, then run the washer through a full cycle. Citric acid powder will also help remove hard-water buildup. Add a half-cup of powder and run the dishwasher. If there’s still an unpleasant odor coming from inside, examine the drain hose to see if it’s crimped and check the bottom for bits of food or gunk. After checking, if the odor it still strong, call a plumber because it might be a possible hazardous plumbing problem, like sewer gas, that needs to be remedied.

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Outdoor Living By Belgard Outdoor living has indeed become a ­staple of American culture. As many homeowners begin to spend more time in their outdoor living areas than in their indoor living areas, the overall trends continue to revolve around creating homey, attractive, livable outdoor spaces that are an extension of the indoor environment. As we enter 2016, expect to see a continuation of this theme in outdoor living design, as well as increases in sustainable (“green”) outdoor living practices. Once upon a time, the living room fireplace was the favored gathering spot for family and guests, and roasting marshmallows over a campground fire was part of the annual family vacation. Modern outdoor living combines these two traditions into one with outdoor fireplaces and fire pits. This trend will continue to be one of the fastest growing phenomenon’s in outdoor living for 2016. To meet these needs, Belgard continues to expand and develop the Belgard Elements collection and has recently released a new Midnight trim option for the Bordeaux Series fireplace and matching kitchen pieces. In addition, Belgard offers a full line of retaining wall products that are ideal for creating custom outdoor fireplaces and fire pits, such as Celtik® Wall or Weston Stone®. Outdoor living room designs continue to mimic the look of their indoor counter­ parts. This includes furniture design, light­ing fixtures, decorative accessories and flooring. Modern interior design is trending towards larger tiles with natural textures. Modern outdoor living combines two traditions (roasting marshmallows and campground fires) into one with outdoor fireplaces and fire pits.

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The same goes for outdoor hardscapes. Expect to see an increase in the popularity of larger format pavers with natural textures and design elements, such as the natural flagstone look of Mega-Arbel®, the cut flagstone look of Mega-Lafitt™, and the cut slate look of Lafitt™ Rustic Slab, all of which offer multi-piece large-format design options. Because of the thinner profile, Lafitt Rustic Slab and its smooth counterpart Lafitt™ Grana Slab are both available with an extra-large 14" x 22" piece. Also expect to see an increase in the popularity of Mirage® Porcelain Pavers, which are a durable outdoor-rated version of interior porcelain tiles and are available in a variety of large-format sizes and natural looks, including trendy wood grain and stone textures. Outdoor kitchens now rival the scope and scale of their indoor counterparts, with professional-rated appliances, multiple cooking surfaces, and bar-type seating with ample countertop and prep space. Expect

to see an increase in brick ovens as more homeowners learn that these attractive fixtures can be used for more than just cooking pizza, but can actually function as a full-use outdoor oven. To meet the needs of evolving kitchen trends, Belgard offers a variety of kitchen pieces and brick ovens in the Belgard Elements collection and has recently released Tandem™ Modular Grid, which can be used to quickly and easily create custom outdoor kitchens and coordinating design elements. For several years, permeable pavers have been a growing movement in commercial construction as more municipalities develop and implement stronger codes for managing storm water. But as homeowners learn about the benefits of permeable pavers, the trend is beginning to make its way into the residential arena, particularly for driveways, and is expected to continue to grow. Textured permeable pavers, like Subterra® Stone and Eco Dublin®, offer the natural stone look that homeowners desire, while at the same time reducing flooding and improving local waterways through the absorption and filtration of storm water through the paver joints. As an added benefit, permeable pavers can be used as part of a rainwater harvesting system to collect and reuse water for irrigation or other gray-water uses. Because many states and municipalities offer grants and tax incentives for these types of sustainable, or green, practices, the reduced net cost is an attractive incentive for savvy homeowners.


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Fall in Love With Your Home All Over Again By Sue Marceau The excitement has fizzled in your life together. You don’t see things the same way. It’s time for a change, but you’re not sure what. Going away might reduce the dullness for a while, but the same lack of magic will stare you in the face when you return. It’s time to admit it. Your home has become just a foundation with roof, walls and personal belongings in between. It’s no ­longer the intimate haven you embraced years ago. What’s a household to do when the love light has gone out in the home you once adored?

and new look to any interior. Once all the artwork is off the walls, rearrange it. ­Displaying art in different places also will give a new look to a home. Then, consider adding a few new pieces and/or eliminating pieces you may have “fallen out of love” with.

Taking a cue from the advice columnists at Annie’s Mailbox (the former Ann Landers franchise), Dumas and Bussell-Eriksson pondered a series of questions about how to love your surroundings again.

YCCA: After living in a home for a while, what might it take to rejuvenate the love? DUMAS: The primary thing that will refresh a home is paint. Up-to-date “in vogue” colors will always bring a new perspective

BUSSELL-ERIKSSON: I always ask my

Sam, but I’d like to add that depending on the age of the home, I always look to changing out hardware, plumbing fixtures and/or light fixtures. If you have lived in the home for more than 10 years, you might be tired of these items and it will certainly bring a “new” and improved/ updated look to have more current items in your home to look at every day.

clients to set a budget. You need to know how much you can afford to spend. First off, make a list of the items you would like to change. Then, assign a price next to each item. Don’t forget about the cost of hiring a professional to help you either with the selection and/or the installation. If you can identify the scope and budget of your rejuvenation, you will then know how much of the work you will be able to achieve at one time. This will prevent you from starting a project and not being able to complete it.

YCCA: What is the technique for success

YCCA: What do you say to

on home rejuvenation? DUMAS: I have always believed in involving professionals who have expertise in design. Consult with an interior designer who knows the latest colors and trends, and who invests in their business by attending trade shows and market shows to keep up with the latest and greatest items for home improvement. For a small

homeowners who wish to spice up their surroundings?

BUSSELL-ERIKSSON: I agree with “Rekindle the romance to fall in love with your home all over again,” advise Associate Real Estate Broker Sam Dumas of S|J Luxury Real Estate – Windermere Northern Arizona and Janet Bussell-Eriksson, president and senior designer at Bussell Interiors and managing member of BussellEriksson Designer Homes.

fee in obtaining this expertise, you can be sure that you are on the right track to execute your rejuvenation.

DUMAS AND BUSSELL-ERIKSSON: One example is buyers who had builtin bookcases removed to create a larger master suite. While well-made, the bookcases were oak and a little dated. The new owners also opted for a flooring change in the master bedroom. The end result was a larger looking master suite with brand new carpet and refreshed paint colors. An entirely new appearance also was created for the master bath by replacing older carpet with travertine stone tile.

YCCA: How much time and energy is devoted to re-energizing a home?

DUMAS AND BUSSELL-ERIKSSON: For the most part, the projects materialize as we are working with new homeowners. Someone who has purchased a resale home tends to start immediately. The length of time it takes all depends upon how much work they are doing. For 46

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instance, we just had a recent sale where the new buyers wanted window treatments, new appliances and relocation of a few light fixtures. This project took about two to three weeks. Some of that time was waiting for the items ordered to arrive. Installation was just a couple of days.

parable market and property values. It is always a good idea to continue updating your home to keep it fresh and modern with no deferred maintenance.

BUSSELL-ERIKSSON: I ask clients if

A seller came to us with a condo unit that they had used as a rental property for several years. When the tenant decided to vacate, the owner decided to sell the unit rather than rent it out again. They are repeat clients, and thus contacted us to see what we felt should be done to get the unit ready to go on the market. After a visual assessment, we came up with three options:

this is their forever home or if they are only looking to remain in the home for a few years. It ties in with what Sam stated: you do not want to over-improve for the current market. It is great to be unique and one of a kind, but in achieving this, you need to understand that you put yourself into a market that becomes incomparable. So, if you are looking to sell your home in a few years, I would recommend doing a transformation that works for the current owners’ lifestyles, while keeping in mind any transformations made should still appeal to the lifestyles of others. In essence, keep resale in mind when renovating.

OPTION #1: (Least Amount of Work)

YCCA: What is the best way to go

Refresh with all new interior paint; remove old window treatments; deep clean everything, including carpeting. Cost: $4,000.

about it?

YCCA: What kind of investment might an average overhaul involve for more significant projects?

DUMAS AND BUSSELL-ERIKSSON:

OPTION #2: (Middle of the Road) Replace all of the flooring in the bedrooms, living room, dining room and kitchen [leave existing tile floors in bathrooms]; dress up with all new paint inside; install all new light fixtures and door hardware; remove old and out-dated window treatments; replace dated and glued mirror in one bathroom; place new mirrors and faucets in bathrooms; and position new facet and appliances in kitchen. Cost: $10,000

OPTION #3 (In Addition to the

DUMAS AND BUSSELL-ERIKSSON: Professionals, professionals, professionals. Consult with people who do the type of work you seek for a living; don’t hire a friend of a friend who moonlights or works at it part-time.

YCCA: What factors should consumers consider when thinking about rejuvenating their homes? DUMAS: Consumers should always keep in mind values of similar homes in the neighborhood and not over-improve or over-build. We always talk about com-

you offer?

DUMAS AND BUSSELL-ERIKSSON: Remodeling is not an exact science. Each home is different. Each client is different. We do not find ourselves doing the same thing over and over again. So what is right for one person or someone else’s home might not be the right thing to do for your home. Get the advice of a professional, and better yet, interview at least two of them to determine who will be the best match for you. Also check references. Someone who is referred to you by a friend or colleague already has a “proven” track record with someone you know. Flirt with new ideas, colors and finishing touches on this romantic journey. Once you’ve dedicated effort to enhancing your relationship with your surroundings, you most likely will feel your attitude improve and your spirits soar. Soon, you will be spending more time at home and bolstering your bond with renewed love and energy. Bliss will be back with a vengeance. You might want to consider putting out that “Do Not Disturb” door hanger.

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Recommendations in Option #2) Add new cabinets in the kitchen and two baths, along with new sinks for each. Additional Cost: $9,000. There are also clients who come to us and ask to have their homes fully refurbished and furnished. These renovations can start anywhere from $30,000 upwards to $200,000 and then some. Again, there are many factors to consider. It all comes down to budget, location of the home, and homeowner desires.

YCCA: What final words of wisdom do

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Smart Home Technology By Sue Marceau The resourcefulness surrounding new technology, the wonderment of seeing it in action, and the fast pace at which advancement occurs remain the hallmarks of product design and applications development. On the home front, hightech monitoring and control tools offer consumers convenience, peace of mind, and energy savings. Smart phones, cameras and automation to manage household systems while away from home constitute a significant draw to some consumers building new homes or updating existing living spaces. Remote monitoring and control remain especially popular among retired, second home and traveling homeowners, according to Alyson Davis, Project Manager for NJ Builders’. What appeals is the “idea of seeing your home while away and knowing you can check in any time,” explained E.W. Bratcher of B&W Fire Security Systems LLC. Steve White, president of Lifestyles Home Technology, described a smart home landscape integrating everyday consumer undertakings and security measures. The common denominator is each aspect programmed and easily managed from afar. “Smart homes are great for families today,” White emphasized. “Want to get a video text showing the kids safely getting home from school?” he asks. “Done. Want the crockpot to start at 6:30? Done. Want

lighting, temperature, (and other systems) ramping up when you are approaching home from anywhere at any time? Done. Want to dim some lights or see who’s at the door without leaving your TV program? Done.” Elements incorporated include smart phones, cameras, automation systems, and wireless protocols, Davis noted, with wirelessly activated thermostats, light switches, cameras, smoke detectors, and door locks often requested by consumers. Shades and blinds that “follow the sun” and whole house audio control are among the implementable systems, according to White. “The technologies are maturing and there is a much wider range of options for whole

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2016 Building Yavapai

house sound and for home automation,” he summarized. “Anything can be automated via schedule and/or events … right down to keeping an eye on your aquarium. (And yes, I have seen that.)” The formula, per White, is defining the level of “hands-on or hands-free” a household wishes to employ. “There are so many options available today for fully customizing the experience that the choices can be both dazzling and confusing.” The three experts provided guidelines for pricing, system decisions, servicing, and where to locate expertise for installation and maintenance. Central to decisions about purchasing smart home technology are budget and what a consumer wants as opposed to what he or she needs, they underscored. “There will always be options for every budget, but today’s wireless technology has brought the cost of smart home features down to a range most people can afford,” Davis clarified. “It always comes down to money. Consumers will need to balance cost/budget with which aspect of the new technology would be beneficial to them to simplify their lives.” Bratcher agreed, estimating prices at $200 to $500 for components. Consumer focus in decision making “should be ‘how


What appeals is the “idea of seeing your home while away and knowing you can check in any time,” explained E.W. Bratcher of B&W Fire Security Systems LLC.

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can this system work for me – the home owner – now,’” Bratcher advised. He cited additional considerations including likelihood that the company from which the components and systems are purchased will be around to service them. “Basic systems can start at about $1,000,” White explained. “Prices go north from there up to hundreds of thousands. How big is the house and how big is the bank roll? One key to price is the level of convenience you want to experience. The greater the convenience and (the situation of) never having to touch anything, the higher the price. Budget is the key. It’s the age-old question: what do you want and what can you afford?”

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Focus should always be on the needs of the homeowner, Davis advised, noting that even “more important would be whether or not the technology can adapt to changes … including changes in needs of the household and changes (updates) to the technology itself.” Davis predicts that smart technology will enhance resale value of homes as applications become more standard, including remote control of kitchen and laundry appliances through manufacturers currently refining that technology. “It seems a lot of folks feel they are never going to sell, and of course that is their intention,” White noted. “It is good to keep in mind, however, that every home is sold sooner or later. People today like to ‘nest,’ and studies consistently show that homes with these amenities already in place have a considerably higher resale value than comparable homes that don’t.” Conducting research about the technology and its longevity in products of interest remains important, Davis counseled, encouraging consumers to “make sure what you’re buying won’t be obsolete in a year.” Finding professional assistance should be the approach for anyone except a “sophisticated techie,” White cautioned. “If you are not experienced at this, you can really go up some blind alleys and cost yourself more than any presumed savings by going do-it-yourself.” From Bratcher’s perspective, consumers should “have a clear idea of what you want this new equipment to do before you just run out pick something off the shelf. The box it is packed in doesn’t know what your real needs are.”

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Eco-Friendly Kitchens By Sue Marceau What’s cooking in the eco-friendly kitchen demands no complicated recipes and is room-ready with reasonable measures of time and thought. “It is very easy to be eco-friendly without spending hours trying to accomplish it,” reassures Christie Board of Board by Board Design – Build. “So many mainstream manufacturers are designing and supplying all kinds of wonderful materials and products that can be used in multiple design styles.” A certified kitchen and bath designer through the National Bath and Kitchen Association, Board defines eco-friendly products as those using “resources (such as water) locally-sourced, environmentally less toxic, or sustainable by the materials it is made from (such as bamboo).” Conceding that “most clients are still looking for products that have value, function and style,” Board noted that many manufacturers are easing the way with appealing yet functional water efficient sinks, LED lighting, solar, and Energy Star appliances. The objective of the Energy Star program is to halve energy consumption of appliances about every 10 years, according to Doug Rupp, owner of Quality Maytag, Inc. Established by the Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Energy in 1992, the Energy Star platform identifies the efficiency of allocated resources such as electricity and natural gas in the operation of appliances. Each year as the bar is

raised, Rupp stated, some products make the cut and others do not. “Cooking generally is not energy-efficient other than induction cooktops and convection ovens,” Rupp reported, and neither product line is monitored for Energy Star certification. A relatively new trend in cooking in the U.S. is magnetic induction, which utilizes electro magnets to vibrate molecules of the pan and provide consistently even heat, Rupp explained. “Magnetic induction is more efficient than a regular electric (stove), cooks faster, more evenly and uses no hot elements under the pan … It has instant control, like gas, and it is easier to clean than normal electric stoves.” The drawback to magnetic induction, which has been around since the 1960s, Rupp disclosed, is that it only works on cooking containers which can accept mag-

nets attached to bottom and sides. That excludes pots made from aluminum, glass and some stainless steel. For all certified appliances except those related to cooking, an accompanying yellow Energy Star Guide will provide a kilowatt hour (KWH) number. That ranking, Rupp explained, remains “the best measure of comparability of how efficient an appliance is versus another of the same type.” Dishwashers and washing machines will have a Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) rating on water usage to identify that efficiency. The amount of water required to operate appliances is rated by the Natural Resources Defense Council. Water-using products manufactured by the Whirlpool family of appliance brands meet or exceed government water standards, Rupp stated. With dishwashers and refrigerators, “we are getting down to minimal usage now with features that customers want,” he added. In dishwashers, for example, the government’s goal is one gallon of water used per load, while actual usage currently is three to five gallons. He said that manufacturers have told regulators that “we are getting near the bottom of water usage and still clean the dishes.” From the water utilization and kitchen design standpoint, Board said she incorporates “many faucets and fixtures that are using less water but still maintain the functionality of a fixture that used more resources.”

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Advances in lighting technology also provide consumers with creative options. Board shared that she also is “very excited about how much LED lighting has improved in the last couple of years. The quality of light LED bulbs emit has gone from an unflattering blue to a very clear white. I love the LED tape lights for an undercabinet application.”

Dishwashers and washing machines will have a Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) rating on water usage to identify that efficiency.

Sun tunnels over skylights are another favorite for Board, who noted that they “add an amazing amount of light and yet blend into a ceiling very easily.” She described applicability for stair wells, small and windowless rooms, and other spaces requiring more light: “With all our sunshine in Arizona, it is like having lights on all day without paying for it.”

by merely upgrading. The appliances carrying that label are the most energy-efficient available, she stated. Ironically, consumers may only stumble upon them by happenstance during a purchase.

Board not only applies these eco-friendly products to client projects, she uses many of them herself at home. Trading traditional bulbs for LEDs and stocking up on Energy Star appliances are among them.

“They work great and make the most of your energy dollar. If you have an appliance that you use frequently that is not Energy Star, you might think about replacing it,” she advised, referencing old freezers and refrigerators sitting in garages. Those units demand large amounts of power compared to their newer and more efficient equivalents.

So many kitchen appliances today carry the Energy Star label, Board explained, that consumers often benefit from eco-savings

Rupp classified “savings in the wallet” as one benefit for consumers who move to eco-friendly appliances. The more energy efficient the appliance, the lower the utility bills, he said. Since these appliances can be more expensive to purchase, consumers should calculate the amount of anticipated savings in usage versus the price, he suggested. “Someone who does two loads of laundry a week doesn’t really need to spend $1,000 to $1,200 for a High Efficiency washer,” he explained. “A $500 to $600 one is more

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Eco-Friendly Kitchens – continued than sufficient, and all appliances are more efficient than before, just not rated HE.” As a newer technology, High Efficiency continues to be tweaked for best performance by manufacturers, Rupp added. Larger loads enable High Efficiency machines to operate better, he shared, explaining that “they can do smaller loads, but depending on the machine and soil level of the clothes (worn around the house versus worked on the car or in-the-garden dirty), it might not clean as well.” When purchasing appliances, Rupp recommends researching brand and model history, the availability of parts and service, the tendency for repair issues in the brand/ product, capacity tuned to household needs, purchase cost versus usage savings, and especially, buying American. A lot of people are not taught the differences in uses for High Efficiency machines versus the old machines they have had in the past. So, reading the manual is a real must.”

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Even though “almost nothing is wholly Made in America anymore, the best thing is to try and buy American-made appliances,” Rupp advised. Such products will carry “Made in America” or “Assembled in America” stickers. Foreign made appliances, he said, often are delivered with different expectations between customers and manufacturer, a potential mismatch in how customers wish to be served, inability to obtain parts and services, and long waits for parts which local merchants do not stock. Rupp cautioned that “what our customers want and expect is not what the (foreign) company is willing to do in most cases.” Other eco-friendly ingredients in Board’s kitchen designs range from countertops to flooring: ›› Touch faucets (“though motivation seems more about ease of use than water conservation”); ›› Man-made quartz countertops constructed of recycled materials;

›› Paints with very low or zero toxin emissions; ›› Flooring options readily sustainable and locally-sourced; ›› Engineered flooring which is formaldehyde-free and stably constructed from layers of plywood. Board also pointed out that “reclaimed wood and up-cycled pieces have become a huge trend in kitchens. Not only is it a great look, it is a great way to incorporate something that may be meaningful to you or just a vintage beauty.” What does she predict for the future? “We will continue to see a lot of improvements in eco-friendly products, as more and more creative inventors find ways to recycle and re-engineer everyday products. From building materials to electronics, there are changes every day. Who knows what they will come up with next?


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Garages go Grand By Gremlyn Bradley-Waddell on Jan 9, 2015 NewHomeCentral.com Is it a place to park the family RV – or a space to park all the pals who’ve showed up to watch the big game? Thanks to a number of thoughtful options, today’s so-called RV garages are much more than oversized rooms made just for vehicle storage. Rather, these expansive and light-filled rooms can be tailored to suit a homeowner’s needs and used just about any way one wishes.

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‘Tricked-out workshops’ RV garages have such great height and space that people use them for cool, tricked-out workshops. People in Arizona love the outdoors and sports – and these garages are great places to store boats and ATVs.

Easy to personalize Homeowners can personalize their garage by adding a bathroom, epoxy flooring, high-voltage capabilities or even a drive-through door on the back of the structure.

Additional living space While many RV garage buyers are empty-nesters who want the extra space for a motorhome, trailer or fifth-wheel vehicle, other buyers are snatching up the garages as a way to add on valuable extra square-footage to their home. For example, a buyer could purchase a home with a four-car garage and then convert half of the garage into an in-law suite or a media room. That would leave the home with a two-car garage and then the buyer could add on an attached RV garage to gain more space, of course all depending on CC&Rs, Zoning and lot sizes.

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Very Cool! By Debra Gelbart on Sept 4, 2015 NewHomeCentral.com

THE GOOD NEWS: Purchasing a new home often means purchasing a new refrigerator, either from your builder’s design center or on your own.

THE BAD NEWS: There are so many options – counter-depth or standard depth? French doors or side-by-side? Water and ice dispensers or not? To help you make an informed decision on your new fridge, we talked to a few experts about the latest style options as well as what’s next when it comes to refrigerator technology.

Hot coffee – from your fridge One of the spiffiest features we found relates to your morning cuppa joe. That’s because within a couple of months, you’ll have another way to get a great cup of coffee when GE Appliances introduces a new refrigerator model featuring a brewing system built into the refrigerator’s water dispenser. The manufacturer already offers a model featuring a hot water dispenser with a pullout tray able to accommodate any size container including large pots and pitchers.

The new model, called the GE Café™ Series refrigerator with Keurig® K-Cup® Brewing System, comes with an accessory to facilitate dispensing a fresh cup of steaming 190-degree coffee. “GE invented the technology and has partnered with Keurig to regulate the temperature, flow rate and water pressure,” said Dan Goldstein, director of marketing for GE Refrigeration. GE produces six brands or series of refrigerators: GE, GE Artistry, GE Café, GE Profile, Hotpoint and Monogram, Goldstein said.

Plenty of style options Along with numerous optional amenities, refrigerators are also available in many styles, explained Mike Perrelli, senior director for Frigidaire, whose parent company, Electrolux Appliances, manufactures Frigidaire and Electrolux refrigerator brands. For example, a built-in “all” refrigerator is typically paired with a built-in “all” freezer, he said. This option allows maximum freshfood storage and offers up to 38 cubic-feet of combined refrigerator and freezer space. The manufacturer’s suggested retail price, often referred to as the MSRP, for Electrolux’s built-in “all” refrigerator is $2,449, Perrelli said. The top freezer style features the fresh-food compartment underneath the freezer compartment, a common configuration found in “urban settings where space is at a premium,” Perrelli said. Goldstein said this remains the most popular option among consumers. Prices range from about $500 to around $2,200, depending on the finish (stainless steel or an enamel-like surface) and features selected, such as additional shelves or an aluminum can dispenser. The side-by-side refrigerator model is manufactured with the fresh-food compartment on the right and the frozen-food compartment next to it. “By far the biggest selling point of this style has been the water and ice dispenser in the freezer door and the organizational flexibility it provides,” Goldstein said. Prices range from about $1,200 to around $3,100. 54

2016 Building Yavapai


“GE invented the technology and has partnered with Keurig to regulate the temperature, flow rate and water pressure,” said Dan Goldstein, director of marketing for GE Refrigeration.

Though as recently as 10 years ago side-by-side refrigerators were the most popular style, today they are the least popular, Goldstein said, because of the narrowness of the freezer compartment. “Customers have told us they worry about fitting a pizza box in the freezer compartment,” he said. The bottom freezer style is configured with a drawer or door for frozen food beneath the fresh-food compartment, Goldstein said. Prices range from about $1,000 to around $1,900. A fifth type of refrigerator is a French door style, featuring two doors that open to the fresh-food compartment and a drawer underneath for frozen foods. The water and ice dispenser can be included on the door of the fresh-food compartment. Prices for these models generally range from about $1,600 to around $4,000 and even up to $8,000-ish for a model that looks like a built-in.

Separate climate environments “Consumers expect food to taste its best,” Perrelli said, “so manufacturers are offering customizable settings to keep food stored at the ideal temperature.” Goldstein said refrigerators can include a dual evaporator that keeps fresh-food and freezer-food in completely separate climate environments, with drier air circulating through the freezer compartment and more humidity in the fresh-food compartment. This keeps fresh-food fresher longer, he said.

Increased energy savings Goldstein said that the U.S. Department of Energy standards for energy-efficiency have increased by 25 percent in the past year, so most refrigerators manufactured in the past year save consumers even more in energy costs than they did prior to 2014. 2016 Building Yavapai

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Saluting the Flag Community pride flies high with banners that honor our nation and heroes By Christine James To “fly your own flag” is to proudly proclaim your ideals to the world. Of course, the same is true for those who take the phrase literally. A flag is one of the clearest and most succinct ways to declare one’s priorities and allegiance. Emblazoned with symbols representing a place, event, club, political stance or personal ethos, flags are a statement expressing what matters most to those who display them. Old Glory is a perennial top-seller as the stars and stripes continue to inspire courage and unity in Americans. “There’s a lot of heart and soul about the flag,” says Kevin Komadina, co-owner with wife Irene of Prescott’s Flags Galore N More. “It’s patriotism as much as anything – God and country.” Also popular are state and military flags, reflecting a deep respect for our community and its heroes. “We get a ton of veterans here. And boy, do you get some stories,” says Komadina. “You can have some teary moments in here now and again with what folks have gone through in the military and in their service.” Komadina also pays respect to the Granite Mountain Hotshots with a flag honoring the 19 firefighters who perished while battling the 2013 Yarnell

BRANSON

CUSTOM HOMES AND REMODELING

Hill Fire. “It hit this town pretty hard,” Komadina recounts with a catch in his voice. “I don’t think we ever want to forget it. And that’s why we have it. We don’t try to push it; we’re not trying to make money off it. I give away as many as I sell.” The Komadinas, who are longtime friends of one of the Hotshots families, also donated three flagpoles with solar lights and installed them at the Hotshots burial site. Solar lights are increasingly popular since flag-flying guidelines have evolved. Etiquette once required people to take down the flag at night, but “they kind of changed the rules,” Komadina says. “There is no mandate. It’s just a matter of respect and how you hold it in your heart.” Now that flags are staying up 24/7, owners want to illuminate them at night. “It shows respect,” Komadina says, adding that the lights shine down instead of up in order to help keep Prescott a dark-sky community. Many hold the flag in such high esteem that it can be a real estate selling point: Komadina has had lots of repeat business from customers who had planned to take their flagpoles with them when they moved but had to leave them behind at the buyers’ request. For interior display, there are smaller flagpoles and an optional bar called a spreader that’s placed behind the flag to unfurl it. Flags Galore sends a number of such sets to state and county agencies like the VA, the Pioneers Home, the Forest Service, fire departments and courtrooms. About half of Flags Galore’s business is commercial, including advertising banners and custom flags. “Our goal is to have every flag in this town have our name on it. And we’re close!” Komadina laughs.

New Homes • Remodeling/Additions Decks & Repairs and much more

Football and baseball team flags and banners are another big seller. “Sports are a big deal here,” says Komadina. “We do fun stuff too to liven things up,” he adds, pointing to mini hot-air balloons, windsocks and “twirlygigs.” “If you can fly it, we try to have it.” Branson and Branson is one of Yavapai County’s foremost home builders and remodeling company in the area. This design/build process, which has been refined and perfected through our projects, ensures that everything is accounted for and in place. From the design and planning to the final walk through, including our warranty, we provide you with a thorough plan and path to get there.

928-499-8786

Member of

www.BransonCustomWorks.com ROC # 180016

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Branson and Branson DBA Branson Custom Homes and Remodeling

2016 Building Yavapai

Customers may be Republicans or Democrats, Sun Devils or Wildcats, but they tend to have one thing in common. “Folks that come in here are just good ol’ folk,” ­Komadina says. “It’s a good crowd. They’re passionate. They care about things.” Flags Galore N More is located at 1701 N Emerald Drive, Prescott. Call 928-708-9283 or visit betterflags.com.


Is it Time to Replace your Mattress? The expression “sleep tight” comes from the 16th and 17th centuries when mattresses were placed on top of ropes that needed regular tightening. The average mattress will double its weight in ten years as a result of being filled with dust mites and their detritus. A typical used mattress may have anywhere from 100,000 to 10 million dust mites inside it. If you have owned your mattress for a number of years, you may find yourself wondering “How long does a mattress last?” This is a common question with a simple answer. It depends. The question about Mattress Life Expectancy is a tough question to answer in general terms. While some experts advocate that you should divide your mattress warranty by 2 to arrive at its life expectancy, there are many factors that contribute to your ­mattress’s long or short life. Years back, it was expected that your mattress should last at least as long as its warranty. But this was back when you would rotate and flip your mattress every few months. These days, ­mattress manufacturers have done away with building two-sided mattresses in the interest of increasing profitability. So comparatively speaking, the matter of life expectancy is not easily compared. Some other factors that influence how long a mattress will last includes your body weight, the number of hours you spend on the mattress, the type of activity you enjoy on your mattress, your partner’s use of the mattress, whether your box spring offers sufficient support and how well you care for the product. Different mattress types last for shorter or longer periods of time.

1. Are you experiencing unusual pain or discomfort when you wake up in the morning? Sometimes one of the most obvious signs that it is time to go mattress shopping involves changes in your personal comfort when you sleep in your bed. If you are experiencing unusual pain, aches, or numbness when in your bed, it may be related to the condition of your mattress. 2. Do you wake up feeling tired? Though waking up tired may be caused by more serious health problems, it can also be a sign that you need a new mattress. Worn out mattresses can lead to sleep disruptions. 3. Does your mattress sag or feel lumpy? Your mattress should feel firm and comfortable in order to provide you with plenty of support for a good night’s sleep. If you feel lumps or sagging in your mattress, it is probably time for a replacement. 4. Do you sleep better when you are not in your own bed? If you find that you sleep better at a friend’s house or in a hotel, it might be mattress-related. Sometimes the only way we know when our own mattress is worn out is to try something different. You may need a new mattress if you get your worst sleep in your own bed. 5. Does your mattress creak or squeak when you get on or off of it? If your mattress is making noise when you get into or out of bed, it might be a sign that it is wearing down. 6. How old is your mattress? Most mattresses have a lifespan of between 7 and 10 years, with some lasting longer, and others needing to be replaced sooner. If your mattress is more than 10 years old, it may be time to consider a replacement.

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2016 Building Yavapai

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Paints Evolve But Basics Remain the Same By Joanna Dodder Nellans John Martinez saw the evolution of paint color preferences in one fell swoop when he watched someone pull a layer of dried paint out of a drywell on a commercial lot many many years ago. Dozens of layers of colors from past decades were visible on the dried pile of paint. And Martinez, owner of Mile High Painting company in Prescott Valley, in the painting business for 27 years has seen abundant evolution in paints on plenty of walls, too since that layer of smeared color first appeared. “I’m seeing a lot more primary colors now,” Martinez observes. The painting industry’s move from natural to synthetic acrylic over the past decade has made more vibrant colors possible, adds Jimmy Cordier, owner of Pinon Painting in Prescott with more than 35 years of experience. Acrylic paints have become far superior to oil based paints, he adds, although oilfortified primer is still needed. Natural and neutral colors are the most common for home exteriors in this region, especially within color-restricted homeowner associations. Color is a powerful design tool that can make the rooms in your home feel more calm, cheerful, comfortable or dramatic.

“I think your colors should belong with your surroundings,” Cordier says. The number of choices can be overwhelming, so Dunn-Edwards Paints offers several ways to help customers choose. DunnEdwards offers 1,996 colors, introducing 300 of them in the last year alone. DunnEdwards also can match any paint that customers bring in. Customers really enjoy all the choices, says Dave Goucher, assistant manager at the Dunn-Edwards store in Prescott Valley.

“As we introduce new colors, people are using those colors,” Goucher says. HOA leaders and homeowners often ask local Dunn-Edwards experts for advice. “I love talking through a project,” Goucher says. Dunn-Edwards has an “InstaColor” online program that allows people to upload photos of walls they want to paint, then add various color schemes. The program even offers advice about what colors might fade faster outdoors, especially in UV-rich environments like Prescott. “It really gives you a good visual,” says Tim Puckett, Dunn-Edwards outside sales rep for Northern Arizona. If you’re not into computers, no worries; the local PV and Prescott stores have professional paint advisors who can help choose color combinations. And when you’re done choosing, Dunn-Edwards even delivers the paint to you for free. Dunn-Edwards was founded in the Southwest in 1925 and makes its paints in Phoenix, so the company has vast experience with colors that work in this dry region, Puckett adds. “Our paints are formulated for this type of environment,” Puckett says.

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Customers can pick up a dozen free DunnEdwards brochures with detailed advice on everything from choosing a paint to choosing a contractor. Since paint is the last thing added to new homes, painters often are left to fix problems created by other contractors and subs – and homeowners. “A You Tube video is not going to compare to the experience you get over time,” says Martinez, who learned the trade from his grandfather and uncle and painted his own bedroom at age 13. For example, he knows just how thick to make the primer, just how much paint to put on a roller and brush. The basics haven’t changed. Amateurs tend to skimp on the preparation and pay for it later, Martinez says. Prep is half of the job on exteriors and one-third indoors, Cordier adds. “It just takes too long to fix mistakes if you don’t do the prep,” Cordier says. “One of the most important parts of painting is preparation, and I do see people skimping on that,” Goucher agrees. Prep involves power washing, repairing cracks, and removing loose paint before adding primer and two coats of finish. If you want to see evidence of poor prep, just take a look at some of the homes built during the local building boom of 20042008, Cordier says. He’s already repainting some of them. It can be expensive to buy all the best equipment such as poles, rollers, sprayers, maskers and ladders, Martinez adds. People should factor in those costs when thinking about whether to hire a contractor. Safety is another reason experts advise people to think twice before painting, particularly on tall structures. “I’ve got many stories of customers who have fallen off a ladder and hurt themselves because they’re not used to climbing ladders,” Cordier relates.

repaint. He likens it to the need for sunscreens on humans. “If we were outside without sunscreen, we’d get burned to a crisp,” he says. In the 1800s, most Americans painted their walls white. Only wealthy people had color in their rooms, because colored paint was very expensive. Today, color is accessible to everyone and it can make a room come alive. So color yourself inspired and let your feelings guide you. If you’re an emotional type, choose colors that reflect your mood. “Hot” colors like reds and oranges will energize you and get you ready to tackle the day. “Cool” colors like greens and blues will help you relax and chill you out. To achieve a more formal look, choose high-contrast colors like dark brown and silver. Remember, don’t lift their spirits, and reach for a bowl of ice cream. There’s a better way to improve your mood, though: color. Color is a powerful design tool that can make the rooms in your home feel more calm, cheerful, comfortable or dramatic.

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Color makes a tiny room feel larger, or a spacious one feel more intimate, without the time and expense of actually moving walls. You can make a den feel cozy by painting the walls with a warm color, or make a narrow space feel wider by using different colors on opposing walls. The paint colors you choose, as well as the color of the furniture and accessories, all create a mood. There are colors that work for certain home styles, but don’t be afraid to be creative. Instead of using dark olive green on a Craftsman, go for a celery green that gives a fresh and lighter touch.

Once the paint job is complete, DunnEdwards offers written advice about maintenance.

The power of color is that it can completely alter your experience. You always want to ask yourself how you want to look and feel in a space. Deciding on colors for your home can feel like an overwhelming chore, but many paint companies offer online tools and paint collections that help you create a cohesive color palette.

“When it’s dull and faded, it’s breaking down,” Cordier warns, and it’s time to

So don’t be afraid to experiment and use color.

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Steps To Realizing Your... Good, you’re finally here! You’re in beautiful Yavapai County because this is where you want to live. Now what? START HERE:

NO

Do you know where you want to live?

YES

AY K O

BUY

You will need pre-approval to purchase and know the amount.

NO

Work with a Land Planner and Realtor who will help you with due diligence.

OKAY

BUILD CASH

Determine how you will pay for your home: Lender or cash.

Work with an Architect or Draftsman to obtain your house plans.

AY K O

LENDER

OKAY

After you interview several Licensed Contractors, select one and finalize buiding contracts, etc.

Retain your mortgage or construction loan.

OK AY

YES

Do you have a lot?

Browse Homes & Land Magazine and HomesAndLand.com to view properties you may be interested in purchasing, which are represented by some of the areas finest Realtors.

NO

Do you have a Licensed Contractor?

YES

OKAY

Do you want to build a custom home or buy an existing home on the market?

Pick up Homes & Land Magazine, because in every issue you’ll find a localized subdivision map to guide you around the area.

Your Licensed Contractor will help you from here on out.


Dream Home! There are many questions to be answered. Using this flow chart will help! However, this is not intended to be a complete set of steps towards building or buying a home.

MOVE IN TIME!

Purchase your new home! Your Realtor will guild you through the process: Lenders, title work, escrow documents, closing, etc.

OKAY

When in doubt, contact the experts – A Land Planner, Realtor, Builder, Architect/Draftsman, or the Yavapai County Contractors Association! AY

AY

OK

Your two year ROC workmanship warranty will start at closing.

Hire a home inspector to make note of any possible deficiencies.

Schedule Buyer walk through and checklist.

OKAY

OKAY

OKAY

OK

OKAY

Your new home is complete!

OKAY

Be patient...this process takes time!

If paying by cash, obtain lien releases. If you have a construction loan, builder will obtain lien releases.

OKAY

Obtain building permits.

OKAY

YOUR NEW HOME IS NOW UNDER CONSTRUCTION!


Downsizing to Tiny House is Latest Building Craze By Joanna Dodder Nellans Sharon Petz has been toying with the idea of building a tiny house for years. Living in a 1,500-square-foot home on a sprawling acreage at the edge of Chino Valley, she thought about building a tiny house next door to see what it’s like to live in one. “Philosophically, I was attracted to the idea of downsizing and living with what you really need, while having a cozy little place,” Sharon relates. “And I like the idea of being movable.” The tiny or small house movement has attracted interest all over the country. It generally means a “traditional looking home on wheels,” so it can be only about 400 square feet in size to fit on a trailer, explains Gregory Johnson, co-founder of the Small House Society in Iowa City, Iowa. It’s handy to move with the seasons or move to be closer to ailing family members. But it’s not like there’s a rule against permanent foundations. “Having a smaller footprint is sort of an obvious way to save money and reduce one’s impact on the environment,” Johnson says. “There’s an increased desire for freedom” from big house payments that create stress. When the Small House Society started in 2002, a Google search for “small house” would produce only a few results, Johnson says. Today it brings up nearly 1.6 billion. “It’s a very hot topic right now,” Johnson says. When Sharon saw a Craigslist ad about a tiny house builder called Frontier Development, she called and found out the company is based in Prescott. So she decided to take action and build her dream house. Like Sharon, Frontier Development owners Bret and April Hagan have long been intrigued by the tiny house movement. They bought a few acres in Walker and designed the tiny house they want to build there. Meanwhile they have downsized quite a bit and reside in a 900-square-foot space.

When he first moved into April’s condo, Bret couldn’t help but notice all the shoes lining the stairs. “I held them up and asked, ‘When was the last time you wore these?’” Bret recalls. April realized she hadn’t worn some of them in five years. She decided to downsize. She put her wrought-iron bedroom set and custom Thomasville couches on Craigslist. “The couches were going out the door and Bret looked at me and said, ‘Are you OK?’ I said, ‘You have no idea how good I feel right now.’” For years she had been working two jobs to pay off a $1,000 monthly mortgage and $300 monthly HOA fees. “All to keep this stuff,” she says. She put more and more items on Craigslist, keeping only photos. “The more I sold, the more I couldn’t wait to sell the next thing,” she relates. “I don’t miss any of it,” Bret adds. “If we need to find something, it’s easy to find it.” Sharon has a similar story. When her parents had to move from a large home to an assisted living apartment, she had to deal with all their stuff and conduct an estate sale. “At some point, somebody has to deal with it,” she says. Her work as a transformational life coach has given her an interesting perspective on her efforts to pare down her own belongings for the last few years. She feels like uncluttering her life is uncluttering her mind. “It does something to clarify your thinking,” Sharon says. “It’s really about getting to the heart of matters and getting things out of the way, so you can be the person you want to become.” Bret’s father and grandfather were builders, so he’s been building stuff since he was a 7-year-old growing up in Pennsylvania. But Sharon’s job was his first tiny house, and now he’d love to do

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more. He thoroughly enjoyed designing it with Sharon and then making her dream a reality. “You don’t even think in terms of square footage, you think in inches,” Bret relates. “It forces you to be more organized, it forces you to re-evaluate, but it feels good when you do it,” Sharon adds. Multi-functional furniture and spaces are key. A living room table folds up and down off the wall, while built-in shelves line the adjacent wall. A surprising amount of storage space fits under the stairs to the loft, including a closet and drawers. Bret built the 227-square-foot tiny house on a custom heavy-duty trailer with four axles and brakes on all four tires. It can’t be any higher than 13.6 feet including the trailer, or it wouldn’t fit under bridges, Bret notes. It’s made of wood with a kitchen, living area, bathroom and loft bedroom featuring amenities such as a barn-style roof for more bedroom head space and windows, full-sized shower, beautiful bathroom sink fountain and granite countertops. “I wanted to feel like it could be home,” Sharon explains. “This is built to last.” She added a detachable porch, walkway and garden as finishing touches. One of her friends already has stayed there a few weeks. “Now I get emails from her saying, ‘I miss my little cozy space,’” Sharon relates. Bret would love to see a tiny house community in Prescott. He says tiny houses on wheels also are perfect for people like his friends who are traveling nurses. “I think in the future, it’s got the potential to really take off,” he says. A tiny-house hotel is in the works on commercially zoned land in Prescott, says Laurel Collins, a City of Prescott building inspector and plans examiner. Residential lots have different rules. In the Prescott tri-city area, local governments generally don’t allow tiny houses on wheels for living quarters. They have to be located on foundations. “We’ve had a few inquiries (about tiny houses), but to be frank, what we do most in this county is huge houses,” Yavapai County Development Services Director Steve Mauk says. The county considers a tiny house on wheels to be a travel trailer, so it can be occupied for a maximum of 90 days on a residential lot, he says.

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One of the Small House Society’s goals is to work with local governments so tiny houses will become more acceptable. See its website at smallhousesociety.net for lots more information. Bret and April can’t wait to start building their own tiny house with a deck overlooking Lynx Creek. “Finally, we’re going to be where we belong,” April says. And Sharon is planning to haul her tiny house to her daughter’s property near the Oregon coast and hang out for half a year. You can reach Frontier Development at 928-910-1575. 2016 Building Yavapai

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Storage showpieces Kitchen cabinets double as design statements By Christine James Old Mother Hubbard’s cupboard wasn’t much to speak of. In fact, it was downright depressing. Modern-day kitchens, by contrast, are hubs of activity and conviviality. And their design has become as important as functionality. Much more than just a place to keep crockery and canned goods, cabinets are now an aesthetic focal point in one of the most popular rooms of the house. “It’s a much richer design in today’s kitchens than in the past,” says Robert Myers, owner of Northern Arizona Woodworking, adding that new installations often feature “staggered elevations, more detail in the

crown trim, and more convenience hardware items throughout the interiors.”

Cabinet functionality has improved over recent years, with soft-close drawers, adjustable shelves and roll-out hardware for ease of access. Pull-out units can include cookware drawers, pot lid dividers, spice racks, bottle racks, cookie sheet slots, and other organizers in a wide array of sizes and configurations. According to kitchen-design-ideas.org, push-to-open mechanisms or long finger pulls along the rim of the cabinets in place of handles are gaining favor as they create a cleaner look. Once-prevalent oak cabinets with heavy grains appear dated nowadays, as do lacquered wood or particleboard interiors. Melamine interiors, Myers says, are more modern-looking, easy to clean and sanitary.

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Walnut, cherry, beech and birch are go-to woods for cabinetry, states Kitchen Design Ideas. Locally, rustic alder is a top seller for wood-finished cabinets, says Myers, while a number of his customers opt for solidtone pigmented lacquer, which is available in every shade imaginable.

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2016 Building Yavapai

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Neutral hues like grays, whites, creams, tans and buffs are in vogue this year, but any color preference can be accommodated.


Dan Kreyling with Timberline Woodworks cites clean-lined Shaker-style designs as a current top seller.

“It’s a much richer design in today’s kitchens than in the past,” says Robert Myers, owner of Northern Arizona Woodworking, adding that new installations often feature “staggered elevations, more detail in the crown trim, and more convenience hardware items throughout the interiors.”

Glass-paned cabinet doors are also a draw for those who want to artfully show off their dishes, glassware and organizing skills. The final touch is the “jewelry of cabinets.” Knobs or pulls are available in just about any material, color and design you can imagine. Striking knobs can pull a kitchen design together elegantly and easily. For a more eclectic space, a “magic knob” is a fun idea: All cabinets are outfitted with identical pulls, with the exception of one whimsical standout. Myers and Kreyling both find that customers are usually looking to replace their cabinetry for a fresh look; a new design that meets their specific needs; the addition of pull-outs; and increased home resale value. “Most every job has a dramatic transformation,” Kreyling adds. “Clients don’t want to spend a lot of money and just have the same look or layout.”

When deciding whether to replace your entire cabinet system or just reface it with new doors, hinges and pulls, some factors to consider are whether you need a different layout or functionality; if the cabinets themselves are still in good shape; and if you’ll be able to achieve the look you want. Either way, the result is “typically a more modern look, with freshly finished cabinets that are not yellowed with years of aging,” Myers says. Kitchens are the heart of the home. Make sure it’s one that makes your own heart soar.

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To learn more about DeCarol Company, our integrity, value and quality visit:

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2016 Building Yavapai

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Get it in Writing!! Arizona law requires that all construction contracts for more than $1,000 between a homeowner and a contractor must be in writing. Granddad never used a written contract because “a man’s word was his bond.” Why are contracts required now? Because today’s business and legal environment are completely different than when your grandfather gave his word. Disputes arise in construction matters because of many reasons such as differing memories, misunderstandings, or lack of clarity. Disputes – and lawsuits – are unfortunately a fact of modern life. When disputes occur the Registrar of Contractors’ investigator, the trial judge, or the arbitrator is asked to determine the actual terms of a verbal agreement. They don’t automatically believe the homeowner. And they don’t automatically believe the contractor. It is very difficult to figure out who is the most honest and believable party in order to determine what was the parties’ actual agreement. Written construction contracts go a long way toward resolving disputes. The most important terms in a construction contract and the most common potential disagreements are addressed in an Arizona statute. This statute requires a contract be in writing and at a minimum include the following information: ›› Name of the contractor, business address, phone number and license number.

›› Name and address of the owner and the jobsite address. ›› Date the parties entered into the contract. ›› Estimated date of completion of all work to be performed under the contract. ›› Description of the work to be performed. ›› Total dollar amount, including all taxes, to be paid to the contractor by the owner. ›› The dollar amount of any advance deposit paid or to be paid, and the requirement that the contractor provide to the owner a receipt for any deposit paid. ›› A clear and detailed explanation of how payment will be made to the contractor. ›› Information on how to file a written complaint with the Arizona Registrar of Contractors. Construction projects require flexibility. Flexibility means changes, changes which will have to be made to the written contract. These changes are made by written “change orders.” Unfortunately, a large number of disputes arise out of such changes: unfortunate because change orders are so simple to create and thus avoid the dispute. A change order must be in writing, state the date the change was made, the dollar amount the change will increase or decrease the written contract amount, and the number of days that the change will expedite or delay the estimated date of completion. Most importantly, the change order must be signed by both the contractor and the owner. If it becomes necessary to make a complaint with the Arizona Registrar of Contractors, investigators now require the written construction contract, all written change orders, and copies of payment checks.

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2016 Building Yavapai

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Payment should always be by check made payable to the licensed company/contractor and never to an individual who is not the named contractor on the business invoice or letterhead. Avoid paying by cash, but if you must do so get signed and dated receipts from the contractor on a letterhead or invoice clearly displaying the contractor’s name. Be wary of any contractor who is unable or unwilling to provide you with a written contract: it’s the law. Be wary of any contractor who is unwilling to give you a written change order: it’s smart.


Pavers Now Feature ...

Huge Variety in Shapes and Textures, with Lower Prices to Boot By Joanna Dodder Nellans Most people would undoubtedly be surprised to hear that the cost of using pavers to build a driveway has dropped so much that it’s now comparable to a basic concrete slab. Prices have decreased about 30 percent over the last decade, estimates Chris Welborn, owner of Vicente Landscaping in Prescott. The cost is about $6-$9 per square foot installed, depending on the amount of excavation and ease of access. Large manufacturing facilities with huge concrete forms have helped pave the way to lower prices, he says. “There’s a real perceived upgrade with pavers,” adds Dane Prator, owner of Autumn Blaze Construction in Prescott. “It definitely looks more interesting than concrete.”

While the cost has gone down, the variety in color, texture and size of pavers has skyrocketed. Belgard and Pavestone are some of the best paver manufactures around. Arizona Stone and Architectural Products features a huge Prescott display to help customers visualize all the choices, Branch

Manager Pat Russell says. “People have a lot more options these days,” ­Russell says. “The selection is just incredible,” Welborn agrees. Concrete pavers can be poured to mimic everything from flagstone to cobblestone to wood. It’s a product that requires little or no maintenance, Prator adds. Order a custom inset for a real eye grabber; Vicente has installed everything from sports team logos to letters. A New Jersey company called Paverart even creates solar-powered glow-in-the-dark pavers. Thinner pavers are now available for installation over concrete, pool decking and patios, Welborn says. One of the newest options is permeable pavers with materials and spacing designed to catch runoff. It’s much less common to use pavers indoors, but Autumn Blaze crews have covered a garage floor, courtyards, sunrooms, breezeways and storefronts with pavers. Right now the company is laying pavers for driveways, parking strips, breezeways, patios, a fountain and nature path for the new Tlaquepaque North in Sedona, across Highway 179 from the existing Tlaquepaque Arts and Crafts Village. Pouring the concrete in a controlled manufacturing environment produces higher quality pavers than driveway concrete poured on site, especially if the weather is

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poor, Prator says. The pavers have three times the strength, leading some governments to even use them for airport runways. He was fascinated by the controls over moisture, compaction and curing during a tour of a Belgard manufacturing facility. That kind of strength is important for driveways that need to withstand the wear and tear from vehicles. Vicente crews excavate three times deeper on a driveway than a walkway to make sure the pavers are on a solid foundation so they don’t shift or sink, Welborn explains. The compactible base is made of a variety of rock sizes. It’s similar to laying road foundations. Contractors often favor pavers because a few can easily be moved or replaced when a design changes, a tree root grows under them, or a car leaks oil, Welborn says.

While the cost has gone down, the variety in color, texture and size of pavers has skyrocketed.

Vicente and Autumn Blaze can help people design a landscape where pavers provide connectivity, from the driveway to the walkway to a patio with a fire pit. All the design choices have drawn Prescott-area landscapers into the paver business over the last decade, Prator says. “It’s an art form,” Welborn observes.

“Our freeze-thaw conditions up here are so severe that concrete driveways fail,” Prator adds. “Contractors love pavers for the peace of mind.” He’s seen onsite poured concrete driveways fail within five years when they were poured in poor weather conditions.

“There’s definitely a learning curve,” Prator adds. “If paver installations are done correctly, they’re bulletproof.” Certification helps hardscapers differentiate themselves from competitors, which

is especially important in the present economy, says Jimmy Veltri, Vice President Sales & Marketing Oldcastle Superlite that represents Belgard Hardsape material. “Anyone can say they can install pavers, but not everyone understands the whole process,” Veltri says, citing the importance of certification. “There’s no reason to have someone (improperly) install a product with a 50-year life cycle so it lasts only two years or less. That’s the whole purpose of certification – to make sure an installer’s skill set is equal to a product’s sustainability.” Some material has a lifetime warranty if installed by certified professionals, Russell says.

YOUR “HOMETOWN” PAVER CONNECTION

CONCRETE PAVERS LANDSCAPE DRIVEWAY RENOVATIONS HARDSCAPE 928-710-4210

www.autumnblazeconstruction.com | design@autumnblazeconstruction.com RESIDENTIAL ROC #216048 B | COMMERCIAL ROC #253282 B-02 2016 Building Yavapai

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Composite decking has practically replaced wood in Prescott region By Joanna Dodder Nellans Composite decking can cost two or three times more than wood, however this “green” product has almost entirely replaced cedar and redwood as the preferred material in the Central highlands region. “Basically, that’s all we sell anymore,” says Brad Olson, general manager at the ProBuild supply store in Prescott Valley. “Our best sellers of composite material are Trex, TimberTech, Azek and MoistureShield.” The reason for the popularity of composite decking can be traced to one word: convenience. Synthetics made of recycled wood and plastic just need to be sprayed down each spring or when they get dirty. Wood decks, however, need to be completely re-stained or painted maybe twice a year because of the strong UV light in highelevation parts of Arizona, experts say. “How much do you value your time?” Olson asks. “If you’ve got a weekend off work, what would you rather do? Watch football and drink beer or roll out sealer on your deck?”

Composites were introduced in the early 1990s to mixed reviews, but they have made great strides in the 21st Century. They have overcome issues of softness and color fading, says Doug Thompson, owner of Thompson’s Remodeling Specialists in Prescott. “It’s a much better choice than 10 years ago,” Thompson says. Quality wood, on the other hand, is harder and harder to find. “Technology has really shown some advancements, allowing composite products to last a very long time,” agrees Tor Andresen, general manager at Foxworth-

Galbraith building material supplies in Prescott. Foxworth-Galbraith sells Trex, Tamko and MoistureShield composite decking. If you hire someone else to periodically sand and seal your wood deck, the cost difference between wood and composites can be a wash in the long run, says Eric Togue, owner of Az Decks Appeal in Prescott. And cedar purchase costs have risen substantially. His company builds and maintains decks and patios, while also installing coatings for existing wood decks. Composites don’t fade nearly as fast as wood, Andresen says. Composites don’t have splinters, either. And fasteners can be hidden from view unless people want screws that are colored to match their decking. “The technology advances every year,” Olson says. Coated or capped composites are the ­latest rage. They feature protective shells made of materials such as plastic and olefin fibers. The caps also allow manufacturers to offer more colors and textures. Trex’s newer generation deck boards generally sell for about $3.25 per linear foot, but they have a lengthy residential fade and stain warranty of 25 years. Wood deck products offer no warranties at all.

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Composites aren’t designed for loadbearing structures, however, so wood is still the norm for deck supports. Douglas fir is common for the base structure, Thompson says. Experts recommend treated wood so it lasts longer. Some companies such as Trex are now making metal deck structures that can withstand wildfires, too. The composites come in all kinds of colors and textures, so ProBuild and FoxworthGalbraith have displays that people can check out. Composite railing systems also are on display and often feature LED lights inside corner posts. “Once you see the literature and displays, it makes the shopping experience a lot easier,” Andresen says. If it’s not in stock, ProBuild and Foxworth-Galbraith can get it within a day or two. Composite decking is a “green” product as well; it’s the largest user of recycled plastic bags in the United States. Other ingredients include sawdust, wooden pallets and even recycled carpet. Olson toured a MoistureShield mill and was amazed to see giant warehouses filled with plastic bags that went through huge wash stations.

“Technology has really shown some advancements, allowing composite products to last a very long time,” agrees Tor Andresen, general manager at Foxworth-Galbraith

Installation is easier with composites, and since they’re more flexible, homeowners can ask for more creative designs, Togue says. It typically costs about $10 to $15 per square foot to buy and professionally replace wood with composite, while composite railings run about $40 per linear foot installed, he says.

end up having something you’re not satisfied with,” Togue warns.

If you’re putting composite on top of an existing deck structure or building a deck structure, it’s a good idea to hire a contractor to make sure that structure is sound. And you won’t make mistakes that waste expensive composite decking. “You can regret spending so much on materials and

“There’s just so much to learn and know,” he says. With his experience, he knows what’s proven and what’s not. “I don’t want to use a product that hasn’t been tried and true,” he says. So when he says he uses composite decking, homeowners can know it’s a well-tested product.

Throughout his 40 years in the business, Thompson’s crews have repaired numerous decks that were failing because of poor installation and design, or rotting from lack of metal flashing on corners.

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Green Flooring By Sue Marceau There’s plenty of energizing news about “green” floor covering. Creative options exist for consumer tastes and preferences. Environmentally-friendly materials are comparatively priced to non-green counterparts. Purchase and installation reaps rewards for eco-systems worldwide and in the home. And the wave is starting to make its mark in Arizona. Whatever the inspiration – doing one’s best to protect the world’s resources at large or pursuing healthy air quality in a home or business – multiple solutions employing hardwood, linoleum, carpet, tile and other flooring answers fit the need and make people feel good. “There was a time when the initial product purchase did cost more,” noted D ­ ennis Rowland, regional vice president for Primera Carpet One Floor & Home & Prescott Granite. “However those prices have now come down and leveled off to a point where they are on par with nongreen products. We have green products to meet any budget. The installation and maintenance costs are typically no different than non-green products.” Consumer preference and taste now play a significant role in decisions, according to Sylvan Incao, owner of Desert Hardwood Flooring. While transition to eco-friendly flooring is slower locally than in larger urban areas, early adopting consumers constitute an impassioned force.

“We see few customers truly interested in the value of green products in our market,” Rowland stated. “However, those that are tend to be passionate about it.” From Incao’s experience, “all trends of this type – including environmentally conscious or ethically minded ones – seem to start in California and reach greater cosmopolitan areas first. Thus Scottsdale and other areas of the Valley have a much stronger interest than Yavapai County. So interest is still low here, although growing.” Trusting that knowledge about what’s available in green products will assist consumers in making the best overall decisions for their households, Incao and

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Rowland helped provide a list of floor covering solutions which have expanded the field of green. Their efforts identify cork, bamboo and other woods harvested using sustainable practices; laminates employing reduced chemical content; utilization of recycled materials in manufacturing; and carpeting generating lower Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions of strong chemical odors. One popular example of recycled materials in the manufacture of flooring products is PolyEethylene Terephthalate (PET). This new class of polyester is stronger than older versions, features natural and permanent resistance to stains, offers better abrasion resistance, and delivers a higher melting point. Sometimes called “pop bottle carpet,” PET is made of chips from recycled plastic containers and can be recycled over and over without affecting the quality of the fiber.

Hardwoods The green product line at Desert Hardwood flooring is made from bamboo, cork and other “naturally green products through manner of harvesting.” The inventory also comprises hickory, walnut, maple and birch and similar woods harvested under stringent standards and quality checks by North American and European manufacturers.


Standards regarding “what goes inside a flooring product, such as the glues and finishes needed to make a finished plank� are established by industry leaders and watchdog groups. Initiatives from the National Wood Flooring Association, the California Air Resources Board, and similar associations have established stringent standards for formaldehyde emissions from wood and other products. Incao described resulting CARB 2 compliant products as “friendlier to your health and household.� Cork and bamboo are both obtained from sustainable and easily replenished sources, he explained. “Bamboo is harvested every four to five years without damaging the root systems of the plants and grows back very quickly. Cork is actually the bark of the cork tree and can be stripped off without damaging the tree every nine or 10 years.� By practicing sustainable harvesting of hickory, walnut, birch and similar trees, “forests are not simply clear-cut,� Incao continued. “Trees are selectively harvested without damaging the entire forest. New trees are planted to replace the harvested forests at an equal pace.� Another development in eco-friendly flooring is utilization of wood salvaged from barns and other buildings. Making a comeback is the old-fashioned linoleum which has been on the market for 60 to 70 years. Constructed from high-density fiberboard with a­ Formica surface, linoleum has experienced recent chemical content improvements in glues and formaldehyde. Whatever the option decided, consumer sentiment remains front and center.

Laminates Customers with chemical sensitivities who prefer laminate flooring “would be wise to spend a little more and find a high quality laminate product that adheres to strict emission standards,� Incao advised. The German-made laminate flooring he recommends is subject to German / European standards, which he described as “often higher than in the US.� Continued on next page

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GREEN FLOORING – continued A zero VOC pad is employed as an underlayment and moisture barrier. For applications to concrete, eco-urethane glue with almost no odor is utilized. That glue “is more expensive than a lot of wood glues on the market,” Incao qualified, “but the quality and healthfriendly elements are more than worth the cost.” “There is no inherent superiority or benefit to bamboo or cork flooring against any other hardwood flooring,” Incao summarized. “It’s mostly a matter of preference and taste. However, if a consumer likes the fact that bamboo and cork are harvested without killing the host plant or tree, then they can make their decision almost on ethical or environmental grounds.”

Carpeting Primera Carpet One Floor & Home & Prescott Granite carries “many green products from recyclable carpet that can be harvested and recycled to hardwood and bamboo harvested from renewable forests. Many of our nylon fiber products are 6,6 nylon which can be recycled. All of our PET polyester carpet fiber is made from recycled materials. Our Triexta/ Smatrstrand fibers are manufactured utilizing a percentage of corn-based material and recycled material.” The manufacturers supported “have done their homework and are committed to the green products they bring to market,” Rowland explained. “Many of our products carry the ‘Green Select’ label certifying that they are environmentally friendly products.” Trashed carpeting and a scandal regarding illegally harvested wood products from China support the wisdom of “educating yourself on American companies committed to preserving and nurturing our environment,” Rowland asserted. “The recycling of used carpet can make a tremendous impact on the amount of material going into our landfills, as the sheer

annual volume of used carpet on a national level is astounding.” Online sources for information about green flooring include the National Wood Flooring Association(www.hardwoodfloorsmag.com/ blog/green-blog/; the World Floor Covering Association at www.wfca.org; and links located at www.riemerfloors.com/greenflooring-resources.aspx. “Although there are sources of general information available, it really pays to look into specific sources related to the product itself, like the company itself,” Incao recommended. “If you find out about a product that is not carried in our store, chances are very good we can get it in for you.” Rowland concluded that “doing one’s research on the internet is helpful, as there is a lot of information out there on this subject … Making a conscious decision to work with floor covering industry experts is the single greatest piece of advice I can offer.”

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How to Choose a Contractor Needless to say there is no shortage of contractor horror stories relating to both licensed and unlicensed entities. There is a rise in complaints through the Registrar of Contractors so for your protection it is important to hire the best, most competent, reliable and reputable contractor. So how does one hire a contractor? Call YCCA your local referral source for contractors. Be cautious when asking your friends because many have hired unlicensed entities without knowing. Select three or four contractors to meet for estimates and further discussion. A contractor should be able to answer your questions satisfactorily and in a manner that puts you at ease. It’s crucial that you two communicate well because this person will be in your home for hours at a time. Now that you’ve narrowed your list, put your research to use. Call former clients to find how their project went and ask to see the finished product. Even more important, visit a current job site and see

for yourself how the contractor works. Is the job site neat and safe? Are workers courteous and careful with the homeowner’s property? If applicable to the type of work you’re having done; landscaping, large-scale remodeling, ask to see photos of past work. Once you have a list of contractors, verify their license status and if they have any complaints against them.

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It is important for you to verify with the permitting jurisdiction that you live in if a permit is required for the work being performed. Most building projects even minor ones usually require building permits and inspections. If your project is not permitted or does not comply with building code, you will probably be ordered to either remove the structure or bring it up to code. You will almost certainly have to correct the issue if and when you try to sell your home. Verify insurance. You can’t afford for someone doing work on your home to be without insurance. If they’re injured or destroy your property and not insured, the bill comes to you. Don’t feel bad being firm on a request for proof of insurance. Make sure any sub contractors that are used are licensed as well. Most homeowner’s policies require that any work done to the property is done by licensed contractors.

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Communicate what you need as clearly as possible to the contractor to decrease any chance of miscommunication and wasted time and money. A conscientious contractor will sense what the homeowner wants out of a project and what they plan to spend. Make sure to be consistent when talking with a contractor so each set of quotes is consistent in regard to what you want done and what materials you want. All bids should be balanced and if there is a “lowball bid” there is an issue. All things being equal, it’s better to spend more and get someone you’re comfortable with.


Draw up a contract that details every step of the project: payment schedule; a start date and projected completion date; specific materials and products to be used; and a requirement that the contractor obtain lien releases (which protect you if he doesn’t pay his bills) from all subcontractors and suppliers. Insisting on a clear contract isn’t about mistrust, it’s about insuring a successful project.

If any changes are made to your project, ask for the changes in writing to stay on top of the project/ contract cost.

Once you’ve found a contractor that checks out and you feel good about, it’s time to get the work started. There are several key things you can do during the actual getting-things-done phase of the process to make life easier and protect yourself if things go wrong. You know when the wrong time is to tell the construction crew that the paint is the wrong color? Right after they’ve painted the walls and give you with the final bill. Stay on top of the project. When something doesn’t look right, bring it up as soon as you notice it. There isn’t a construction process around that is easier to fix later rather than sooner. It is a good idea to take photographs not only because is it fun, but should things sour between you and the contractor it will be invaluable to have a clear record of the work being done and photographs of any damage or poor construction materials/techniques being used. If any changes are made to your project, ask for the changes in writing to stay on top of the project/contract cost.

Reputable contractors do not demand all the money up front. If a contractor insists that you pay a large deposit or the total bill before the work even starts, that is a red flag. Never pay in cash, make checks payable to the licensed contractor (not an individual), and never allow payments to get ahead of the work. If you’re a great client, you’ll be the one your contractor wants to work the hardest for and take the best care of. If you’re courteous, ask questions while still respecting the wisdom and experience he’s brought to the job. That effort will go a long way. We ask that you familiarize yourself with these issues to better your chances of hiring the right contractor. If you select your contractor carefully in the beginning, you are less likely to have problems later.

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Mother Nature’s Rototillers Pocket gophers are Mother Nature’s rototillers in wildland ecosystems. However, they can be very destructive when they venture into gardens and landscapes. Their activity always increases during springtime, especially when food is plentiful. Young are also born in spring and, once they are a few months old, they leave their mother’s burrow system and establish their own territories. To successfully control gophers, you must understand their behavior and be diligent. Pocket gophers are Mother Nature’s rototillers in wildland ecosystems. However, they can be very destructive when they venture into gardens and landscapes. Their activity always increases during springtime, especially when food is plentiful. Young are also born in spring and, once they are a few months old, they leave their mother’s burrow system and establish their own territories. To successfully control gophers, you must understand their behavior and be diligent. Gopher activity can be recognized by the fan-shaped mounds of loose soil they create when they push soil out of their burrow system. The soil mound will also have a smaller plug of loose soil in the center or to one side of it marking where the burrow has been closed off. Fresh mounds indicate feeding or nesting activity. If the burrow is not plugged, then it likely belongs to a rock

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Pocket gophers often invade yards and gardens, feeding on many garden crops, ornamental plants, vines, shrubs, and trees.

s­quirrel. Their burrow system can be very extensive, especially where gophers have been present for long periods. Pocket gophers live their entire lives in the soil, leaving only to occasionally feed above ground, to travel to a new area, or to get around an obstacle. They usually are five to seven inches long (without the tail), have pale to dark brown fur, wide headed, have enlarged front feet (the better dig with), have long upper and lower front teeth (the better to eat roots with), and a short tail with tactile hairs to allow them to feel their way when traveling in reverse. Pocket gophers are named for the fur-lined pouches outside of the mouth, one on each side of the face. These pockets are capable of being turned inside out and used for carrying food and moving soil. Pocket gophers are not protected under Arizona Law and may be controlled at will on private property, meaning gophers are nongame mammals and if you are the owner or tenant of the premises and you find pocket gophers that are injuring growing crops or other property, including garden and landscape plants, you can control them at any time and in any legal manner.

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Pocket gophers, often called gophers, Thomomys species, are burrowing rodents that get their name from the fur-lined, external cheek pouches, or pockets, they use for carrying food and nesting materials. Pocket gophers are well equipped for a digging, tunneling lifestyle with their powerfully built forequarters; large-clawed front paws; fine, short fur that doesn’t cake in wet soils; small eyes and ears; and highly sensitive facial whiskers that assist with moving about in the dark. A gopher’s lips also are unusually adapted for their lifestyle; they can close them behind their four large incisor teeth to keep dirt out of their mouths when using their teeth for digging. Mounds of fresh soil are the best sign of a gopher’s presence. Gophers form mounds as they dig tunnels and push the loose dirt to the surface. Typically mounds are crescent or horseshoe shaped when viewed from above. The hole, which is off to one side of the mound, usually is plugged. Mole mounds are sometimes mistaken for gopher mounds. Mole mounds, however, are more circular and have a plug in the middle that might not be distinct; in profile they


are volcano-shaped. Unlike gophers, moles commonly burrow just beneath the surface, leaving a raised ridge to mark their path. One gopher can create several mounds in a day. In non-irrigated areas, mound building is most pronounced during spring or fall when the soil is moist and easy to dig. In irrigated areas such as lawns, flower beds, and gardens, digging conditions usually are optimal year round, and mounds can appear at any time. In snowy regions, gophers create burrows in the snow, resulting in long, earthen cores on the surface when the snow melts. Pocket gophers live in a burrow system that can cover an area that is 200 to 2,000 square feet. The burrows are about 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 inches in diameter. Feeding burrows usually are 6 to 12 inches below ground, and the nest and food storage chamber can be as deep as 6 feet. Gophers seal the openings to the burrow system with earthen plugs. Short, sloping lateral tunnels connect the main burrow system to the surface; gophers create these while pushing dirt to the surface to construct the main tunnel. Gophers don’t hibernate and are active year-round, although you might not see any fresh mounding. They also can be active at all hours of the day. Gophers usually live alone within their burrow system, except when females are caring for their young or during breeding season. Gopher densities can be as high as 60 or more per acre in irrigated alfalfa fields or in vineyards. Pocket gophers are herbivorous and feed on a wide variety of vegetation but generally prefer herbaceous plants, shrubs, and trees. Gophers use their sense of smell to locate food. Most commonly

they feed on roots and fleshy portions of plants they encounter while digging. However, they sometimes feed aboveground, venturing only a body length or so from their tunnel opening. Burrow openings used in this manner are called “feed holes.” You can identify them by the absence of a dirt mound and by a circular band of clipped vegetation around the hole. Gophers also will pull entire plants into their tunnel from below. In snow-covered regions, gophers can feed on bark several feet up a tree by burrowing through the snow. Pocket gophers often invade yards and gardens, feeding on many garden crops, ornamental plants, vines, shrubs, and trees. A single gopher moving down a garden row can inflict considerable damage in a very short time. Gophers also gnaw and damage plastic water lines and lawn sprinkler systems. Their tunnels can divert and carry off irrigation water, which leads to soil erosion. Mounds on lawns interfere with mowing equipment and ruin the aesthetics of well-kept turf grass. To successfully control gophers, the sooner you detect their presence and take control measures the better. Most people control gophers in lawns, gardens, or small orchards by trapping and/or by using poison baits. Successful trapping or baiting depends on accurately locating the gopher’s main burrow. To locate the burrow, you need to use a gopher probe. Probes are commercially available, or you can construct one from a pipe and metal rod. Probes made from dowels or sticks work in soft soil but are difficult to use in hard or dry soils. An enlarged tip that is wider than the shaft of the probe is an important design feature that increases the ease of locating burrows. Continued on next page

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Mother Nature’s rototillers – continued To find burrows, first locate areas of recent gopher activity based on fresh mounds of dark, moist soil. Fresh mounds that are visible aboveground are the plugged openings of lateral tunnels. You can find the main burrow by probing about 8 to 12 inches from the plug side of the mound; it usually is located 6 to 12 inches deep. When the probe penetrates the gopher’s burrow, there will be a sudden, noticeable drop of about 2 inches. You might have to probe repeatedly to locate the gopher’s main burrow, but your skill will improve with experience. Because the gopher might not revisit lateral tunnels, trapping and baiting them is not as successful as in the main burrow. The key to an effective toxic baiting program is bait placement. Always place pocket gopher bait in the main underground tunnel, not the lateral tunnels. After locating the main gopher tunnel with a probe, enlarge the opening by rotating the probe or inserting a larger rod or stick. Following label directions, place the bait carefully in the opening using a spoon or other suitable implement that you use only for that purpose, taking care not to spill any onto the ground. A funnel is useful for preventing spillage. Often, a back-filled (plugged) tunnel – one a gopher has filled with loose dirt – will feel similar to an active tunnel. Experience is required to tell the difference. New probe users might benefit from digging down to confirm that the tunnel is active or plugged. If it is an active tunnel, you can apply bait to both of the tunnel’s sides before closing it up. If it is plugged, don’t treat. Once you

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are comfortable with your ability to accurately determine active tunnels, you can determine what will work best for you to eliminate the gophers. Because no population will increase indefinitely, one alternative to a gopher problem is to do nothing, letting the population limit itself. Experience has shown, however, that by the time gopher populations level off naturally, they’ve already caused much damage around homes and gardens. Predators – including owls, snakes, cats, dogs, and coyotes – eat pocket gophers. Predators rarely remove every prey animal but instead move on to hunt at more profitable locations. Once you have controlled pocket gophers, monitor the area on a regular basis for re-infestation. Level all existing mounds after the control program, and clean away weeds and garden debris, so you easily can see fresh mounds. It is important to check regularly for re-infestation, because pocket gophers can move in from other areas, and damage can reoccur in a short time. If your property borders wildlands, vacant lots, or other areas that serve as a source of gophers, you can expect gophers to reinvade regularly. Be prepared to take immediate control action when they do. It is easier, cheaper, and less time consuming to control one or two gophers than to wait until the population builds up to the point where they cause excessive damage.


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How Green is Your Home? By Joanna Dodder Nellans There are myriad ways to make your home green, and recent improvements in technology even make it possible for homes to produce as much energy as they use. We’re talking about eco-friendly homes that not only help the planet, but also save you plenty of money on everything from electricity to water. It’s a winning combination for the homeowner and the environment. “Green is one of those somewhat nebulous terms,” says Ed Stahl, owner of RES Contracting based in Prescott. “It’s a way to define energy efficiency and conservation and all those things in one description. “You want to look at the house as a system. The greenest thing you can do is have a house that is very energy efficient. It makes a quality house.” It’s more comfortable with fewer temperature fluctuations. RES builds custom homes with a strong emphasis on green, listing 12 reasons on its website why it’s the greenest local builder. “Number one is to make the thermal envelope work,” Stahl explains. “With the technologies we have today, we can get high-performance homes compared to just 10 or 15 years ago.” One example is spray-foam attic insulation. By spraying it into a new home before adding drywall, the attic becomes part of the thermal envelope. Instead of being the hottest or coldest part of the house, it’s

room temperature. Recent studies about the benefits were surprising, Stahl says. “The benefits are tremendous,” Stahl says. “And it makes the house much less dusty.” For the past few years, local governments have required new homes to include perimeter insulation as well, Stahl says. That’s almost impossible to add later. For existing homes, heating and cooling are the biggest daily costs since we’re heating or cooling our home about 80 percent of the time, says Glenn Meyers, vice president of Verde Sol-Air in Camp Verde. Making sure ducts are properly sealed can produce huge energy savings, Meyers says. “That’s probably the number one thing people can do” to improve energy efficiency in an existing home, he says. Second would be replacing or improving the heating and cooling system itself, he

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says. “Most people have a tendency to buy the cheapest heating and cooling systems, but they don’t know they’re cheating themselves on utility bills for years to come,” Meyers observes. “Heating and air conditioning systems use way more energy than all the lights and other components combined.” Blazing Sky Energy Group of Prescott emphasizes a broad-based plan to make an existing home more energy efficient, with a goal toward “net-zero” energy costs. “We try to reduce as much of the energy consumption in a home as we can, then follow up with solar,” Blazing Sky rep Darron Baker says. By reducing consumption first, the size of the solar system can be smaller and less expensive. It starts with a free evaluation, then a tailor-made plan that customers can carry out right away or over time. “We try to educate customers about how you use energy,” Baker explains. “Most people have no idea how they use energy.” Blazing Sky carries out a wide variety of energy-efficient installations, just about everything except HVAC systems. “It’s a full package we put together,” Baker says. Customers who follow Blazing Sky recommendations typically see a payback on their investments with seven or eight years, Baker says. Some government rebates may not stick around, so the sooner the better to do energy improvements, Baker adds. Right


now the State of Arizona is offering a one-time tax credit of $1,000 for various energy improvements. The other component of a green home is the yard surrounding it. First try to focus on the concept of xeriscaping by sticking with drought-tolerant vegetation. Then install a rainwater collection system to save big on water. Arizona Seamless Gutters in Prescott sells and installs a wide variety of rain barrels made by Bushman. While many brands recommend disconnecting their barrels during the winter, Bushman’s high quality allows them to work year-round, even collecting snowmelt. “All the water you can collect with a rain barrel is incredible,” Arizona Seamless Gutters owner Travis Stedman says. “We get quite a few people staggered by the amount of water you can conserve.” Arizona gets periodic heavy rains with long dry stretches in between. Rain barrels allow homeowners to catch the heavy rain and use it during the dry periods. You can collect 600 gallons of rain off a 1,000 square-foot roof from just an inch of rain, Stedman says.

›› Install geothermal technology. Meyers says it produces three units of energy for every unit it uses, plus lasts twice as long as a typical HVAC unit. It involves drilling holes about 300-350 feet into the ground and installing tubes with liquid that gathers or removes heat. Right now a 30 percent tax credit is available. A similar and newer technology called an inverter heat pump requires no drill holes. ›› Install a solar hot water heater that uses a solar panel to heat liquid before it goes into the water tank. You can get a return on your investment as quickly as two years, Meyers says. ›› Install solar photovoltaic panels, which have gone down in price in recent years. The payback can be as quick as 7-12 years, Stahl says. ›› Install a heat recovery ventilator, a simple device that keeps heat indoors while moving stale air out, Stahl says. ›› Buy appliances with the Energy Star seal. ›› Do an energy audit to find and seal major leaks in your home and duct system, reducing your energy loss and cost. APS offers rebates. ›› If the south side of your home gets too hot, add a sun room to absorb the heat. It’s also great for growing plants. ›› Replace older toilets with new ones that use substantially less water. Some local governments offer rebates on things such as toilets and showerheads. ›› Replace your light bulbs with LED lights. APS helps stores keep prices low, Stahl says. Go online to energy.gov/eere/efficiency/homes for more tips on saving energy and money.

And a few more green ideas for the outdoors: ›› Install rotator sprinkler nozzles on irrigation systems. They are 30 percent more efficient than traditional nozzles. ›› Install a greywater reuse system that reuses water outdoors from clothes washing machines, bathtubs and/or sinks. One of the easiest things to do is to run your clothes washing machine line outdoors into a garden. Just make sure you use biodegradable detergent and you don’t wash diapers in the machine.

The Bushman barrels range in size from 50 gallons to 5,500 gallons, costing about $1 to $1.50 per gallon in size, including installation. Different colors and sizes include a ‘slimline’ version that’s easier to hide.

Here’s a list of more green ideas for homes: ›› Install window screens to keep heat out of the home during the summer. ›› Switch to a hybrid hot water heater that uses 60 percent to 70 percent less energy by taking heat out of the air and putting it into your water tank, Baker says. It’s less expensive than a solar hot water heater. ›› Add insulation. Most homes just don’t have enough, or it needs to be replaced, Baker says. ›› Install an HVAC optimization unit. It can save about 15 percent on heating and cooling costs, with a return on investment in just three years, Baker says. ›› If your HVAC or refrigerator is more than 15 years old, replace it because new ones are much more energy efficient.

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Environmentally Friendly Cleaning Purchasing eco-friendly cleaning products can be confusing at best. Cleaning products are necessary for maintaining attractive and healthy conditions in the home and workplace. In addition to the obvious aesthetic benefits of cleaning, the removal of dust, allergens and infectious agents is crucial to maintaining a healthful indoor environment. Eco-friendly products are free of toxins and hazardous materials, making them safe for use in the home, workplace, or around children and small pets. They do not release harmful fumes into the air, thereby eliminating the risk of respiratory symptoms associated with airborne chemicals. Most are mild on the hands, eliminating the danger of burns or injury from harsh chemicals. Look on your store shelves for all-purpose cleaners, laundry detergents and other cleaning products that carry labels signifying that the ingredients are safe for the environment. The Environmental label, sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, indicates that every ingredient in that product was assessed and deemed minimally toxic to humans and animals, and less harmful to the environment than other chemicals of the same type.

improve indoor air quality and reduce water and ambient air pollution while also providing effective cleaning. In addition look for products that are low flammability, designed for use in cold water and products using citrus, seed, vegetable and pine oils.

Cleaning products with positive environmental attributes, such as biodegradability, low toxicity, low VOC (volatile organic compound) content, reduced packaging and low lifecycle energy can

Many household products make effective eco-friendly cleaning products. The products listed are safe but must be used according to directions on the containers: Baking soda removes stains

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and can be used as a mild abrasive to clean counter tops, cooking pans, household appliances, and bathroom fixtures. White vinegar and lemon juice cut through greasy or waxy buildup, leaving the home smelling fresh and clean. Both borax and castile soap remove laundry stains and can be used as cleaning solutions. When you need to hire a professional cleaning crew to steam your carpets or provide periodic thorough cleaning, patronize companies that use environmentally friendly products. Before you hire a service that claims to be eco-friendly, ask to see the labels of the cleaning products it uses. If the products require hazardous waste disposal, they are not environmentally friendly. Look for cleaning solutions that thoroughly clean your carpets, upholstery, and tile and grout with absolutely no health risks to you or your family. Remember there are cleaning agents that are 100% Hypoallergenic, 100% Child Safe, 100% Baby Safe, 100% Non-toxic, 100% Non-Hazardous, 100% Colorless, 100% ­Biodegradable. Water consumption is drastically reduced, with no waste water. Commercial spot removers for carpets and rugs usually contain caustic substances, not to mention chlorine and/or petroleumbased solvents. Although more and more spot removers are becoming available that claim to be easy on both the environment and your health, there is really no need for you to buy them. Luckily, you can tackle many of the common carpet and rug stains you may encounter with a vinegar and water solution, and sometimes with just undiluted vinegar alone or baking soda mixed with water. To get that coveted foaming action that many products feature, place the vinegar solution into a well-rinsed foaming soap bottle.

In many homes, carpets cover nearly every area of the house. Because of its prevalence, carpeting should be cleaned with ecofriendly non-toxic solutions to prevent potential health problems and environmental contamination from chemical-based products. Nontoxic carpet cleaners effectively attack dirt in the carpets without introducing noxious chemicals into your home. Before you choose your professional cleaning crew there are many non-toxic options for both spot removal and full-carpet cleaning. A dry non-toxic carpet cleaner can be as simple as sprinkling corn meal or baking soda with an optional 20 to 30 drops of your favorite essential oil over your carpet and vacuuming it up after a few minutes to deodorize and quickly clean. Non-toxic full carpet liquid cleaning solutions are best kept water-based with a softener like borax or baking soda for a gentle cleaning. Steam cleaning with a vinegar-water solution is also effective for deodorizing while still gently lifting stains. The traditional commercial carpet-cleaning solutions can contain a cocktail of noxious synthetic chemicals. One, perchloroethylene, commonly called “perc” in the industry, is a notorious dry cleaning additive known to cause dizziness, fatigue, and nausea if ingested or inhaled. Another chemical, naphthalene, a solvent manufactured from coal tar, is considered toxic to the human central nervous system and a possible carcinogen by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Carpet cleaning chemicals get into the air of a room when applied during cleaning, and can also be ingested by kids who play on the floor soon afterwards. Besides such on-site health threats, carpet cleaning chemicals can pollute local groundwater if disposed of improperly (such as down your drain). Wastewater from carpet cleaning requires treatment and/or filtration in order to neutralize contaminants.

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WHAT?!!

My Home Doesn’t Have A Permit For That? You have decided to remodel the shower and bathroom in the master bedroom of your recently purchased 12 year old home. You hire a licensed contractor as YCCA Director Sandy Griffis recommends. You work with the architect. You go through countless catalogs with the design experts to select cabinetry, countertops, plumbing fixtures, and lighting. A licensed contractor provides you with an estimate. And you have the money to do this dream job! The construction contract is signed. The contractor goes to the local building department to obtain a permit. Bummer! You find out that the old bathroom was previously remodeled without a building permit. Worse yet, you find out that the master bedroom was remodeled and enlarged without a building permit. And horror of horrors, you also learn your five-bedroom home is only permitted under the original – and only – building permit to have three bedrooms. Not very likely to happen, right? According to Mark Rogers, Yavapai County Development Services Chief Building Official, problems like this come to his department on a daily basis. Such problems usually originated so many years ago that the homeowner at the time of the non-permitted “improvement” has long passed from

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the scene. The identity of the contractor or unlicensed person performing the work is not known. The applicable legal time periods to file a lawsuit expired many years ago. The building department is immune from such lawsuits. What do you do now? Can you even proceed with your dream plans? Yes. The current policy of the Yavapai County Development Services Building Department is generally to work with the current homeowner to try and solve the problem on a case-by-case basis. The department will generally begin by requiring the new homeowner to submit “as-built” plans to allow the department, the homeowner, and the contractor to determine the scope of the non-compliance. Sometimes the department may require that walls or ceilings be opened to permit inspection and determine whether potential life and safety issues exist because of the non-­compliance. Life and safety issues may exist with construction involving noncompliance with structural, electrical, gas and plumbing. The department will then require the submission of detailed plans to address these non-compliance issues, particularly those involving the life and safety concerns. The department may assess an increased permit cost for the new construction. Interim and final code compliance inspections will occur throughout the new construction process to bring the structure into compliance. Although this policy is similar to other building departments, it is important to contact the applicable jurisdiction in which you live to determine the specific corrective action to be taken should you find out you have on permitted improvements in your existing structure. If there ever was a situation which cried out for application of the admonition “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” this is the situation. Before going through with the purchase of

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any home, certainly a home built or remodeled more than 20 years ago, Mr. Rogers recommends going to the local building department to do the “due diligence” referred to in the standard real estate purchase contract. Local building inspector Randy West echoes Mr. Roger’s advice. With just the street address (ordinarily) the building department can provide you with the permit history of that home. The home’s file will reveal the scope of the original building permit issued, and the date and nature of permits issued later. At the present time Yavapai County, for example does not charge a fee to a homeowner or potential homeowner for this assistance (but be prepared to pay for copying charges). Armed with such permit information, or information that no permit was obtained, the homebuyer should negotiate a lower price with the seller for the costs which will be incurred to bring the home into compliance.

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Paying for a building inspector to go over the home does not include checking for permits, and is not a code compliance inspection. Sometimes a building inspector may include a comment in the inspection report that there are obvious signs of major improvements, for example room additions, which waves the red flag that it is time for the buyer to check out the building permit history at the building department.

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In addition to checking out the building permit history, Mr. West suggests that buyers during negotiations carefully review the seller’s disclosure statement and ask specific, detailed questions about every improvement made to the home. Continued on next page

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WHAT?!! – continued

Remember, nothing beats “an ounce of prevention.”

There are additional critical points that could come into play with un-permitted structures or portions of structures: ›› When an identified or proposed additional to an existing structure exceeds a certain percentage of the total new proposed square footage, the entire structure both new and existing portions may have to be brought up to current building code standards. ›› When the method of construction or potential structural concerns are observed to the addition a structural engineers analysis may be required in order to satisfy the municipality. ›› Properties with wells that have to contend with well setbacks that may be affected by new additions. In addition if a shared well is present restrictions on the size of the home (ie water use) may apply. ›› Waste disposal systems may have to be changed (ie tank size, setbacks, waste disposal field enlarged and type of system may have to be altered). ›› Property insurance and property taxes may increase due to the increased and now properly permitted and code approved square footage. These are just a few critical examples of issues that could arise with unpermitted structures. There is no relatively easy issue to correct with unpermitted work, compounding issues seems to be the case.

But, doesn’t homeowners insurance or title insurance cover construction problems when no permit was issued or inspections performed? No. Plain and simple. Brenda Martinez, Chief Title Officer and Vice President with Yavapai Title, advises homebuyers to consider purchasing an ALTA (Arizona Land Title Association) policy which might cover a few – but not all – problems relating to construction permits. Because ALTA policies have many exceptions and exclusions, a conversation is recommended with the escrow/ title officer about the details of this type of policy. Remember, nothing beats “an ounce of prevention.” Working with the building department before purchase can reveal problems, and even provide you with knowledge to negotiate a lower sales price to include the cost of repairing the problems. If it is too late for that, contact a reputable, licensed contractor to work with the building department and help that dream remodel project come true.

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Insulation By Sue Marceau Keeping warm in winter and cool in summer is as important to a home’s well-being as it is to the comfort of the people living within its walls. The sweaters and layers or light-weight fabrics and neck-cooling bandanas which help control extremes in temperature within the human body are similarly employed in heating and cooling a residential structure. Only the names are changed. Clothing materializes as insulation in the dress code of construction, and its types, textures and design can be as diverse as everyday fashion. Attics, walls, floors, basements and crawlspaces represent the heads, arms, legs, feet and small of the back needing protection through variations in temperature and moisture.

and cooling units which cycle often, and cold and hot spots in the house, according to Shane Burginger, division manager at Gale Contractor Services.

American home, according to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which cites inadequate insulation and air leakage as the primary causes of residential energy waste.

Clues that a home might not be properly insulated include high energy bills, heating

Heating and cooling represent 50 to 70 percent of the energy used in the average

“Most homes built prior to 2010 could probably use more insulation in the attic due to code changes, possible settling of material, and disturbance of material,” Burginger explained. “Most of your heating and cooling is lost in your ceiling. This is usually a fairly simple fix by adding insulation. There are many different types of insulation.”

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DOE advises that insulation can help save money on energy bills and preserve the country’s limited energy resources, in addition to helping ensure a more comfortable home through uniform temperatures. Once savings on utility bills have returned the homeowner’s monetary investment for installing insulation, the remainder offsets monthly energy expenses. Factors which affect the amount of energy conserved, DOE notes, include climate, construction details of the home, living habits of the household, type and efficiency of heating and cooling systems, and the specific fuel used. The most common insulation issues discovered by Burginger and his team are “insufficient R-Value, settling of material, material stepped on, and improper installation in crawlspaces,” he explained. The solutions involve blowing additional insulation into the attic, ensuring the proper R-Value for the home, and improving alignment in the crawlspace.


conditioner. By utilizing products and tactical installations to resist or limit air flow, insulation helps reduce the amount of energy lost.

Materials (also called  blankets) are flexibly constructed from mineral fibers, including fiberglass and rock wool, and available in standard sizing for wall studs and joists in attics and floors.

A home energy audit from a knowledgeable consultant can help determine the appropriate insulation to outfit a home for any season. From the structural perspective, how to dress properly for the weather ranges from rolls and batts to loose-fill insulation to rigid foam and foam-in-place. Budget and how the material will be used play a significant role in what type will be recommended. Here’s the skinny on what to select and when:

The science behind heating or cooling a home is important to recognizing the need for proper insulation. Heat flows naturally from warmer to cooler spaces, which means towards the outdoors in winter and to the inside in summer. A home’s unheated and uncooled attics, garages, and basements also provide an ideal challenge for equilibrium. Heat lost in winter is replaced by a heating system and that collected in summer is removed by an air

›› Rolls and batts – Materials (also called blankets) are flexibly constructed from mineral fibers, including fiberglass and rock wool, and available in standard sizing for wall studs and joists in attics and floors. Either 2 x 4 or 2 x 6 construction can be accommodated as blankets are placed. ›› Loose-fill insulation – Loose fibers or fiber pellets of fiberglass, rock wool or cellulose can be blown into odd-sized building cavities and attics which are difficult to reach with other forms of insulation. This includes areas with wires, ducts and pipes. ›› Rigid foam insulation – Rigid foam, a more expensive option, can be placed in exterior and interior wall sheathing and on attic hatches. It offers up to twice the insulation R-value of alternatives in equal thickness. ›› Foam-in-place insulation – Small pressurized cans of foam-in-place installation can be blown into walls, on attic surfaces or under floors to reduce air leakage. It is particularly useful for holes and cracks around window and door frames, electrical installations and plumbing penetrations. Beyond the obvious benefits of energy savings and whole house comfort, insulation (especially on interior walls) can absorb sound from dishwashers, media centers and household activities, while also improving the structure’s future appeal to potential buyers. It’s amazing what a little dressing up will do, even when subtly achieved.

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Is Refinancing Your Home Worth It? By Sue Marceau You consider refinancing your home at any given time and wonder if it’s the right move. This refresher on the considerations and advantages of re-negotiation could be your guide, whether you seek to lower a loan rate or term, reduce monthly payments, fix an adjustable rate scenario, convert a line of credit, consolidate debt, or obtain cash. Leanne Martinez, assistant vice president senior mortgage loan officer at Country Bank, poses three questions to help consumers evaluate a home refinance: 1. What are your goals? To lower monthly mortgage payments, reduce interest costs, or pay off the loan earlier? 2. At what point do you “break even,” meaning how many months at the lower interest rate will be required to recoup the cost of the refinance? 3. Do you plan on owning the property long enough to realize the benefit of a reduced interest rate? Lowering the interest rate is the primary reason homeowners choose to refinance, according to Randy Roberts, vice president/ senior real estate loan officer at National Bank of Arizona. The second most common purpose, he said, is converting an Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) into a fixed rate. Homeowners also may elect to refinance purely for cash flow, Roberts added. The sluggish economic recovery has pushed some individuals and families into tight financial corners, where having funds to manage daily living and pay bills takes priority. Their home, he indicated, may be the only asset from which to obtain funds. When comparing rates, “the bottom line is essentially to have a gain of one to 1.5 percent to make it financially feasible, in order to get closing costs and fees back 94

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in a reasonable amount of time,” Roberts advised. “By the time you pay a couple thousand dollars in closing costs, you are not really gaining anything. It could take you years and years to make that up.” Roberts and Martinez agreed that interest rate plays the largest role in refinancing decisions, but also emphasized consideration of other notable factors, including loan amount and term, personal needs, risk tolerance, and anticipated length of home ownership. Every situation is unique and homeowners are encouraged to do their homework in discovering opportunities available, resources to assist, and what factors to consider. Asserting that no minimum rate reduction exists “to make a refinance beneficial,” Martinez explained that “there is a misconception that you have to reduce your rate by a least 1% to make it worth the cost … The rate, loan amount and term all play into whether a refinance is beneficial. This is something you should discuss with your mortgage professional to find out the pros and cons based on your specific scenario.” Break-even analysis is employed to determine the point at which the borrower’s total monthly interest savings on a refinance equal the costs incurred to obtain the new loan. Assessing the break-even point can be a “complicated calculation” capturing fees for underwriting, document preparation, appraisal and title insurance,

Martinez cautioned, along with other potential costs based on property type, nature of occupancy, and lender requirements. Applicable costs generally exclude tax and insurance escrowed accounts, which would be present in either the current or refinanced scenario. Martinez identified “average” closing costs at $2,500 to $2,800 to refinance a primary residence with a loan amount ranging from 100,000 to $250,000. Any discount fee (points) to buy down the interest rate also would need to be included in the calculation. The question of when to refinance garners “no pat answer,” Roberts said, providing an example of the traditional break-even formula. Say a homeowner’s refinancing fees totaled $2,400 and the new monthly payment (principal and interest) amounted to a savings of $50 a month, he outlined. The total fees ($2,400) would be divided by monthly savings ($50) to calculate breakeven (48 months). The consumer then needs to consider the non-math e ­ lements of the equation. While “anywhere from three to five years (to recover fees) might be worthwhile,” Roberts continued, “here’s the question to ask: ‘how long are you going to be in this house?’ If you plan to retire and move, don’t do it. It’s not worth it. People normally say they are going to live in a home forever, but the average life of a loan is just over three years.”


That turnover is partly because low rates have inspired many homeowners to refinance “a couple times over the last seven, eight or 10 years,” he concluded. “It was a good decision at the time, but then, as the rates slide down even more, they try to fix it again.”

shorter-term mortgages are significantly less than 30-year mortgages. Refinancing a higher rate loan with 15 years remaining to a new 15-year loan at a lower interest rate would maintain the same amortization schedule and provide the desired interest rate savings.”

A “no fee” refinance can solve the issue of recouping upfront fees, Roberts suggested, qualifying that the interest rate is generally higher by 1/4 to 3/8 of a percent based on borrowed amount and larger loans typically are given the best rates by lenders offering this option.

Something else to consider is the tradeoff between a lower monthly payment and extending the term of the loan. Paying off a car debt, for example, would reduce the monthly payment with a lower interest rate, but instead of the loan being paid off in three to four years, it would be extended over a significantly longer period of time, Roberts said.

Advantages of a home refinance also may apply to consumers approaching the end of their loan term, and who perceive that they have missed their window of opportunity. “A common misperception is that homeowners that say have 10 or 15 years remaining on a mortgage should not consider refinancing because they are paying mostly principal in the later years of their mortgage term,” Martinez clarified. “The fact is there are 10, 15 and 20-year mortgage terms available and the interest rates for

“Be aware that it is possible to lower the interest rate and save money in the short term, yet pay a higher amount of total interest over the life of the loan if the term of the loan is extended,” Martinez reinforced. Loan qualifications and rules are the same for purchase, construction financing, or refinance of a home, Roberts said, citing a maximum debt to income ratio of 43 percent. Interest rates at below four

percent may not be as low as a year ago, he acknowledged, but they remain historically appealing. Roberts and Martinez recommend that homeowners speak with a loan officer about their specific situation and what they wish to accomplish by refinancing their home. Running the numbers and laying out the scenarios can provide the knowledge needed for effective decision-­ making. Loan professionals have the resources to run amortization schedules and prepare side-by-side comparisons of existing and potential new loans. “The home mortgage process is more complicated than it was in the past and it is helpful to have a local mortgage professional who can sit down with you and have detailed conversations regarding your loan options,” Martinez summarized. “We understand that financing a home can seem like a daunting process, due to tightened lending standards and increased federal regulations. However, we take pride in simplifying the process as much as possible and working as your partner to obtain the best financing for you.”

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New Reverse Mortgage Rules Open Door to a More Secure Retirement Owning a home has always been part of the American Dream. Therefore it should be no surprise that home equity represents a large portion of the average retiree’s net worth according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau statistics. Now, as many Americans near retirement, properly leveraging that home equity will become a crucial part of a secure retirement plan. There are a variety of ways to tap into one’s home equity, such as downsizing, taking a traditional home equity loan, home sharing, entering into a sale leaseback arrangement, or entering into a reverse mortgage. However, each of these strategies is not suitable for every retiree. For instance, the history of reverse mortgages has taught us that they are not the right financial strategy for everyone. In April 2015, new rules have been implemented to help prevent previous miscues often associated with reverse mortgages. While it remains true that entering into a reverse mortgage is not a suitable financial decision for all retirees, for some, a reverse mortgage can be properly utilized to significantly improve retirement income security. This article will examine three different strategic uses of reverse mortgages within a retirement income plan and will illustrate how these strategies are for more than just the cash-poor, house-rich client. Before taking a deeper dive into the possible strategic uses of a reverse mortgage, the nuts and bolts of such an arrangement are worth mentioning. A reverse mortgage enables homeowners, aged 62 and older, to get a loan and tap into their home equity without losing their home in the process. The amount of the loan is based on the value of the home, the homeowners’ ages, and the prevailing interest rates. There are three different types of payment options available for a reverse mortgage: a tenure option payment, in which you receive a monthly payment for as long as you live in 96

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your home; a lump sum, in which you get the amount of the loan upfront; and a standby line of credit, in which you can borrow from a line of credit as you choose. Additionally, the loan does not need to be repaid for as long as the homeowner continues to live in the home. Furthermore, the loan is non-recourse, meaning that the bank entering into the reverse mortgage only gets the value of the loan and does not get a windfall if the home value exceeds the loan. The homeowner does not owe anything more than the value of the home in the event the loan value exceeds the value of the home. In recent years there have been concerns about homeowners with reverse mortgages going into technical default, a condition that affects about 10% of reverse mortgages. This can occur when the homeowner is unable to pay their property taxes, their home insurance premiums, and other homeowner fees. The failure to pay property taxes could cause the homeowner to lose his or her home, even if they had previously entered into a reverse mortgage. In order to reduce the number of reverse mortgage homeowners going into technical default and getting behind in property

taxes, the government has added further consumer protection measures in the form of a financial assessment screening test to help determine whether potential borrowers can afford to enter into a reverse mortgage. The new rules apply to the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (“HECM”) program, which is the primary reverse mortgage program representing approximately 95% of the market. The new rules will require potential borrowers to demonstrate their ability to pay property taxes, fees, and insurance premiums based on their income and available credit. The new rules will disqualify a tremendous number of people who would have been able to qualify for a reverse mortgage just a few months ago. If you can qualify for a reverse mortgage, the next question becomes when, if ever, should you enter into one? In the past many reverse mortgages were used for the wrong people at the wrong time and outside the context of a comprehensive plan. Home equity has often been used as a line of last resort against unexpected future expenses or when an individual has run out of money. However, there are a variety of strategic uses for reverse mortgages that might prove to be more beneficial to the


homeowner, especially when it comes to retirement income planning. First, a standby reverse mortgage line of credit can be used to mitigate market risk and other retirement income planning risks. Don Graves, President of the HECM Advisors Group calls it the “Swiss Army Knife of Retirement Income Planning.” Instead of using a reverse mortgage towards the end of one’s retirement when assets might be dwindling, strategic use of a reverse mortgage closer to the front end of one’s retirement could be even more beneficial. For example, one of the biggest risks that retirees face in retirement is sequence of returns risk, especially during the first few years of retirement. A reverse mortgage line of credit can be used in variety of ways, and Graves offers just two of the possible examples. In the first example, the reverse mortgage line of credit could be used in its entirety during the first few years of retirement. This method would enable the retiree to avoid taking substantial withdrawals from an investment portfolio in the early years, thus allowing it to continue to grow. It would also safeguard against taking needed withdrawals from the growth portion of their investments during periods when the market is in a decline. In the second example mentioned by Graves, the reverse mortgage line of credit could be used in a coordinated fashion with the returns of your portfolio, namely living off of the income from the standby line of credit only in the years following a negative return on your investments. The second strategy would only tap into home equity if you experienced negative or low returns in the first few years of retirement. Either way, the retiree could significantly improve the longevity of their investment assets by reducing the risk of sequence of returns risk to a portfolio. Furthermore, when the market rebounds, the retiree could use the excess income in those years to repay the reverse mortgage and preserve the value of their home. The second strategic use of reverse mortgages can be to postpone claiming Social Security benefits, or to defer one’s employer sponsored pension plan. This strategy (depending on the value of your home) actually uses up a large portion of your equity early on in retirement, instead Continued on next page

TURN EQUITY INTO CASH WITH A

REVERSE

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New Reverse Mortgage Rules – continued of relying upon it later in retirement. Let’s take a look at how you might be able to utilize your home equity to defer Social Security benefits. Joe is a single individual aged 62 with a $200,000 home with no remaining mortgage. Joe expects to receive roughly $1,000 a month from Social Security if he collects at age 62. However, Joe wants to consider pushing off benefits to age 70. Joe could enter into a reverse mortgage which would enable him to get access to roughly $97,000 of his home equity. In order to generate a line of credit withdrawal to make monthly $1,000 payments for the next 8 years to replace his Social Security income while in deferral, Joe would need to use up about $75,000 of his home equity. This means his line of credit would still have roughly $22,000 remaining for other uses, and his home would still have over half of its equity left at the start of the loan. This would enable Joe to defer his Social Security income to age 70 and receive roughly 78% higher benefits (roughly $1,780 a month), based on an average increase of 7% to 8% per year. Additionally, this higher benefit would

also be subject to cost of living increases to help protect against inflation. Joe would also still have roughly $137,000 of home equity left over at age 70, assuming 4% annual appreciation in the value of his home. This strategy could also be employed for anyone who wants to defer taking withdrawals from their 401(k), IRA, or pension plan. The third strategic use of a reverse mortgage can be to exchange debt for income by replacing a traditional mortgage payment with a reverse mortgage. More and more retirees enter into retirement with an outstanding mortgage. This creates a cash outflow event for the retiree, requiring the retiree to generate more income and take larger withdrawals from his or her investments in order to pay the mortgage each month. Instead, some retirees are now taking a reverse mortgage to pay off their traditional mortgage, and at the same time creating a line of credit or generating additional income. The biggest benefit of this strategy is the reduction of one’s cash outflow in retirement. Research by Michael

Kitces shows that this strategy can significantly extend the longevity of an investment portfolio by reducing the amount of distributions taken in the early years of retirement. Using a reverse mortgage is no longer just for the cash poor and house rich. Instead, reverse mortgages can be used strategically as one part of a retirement income plan designed to build a buffer against sequence of returns risk early in retirement, help defer Social Security benefits or reduce cash outflow from traditional mortgage payments. Reverse mortgages can be used properly, but there are risks associated with using them, as there are with any other financial or investment strategies. As such, you need a comprehensive understanding of the risks and costs associated with a reverse mortgage before you decide to enter into one. This means that any reverse mortgage decision should only be made after doing your due diligence, consulting an expert, finding a reputable lender, and incorporating the decision into your overall retirement plan.

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Your Home is Yours Title Insurance Helps Keep It That Way. Without it, you could lose your most valuable asset – your home. By Danny Sullivan, Yavapai Title Agency If you have recently purchased or refinanced a home, chances are you have had to get title insurance. What exactly does title insurance cover, and who does it protect – the homeowner or the lender? Do you need title insurance on a refinance if you bought title insurance when you purchased your home? Here are the answers to those important questions, as well as some helpful advice regarding title insurance, and whether or not you need it. Basically, title insurance protects you against problems affecting the title to your home. There are two types of title insurance – a Loan Policy, and an Owner’s Policy. A Loan Policy protects the lender for the amount of the loan, while the Owner’s Policy protects you, the homeowner, for your investment in the property – your equity. In both cases, the title process involves an exhaustive search of public records to make certain the title to the subject property is clear, and covers against future loss if a title claim against the property is made. While discovering an issue with your title may seem rather remote, one out of every four title searches reveals a problem with the title. Examples include tax liens, forged signatures in the chain of title, recording errors, title search errors, undisclosed easements and claims by missing heirs and/or ex-spouses. These problems would be uncovered in a title search before you even close escrow on your home.

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The reality is that even after an exhaustive title search is performed and a Title Policy is issued, sometimes a problem may surface that can threaten your home. If you only have a lender’s policy, where the outstanding loan is covered, your equity is not protected. A separate Owner’s Policy would protect you for as long as you or your heirs have an interest in the property. If you are a homeowner considering a refinance loan you might be wondering whether or not you’ll need a new title policy when you refinance. The answer is, you won’t need a new Owner’s Policy, but the lender will require a new Loan Policy because a title search must be performed covering the period of time since the last policy was issued. Although somewhat remote, there is a chance that an unforeseen problem might exist that could now affect the title to your home. The lender will understandably want to make sure the title to the property they are financing is clear of any defects. It is interesting to note that, even after a title search has been completed, a second search is done just prior to recording the deed to make sure nothing has affected the title since the initial search, even if it’s only been a few weeks.· Always be sure your property is covered by an Owner’s Policy, as title insurance protects you against the potential loss of your most valuable asset – your home.


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Homeowners Insurance By Sue Marceau Curiosity may have killed the proverbial cat, but it’s a highly endorsed approach to buying homeowners insurance. If the important questions are answered upfront and the purchaser understands the policy’s terms and conditions, suitable plans can be arranged and kept current despite inflation and changes to the home. Policy reviews every one to two years can help ensure accuracy and manage risk. Eric Strobel, agent/owner of Eric Strobel Agency with State Farm, urges homeowners researching new policies or investigating updates to existing policies to “be inquisitive. Ask the right questions in order to get the proper coverage. Make sure that the agency gets as much detail about the home as possible.” The Mahoney Group’s Customer Service Agent Terri Daniels advises them to “allow your agent enough time to ask all the questions. Do not try to ‘hide’ information. If you are buying a home for a relative to live in, disclose that information. If you are buying a second home, disclose that information. Many times, we can better help you with coverage and affordability if we know the details.” Sandy K. Merrill, owner agent at Mosaic Insurance Agency counsels consumers to recognize that an insurance policy “is never the answer to everything and anything that can go wrong. Standard policy is not going to cover flood, sewer or septic back up, wear and tear, earthquake, (and

similar items). These are pretty standard industry exclusions, but most are available by endorsement. Water losses can be the trickiest coverage (and) create the most headaches for homeowners. Everything that leaks doesn’t necessarily mean you have coverage. Always review that with your agent.” A diligent insurance agent will ask questions – many of them personal – to help identify the consumer’s needs. Individuals and families buying homeowner’s insurance should be prepared to answer queries about their property, risk tolerance and expectations regarding their policies. They should understand that agents will be asking questions for which they need answers to provide the best policy for the household’s needs, Daniels explained. Buyers should feel comfortable requesting more information about concepts they

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do not immediately grasp, the experts state, adding that a good insurance agent remains focused on the customer and ensuring a positive exchange of information. They share that it’s the agent’s role to educate consumers regarding how homeowner’s insurance works and what clients can expect from it. This includes outlining policy requirements and limitations. “The best help is to know the details of your home,” Merrill noted, offering the example of a significant upgrade in replacement cost when a homeowner replaces carpet with hardwood flooring. “You always want to do your due diligence to keep your agent aware, but an agent should be keeping in touch as well.” Strobel described every home as “unique” and the cost of insurance varying “greatly.” Coverage on the dwelling, personal property, liability, and loss of use are among inclusions he identifies for coverage. Because homeowner policies were designed “to package coverage for the average person,” limits are imposed on personal property such as artwork, firearms, furs, jewelry, and collectibles, Daniels added, noting that such coverage can be added for an additional premium. Acknowledging that each home indeed is distinctive, Daniels stated that there is no “typical cost. Insurance is based on replacement of square footage, insurance history of the individual, and claims history. You and I can buy the same home and have


completely different premiums based on the answers to (those) prior three details.”

the agents assert. Changes to the square footage of the home or major renovation/ remodeling should be disclosed to the agent at the earliest possible time, Daniels noted.

Merrill estimated that insuring an “average home” with three bedrooms, two baths, a two-car garage, asphalt shingles, standard appliances and basic countertops might cost between $425 and $800 a year. She cautioned that claims history and other factors affect the ultimate cost.

“We like to go over our clients’ coverage every year or two,” Strobel stated. “That way, we can be sure that the coverage has kept up with inflation and/or the cost to rebuild in the event of a major loss. This also will allow us to uncover any changes (homeowners) have made to the home, or would like to see (in the policy).”

“You can figure around $125 per square foot for replacement cost as a starter,” she suggested regarding that referenced average home. “But always check with a licensed contractor to make sure. You never want to pay for so much insurance that you are paying for something you would never get, but taking your square footage (multiplied by) the going replacement cost factor that contractors charge would be a good starting place.” Merrill also reminds consumers to be aware of the difference between market value and replacement costs: “Always remember insurance values are not the same as real estate values. Construction costs are the values we determine to replace a home. Where the market is hot now, many homes are selling (for) much more than it might cost to replace (them).” She clarified that “replacement price is determined on square footage and very rarely goes down. Insurance will not cover amenities or views, and especially, will not guarantee outstanding loans. Lenders can only require guaranteed replacement of the home, which is determined by the insuring company. Make sure your agent is willing to argue that point on your behalf, if necessary.” Strobel additionally highlighted the need for balancing policy cost and benefits.

Daniels relayed that insurance companies often perform routine inspections about 90 days prior to a renewal, looking for “issues that may need to be remedied to prevent claims. Everyone wants to keep their premiums low, and preventing claims is the best way to accomplish that. If an issue is noted, the company will ask you to remedy it by a given date. Ask your agent to explain better if you are unclear on the details.”

Q&A

How much insurance is enough? STROBEL: “Enough to replace their home in the event of a total loss. We use a replacement cost approach and ask detailed questions to get to the appropriate amount.”

DANIELS: “Guaranteed replacement is the key. Most homeowner policies also offer extended replacement of 25% or 50%.” MERRILL: “Building costs are escalating tremendously, so keeping up with true replacement cost to allow for enough to rebuild is important. Most policies allow some form of a cushion of 25% that helps keep you insured to value if there was a total loss. But the values changing would trigger a review as well as any dramatic changes to the construction of the home (and) upgrades.” What should a homeowner expect from his or her agent? STROBEL: “To be there when they need them the most … especially in a loss situation. Their agent should also be accessible and have the heart of a servant. After all, if it (were not) for the customer, the agent wouldn’t be in business.” DANIELS: “I always try to let them know I have to ask nosy questions. Expect courtesy, honesty and ­diligence. Your agent should be in contact on a regular enough basis that you know their name.” MERRILL: “A homeowner’s agent should be reviewing your coverage, hopefully at least every couple of years, and always be available and offer 24/7 claims service … Always try to shop for an agent that can be available by phone and appointment. 1-800 (agencies) dominate a lot of insurance shoppers’ choices, but those 1-800s aren’t on the ground floor helping you if you have a claim. So local is always best.” How do home warranties fit in the picture? STROBEL: “Home warranties typically would cover things that “break” and aren’t part of a loss that is covered under their homeowners policy.” DANIELS: “Home Warranty claims are not reported in the insurance database, which is a definite advantage. I generally recommend going online or through your realtor to decide what you would like covered. Some of our carriers offer an additional policy as well. It is separate from the home policy and has its own requirements for coverage.” MERRILL: “Home warranties are a new arena for insurance companies and they are entering this in the home insurance world as well as auto. They can be very inexpensive for an add-on to your policy, but you should always compare to what your carrier offers to what a company that sells nothing but home warranties.”

“Don’t always go for the policy that is the least expensive,” he explained. “Not all policies are created equal and some policies do not cover as much as others … Hence the cheaper rate. Ask a lot of questions of your insurance company to make sure you understand what you have. You don’t want to find out something isn’t covered when you need it the most … If you don’t understand, ask more questions. Don’t get something if you don’t understand it.” Standard industry practice promotes reviewing policies at least every couple years, 2016 Building Yavapai

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Home Inspections By Sue Marceau One of the most controversial elements in the sale of a home could be the inspection report. Important decisions ride on that document from the perspectives of both buyer and seller. Misunderstandings regarding a home inspection generally do not relate to the report itself, but how a particular buyer or seller interprets the findings and how that perception affects the transaction. The simplest way to ensure a smooth home inspection involves educating all participants in the property transfer about the process, methodology, implications of findings, necessary repairs, and the general conditions of a typical, lived-in (or brand new build) seller’s house transitioning into the home of a buyer. Setting the stage remains top of mind for Home Inspector Randy West, owner of Professional Building Consultants, Inc. Knowledge-sharing is incorporated into his every consumer interaction and integral to West’s preparation of buyers, sellers and real estate agents regarding how home inspectors generally go about evaluating homes and preparing reports. West has been a speaker at numerous realtor and home inspector classes, where he stresses that proper transfer of information will be beneficial to clients and all parties in the transaction. “Home buyers know that a pre-purchase inspection will enable them to make an

informed buying decision and will protect their largest investment,” West stated. “Welldone inspection reports are a combination of honey-do list and owner’s manual. A good inspection report will tell you where the gas and water valves are, where the furnace filter is, information on special or unique features in the home, (and) areas that may require special attention or maintenance.” Many home inspectors walk through a property with their clients to review the inspection report and answer questions. “I have the clients meet me at the end of the inspection for several reasons,” West described. “First, I am on site for 3+ hours and I am not going to say anything until I’m finished.

After 20 years and 8,000 inspections, I have learned that I don’t know enough to talk until I’ve been everywhere – around the home a couple times, on the roof, in the attic, through every interior room, (and so on). Sometimes I see something inside and have to go outside for a second look to verify or check something. It would be hard to follow me around, and I don’t try to give a ‘running narrative’.” Conversation with an independent and unbiased home inspector can help clients understand the seriousness of situations noted and the reasons for repairs recommended in the inspection report. The home inspector, however, does not recommend repair vendors. “When the clients meet with me, I go over my notes and pictures, and tell them after that we’ll walk around and look at anything that sounds exciting to them,” West explained. “I will spend as much time with them as they need or want.” The inspection on a 1,500 to 2,000 square foot home typically takes three to four hours, he noted. During that time, the inspector operates all kitchen appliances, the furnace, air conditioner, evaporative cooler, lights and ceiling fans, doors and windows, garage doors, plumbing fixtures, and whirlpool tubs. If any of those items

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is not accessible, the inspector is required to state that fact in the inspection report. Depending on the severity of that situation, a re-inspection may be required and delays could occur. Sellers should anticipate that the inspector will look in closets and cabinets, walk on the roof, shimmy through crawl spaces, and investigate the attic. The inspector is not permitted to discuss his or her findings with anyone other than his or her client, usually the buyer. According to the terms and conditions of the Arizona Residential Real Estate Purchase Contract, the buyer is obligated to provide the seller with a copy of the inspection report. This generally is accomplished through their respective realtors upon receipt of the report. Imagine that you are the buyer, seller or realtor in an upcoming home sale and wondering what steps to take in getting ready for the home inspection. West offers the following tips for each scenario.

Sellers Key for sellers in the home inspection process, West indicated, is recognizing that the inspector is just doing his job. We know you like and are proud of your home. But do not take anything personally. Most of the recommendations in your report are likely common ones that we find in many homes.

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West also suggests the following to sellers: ›› A ​ llow the inspector to work without interruption; ›› Place all breakables, antiques and other items out of the way; ›› Remove items from window sills; ›› Ensure that all interior and exterior light fixtures work (bad or no bulb means not working); ›› Provide access to the furnace, water heater, and electrical panel (cover must be removable); ›› Install a new furnace filter; ›› Make sure that windows and doors are accessible and operational. (Silicone spray may be helpful, but no WD-40); ›› Test all smoke alarms; ›› Unlock (electrical) panels and gates and doors to detached garages and outbuildings; ›› Confirm that all utilities are on during the inspection; and ›› Check that pilot lights on stove and hot water heater are on. Continued on next page 2016 Building Yavapai

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home expections – continued Buyers West recommends that buyers ask their realtor for a copy of the Standards of Practice from the Arizona State Board of Technical Registration, or download those standards themselves at www.btr.az.gov.​ He also suggests that buyers review their inspector’s website and look for a sample of the firm’s inspection report. A narrative (computer/written) report contains much more information than a “checklist” (check a box) report. Making a list of questions about the home or systems will help the buyer when speaking with the home inspector. He also maintains that it’s “imperative” for the buyer to understand the report and “not be shy” about contacting the inspector for clarification of any items not understood. Buyers should realize there is no such thing as a “perfect house,” he cautioned. “Any report on any house will have some recommendations. Typically, the older the home (is), the more recommendations (can be expected).

The purpose of the report is not to give you a list of things to have the seller repair, but to let you know the overall condition of the home and systems. It’s one thing if a buyer finds out a house immediately needs a major expense item, like a roof or furnace replacement, but I cringe when I hear that a buyer asked for every single thing in the report.”

West also explains the following for buyers: ›› Recommendations for site drainage and the electrical system are nearly always discovered in a home; ›› Older homes, especially, will have safety upgrades recommended. These may include Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) outlets, handrails, and rail openings, even though these were not required at time of construction; and ›› Payment often is required before or at the inspection, although some inspections may be billed through escrow for an additional fee.

Realtors Realtors can help educate their clients regarding the inspection process and provide useful information to the home inspector. Specifically, West recommends that real estate professionals assist their clients by: ›› Giving the inspector a copy of the Seller Property Disclosure Statement (SPDS); ›› Supplying the client’s name and complete contact information; ›› Ensuring that the inspection agreement is buyer-signed and returned to the inspector prior to the scheduled event; ›› Providing access if the property is not on lockbox; and ›› Confirming accepted payment methods. With all stakeholders working together for mutual benefit, a home inspection can be one of the most valuable tools in the exchange of residential properties among buyers and sellers.

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Is Hard Water Causing you problems? By Joanna Dodder Nellans Much of Yavapai County has a water problem, and we’re not talking here about low supplies.

Does the soap scum on your tub or shower bug you? Do you have to periodically soak your faucet in vinegar to get a reasonable water flow? Does your clothes washer seem to take forever to fill with water? If the answer is yes, then you, like many of your neighbors, have a hard water problem. “We definitely have hard water here,” confirms Kim Gagnon, office manager at The Plumbing Store in Prescott. “Hard water won’t take out laundry stains as well,” says Doug Rupp, owner of Q ­ uality Maytag in Prescott. Hard water scale can cut the life of electric hot water heaters in half, adds Steve Stover, owner of Arizona All Service ­ Plumbing based in Prescott Valley. “I’ve been here 25 years and I’ve seen electric heaters really take a beating,” Stover says. Luckily, you can solve this ­ problem with a water softener system. “You can retrofit them almost anywhere,” says Scott Teal, general manager at RED Plumbing in Prescott Valley. “People want soft water for different reasons,” Gagnon says. “For me personally, I like the feeling of soft water for my hair and skin.” It’s already dry enough in ­Arizona without adding to skin problems with hard water. Most Yavapai County residents use groundwater, including Prescott-area munici­pal­ities. Water hardness is a measure of the amount of calcium and magnesium salts that get into water through the weathering of rocks. 108

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Prescott’s water is “moderately hard,” according to the city’s latest annual water quality report. It averages 113-127 parts per million (ppm) of calcium and magnesium, or 6.6 to 7.4 grains per gallon (gpg). “The term ‘hardness’ comes from the fact that it is hard to get soapsuds from soap or detergents in hard water,” the city report explains. “This happens because calcium and magnesium react strongly with negatively charged chemicals like soap to form insoluble compounds. As a result, hard water can reduce the effectiveness of the cleaning process.” Some local residential wells can have water that’s way up the hardness scale. It’s officially ‘hard’ if it’s over 8.8 gpg or 150 ppm; Gagnon and Teal have seen some homes with 40 to 50 gpg. Teal has had to replace some appliances completely clogged by hard water minerals, especially dishwashers. Hard water can reduce the life of appliances and fixtures by making them work harder, too. Both Gagnon and Teal recommend highquality water softeners like the Plumber’s Choice Water Systems and Nugen Pure Water Systems that The Plumbing Store and RED Plumbing sell, install and maintain, respectively. Low-quality systems found at some big box retailers feature undersized control heads that restrict water flow and cause the systems to dump or “backwash” salt and water more frequently, Teal says. High-quality systems

track household water use, dumping salt and water only when necessary. Water softeners use salt, but people on low-salt diets needn’t worry about newer systems because they have dramatically reduced the amount of salt in the water, Gagnon and Teal say. The systems produce less than three-tenths of a one percent increase in salt in the water, Teal says. A system built for two people might use a single $15, 50-pound bag of salt per month. The systems are becoming so popular that homes in some local planned communities are pre-plumbed for soft water systems, Teal says. A typical high-quality system might cost $1,500-$2,000 installed, he says. If your only concern is the mineral build-up on appliances, you might want to consider a less expensive water descaler or conditioner. Water descalers and conditioners don’t use salt, they don’t dump water periodically, and they don’t remove calcium and magnesium from water. Instead, they keep these dissolved minerals from attaching to appliances and plumbing fixtures. And for electric hot water heaters, a heater guard is an option, Stover says. It acts like a filter and can be retrofitted on any heater. It costs about $250 to $300, and the approximately $40 cartridges need to be replaced every one or two years. A gauge lets homeowners know when it’s time for the replacement.


How to Save Your Home – and Maybe Your Life By Joanna Dodder Nellans The 2012 Arizona Cowboy Poets Gathering in Prescott was likely a pivotal moment in the lives of dozens of homeowners along the Williamson Valley Road corridor, although they didn’t know it at the time. Long-time Williamson Valley resident Jim Buchanan was talking with a couple friends at the cowboy poets gathering that year when they mentioned they were planning to cut some firewood on the Prescott National Forest over the winter. “It clicked that we had wood that needed to be cut,” Buchanan recalled. He asked if they’d be interested in thinning out the overgrown oak tree forest on a long two-acre ridge toward the edge of his 18-acre property north of Prescott. While the Buchanans already had cleared trees and brush closer to their home to reduce wildfire danger, this was one of those projects Buchanan had pondered for years and never accomplished. Buchanan and his friends ended up hauling 16 pickup loads of firewood and 25 loads of branches off that ridge in early 2013. Just a few months later, the Doce fire barreled down Granite Mountain toward the Buchanans’ home. Firefighters parked 12 engines and crew buggies in his horse arena. “That ridge is where the firemen were able to stop the fire after it jumped Mint Wash and was heading toward homes,” Buchanan related. More than one firefighter told him that if he and his friends had not thinned out vegetation on that ridge, the wildfire would have run all the way to Williamson Valley Road and torched about 25 homes. “You could see where the fire stopped in yards where people had defensible space,” Central Arizona Fire and Medical Authority (CAFMA) Fire Marshal Rick Chase recalled. 110

2016 Building Yavapai

2013 Doce Fire Photo Courtesy of City of Prescott Fire Department

“That experience told (wife) Barb and I that reducing fuels is critically important, and everybody ought to be doing it,” Buchanan said. Bringing vegetation back to a more natural state not only reduces wildfire danger, but also benefits wildlife and the watershed, Buchanan noted. For example, the State Land Department recently thinned out vegetation on a state trust land parcel along Williamson Valley Road, and now Buchanan has been seeing pronghorn antelope there for the first time in many years. To do his part by educating others about the importance of being “Firewise” and acquiring government grants to help people do it, Buchanan joined the Prescott Area Wildland Urban Interface Commission (PAWUIC) and soon agreed to be its vice president. “I felt like the work PAWUIC is doing is extremely valuable,” Buchanan said. “And if my story motivates one property owner, then that’s good.” PAWUIC organized in 1990, shortly after the deadly Dude wildfire struck Arizona. Its members include Firewise citizens alongside federal, state, county and fire department officials. PAWUIC’s goal is to help reduce local wildfire danger while educating citizens about how they can help themselves.

PAWUIC’s leadership and accomplishments have been hailed by fire officials at the state and national level, including the National Fire Protection Association and its Firewise Communities program. With 32 official Firewise Communities in Yavapai County, mostly in the Prescott Basin and Crown King, this county likely has the highest concentration of Firewise Communities in the nation. PAWUIC has been a major factor in that accomplishment. The communities usually consist of subdivisions or neighborhoods, where residents have met a rigorous set of requirements to reduce overgrown v­egetation and other wildfire dangers. “We pull a tremendous amount of money from the state (and ­federal government) because of our reputation for doing the right thing with funds,” PAWUIC Chair Bob Betts said. “We’ve made some tremendous progress and I’m so proud of it.” Betts lives in the Hidden Valley subdivision on the south side of Prescott. It became an official Firewise Community in 2007, a huge turnaround from the not-so-distant past when the Hidden Valley HOA was prohibiting residents from cutting any trees down. “Finally, guys like Ben Tuttle were able to convince them that ­400 ponderosa pines per acre was not healthy like 40 to 100 per acre,” Betts related.


Betts didn’t move to Prescott until 2012, and he didn’t think much about being Firewise until the Doce fire struck in 2013 and he could see the smoke from his home. “Suddenly I got religion,” Betts recalled. “I became active in Firewise.” Not coincidentally, eight Prescott Basin subdivisions started working on becoming Firewise Communities in 2013 after the Doce and Yarnell wildfires struck the region. The latter blaze tragically claimed the lives 19 of Prescott’s Granite Mountain Hotshots. “Unfortunately, these horrific events have raised awareness,” Prescott Fire Marshal Don Devendorf said. “The sad part is, people don’t get motivated until the fire’s in their backyard,” Betts added. Some people still think that being Firewise translates to clear-cutting. “It’s not about moonscaping your property,” Chase explained. “You’re just taking away the continuity and thickness of vegetation.” Create islands of vegetation so fires can’t spread across them, he said.

With 32 official Firewise Communities in Yavapai County, mostly in the Prescott Basin and Crown King, this county likely has the highest concentration of Firewise Communities in the nation.

and properties, using specific guidelines from the International Wildland-Urban Interface Code.

Of course vegetation grows back, so people need to thin it annually to keep the work manageable, Betts said.

Prescott also has a crew that clears vegetation on private properties, although the crew has been cut to only a few people most of the year since the hotshots perished. “People are finding out that when we’re done doing the work, it looks nicer,” Devendorf related.

A Prescott-area resident for nearly seven decades since he was a toddler, Buchanan figures he’s spotted at least 20 wildfires on Granite Mountain throughout that time. He and his neighbors used to call the Prescott National Forest as soon as they spotted fires in the wilderness area and ask firefighters to extinguish them. As the blazes were repeatedly halted, vegetation built up to unnatural densities. Fueled by all that wood, the Doce fire moved so fast down Granite Mountain that firefighters couldn’t even get near it.

Sometimes just seeing a neighbor become Firewise can motivate people. That worked for Betts. He cleared out all non-irrigated vegetation within 10 feet of his house, separated trees and bushes between 10 and 50 feet from the house, and cut down two trees that were growing under a larger juniper. His neighbor asked him about it and followed his lead.

Betts tries to motivate people by relating the experiences of others such as Buchanan and the residents of the Firewise Community of Pine Creek in Oregon, where the 2015 Canyon Creek Complex blaze destroyed 43 neighboring homes but didn’t claim any at Pine Creek. PAWUIC helps communities become Firewise by acquiring federal and state grants to help assess the wildfire danger around people’s homes, then helping with the cost of hiring experts to make their properties Firewise.

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A PAWUIC grant is allowing CAFMA to help people with the cost of clearing vegetation from their properties in the Williamson ­ Valley Road corridor, Lynx Mountain Estates and Dewey-Humboldt, Chase said. CAFMA, the new name for the combined Chino ­Valley Fire District and Central Yavapai Fire District, covers 240 square miles. Prescott goes one step farther and requires Firewise construction on all new homes

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Building Costs Quite often calls will come in from other states from people inquiring about relocating to Prescott. This is a very common question and one whose answer is based on the complexity inherit in the construction industry.

Q A

Ask Your Contractor

What the cost is per square foot to build a home?

P  er Tom Reilly, owner of Renovations Your Complete Remodel Resource, and local architect and builder in Prescott for over 30 years, “square foot pricing is a ratio of the total costs of a projects components divided by the size of the livable portion of a house in most instances.”

Since the components that make up a project can be so different from project to project it is impossible to predict a price per square foot with any accuracy. Defining the total cost of a projects components without first going through a design process, or at a minimum a detailed written project scope will most certainly lead to a level of speculation that will generate hard feelings. Unless you are building a tract home, on the same terrain in the same area, square footage pricing is not the way to analyze the best course of action for your project. The more unscrupulous among

Be sure to read our YCCA “Ask the Contractor” column in the Daily Courier Real Estate Section every Friday or online at

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the industry will use the complexity of real pricing to low ball their way into a project. If you have decided to do a project, do it well. Form a budget, get qualified assistance from reputable contractors and determine if your goals and your budget mesh. Do not fall prey to the speculation of shopping square foot pricing.

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Fixing a Major Energy Problem that You Can’t Even See By Joanna Dodder Nellans An invisible problem could be blowing your home energy bills way out of proportion. Air that you’ve spent a pretty penny to heat in the winter or cool in the summer could be leaking right out of your house into the atmosphere. Signs of this problem include rooms that are hotter or colder than other rooms, an unusually high amount of dust in your house, out-of-control allergy symptoms, energy bills that seem too high, or a musky or fume smell, according to the website for Arrowseal in Prescott Valley. “If it was water, people would stop the leak in a heartbeat,” observes Troy Koski, president of TDK Comfort Systems based in Chino Valley. “But since it’s air and they can’t see it, they don’t do anything.”

The biggest energy losses occur in duct­ work, says Bryce Cox, a partner with Arrowseal. But a lot of older homes have inaccessible ductwork. His company gets around that problem with Aeroseal technology. After finding leaks with a duct blaster, Arrowseal sprays Aeroseal’s vinylized polymer compound into ducts. The sealant migrates through the duct system to seal leaks, then cures in place like rubber. Homeowners can take advantage of a $400 Arizona Public Service rebate off the cost of hiring a qualified contractor to test and repair duct leaks. APS estimates such leaks could add $200 annually to energy bills. Sealing leaks also keeps dust, pollens and insulation fiberglass out of living spaces, Cox says. Arrowseal duct repairs generally run $1,500-$2,000 before rebates. APS also offers a rebate for hiring a qualified expert to conduct an energy audit, aka Energy Star Checkup. The audit normally runs $400 but costs only $99 under the APS program. Sometime in 2017, the City of Prescott plans to start requiring blower door and duct blaster tests on all new homes before they get a certificate of occupancy, says Laurel Collins, City of Prescott building inspector and plans examiner. Other local governments may follow as they also adopt the 2012 International Energy ­Conservation Code. “There has been a big push to get energy more efficient,” Cox says. The EPA estimates that homeowners can save 5 percent to 30 percent on their utility bills by making efficiency upgrades recommended in energy audits.

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Newer homes have more efficient expandable foam insulation sprayed right onto the roof, but older homes have insulation sitting on the attic floor with ductwork, Koski says. Leaks in the envelope of the home can be a huge energy loss culprit, says Koski, whose company has been conducting energy audits for more than a decade. To conduct blower door tests, auditors close all the home’s windows, exterior doors and flues. They mount a calibrated fan in an exterior door. The fan pulls air through all the holes in the building envelope. The auditor holds a smoke stick in front of suspected leaks to see if the smoke wafts away from the area. The auditor writes up a report and, if the auditor works for a contractor, offers a proposal to seal any major leaks. Tests after the work is done will show how much the leakage has been reduced. Ductless units for each room in the home are one popular option that also increases heating and cooling efficiency, Koski says. Other tools in the TDK and Arrowseal toolboxes include technology to find everything from hot water leaks to carbon monoxide problems. It is possible to seal a home too tight, so newer homes often have energy recovery ventilators. Future building codes might require those, too. Auditors with both TDK and Arrowseal are trained and certified through the Building Performance Institute (BPI). The auditors generally find substantial energy leaks in homes built before 2006 international codes were in effect, Cox says – especially those built hastily during construction booms.


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Change your filters right away when you move into a new home, because there can be a lot of dust and debris from construction. A plugged filter affects the efficiency and the cooling/heating capacity of your unit. If you leave the filter unchanged for a long period of time, it causes more strain on the motor and can lead to expensive repairs. There is less air flow, the AC can freeze up when filters are not changed and you can get more dirt and dust in your home.

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Xeriscaping is the Way to Go in Arid Arizona By Joanna Dodder Nellans Anyone who has lived in Yavapai County more than a few months knows it’s a challenging environment for trees, shrubs and plants, living in the high desert. Xeriscaping is the way to go in arid regions such as Arizona. It means using plants that survive well in dry climates, alongside other materials that don’t use water at all. Some common myths may need to be dispelled about xeri­scaping, however. Myth number one: xeriscape vegetation never needs watering. Xeriscape plants still need watering for one or two years after planting, while their roots become established, experts emphasize. And during long dry periods, say 45 days or so, they might need a little help to keep them resistant to disease and bark beetles. “Xeriscaping is basically low water use,” explains Bryan Gabbard of Landscape Now based in Prescott Valley, who has 35 years of landscaping experience in the Southwest.

Myth number two: xeriscape vegetation is boring and lacks color, because it means rocks and cacti. “You can make it very colorful,” says certified arborist Joshua Loveall, owner of Joshua Tree and Landscape. “You also can make it very fragrant if you know what sages to use.” If you’re having trouble figuring out what vegetation can spruce up your yard and survive, it might be time to turn to local experts for advice. “If a design is done properly with someone who knows the environment, you have an advantage,” says Arizona native Marc Vetere, owner of Manzanita Landscaping based in Prescott Valley. Local landscapers recommend shopping at locally owned nurseries, too, because they tailor their supplies to local planting zones. “We’ve been here 18 years,” says Susie Burgin, owner of Earthworks Garden Supply in Chino Valley. “I know what does well in our area, and I don’t bring things in that don’t survive winters.” A good design is worth its weight in gold, Loveall says. He also is a native Arizonan. Experts help customers take soil type, drainage, sun exposure, customer preferences, water needs, aesthetics, and buffer zones into consideration. Avoid planting invasives in riparian areas where they can spread and compete with native vegetation. Wildfire is an ever-present danger in Yavapai County, so homeowners also should know what plants are fire resistant and where it’s

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best to plant them. Landscape Now has two experts with Firewise assessment certifications from the Arizona State Forestry Division, owner Shelley Murphy and licensee Gabbard.

“There are lots of good native wildflowers that do well with natural water,” Vetere adds, including gaillardia and California poppies. Autumn sage and butterfly bushes attract butterflies.

“We need to know what we’re doing, and that training gave us the knowledge of what fire departments are looking for,” Gabbard explains.

A great plant for an overall bird sanctuary is the native algerita berry bush, Loveall says. It provides cover for quail from hawks.

While it’s important to keep yards fire resistant, don’t rake pine needles down to dry dirt, Loveall urges.

“A lot of people feed quail in an open area,” Loveall observes. “All you’re doing is putting a bulls eye on their back.”

Treetops can dry out without any needles to keep the ground moist. Yavapai County has varied elevations and therefore a halfdozen planting zones. Experts know which plants work in which zones.

Others want plants that do not attract certain animals such as javelina or deer.

“Every area is different,” Vetere says. “We go from grasslands to pine. There are things that work in Prescott that don’t work in Prescott Valley and Chino Valley.” A few cacti such as barrel, hedgehog and prickly pear work in more than one zone. Native grasses and trees can be part of xeriscaping, Loveall says. Some of his favorite trees for the Prescott region include desert willow, Arizona cypress, Arizona ash and Arizona walnut. Some of his favorite plants include Apache plume, chamisa (rabbitbrush), snakeweed, prickly pear, agave, beargrass, gopher plant, silver sage and rosemary. Some people enjoy focusing on plants that attract hummingbirds, such as firecrackers, penstemons and salvia, Loveall notes.

If all this advice has your head spinning, you might want to just go take a look at the choices on display. Prescott Dirt has a wide variety of rocks, sands, boulders, topsoil and planter’s mix at its Prescott and PV locations to round out your xeriscaped yard, including washed rock so you’ll know just how it will look. All of these landscapers say “bring a sample or photo of landscapes you’d like to emulate.” “We have a lot of customers that are moving away from grass and trees, anything that takes time and water,” Prescott Dirt Office Manager Samantha Leigh says. “A lot of people from out of state say, ‘I never thought we’d have to be buying rock and how beautiful they are.”

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Synthetic Turf Saves Water, Time and Money By Joanna Dodder Nellans The use of synthetic turf has moved beyond sports stadiums to residential yards and is becoming increasingly popular. Fake grass, synthetic grass, artificial turf, all one in the same are gaining in popularity. Why? Solves and saves on watering issues, weeding, no pet yellow spots and saves on fertilizing and maintenance. Sales of synthetic grass, once considered the bad toupee of landscaping has increased about 35%-40% a year for the past seven years. “It’s a great product,” says Pat Russell, branch manager at Arizona Stone and Architectural Products in Prescott Valley. “Artificial turf has come a long ways making it look and feel more realistic.” If you have dreamed of having a lawn that is on par with a well-maintained putting green, or if your dreams are less extravagant you can have both. At an affordable price today’s synthetic lawn manufactures produce artificial turf in a wide range of products. Like flooring inside your home, synthetic turf comes in different grades, color (to imitate different grass varieties), and length and width of grass blades. There is synthetic grass on the market with a lower luster, skinner blades and a softer feel to “It’s a great product ... Artificial turf has come a long ways making it look and feel more realistic,” says Pat Russell, branch manager at Arizona Stone and Architectural Products in Prescott Valley.

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make the appearance and feel of the grass more realistic. There are different types of turf available for different needs; visual needs, pet yards, lawn sports and children friendly play areas. Cost is dependent upon these various factors. The quality of synthetic grass is measured by the products face weight, (weight of the fibers) per square yard. Artificial turf face-weight in the range from 40 ounces to 93 ounces. With synthetic lawns there is no more spending weekends mowing, edging and trimming the lawn. There is no more fertilizing and buying lawn equipment or pulling weeds and just think, when you go on vacation you do not have to worry about coming home to an overgrown lawn. It is recommended that a licensed landscape contractor install your turf. Preparation of the ground for a smooth lawn is essential, as is sloping of the ground away from the home where the turf is to be

installed. For do-it-yourselfers, artificial turf is available as home-improvement centers, but beware that this product is extremely heavy. Improperly joining seams can result in a visually poor lawn. And something else to consider for the do-it-yourselfers, you are limited in your choice of available products, while a contractor has access to virtually all available turf products. Before you completely doze off dreaming of an idyllic lifestyle in your new yard, be aware that synthetic turf is not entirely maintenance-free. Synthetic turf cannot absorb and break down pet urine, which will have to be hosed off. Leaves will need to be raked, blown or vacuumed and every few years “lofting” of the turf with a “power broom” may be necessary and it heats up in direct sun. So faking it is right for you if you are tied of watering, weeding, fertilizing, mowing and want to be environmentally friendly and look as good as real grass. If you want a beautiful lawn year round with the tremendous cost and time savings then faking it can be a great thing to do. Arizona Stone sells one of the most popular synthetic turf products on the market, called Global Syn-Turf. Global Syn-Turf features a 10-year warranty and projected life of 15-20 years. Global manufactures 80 million square feet of artificial turf annually, with dozens of different varieties depending on the use.


The City of Prescott offers a rebate of 25 cents per square foot for removing real grass. Russell recommends hiring a contractor to install the turf. “A lot of people think you just roll it on the ground and nail it down, but there’s a lot more to it,” Russell says. “You definitely want to have a licensed landscaper with experience doing it,” agrees Ray Hernandez, owner of the Hacienda Del Ray landscaping company that installs artificial turf throughout this region. He’s had to fix plenty of seams and improperly compacted base materials that led to sinking turf pulling away from the edges of lawns. After removing any existing sod, Hacienda Del Ray crews install a two-inch layer of decomposed granite. They compact it before rolling out a heavy layer of artificial turf, perfectly matching any seams, and nailing perimeters. It’s a lot of work. The cost for materials and installation averages about $6 to $8 per square foot, Hernandez says. He estimates people get a return on their investment in just three or four years because of the savings on water, fertilizer and herbicides. Outdoor water use accounts for an average of 58 percent of water use in Arizona, estimates the Arizona Department of Water Resources. Most of that outdoor use is for grass, overwatering, and/or leaky or inefficient irrigation systems. A homeowner can save about 55 gallons of water annually for every square foot of grass replaced with synthetic turf, the Southern Nevada Water Authority estimates. Convenience is another obvious advantage of synthetic turf. Hernandez recommends using a plastic rake to fluff artificial grass about once a month, and blowing off leaves if desired. During dry periods, people can hose off the grass if dogs are using it; holes allow drainage. Compared to mowing and fertilizing and pulling/spraying weeds from natural grass, the maintenance time is substantially reduced. Synthetic grass blades are made of dyed nylon, polyethylene or polypropylene, then held together with backing materials similar to indoor carpets.

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No Yard for Plants? No Problem! By Joanna Dodder Nellans If you want to grow flowers and vegetables but your outdoor space is limited, containers are the perfect solution. You can enjoy the fruits of your labor on a balcony or patio. In fact, containers are an all-around good idea in a hot, dry place like Arizona where soils are generally poor. “It’s a challenging environment,” Master Gardener Mary Barnes agrees. Barnes and other Master Gardeners volunteer their time with the University of Arizona’s Cooperative Extension Office in Yavapai County so they can help residents take on such challenges and win. Containers are a great way to consolidate good soils and fertilizer while avoiding other potential pitfalls such as wily gophers. And alongside the plants inside them, containers can add beautiful splashes of color and design. However, soils in containers do dry out much faster than soils in the ground because of the exposure to the elements. Clay pots also dry out soils faster than plastic. So gardeners need to keep a close eye on container plants and add water as often as twice daily during the growing season. You don’t want to let them dry out completely. If your water is salty, add enough

water so that about 10 percent drains back out and flushes the system a bit. Residents can call the Extension Office at 445-6590 weekdays for free advice, or stop by the office at the Prescott rodeo grounds off Gail Gardner Way. The Yavapai County Cooperative Extension Office also posts a wealth of gardening

Adequate drainage is critical, Schalau says. If your containers don’t have drainage holes, just drill some in. Drainage is especially important in plastic, metal and glazed containers that block air from the soil.

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“Whether you have limited garden space, poor soil, or simply want to visually enhance an area, container gardening is always a winning idea,” Schalau writes.

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information online at extension.arizona. edu/Yavapai. County Agent Jeff Schalau has posted his Backyard Gardener columns online, too. Click on “Backyard Gardener website” on the top of the home page.


Lighting also is important. Follow the plant labels and don’t mix plants with different lighting needs in one container. Watch out for reflected light that could scald your plants.

“There are a lot of herbs that grow really well in containers,” Barnes adds. And many add the element of fragrance.

On the bright side, if something isn’t working, you always can change it when you’re using containers. Move plants around within or between containers. If a plant isn’t getting the right amount of light, you can simply move the container. That’s why container gardens are great for beginners. Tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers and beans are some popular veggies for Yavapai County growers, Barnes says. The tomatoes might need a trellis. “There are a lot of herbs that grow really well in containers,” Barnes adds. And many add the element of fragrance. Some people enjoy focusing on “salad bowl gardens” with containers that feature various salad greens. You can eat the greens within a few weeks after planting and get several harvests during the growing season. Containers should accommodate the roots of the plants when fully grown, Schalau says

in a container gardening column. Larger vegetables such as tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, cucumbers and beans should be planted in five-gallon containers or larger. Herbs are fine in smaller containers. Taller flowers have larger root masses so they need larger containers than short flowers. Container plants can add joy to winters, too. Schalau said he knows several Verde Valley residents who grow Meyer lemons in containers and move them indoors to a bright, sunny spot for the winter. All

porous containers should come inside for the winter to avoid cracking, by the way. Besides the visual and gastrointestinal benefits, container plants can even help you wind down after a long day at work or play. “Frequent irrigation and fertilization forces you to visit your containerized plants often,” Schalau says. “This is a good thing because it forces you to observe their progress, slow down and enjoy your outdoor living space.”

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Why should we hire an arborist? An arborist is an individual trained in the art and science of planting, caring for and maintaining individual trees. Arborists are extremely knowledgeable about the needs of trees and are trained and equipped to provide proper tree care. In other words, arborists are certified tree doctors and in Yavapai County we are extremely fortunate to some of the best right here in Yavapai County: The Joshua Tree and Landscape Company, Jonny’s Tree and Landscaping and Yavapai Exterminating. These companies have achieved their knowledge through experience and by passing a comprehensive examination

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Hiring an arborist is a decision that should not be taken lightly. Proper tree care is an investment that can lead to substantial returns as well cared-for trees are attractive and can add considerable value to your property. On the other hand, poorly maintained trees can be a significant liability. Services that arborists can provide to maintain tree health are:

Pruning An arborist can determine the type of pruning necessary to maintain or improve the health, appearance and safety of trees. Pruning techniques include removing limbs that interfere with utility lines or structures, obstruct streets, are dead, weak or decayed, are diseased or insect-infested, damaged by storms, increasing light penetration and reducing wind resistance within the canopy.

Planting An arborist can recommend what species are appropriate for a particular location. The wrong tree in the wrong location will lead to further problems as a result of limited growing space, insects, diseases or poor growth. It is important to remember “the right tree for the right space.” Tree function, form and size, site conditions, soil conditions, drainage, space constraints, human and


pet activity, pest problems are all things that should be considered when planting a tree – not just plopping the tree into the ground and/or selecting a tree just because it has nice foliage.

Proper tree care is an investment that can lead to substantial returns as well cared-for trees are attractive and can add considerable value to your property.

Tree Health An arborist will offer tree health care and/ or preventative maintenance to keep trees in good health while reducing insect, disease or site problems. Fertilization and soil recommendations are offered for improved tree health. Soil aeration to improve root growth and applications to manage certain insect and disease problems are services offered by an arborist.

Soil Conditions In dense urban areas and new subdivisions, soil is often disturbed, shallow, compacted and subject to drought. Most trees will suffer in these conditions without additional care. An arborist can take soil samples from your yard and test for texture, fertility, salinity and pH and from the results of these tests you can determine which trees are suited for your property.

planting trees, an arborist can assist you with tree selection. Taking into consideration the factors above, you can ensure the trees in your yard and the new ones you plant will grow and function as desired.

Tree Removal

Whether you already have existing trees on your property, or you are considering

Although tree removal is a last resort, there are circumstances when it is necessary and

an arborist can help decide whether a tree should be removed or not. Tree removal is determined if a tree is dead or drying, considered an unacceptable risk, causing an obstruction that is impossible to correct through pruning, crowding and causing harm to other more desirable trees and located in an area where new construction requires removal.

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Prune for Safety, Plant Health and Pleasing Appearance By Sue Marceau When your outdoor greenery looks sad or unkempt, you may consider employing your own handiwork, a landscaper or “an urban forester” as Arborist Joshua Loveall calls his profession. There is a time and a technique to spruce up nearly any plant. The important thing is to know what’s required and how best to accomplish it.

Several local landscapers – including Loveall’s The Joshua Tree & Landscape Company – were approached about what, when and how to prune. All agree on the importance of pruning during dormancy, which could be winter or early spring, depending on the specific plant, shrub or tree. They also identify three main reasons for pruning: safety, health of the tree and aesthetics. Part of the latter is deciding “what you want the tree to be, the shape you want it to have”, said John D. Prentice of Big Bear Tree Care. “Pruning is discipline for plants. It should be done from time they are very young…(so) you won’t have a problem when they get older.”

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Frank Abbott, general manager of CareScape, agrees. Abbott recommends starting “corrective aesthetic pruning when trees are young. It’s easier to get them where you want them. Never prune within the first year of planting. After the first year, start pruning off the younger branches…Then, over the years, train (the tree) to be the structure you want.” One of the key benefits to aggressive pruning is protection against stress and damage from winds in spring and heat in summer, Loveall said. Failure to prune properly can upset the crown to root ratio and result in trees falling over during storms, he explained. Similarly, topping off can encourage chaotic growth, another unintended consequence. “The tops of trees produce a hormone that regulates growth, Loveall said. “When a tree is topped off, you remove the growth regulator (causing) thousands of suckers to shoot out everywhere and sending rot and decay down the root. If you want a hollow tree in (its) older life, top it.” The first thing to look for in pruning branches is anything dead, dying or diseased, instructs Marc Vetere, owner of Manzanita Landscaping Inc.: “Get those out right away. From there, start looking at crossing or rubbing branches. Then, adjust the overall structure and aesthetics of the tree. These principals apply to all tree pruning…I have never found any plant that could not have used a little bit of pruning at some point.”


Pruning can differ by tree type, so know-how is essential. Rules of thumb emerged in conversations with the landscaping companies:

›› Fertilize and water all non-native plants, trees and grasses at appropriate times, so you won’t be wondering years out what went wrong.

›› Thin the crown by removing cross branches or branches with narrow crotches, which are weak because they consist of more bark than wood. ›› Do not cut more than one quarter of the crown at any one time. Instead, phase in the task over the following two or three years. ›› Ensure a strong stem by maintaining at least two thirds of the tree’s height while thinning and keeping foliage one third off the ground. ›› Raise the crown for pedestrian, signage and other safety clearances. ›› Remove any limb for which you need to remove half or more of the foliage. ›› Go out on large branches as far as needed to get the weight off on a first cut – followed by a second cut about a foot long – to ensure a clean cut and no peeling of the bark. ›› Remove suckers at the base of the tree (the tops also for fruit trees). ›› Skip sealants because they could trap disease, interfere with natural healing and promote rotting. ›› Disinfect tools with alcohol (not bleach) and avoid using spikes on footwear to prevent spreading bacterial infection from tree to tree. ›› Deflect heat – and sun scald – off the base (as needed) with special thick white paint from a garden center.

“Removing deadwood in a tree is not just aesthetics,” Loveall said. “It also allows the tree to heal up and gets rid of insect hotels. (Deadwood) is like Motel 6 leaving the light on (to welcome guests).” Deciduous trees: “Elms, cottonwoods and willows can stand trimming any time of year,” Prentice said, “but watch out for bacterial diseases and fungus (including) slime flux and canker worm. They get into running wounds – where trees have been trimmed – and cause something like a person’s blood pressure problem.” Sap pressure will kill willows, he warned, but cottonwoods and elms can survive for years, despite the “unsightly wounds.” Fruit trees: Some trees bear fruit from existing spurs (older wood), while others produce from tips grown the previous year. It is important to know which variety – or combination – before incorrect pruning ruins a potential harvest. Fruit can be removed as needed to keep branches from breaking and damaging the tree, Prentice suggested. Rose Bushes: “Hybrid tea roses and floribundas thrive with annual hard pruning,” explained Chris Welborn, owner of Vicente Landscaping. “The rule of thumb is late winter or early spring after the buds start swelling. When you prune back, you are getting rid of Continued on next page

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Prune for Safety, Plant Health and Pleasing Appearance – continued dead and diseased limbs and promoting growth and future buds for flowering. Just use pruners and gloves for the thorns.” Look first for dead or diseased canes or stems and get rid of them. Next, scan for “weird shapes, crossing or rubbing, or growing way out”, Welborn said. Then, thin out from inside the rose plant to allow air and sunlight to penetrate. Finally, cut down to 12 or 18 inches, depending on location and desired height. “Doing all of those things promotes a healthier growth and new buds and gives good shape and size for the New Year,” Welborn advised. “Roses are pretty hardy. Don’t worry if you make a mistake; you are not going to kill the plant.” Perennials: Winter is the best time to prune summer blooming perennials, in­cluding butterfly bushes, rose of Sharon and purple sage, Welborn said. Keep perennials in check, he added, but preserve size and shape. “You want some foliage – dead or semi-dead – protecting the plant and root system over the winter,” Vetere noted. Evergreens: While pines and other evergreens do not require routine pruning, their health must be properly maintained to guard against bark beetle infestation and fire hazard. Though dormant in winter, bark beetles come out in pines and begin their season when the weather warms. Moisture must be retained after remov-

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ing fuel – such as leaves, needles and other debris – from around the base of trees. Raking up everything at the foot of pine trees dries out the tops, Loveall said. He warned that removing fuel and failing to water makes trees susceptible to combustion.

Loveall stressed watering a tree’s root zone, which averages twice the size of the top. “Ninety plus percent of all nutrient absorption and water is out at the drip line and further,” he said, a fact that many homeowners do not realize. Fire Wise Precautions: Pruning, watering, feeding and other preventative maintenance are important to prevent disease and reduce fire risk, which continues to heighten with ongoing drought conditions. Winter weather can be deceiving regarding plant maintenance, Welborn said. “When plants have gone two months without measureable precipitation, they need to be watered,” Welborn said, despite the dropped leaves and cold winter nights. Most people turn off and drain their drip system over the winter, he continued. If the drip is not operating in winter, the homeowner needs to provide supplemental water when plants are not getting enough rain or snow. “How much to water depends on the size of the drip,” Welborn advised, explaining that deep watering less frequently is better than watering less deep every day. Deeper and longer watering promotes better root structure and better health of the plant overall.” Loveall stressed watering a tree’s root zone, which averages twice the size of the top. “Ninety plus percent of all nutrient absorption and water is out at the drip line and further,” he said, a fact that many homeowners do not realize. Homeowner or Professional: “The average person can prune, with research and if willing to do it,” Abbott said. “But don’t grab set of pruners and go out. You have to understand why you are pruning ... I would recommend a professional 99 percent of the time because most people do not have time to do the research first.” Vetere agreed, noting that many non-professionals “cut in ways that leave little stubs that will create problems … so re-growth is unruly and uncharacteristic.”

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Additionally, homeowners often do not realize their liability in hiring non-insured individuals to help with landscaping and other dangerous home jobs, Lovell said. “Let any Tom, Dick or Harry mow the lawn,” Loveall summarized. “Hire an arborist to fix your tree. Improper pruning definitely is the demise of a tree.”


Choosing the Right Toilet By Joanna Dodder Nellans Are you ready for a high-tech toilet? There are a lot of toilet options out there, and whether you want electronic toilet seats or low water usage loos, or seats that glow in the dark there is a toilet out there for your bathroom preference. How do you find the perfect toilet? There is a wide range of selections; one-piece, two-piece and even portable toilets. Toilet bowls also come in varying shapes and sizes including round and elongated, while different toilet tanks offer different flushing options. Do you want a Pressure-Assisted Flush Systems? This system works with pressurized air that forces water into the bowl when flushed and is king when it comes to preventing clogs or does a Gravity-Flush Systems work for you? This is the most common and simplest system and uses the water weight to create flushing pressure. A

toilet with this flushing system is quieter and requires a lot less maintenance, saving you work after the renovation, and money too.

this is the perfect toilet for your new bathroom, but you still have a lot of choices when buying a new one.

And there is the Dual Flush toilet. This system is designed to conserve water, offering full and a partial flush options to help stop the wastage of unnecessary water. If you are looking to cut down on long term running costs and prevent water wastage,

Something as truly basic as the toilet has been transformed. As we all know first came covered sewers, then indoor plumbing and flush toilets. Now, one bathroom at a time, another major shift in toilet hygiene is quietly underway.

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Did you know that a new generation of toilets may one day make toilet paper unspeakable. On the market now is a hightech version washes from behind and – if desired – in front with water. Better models allow for temperature, direction and pressure control, and have retractable spritzing wands and automatic driers as well. There are toilets with warm seats, automatic motion sensors to raise the lid, buttons to raise the seat, nightlights, self-cleaning mechanisms, music to mask unpleasant sounds, deodorizer spritzers and other conveniences.

nience and comfort to pamper you from top to bottom. Many of the fancy features come built into the seat itself:

›› Clean living. High pressure flushing technology, rimless designs, and space-age materials make these futuristic toilets ultra-hygienic and virtually self-cleaning.

›› Uplifting moments. A motion detector senses when you approach to quietly raise the lid and lower it when Kohler C3 toilet seat that promises loads you step away. of bottom-line pampering is equipped ›› Paper-free society. Sprays and with two separate water nozzles for front fountains offer adjustable pressures and back, the heated seat also features a and pulsations to provide comfortable warm air dryer, deodorizer, and a lighted and thorough cleanup of front and bowl. Prices start at $983. back. ›› Fanny fan. No need to drip dry. Toto’s Washlet has a seat that delivers Turn on the fan to generate a breeze automatic flushes and lifts and lowers the In the market for a new toilet, but not for your backside. lid. Other features include front and rear quite sure which one to buy? Check out ›› Glowing reports. LED lighting washing, massage, warm air drying, and www.map-testing.com the right place sets the seat or bowl interior aglow heated seat (both with adjustable temperwith the information you need to make as a handy nightlight. ature) – all controlled with wireless remote the right decision. From toilet reviews ›› Bun warmer. If you’ve ever control. The seat sells for $1,073. and flush ratings, to water usage reports received an icy reception from and efficiency grades, MaP is an industry-­ a toilet seat, you’ll love the toasty Push-button convenience - you can have leading provider of the most current welcome from a seat with a built-in that with four user presets on the Coco plumbing data. With MaP, you can be sure warmer. 9500R seat. The settings let you personthe next toilet you buy will be the best ›› Scent-sational. A built-in automatic alize your experience with all-adjustable toilet! deodorizer keeps the bathroom fresh oscillating water pressure, spray position, and clean smelling. and temperatures for the seat, water, and Remember that you’ll probably have the ›› No-touch flush. Sensors flush the air dryer. The model also offers a soft-closARIZONA TILEso 2016 Yavapai Page Horizontal 8.375 toilet for 20 years, make sure it has aAd Half toilet automatically when the time x 5.375ing lid and seat as well as a deodorizer. good MaP rating and suites your conveis right. Prices start at $459.

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Mold Can Be Found Almost Anywhere By Sue Marceau People often do not give much credence to mold problems in Yavapai County, given our central Arizona high desert climate. Surprise! Mold can be found almost anywhere, growing on many organic substances when supplied with moisture, oxygen and food. “The most common indoor food source for mold is the cellulose in building materials, such as drywall, insulation and wood,” explained Eppie Vicente, owner of ServiceMaster in Prescott ­Valley. “We’ve all seen mold at one time or another. It might have been in the shower, on stale bread or wet drywall. The colored, fuzzy growth on a wall, floor, ceiling or other indoor surface can reveal a water damage concern and result in building material damage.” Mold will digest, decay and recycle organic matter in the process of typical growth. It is critical to repair the water intrusion, remove damaged building materials and disinfect the remaining structure to stop damage.

Exposure to the tiny “spores” which spread mold can cause mild to severe allergic reactions in the human body, depending on a person’s sensitivity and exposure. “Although the health effects of exposure are not fully understood and can vary, mold in an occupied building can be suspect in contributing to a range of symptoms (including headaches, nasal irritation, and other allergy or respiratory complaints). With mold exposure in your home, it’s possible to feel that your allergies are more active than usual,” Vicente continued. Particularly vulnerable to mold-related health issues might be pets, seniors, infants, children or anyone with mold sensitivity or lowered immune systems, according to Kathleen Frost, principal and environmental scientist for Western Technologies in Prescott. “If people are basically healthy, they might sneeze a bit,” Frost said. “For those with health issues – infants whose immune systems are not fully mature or seniors on medications – (exposure to mold) could trigger asthma attacks or cause more serious infections.” Vicente noted that moisture control is critical to managing interior mold growth, naming typical causal conditions such as poor interior ventilation, plumbing leaks, irrigation and drainage problems, roof leaks and weathering. Hidden water leaks behind walls can create an ideal environment for the “establishment and amplification” of mold. Visible clues are constant drips and leaks under cabinets, situations which can go undetected for a long while, until water stains or odors are noted. In one extreme case remediated by ServiceMaster, a client had a leaking humidifier between the ceiling and joists. Despite the very strong musty smell and the client’s breathing problems, the

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leak was difficult to locate. When they “cracked open the ceiling, mushrooms as wide as my arms were growing … it smelled like a (hot house) nursery,” Vicente related. Mold often is discovered behind a washing machine or in a bathroom, and usually traced to loosely connected parts or corrosion, where the growth has the “one thing it needs: water, humidity, dew point,” Vicente said. “When water intrusion comes in, it takes 72 hours for microbial growth to start happening. With a water spill after three days … mold can become established … If you have a leak, get it dried as soon as possible. That’s the key thing: wet to dry.” Vicente urges anyone who suspects a leak to have it examined by a mold remediation company with an Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC). The priority for that company will be identifying any mold source by using instruments such as moisture meters and infrared cameras. Care must be taken when disturbing affected areas to prevent the release of mold spores and aggravating the situation, according to both Frost and Vicente, who cite containment and filtration as major precautions to limit “fugitive” mold spores from being released to other areas. “One of the things I have seen periodically is a well-intending contractor who offers to help the homeowner and starts ripping into a water damaged area and inadvertently causes a more severe problem by releasing spores into the home,” Frost said.

Anti-Microbial Remediation Specialists (AMRTs) are trained to construct containment facilities around an area of concern and control air flow with High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filtration systems. Water damaged materials then are removed and the remaining framing and support systems are cleaned and disinfected. Post-remediation testing helps ensure that the area has been sufficiently treated. An independent third party, such as Western Technologies, provides testing services important to both building owners and occupants for investment and liability protection. Checks also should be made to confirm the water intrusion has been corrected and the remaining building materials are fully dried before installing new components. Vicente and Frost calm homeowners’ fears by reassuring them that moisture or mold discovery does not cause an “irresolvable” situation. It does, however, require careful and prompt response by experts to protect both occupants and investment. “Don’t panic,” Vicente advised. “The media has made mold bigger than what it is. It can be dangerous, but it can be remediated.” Resolving any water damage discoveries by using industry professionals “will give you peace of mind,” Frost said. “And then you can go back to enjoying the good byproducts of mold, such as your blue cheese, sour dough bread and many liquid beverages.”

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Pssst! Can We Talk? Openly. Honestly. Earnestly … about your septic system? By Sue Marceau Septic tank owners often gloss over the nitty-gritty. Comforting is that no new rules have been released in the past 10 years about septic systems. Constant is that septic systems demand some attention. Unfortunate is that proper oversight and maintenance may be elusive and/or not fully understood. Without appropriate discharge of waste water and removal of solids, nasty problems could surface. Advances in industry knowledge about cleaning waste water triggers updates in septic system regulation, according to Office Manager Brenda Taulbee of JT Septic. A lull has occurred since 2006, she said, on new rules from Yavapai County and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ). That most recent ADEQ regulation requires a system inspection and pump upon the transfer of home ownership. Such property transfer requests comprise about half of the workload at JT Septic. Pumping and maintenance encompass the remainder. Consumer education is a valuable byproduct. Getting the scoop and staying informed about private waste water treatment and optimal performance remain crucial to worry-free system ownership. Online resources and local expertise are available. Take a minute to refresh your knowledge. Did you know, for instance, these seven facts about septic systems? 1. Odds are that systems appropriately installed and properly maintained will last for decades; 2. Well-functioning systems should be free of odor; 3. Inspection and pumping of tanks at set intervals helps ensure tip-top operations; 4. Overflowing septic tanks can discharge raw residue into the leach (drainage) field and harm the environment; 132

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5. Growth of nearby trees at unprecedented rates could mean that nutrient-seeking roots have penetrated the system; 6. Tree roots growing into the system can create drain pipe clogging and blockage; and 7. Excessive amounts of water entering the system – including that sourced by heavy rain, rapid snowmelt, high water tables, and flooding – can produce overload, system failure, and/or groundwater backflow. Homeowners can ensure environmentally friendly and economically effective operation of their private waste water treatment facilities by anticipating what to expect and absorbing a few tricks of the trade. System backups and inconvenience can be limited or avoided with by-the-book inspection and timely removal of solid waste. The first step involves understanding the components of private waste water treatment facilities on one’s property, Taulbee explained, including whether the system is conventional or alternative. A conventional septic system consists of one or more plastic tanks ranging between 1,000 and 2,000 gallons. One

end is attached to an incoming waste­ water pipe and the other to a leach field. Designs ­typically consist of two chambers, each with a manhole cover. A dividing wall featuring openings midway between the floor and roof of the tank separates the chambers. Bacteria begin feeding, first in one chamber and then the next, ultimately draining fairly clear, excess liquid into the leach field. A pipe and drain configuration distributes surplus liquid throughout the field. Percolation, evaporation, and root absorption by plants help eliminate the remaining water from the field. Residual solids in the tank should be pumped out at recommended intervals based on tank size and number of occupants in the home. The Pennsylvania State University Cooperative Extension Service has charted tank sizes ranging from 500 gallons to 2,500 gallons and household occupancy extending to six. The result, available on the JT Septic website, estimates a pumping schedule of 3.7 years for a three-member household on a 1,000 gallon tank. Percolation relates to the porousness of the soil and its adequacy to function as a leach field. A percolation (perc) test is required prior to building a septic system,


and soil which fail that test requires construction of an alternative system. Granite and other rock surfaces in Yavapai County often necessitate the construction of a more expensive alternative system. Taulbee noted that systems installed since 2001 contain a filter which should be cleaned “at least annually.” She described that filter as the “last ditch effort to keep solids from going out to the disposal area.” Sadly, she said, homeowners often do not realize that they have the filter and failure to clean it could result in backups. Alternative systems in rocky areas often include high water alarms, floats, switches, and pump tanks, Taulbee added. Use of these tools “saves a disaster … Know what your system consists of”. The ultimate disposal type is determined by the county and the engineering design. In the boulders, there’s no soil to have a (conventional) disposal system. You have to have an alternative type.” Taulbee said that “the biggest misconception is that if you add additives to the tank, you never have to pump it. The only true way to get rid of solids is to have a septic maintenance company pump them out. The number one thing we tell (consumers) is pump your tank at the required years according to the tank size and number of occupants living in the home.” Tank size and labor determine pumping cost. The final tally includes price per gallon, along with location and digging fees. Each situation varies, Taulbee said, but the minimum price is $400 and includes tanks up to 1,000 gallons. In many cases hand digs are required to locate the access point for pumping. Taulbee shared additional suggestions about owning, utilizing and maintaining a septic system. System demand and use patterns also play a major role in timing for maintenance and pumping. The more a system is stretched, the more often pumping may be needed. The following suggestions are designed to encourage appropriate system use: ›› Know the location of your septic system before planting a garden or trees, building a garage, placing a shed, or installing corrals. ›› Avoid at all costs flushing wet wipes and other solids because they do not break down in the system. Just because something says it is “flushable” it should never be disposed of in the septic system. ›› Test the ability of a toilet paper product to break down by placing a couple sheets in a jar of water and gauging the result. Never flush a Kleenex product as they do not break down properly. ›› Recognize that more frequent pumping may be required for systems with heavy garbage disposal use, the addition of other solids, and RV tank dumping. JT Septic offers to present information about septic systems to meetings of homeowner associations, real estate offices and other interested parties, and/or address consumer questions. Research is available from ADEQ at www.adeq.org; the National Association of Wastewater Transporters at www.nawt.org; and www.jtseptic.com.

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Accounting/Payroll/Tax Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Acoustical Ceilings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Acrylic Block Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Advertising/Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Apparel Logo Wear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alarms/Home & Fire (See Home Security Systems) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appliances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Architectural Services/Architects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Architectural Services/Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arizona 811 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Asphalt Maintenance/Paving/Seal Coating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Attorney/Legal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Audio/Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auto Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Banking/Lending & Financial Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bath Conversions (See Tub/Shower Conversion) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blueprint Copying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bookkeeping (See Construction Accounting/Tax Preparation) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Building Materials & Builders Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cabinet Re-facing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cabinet Refinishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cabinets/Garage & Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cable TV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Camera Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carpet & Tile Cleaning (See Floor Cleaning) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ceramic, Stone & Tile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chimney Sweep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Civil Engineering & Land Surveying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cleaning/Residental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Community Farm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Concrete Contractors & Suppliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Construction Accounting /Tax Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Countertops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Countertops/Concrete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coupons/Savings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deck Coating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Decks/Deck Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Decks/Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Decks/Refinishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Decorative Concrete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Developers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Direct Mail Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Directional Boring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disaster Restoration Clean-Up – Fire, Flood, Odor, Personal Property, Trauma, and Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doors/Screens (See Screens) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drainage Systems & Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134

2016 Building Yavapai

136 136 136 136 136 136 136 136 136 136 136 136 136 136 136 136 136 136 136 137 137 137 137 137 137 137 137 137 137 137 137 137 138 138 138 138 138 138 138 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139

Drywall & Plastering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duct & Dryer Vent Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duct Sealing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Electrical Contractors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Electrical Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Employment Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Energy Building Consultants/Home Energy Audit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Engineering/Testing/Structural/Special Inspections/Foundations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Environmental Testing (Mold, Asbestos, Water Quality) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment Rentals & Dealers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Escrow & Title Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Excavation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fencing – Chain Link/Vinyl/Welded Rail/Wood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fencing – Ornamental Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Finish Carpentry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fire Sprinklers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fireplace Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fireplaces, Woodstoves & BBQ’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Flagstone/Rock Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Floor Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Floor Covering (Tile, Natural Stone, Wood & Carpet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Flooring – Polish Concrete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Foundation Issues/Heaving-Settling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fuel Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Garage Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Garage/Horse Stalls/Barns/Sheds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Garage Floor Coating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Garden Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gates – Chain Link/Vinyl/Welded Rail/Wood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gates – Ornamental Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Contractors: Commercial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Contractors: Engineering, Excavation, Grading & Paving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Contractors: Green Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Contractors: Government, Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Contractors: Historic Restoration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Contractors: Multi-Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Contractors: Residential/Custom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Glass & Mirrors (See Shower Doors/Mirror/Glass) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grass (Artificial/Synthetic Turf) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grid/Tile Ceiling Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gutters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Habitat for Humanity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Handyman/Home Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Health Care Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Highway Construction Safety Guardrail Signs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Home Automation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Home Builders (See General Contractors: Residential/Custom) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Home Furnishings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Home Security Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Home Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hotel – Extended Stay/Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

139 139 139 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 142 142 142 142 142 142 143 143 143 143 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 145 145 145


CATEGORY INDEX

HVAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HVAC Supplies & Fixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hydroseeding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Insulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interior Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Irrigation Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Irrigation Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kitchen & Bath Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kitchen & Bath Remodeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Land Development/Lots & Acreage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Landscaping & Construction Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Landscaping – Erosion Control/Xeriscape/Water Features/Defensible Space Commercial & Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Locks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Log Home Chinking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Log Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marble (Countertops, Shower Surrounds) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Masonry Block/Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mediation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Membership Warehouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Metal/Steel Buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Metal Stud Framing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Millwork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mold Abatement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mold Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mold Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Municipalities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Murphy Beds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Network Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nursery/Garden Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Outdoor Living . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paint & Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Painting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Patio Furnishings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pavers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pavers Material Only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pest Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plan Rooms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Planting Soil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plumbing Contractors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plumbing Fixtures/Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Printing/Copying (See Blueprint Copying) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Promotional Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Propane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Radio Partners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Radon – Testing & Remediation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rainwater Harvesting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Real Estate/Residential & Commercial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Recycling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

145 145 145 145 145 145 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 150 150

Remodeling/Restoration Contractors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Retaining Walls – Masonry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Retaining Walls – Stone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Road/Driveway Chip Sealing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rock (See Flagstone/Rock Supplies) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roofing – Residential & Commercial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saws/Tools/Small Engine Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Screen Doors/Retractable Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Screens (Doors & Windows) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Security Doors & Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Septic & Water Tank Manufacturer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Septic Tank Repair – Cleaning & Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Septic System Design & Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sewer & Drain Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shower Doors/Mirrors/Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Showers – Tile, Marble, Travertine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shredding Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Siding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Signs/Banners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Signs – Highway Construction Guardrail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Snow Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Solar Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Solar Plumbing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Solar Tubes & Skylights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spas/Saunas/Hot Tubs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stock Troughs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stone (See Flagstone/Rock Supplies) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stucco/Plastering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sun Rooms/Pergola Shade & Patio Covers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Surround Sound Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Telephone & Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tile Repairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tree Removal/Trimming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tub Shower Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Underground Utilities: Excavation/Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Waste Hauling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Water & Fire Damage Restoration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Water Purification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Water/Waste Water Piping Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Waterproofing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Weed Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wells/Pump Installation & Servicing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Window Coverings, & Shutters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Window Tinting (Auto, Building, and Home) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Windows/Sliding Door Repairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Windows – Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2016 Building Yavapai

150 150 150 151 151 151 151 151 151 151 151 151 151 151 152 152 152 152 152 152 152 152 153 153 153 153 153 153 153 153 153 153 153 153 154 154 154 154 154 154 154 154 154 154 154 154 154 155 155

135


YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Accounting/Tax Preparation Richard L. Joliet, CPA

1129 Iron Springs Road, Suite 202 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-2386 www.richardjolietcpa.com

Acoustical Ceilings Chartier Drywall, Inc.

(See our ad on page 139) 655 Brannen Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1191

Jebco Construction Companies (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

Acrylic Block Windows Greenlee Designer Surfaces (See our ad on page 14 & 27) Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com

Prescott Window & Door

(See our ad on page 14 & 26) Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-0438 www.prescottwindowanddoor.com

Yavapai Block & Precast Co. (See our ad on page 120) (Material Only) 1389 Masonry Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4340 www.yavapaiblock.com

Advertising/Graphic Design A & E Reprographics

www.a-erepro.com Prescott Location 1030 Sandretto Dr., Ste. F Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-9116 Prescott (Downtown) Location 222 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3815 Prescott Valley Location 8010 E. Hwy. 69, Ste. D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0054

Morgan Sign Company 704 E. Moeller St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6336 www.morgansign.com

136

2016 Building Yavapai

Sir Speedy

Michael Taylor Architects, Inc.

Robert C. Kozak, PLLC

Apparel Logo Wear

Renovations, Your Complete Remodel Resource

Audio/Video

1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

Sir Speedy

118 S. Pleasant St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-0626 www.mtai.net

1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

(See our ad on page 82) 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8506 www.renovationsaz.com

Alarms/Home & Fire

Architectural Services/ Designers

(See Home Security Systems, page 145)

Blue Line Designs

Appliances Lowes

2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

Monark Premium Appliance Co Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (480) 209-6917 www.monarkhome.com

MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 64) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

Quality Maytag

(See our ad on page 51) 1097 Iron Springs Rd. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-8460 www.qualitymaytagaz.com

Architectural Services/Architects Arizona Natural Design (928) 277-1048 www.and-or-tge.com

Catalyst Architecture

123 E. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-3508 www.catalystarchitecture.com

Crystal Creek Builders, LLC (See our ad on page 90) 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

Desert Development & Design, Corp. (928) 777-0022 www.desertdevelopmentaz.com

Headwaters Architecture PC 212 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-7180

Lovdahl Contracting, Inc. (928) 277-5247

730 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-2901 www.bluelinedesignsaz.com

Crystal Creek Builders, LLC (See our ad on page 90) 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

Sterling Design Group 518 E. Gurley St., Ste 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 499-5718

Arizona 811 “Call Before You Dig” 811 www.arizona811.com

Asphalt Maintenance/ Paving/Seal Coating Eyemark, LLC

6947 E. 1st Street, Ste. B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928)237-0404

Specialty Paving & Grading (See our ad on page 130) 503 EZ St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8411 www.specialtypaving.com

Vulcan Materials Company (Material Supplier) 3051 W. Shamrell Blvd. #101 Flagstaff, AZ 86005 (928) 220-7400 www.vulcanmaterials.com

Associations

Bob Kozak 3619 Crossings Dr. Suite B Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7140

Lifestyles Home Technology

(See our ad on page 48) (928) 848-4700 www.lifestyleshometechnology.com

Auto Glass Bennett Glass & Mirror (See our ad on page 152) 722 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1180 www.bennettglassaz.com

Banking / Lending & Financing Services Country Bank

(See our ad on page 6) 147 N. Cortez Street Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-9595 www.countrybankaz.com

National Bank of Arizona

201 N. Montezuma St., Suite 100 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-6900 www.nbarizona.com

Bath Conversions (See Tub/Shower Conversion, page 153)

Blueprint Copying A & E Reprographics

www.a-erepro.com Prescott Location 1030 Sandretto Dr., Ste. F Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-9116 Prescott (Downtown) Location 222 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3815 Prescott Valley Location 8010 E. Hwy. 69, Ste. D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0054

Sir Speedy

Prescott Lakes Architectural Review Committee www.prescottlakescommunity.org

1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

Attorney/Legal

Bookkeeping

Gammage & Burnham

(See Construction Accounting/ Tax Preparation, page 138)

Kevin J. Blakley 2 N. Central Avenue, 15th Floor Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 256-4467 www.gblaw.com


YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Building Materials & Builders Hardware DuPont Tyvek Weather Barriers (800) 288-9835 www.weatherizationpartners.com

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber (See our ad on page 45) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Lowes

2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

ProBuild

(See our ad on page 35) 6601 E. 2nd St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-1221 www.probuild.com

Engrained Cabinetry & Countertops www.engrained.com Prescott Location 550 N. 6th St. (928) 776-4568 Prescott Valley Location 7129 E. 1st St., Ste. 101 (928) 772-8149

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber (See our ad on page 45) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC 9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

Lowes

Cabinet Re-facing

2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

Granite Transformations

MCK Woodworks, LLC

2205 W. Lone Cactus Dr. #23 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (623) 581-5056 www.granitetransformations.com

Reliant Capitol, LLC

725 N. 73rd Ave., Suite 124 Phoenix, AZ 85043 (623) 388-8899

MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 64) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

Northern Arizona Woodworking 8875 E. Laredo Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3779

Cabinet Refinishing Northern Arizona Woodworking 8875 E. Laredo Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3779

The Arizona Woodworking Co.

8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworkingcompany.com

Cabinets Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling (See our ad on page 122) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

(See our ad on page 64) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

Northern Arizona Woodworking 8875 E. Laredo Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3779

Prescott Design Center

(See our ad on page 14) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com

The Arizona Woodworking Co.

8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworkingcompany.com

Timberline Woodworks Inc. 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

USA Cabinets Direct 303 E Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 771-1122

We Organize-U

(See our ad on page 53) 2675 N. State Rt. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 458-7323 www.weorganize-u.net

Cabinets/Garage & Storage Engrained Cabinetry & Countertops www.engrained.com Prescott Location 550 N. 6th St. (928) 776-4568 Prescott Valley Location 7129 E. 1st St., Ste. 101 (928) 772-8149

Garage Floors and More

(See our ad on page 53) 303 E. Gurley St. #195 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 308-7337 www.garagefloorsandmore.net

MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 64) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

The Arizona Woodworking Co.

8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworkingcompany.com

Timberline Woodworks

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC 9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

Interior Logic

(See our ad on page 52) 710 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0900 www.interior-logic.com

Lowes

2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

Precision Marble & Granite

1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

(See our ad on page 36) 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com

We Organize-U

Prescott Flooring Brokers

Cable TV

Prescott Floors

(See our ad on page 53) 2675 N. State Rt. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 458-7323 www.weorganize-u.net

Cable One

(See our ad on page 131) 3201 Tower Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-4511 www.cableone.net

Camera Systems B&W Fire Security Systems (See our ad on page 90) 8544 E. Eastridge Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8008 www.bwfiresecurity.com

Carpet & Tile Cleaning (See Floor Cleaning, page 141)

Ceramic, Stone &Tile Arizona Stone & Architectural Products (See our ad on page 9) (Stone & Pavers Only) 2601 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0828 www.arizonastone.com

Arizona Tile

(See our ad on page 129) (Stone and Tile Supplier) 625 Holiday Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-1070 www.arizonatile.com

Greenlee Designer Surfaces (See our ad on page 14 & 27) Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com

(See our ad on page 47) 401 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-2544 www.prescottflooringbrokers.com 1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life (See our ad on page 75) 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

Certified Public Accounts (CPAs) Richard L. Joliet, CPA

1129 Iron Springs Road, Suite 202 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-2386 www.richardjolietcpa.com

Chimney Sweep Top Hat Chimney Services (928) 899-9659

Civil Engineering & Land Surveying Shephard-Wesnitzer, Inc. 221 N. Marina St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 282-1061 www.swiaz.com

Cleaning/Residential Prescott Maid to Order, LLC 5810 N. Prairie Ln. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 899-8518 www.prescottmaidtoorder.com

2016 Building Yavapai

137


YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Community Farm Mortimer Farm and Events 12907 East St. Rt. 169 Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 830-1116

Concrete Contractors & Suppliers Asphalt Paving & Supply 2425 N. Glassford Hill Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6363 www.ashpaltpavingsupply.com

CEMEX

(See our ad on page 33) 13531 E. Hwy. 89A Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 772-3733 www.cemexusa.com

Diversified Concrete Crafters

(See our ad on this page) (928) 237-0085 www.diversifiedconcretecrafters.com

Drake Cement

5745 N. Scottsdale Road Scottsdale, AZ

Hanson Aggregates

5899 Wilkinson Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7305 www.heidelbergcement.com

Construction Accounting/ Tax Preparation Richard L. Joliet, CPA

1129 Iron Springs Road, Suite 202 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-2386 www.richardjolietcpa.com

Countertops Arizona Tile

(See our ad on page 129) (Material Supplier) 625 Holiday Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-1070 www.arizonatile.com

Artisan Stone Surfaces, LLC (See our ad on page 117) Prescott Design Center Solid Surface Tops Only 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.artisanstonesurfaces.com

Engrained Cabinetry & Countertops www.engrained.com Prescott Location 550 N. 6th St. (928) 776-4568 Prescott Valley Location 7129 E. 1st St., Ste. 101 (928) 772-8149

Laipple Construction (928) 445-6865

Interior Logic

(See our ad on page 52) 710 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0900 www.interior-logic.com

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber (See our ad on page 45) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Granite Transformations

(Granite Only) 2205 W. Lone Cactus Dr. #23 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (623) 581-5056 www.granitetransformations.com

Greenlee Designer Surfaces (See our ad on page 14 & 27) Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC 9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

Lowes

2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 64) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

Northern Arizona Woodworking 8875 E. Laredo Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3779

CREATIVITY ...

SET IN CONCRETE

Decorative Concrete Overlays • Stamping • Staining Garage Floor Coatings Cast in Place • Concrete Restoration Driveways, Patios, Walkways, Slabs Handcrafted Concrete Countertops Polished & Stained Floors 928-772-0110 | Cell: 928-237-0085 DiversifiedConcreteCrafters.com 138

2016 Building Yavapai

Licensed Bonded Insured | ROC 154561

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors To Life (See our ad on page 75) 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

USA Cabinets Direct 303 E Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 771-1122

Countertops – Concrete Diversified Concrete Crafters

(See our ad on this page) (928) 237-0085 www.diversifiedconcretecrafters.com

Coupons/Savings Money In The Mail

(See our ad on page 128) Willie Lass, Publisher (928) 830-5208 www.nazmoneyinthemail.com

Deck Coating Central Basin Roofing, Inc. (See our ad on page 85) 331 N. Arizona Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-5819 www.centralbasinroofing.com

Granite Basin Roofing

(See our ad on page 82) 1011 E. Commerce Dr., Suite #E Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 772-9222 www.granitebasinroofing.com

Western Sealant Company Inc. (See our ad on page 80) (928) 778-3112 www.westernsealantaz.com

Decks/Deck Repair

Precision Marble & Granite

Ability Remodeling & Home Services

(See our ad on page 36) 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com

(See our ad on page 55) 128 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 458-6044 www.abilityprescott.com

Prescott Design Center

AZ Decks Appeal

Prescott Floors

Branson Custom Homes & Remodeling

(See our ad on page 14) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com

331 N. Arizona Avenue Prescott, AZ 896301 (928) 771-0364 www.azdecksappeal.com

1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

(See our ad on page 56) (928) 776-4212 www.bransoncustomhomesaz.com

Prescott Valley Countertops

(928) 533-3376

(Granite Countertops only) 9551 E. Lorna Lane Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 899-3663 www.pvcountertops.com

Moloney Construction, LLC Thompson’s Remodeling Specialists, LLC

(See our ad on page 70) (928) 778-6407 www.thompsonsprescottaz.com


YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Decorative Concrete AZ Decks Appeal 331 N. Arizona Avenue Triple E Construction Pella Certified Prescott, AZ 896301 Contractor See 771-0364 Our Ad Page 35 (928) 540 N. 6th St. #F www.azdecksappeal.com Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) C778-3056 Circle Construction www.tripleeaz.com (See our ad on page 105)

1190 W. Rd. S1yStemS North & SupplieS Drainage Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 Earth Resources Corporation 8120 Poland Road www.circle-c-const.com

Dewey, AZ 86327 Classic Garage, Inc. (928) 775-2795

(928) 308-9477 HD Supply www.classicgarageinc.com

3100 N. Hwy. 89 Prescott, AZ 86301Crafters Diversified Concrete (928) 445-8032 (See our ad on this page) www.hdsupply.com

(928) 237-0085 www.diversifiedconcretecrafters.com Drywall & plaStering

Able & Ready PaintingDeck/Maintenance/Refinishing Remodeling, LLC DeckGuard See Our Ad Page 54 7245 E. 2nd St. #C (928) 776-1767 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 Developers www.ablereadyllc.com Carrington Homes Inc. Chartier Drywall, 394 LaneThis Page SeeIsabelle Our Ad Prescott, AZ 86301 Ave. 655 Brannen Prescott, (928) 445-9711AZ 86301 (928) 778-1191 www.carringtonhomesaz.com

TaylorDevelopment Plastering & Design, Corp. Desert 5798 Foxglove Place (928) 777-0022 Prescott, AZ 86305 www.desertdevelopmentaz.com (928) 772-7522 Dorn Homes, Inc.

Duct Dryer ent cleaning 600 W. & Gurley St. V #200 Prescott, AZ 86305 Builders Wholesale (928) 400445-9427 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 www.dornhomes.com

(928) 778-6655 The Fain Signature Group www.buildersprescott.com

3001 N. Main Street Energy Savings Heating & Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Cooling (928) 772-8844 360 Henry St. Suite A www.fainsignaturegroup.com Prescott, AZ 86301

Directional Boring

Drywall & Plastering

Pitzer’s One-Hour Air Conditioning & Heating

(See ad on page 105) Ductour Sealing (928) 717-0024

(See ourBad on page 122) energy uilDing conSultantS 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Performance Advantage Home See Our Ad Page 17 (928) 775-6178 1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A www.ablereadyllc.com

Valley, 86314 ePrescott ngineering /tAZeSting /Structural 777-8899 S(928) pecial inSpectionS/FounDationS

2013 YCCA Membership Directory Savage Development, Inc. Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling Advantage Home Performance

See Our Ad Page 17 Clean-Up – Disaster Restoration 1021Flood, Commerce Dr., Ste. A Fire, Odor, Personal Prescott, AZ 86305 Property, Trauma and Vandalism (928) 445-3828 www.advantagehome Service Master of Prescott performance.com

8330 E. Pecos Dr. ArrowSeal Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 See 445-9205 Our Ad Page 94 (928) Serving Yavapai County www.servicemasterofprescott.com (928) 925-5353

www.aeroseal.com

Doors/Screens

Moyer’s Heating & Cooling See Our Ad page Page171) 102 (See Screens, 8146 E. Ashley Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Doors Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282Builders 2659 Wholesale, LLC 801 White Spar Road www.moyershvac.com Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 eDucation www.buildersprescott.com

Yavapai College Foundation Foxworth GalbraithSt. Lumber 1100 E. Sheldon Prescott, AZpage 86301 (See our ad on 45) (928) 776-2063 430 N. 6th St. www.yc.edu Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 electrical contractorS www.foxgal.com

Boxer M Construction, LLC Pella & Vista Dr. 11971Windows E. Mingus Doors Mountain West Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 120 E. Corporate Place Suite 16 (928) 925-4967

Chandler, AZ 85225 Delta Diversified Enterprises (928) 710-4253 See Our Ad Page 43 www.pella.com 2606 Centerforce Dr.

Prescott,Window AZ 86301 Prescott (928) 708-0066 & Door (See our ad on page 14 & 26) www.deltadiv.com

6640 Intercal Way Mar Dez Electrical, Inc. Prescott, AZ 86301 PO 772-0438 Box 709 (928) Chino Valley, AZ 86323 www.prescottwindowanddoor.com (928) 642-8073

(928) 445-8402 Prescor Builders www.energysavingshc.com

ProBuild Ponderosa Electric (See our adAd on page See Our Page35) 11 6601 St. 418 E.N.2ndWashington Ave. #F Prescott, AZ Prescott Valley, AZ86301 86314 (928) 717-1790 (928) 772-1221 www.ponderosaelectric.net www.probuild.com

Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282-

S &Door M Electric The & Window Store SeeEOur Ad Page 45 487 St. 10006 P.O.ZBox Prescott, AZ 86301 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 778-6400 (928) 778-1871 www.sandmelectricinc.net www.prescottdoors.com

(See our ad on page 87) Moyer’s 609 WesternHeating Avenue & Cooling See Our Page 102 Prescott, AZAd 86305 8146 E. Ashley Dr. (928) 778-7043 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 www.prescoraz.com Quad Cities (928) 772-4346

2659 Mail Marketing Direct

www.moyershvac.com Money In The Mail Pitzers (See our adOne-Hour on page 128) Air Conditioning & Heating Willie Lass, Publisher 63363 Cooper Hill Dr. (928) 830-5208 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 www.nazmoneyinthemail.com (928) 777-8899 www.pitzersonehour.com Sir Speedy 1961 Commerce CenterSystems Circle TDK Comfort 1940 S.AZHwy Prescott, 8630189, #D Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 776-4332 (928) 636-0846 www.sirspeedyprescott.com www.tdkcomfortsystems.com Yavapai Plumbing & Heating See Our Ad Page 10 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Thomas Electrical Contractors Triple E Construction (Commercial Contractor) (See our ad on page 71) 4636Certified S. 35th St., Ste. 1 Pella Contractor Phoenix, AZ 85040 540 N. 6th St. #F (602) 268-8620 Prescott, AZ 86301 www.teci.us (928) 778-3056 employment SerViceS www.tripleeaz.com

Labor Systems Temporary Drainage Services Systems & Supplies 701 Miller Valley Road Earth Resources Corporation Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 775-2795 (928) 541-0010 www.laborsystems.com

Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-3828 Chartier Drywall, Inc. www.advantagehome (See our ad on this page) performance.com

655 Brannen Ave. Prescott, AZ Public 86301 Service Arizona See Our Ad Page 59 (928) 778-1191

120 N. Marina St. Taylor Plastering, Inc. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-3636 (928) 772-7522 www.aps.com

Duct & Dryer Vent & Cleaning Moyer’s Heating Cooling

See Our Ad Page 102 ArrowSeal 8146 E. Ashley Dr. (See our adValley, on page AZ 114) 86314 Prescott (928) 925-5353 Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282www.arrowseal.net 2659 Energy Savings Heating & Cooling www.moyershvac.com 360 Henry St. Suite A TDK Comfort Prescott, AZ 86301 Systems, Inc. 1940 S. Hwy. 89, Ste. D (928) 445-8402 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 www.energysavingshc.com (928) 636-0846

www.tdkcomfortsystems.com Moyer’s Heating & Cooling (See our ad on Energy page 141)Services UniSource See Our AdDr.Page 59 8146 E. Ashley 6405 Wilkinson Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Prescott, AZ 772-4346 86301 Quad Cities (928) (866) 467-1229 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282-2659 www.uesaz.com www.moyershvac.com

6363 Cooper Hill Dr.

www.pitzersonehour.com

Core Structure Group TDK E. Comfort Systems, Inc. 621 Gurley St. (928) 636-0846 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 899-8696 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com www.corestructuregroup.com Top Hat Chimney Services Western (Dryer Only) Technologies 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. C (928) 899-9659 Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) Verde 443-5010 Sol-Air www.wt-us.com 724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322

e(928) nVironmental 567-5315 teSting (molD, SBeStoS, raDon, water Quality) awww.verdesolair.com Yavapai Plumbing & Heating Western Technologies 1040 Sandretto (See our ad on pageDr., 128) Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86305 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Phone: (928) 443-5010 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 www.wt-us.com (928) 776-7025

ewww.ypeinc.com Quipment rentalS & DealerS Bingham Equipment Company Duct Sealing 2694 Union Dr. Cottonwood, AZPerformance 86326 Advantage Home (928) 646-5388 1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A www.binghamequipment.com Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-3828 Chino Rentals www.advantagehomeperformance.com See Our Ad Page 24 1181 N. Hwy. 89 ArrowSeal Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) (See our636-2026 ad on page 114) www.chinorentalsonline.com (928) 925-5353 www.arrowseal.net

Drywall can be finished using a number of techniques and textures. Homeowners can choose from smooth or textured drywall finishes. Some common drywall textures are: • Knockdown • Venetian Plaster • Trowelled • Mud Swirl • Brush Textures • Skim Coating Some drywall finishes are better for walls that are not as flat or smooth and other finishes can help soften the angels of a room and create a great new look.

2016 Building Yavapai 2013 Building Yavapai www.ycca.org

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YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Moyer’s Heating & Cooling

(See our ad on page 141) 8146 E. Ashley Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282-2659 www.moyershvac.com

Verde Sol-Air

724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 www.verdesolair.com

Electrical Contractors Bice Electric (928) 451-2326

Boxer M Construction, LLC (928) 925-4967

Delta Diversified 6724 Corsair #6 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-0066 www.deltadiv.com

Elan Electric

7760 E. State Rt. 69 Suite C5 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 925-7937 www.elanelectricinc.com

Lifestyles Home Technology

(See our ad on page 48) (928) 848-4700 www.lifestyleshometechnology.com

Mar Dez Electrical, Inc. (See our ad on page 113) (928) 642-8073 www.mardezelectrical.com

P.S. Electric

6301 Baja Circle Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 759-2151

Moyer’s Heating & Cooling

(See our ad on page 141) 8146 E. Ashley Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282-2659 www.moyershvac.com

TDK Comfort Systems, Inc.

(928) 775-2795

Savage Development, Inc. (See our ad on page 105) (928) 717-0024

Fencing – Chain Link/Vinyl/ Welded Rail/Wood

Verde Sol-Air

Prescott Fence

724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 www.verdesolair.com

6576 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928)-445-4211 www.prescottfence.com

(See our ad on page 105) (928) 717-0024

Engineering/Testing/Structural Special Inspections/Foundations

Fencing – Ornamental Iron

Employment Services

Core Structure Group

1514 Shoup St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-2579 www.a-actionwelding.com

(See our ad on page 59) (928) 778-1871 www.sandmelectricinc.net

Electrical Design Savage Development, Inc.

Labor Systems Temporary Services 701 Miller Valley Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-0010 www.laborsystems.com

Energy Building Consultants ArrowSeal

(See our ad on page 114) (928) 925-5353 www.arrowseal.net

621 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 899-8696 www.corestructuregroup.com

Western Technologies, Inc. 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

Environmental Testing (Mold, Asbestos, Water Quality) Western Technologies, Inc. 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

Bingham Equipment Company

Developing the power to help you succeed by delivering quality products and services. Let us show you how “we are working hard to keep you working.

(See our ad on this page) 2694 S. Union Dr. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 646-5388 www.binghamequipment.com

Chino Rentals

(See our ad on page 121) 1181 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2026 www.chinorentalsonline.com

Sunstate Equipment Co., LLC 9351 E. Lorna Lane Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-7350 www.sunstateequip.com

Escrow & Title Services Yavapai Title Agency

(See our ad on page 100) www.yavapaititle.com 123 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2528

EQUIPMENT | PARTS | SERVICE | RENTALS (928) 646-5388 | 2694 S. Union Dr. | Cottonwood www.BinghamEquipment.com 2016 Building Yavapai

Earth Resources Corporation

(928) 636-0846 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com

S & M Electric

Equipment Rentals & Dealers

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Excavation

A-Action Welding

Prescott Fence

6576 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4211 www.prescottfence.com

Finish Carpentry Ability Remodeling & Home Services (See our ad on page 55) 128 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 458-6044 www.abilityprescott.com

MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 64) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

Moloney Construction, LLC (928) 533-3376

The Arizona Woodworking Co.

8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworkingcompany.com

Timberline Woodworks

1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

Triple E Construction (See our ad on page 71) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

We Organize-U

(See our ad on page 53) 2675 N. State Rt. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 458-7323 www.weorganize-u.net


YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Fire Sprinklers All West Fire Protection Systems, LLC 6735 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-7861 www.allwestfire.com

B&W Fire Security Systems (See our ad on page 90) 8544 E. Eastridge Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8008 www.bwfiresecurity.com

Fireplace Cleaning Top Hat Chimney Services (928) 899-9659

Fireplaces, Woodstoves & BBQs Banker Insulation of Northern AZ 5790 Fulton Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2544 www.bankerinsulation.com

Builders Wholesale, LLC 801 White Spar Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com

Eric & Sons

(See our ad on page 14) 6640 Inter Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 775-2880 www.ericandsons.net

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber (See our ad on page 45) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Flagstone/Rock Supplies Arizona Stone & Architectural Products (See our ad on page 9) 2601 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0828 www.arizonastone.com

Asphalt Paving & Supply 2425 N. Glassford Hill Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6363 www.asphaltpavingsupply.com

Dunbar Stone Company, Inc. 1041 Commerce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7880 www.dunbarstoneinc.com

Earthworks Garden Supply

(See our ad on page 116) 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

G&S Gravel

11500 E. Finley St. Mayer, AZ 86333 (928) 632-9359

Mortimer’s Nursery and Landscape Supplies

3166 Willow Creek Rd Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-8000 www.mortimer-nursery.com

Prescott Dirt, LLC

www.prescottdirt.com Prescott Valley Location 7563 E. Hwy 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9030 Prescott Location 4229 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 636-5844

Floor Cleaning Greenlee Designer Surfaces (See our ad on page 14 & 27) Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life (See our ad on page 75) 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

Service Master of Prescott

Delta Plus Floors (Wood Floors Only) (928) 445-3926

Dunbar Stone Company, Inc. (Stone & Tile Only) 1041 Commerce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7880 www.dunbarstoneinc.com

Greenlee Designer Surfaces (See our ad on page 14 & 27) Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC

Desert Hardwood Flooring

(See our ad on page 73) (Install Hardwood Flooring Only) 115 E. Goodwin Street Ste A Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 713-6785 www.deserthardwoodflooring.com

Arizona Foundation Solutions 3841 Superior Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85404 (602) 470-1311 www.foundationrepairsaz.com

Fuel Companies Barrett Propane

Bennett Oil

(See our ad on page 52) 710 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0900 www.interior-logic.com

Lowes

2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

Mile High Tile

(Tile Only) (928) 713-2924 www.milehightile.com

Prescott Design Center

Prescott Flooring Brokers

(See our ad on page 129) (Stone & Tile Supplier) 625 Holiday Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-1070 www.arizonatile.com

Foundation Issues/Heaving – Settling

Interior Logic

Flooring Covering (Tile, Natural Stone, Wood & Carpet)

Arizona Tile

(See our ad on page 138) (928) 237-0085 www.diversifiedconcretecrafters.com

(See our ad on page 23) 1555 W. Iron Springs Road, #5 Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 636-1600 www.barrettpropane.com

(See our ad on page 14) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com

(See our ad on page 122) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

Diversified Concrete Crafters

9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

8330 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-9205 www.servicemasterofprescott.com

Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling

Flooring – Polished Concrete

(See our ad on page 47) 401 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-2544 www.prescottflooringbrokers.com

Prescott Floors

1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life (See our ad on page 75) 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

The Flooring Shack

(See our ad on page 92) 9234 E Valley Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 515-2450 www.theflooringshack.com

810 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1181 www.bennettoil.com

Yavapai Bottle Gas 2170 Concord Dr. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 776-9007 www.yavapaigas.com

Garage Doors Neumann High Country Doors (See our ad on page 72) 8920 E. Valley Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-9738

Garages/Horse Stalls/ Barns/Sheds Ability Remodeling & Home Services (See our ad on page 55) 128 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 458-6044 www.abilityprescott.com

JAGR Shed & Garage (928) 227-6705

Garage Floor Coating Classic Garage, Inc.

(928) 308-9477 www.classicgarageinc.com

Diversified Concrete Crafters

(See our ad on page 138) (928) 237-0085 www.diversifiedconcretecrafters.com

Garage Floors and More

(See our ad on page 53) 303 E. Gurley St. #195 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 308-7337 www.garagefloorsandmore.net

2016 Building Yavapai

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YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Garden Center Earthworks Garden Supply

(See our ad on page 116) 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

Lowes

2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

Mortimer’s Nursery and Landscape Supplies 3166 Willow Creek Rd Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-8000 www.mortimer-nursery.com

Circle D Builders

1035 Vantage Point Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0208 www.circledbuilders.com

Concord General Contracting

Custom Castle Builders

Prescott Builders of AZ, LLC

Headwaters Construction

(928) 925-8809

DeCarol Company

(See our ad on page 65 & 89) (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com

Don Savage Building Contractors, Inc.

(928) 445-9572 www.gresethbuilders.com

Greseth Builders

Haley Construction Company

Gates – Ornamental Iron

(See our ad on page 109) (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

A-Action Welding

Jebco Construction Companies

(See our ad on page 74) 600 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-7900 – Prescott (928) 204-1222 – Sedona www.prestigesecuritydoors.com

General Contractors: Commercial

(928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

John T. Barenz Construction (See our ad inside front cover) (928) 778-3343

Kenson Construction Co.

(928) 778-4007 www.acklinbrothersconstruction.com

6135 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5192 www.kensonconstructionco.com

Aspen Valley Homes

KNA Construction, Inc.

Acklin Brothers Construction

(See our ad on page 143) 697 6th Street, Suite 503 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-9877 www.aspenvalleyhomesaz.com

B’s Contractors, LLC

(928) 771-9240 www.bscontractorsllc.com

Bancroft Homes

7760 E. State Route 69 Ste. C-5-356 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 494-HOME

Circle C Construction

(See our ad on page 105)

1190 W. Rd. 1 North

Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com

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2016 Building Yavapai

1403 Industrial Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-0170 www.fanncontracting.com

FNF Construction, Inc.

Prescott Fence

Prestige Security Doors

Prescor Builders

Fann Contracting, Inc.

(See our ad on page 87) 609 Western Avenue Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com

(928) 445-1307 www.donsavagebuilders.com

1514 Shoup St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-2579 www.a-actionwelding.com

(See our ad on page 49) (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com

4215 E. McDowell Road, Ste. #201 Mesa, AZ 85215 (480) 962-8080 www.concordinc.com

Gates – Chain Link/Vinyl/Rail/ Welded Rail/Wood 6576 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928)-445-4211 www.prescottfence.com

NJ Builders, Inc.

(See our ad on page 124) (928) 717-0147 www.prescottbuildersofaz.com

The Prescott Building Company (928) 713-6008 www.prescottbuildingco.com

Ravencrest Builders LLC 240 S Montezuma Suite 202B Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 541-1677 www.ravencrestbuilders.com

Renovations, Your Complete Remodel Resource (See our ad on page 82) 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8506 www.renovationsaz.com

G. Salisbury & Assoc. Inc.

(928) 713-6966 www.gsalisburycustomhomebuilders.com

Ridgeline Builders, LLC 6640 Intercal Way, Ste. B Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-7194 www.ridgelinebuilders.com

(928) 925-1342 www.tlcconstructionofprescott.com

Triple E Construction

Lovdahl Contracting, Inc.

General Contractors: Engineering, Excavation, Grading & Paving

(928) 445-6094 www.womack-brothers.com

Asphalt Paving & Supply

325 W. Gurley St., Ste. 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1657

2425 N. Glassford Hill Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6363 www.asphaltpavingsupply.com

Michell Development Corp

CLM Earthmovers

Malouff and Company, Inc.

3413 E. Merlot St. Gilbert, AZ 85249 (928) 445-6958 www.mitchellcustomhomes.com

Ringler Excavating (928) 899-0012

Savage Development, Inc. (See our ad on page 105) (928) 717-0024

Specialty Paving & Grading (See our ad on page 130) 503 EZ St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8411 www.specialtypaving.com

Technology Construction 5430 Side Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-0099

Vastco, Inc.

General Contractors: Green Building

Womack Enterprises

(928) 277-5247

(See our ad on page 87) 609 Western Avenue Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com

TLC Construction

(See our ad on page 105) (928) 717-0024

Lantana Development, Inc. (See our ad on page 7) 115 E. Goodwin Street Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 717-0033 www.lantanacustomhomes.com

Prescor Builders

Savage Development, Inc.

(928) 445-6865

Laipple Construction

(928) 636-6976

425 Industrial Dr. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3880 www.vastco.com

(See our ad on page 71) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

(928) 778-6932

115 S. 48th St. Tempe, AZ 85281 (480) 784-2910 www.fnfinc.com

Benttree Custom Homes

(See our ad on page 37) 1575 Plaza West Dr. #B Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 443-5484 www.benttreecustomhomes.net

Carrington Homes

394 Isabelle Lane Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-9711 www.carringtonhomesaz.com

Crystal Creek Builders, LLC (See our ad on page 90) 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

Evergreen Homes

(928) 445-1918

(See our ad on page 76) 2008 Forest Hills Rd. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-0006 www.evergreen-homes.com

Earth Resources Corporation

Haley Construction Company

(928) 775-2795

(See our ad on page 109) (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com


YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

R.E.S. Contracting. Inc. (928) 776-0301 www.prescottbuilder.com

Sun Pine Homes

(See our ad on page 106)

2480 E. Boulder Creek Ln. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6600 Ext. 7 www.sunpinehomes.com

Triple E Construction (See on ad on page 71) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

General Contractors: Government & Schools Concord General Contracting 4215 E. McDowell Road, Ste. #201 Mesa, AZ 85215 (480) 962-8080 www.concordinc.com

Haley Construction Company (See our ad on page 109) (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

Aspen Valley Homes

Evergreen Homes

Bancroft Homes

Greseth Builders

(See our ad on this page) 697 6th Street, Suite 503 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-9877 www.aspenvalleyhomesaz.com 7760 E. State Route 69 Ste. C-5-356 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 494-HOME

Benttree Custom Homes

(See our ad on page 37) 1575 Plaza West Dr. #B Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 443-5484 www.benttreecustomhomes.net

Board by Board, Inc.

(See our ad on page 115) (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com

Branson Custom Homes & Remodeling

(See our ad on page 56) (928) 776-4212 www.bransoncustomhomesaz.com

Carrington Homes

General Contractors: Historic Restoration

394 Isabelle Lane Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-9711 www.carringtonhomesaz.com

Haley Construction Company

Circle C Construction

(See our ad on page 109) (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

General Contractors: Multi-Family Carrington Homes

394 Isabelle Lane Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-9711 www.carringtonhomesaz.com

Haley Construction Company (See our ad on page 109) (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

Jebco Construction Companies (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

General Contractors: Residential/Custom Ability Remodeling & Home Services (See our ad on page 55) 128 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 458-6044 www.abilityprescott.com

Acklin Brothers Construction

(928) 778-4007 www.acklinbrothersconstruction.com

(See our ad on page 105) 1190 W. Rd. 1 North Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com

(See our ad on page 76) 2008 Forest Hills Rd. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-0006 www.evergreen-homes.com (928) 445-9572 www.gresethbuilders.com

Haley Construction Company (See our ad on page 109) (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

Headwaters Construction (928) 636-6976

Jebco Construction Companies (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

John Nanke Signature Group (928) 899-7259

John T. Barenz Construction (See our ad inside front cover) (928) 778-3343

Kenson Construction Co.

6135 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5192 www.kensonconstructionco.com

KNA Construction, Inc. (928) 778-6932

Laipple Construction (928) 445-6865

Lantana Development, Inc. 115 E. Goodwin Street Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 717-0033 www.lantanacustomhomes.com

Lovdahl Contracting, Inc. (928) 277-5247

Malouff and Company, Inc. 325 W. Gurley St., Ste. 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1657

Mandalay Homes

1955 E. Commerce Center Cir. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 277-4817 www.mandalayhomes.com

Michell Development Corp 3413 E. Merlot St. Gilbert, AZ 85249 (928) 445-6958 www.mitchellcustomhomes.com

Moloney Construction, LLC (928) 533-3376

Circle D Builders

1035 Vantage Point Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0208 www.circledbuilders.com

Crystal Creek Builders, LLC (See our ad on page 90) 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

Culhane Contracting, LLC

(See our ad on page 66) (928) 713-8199 www.culhanecontractingllc.com

Custom Castle Builders (928) 925-8809

DeCarol Company

(See our ad on page 65 & 89) (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com

Desert Development & Design, Corp.

(928) 777-0022 www.desertdevelopmentaz.com

Designer Homes By Szabo, LLC (928) 717-9326 www.designerhomesbyszabo.com

Don Savage Building Contractors, Inc.

(928) 445-1307 www.donsavagebuilders.com

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YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

NJ Builders, Inc.

(See our ad on page 49) (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com

Premier Development AZ, LLC (See our ad on page 121) 1305 Westridge Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 227-2043 www.premierdevelopmentaz.com

Prescor Builders

(See our ad on page 87) 609 Western Avenue Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com

Prescott Builders of AZ, LLC (See our ad on page 124) (928) 717-0147 www.prescottbuildersofaz.com

The Prescott Building Company (928) 713-6008 www.prescottbuildingco.com

R.E.S. Contracting. Inc. (928) 776-0301 www.prescottbuilder.com

Ravencrest Builders LLC 240 S. Montezuma Suite 202B Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 541-1677 www.ravencrestbuilders.com

Renovations, Your Complete Remodel Resource (See our ad on page 82) 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8506 www.renovationsaz.com

Ridgeline Builders, LLC 6640 Intercal Way, Ste. B Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-7194 www.ridgelinebuilders.com

G. Salisbury & Assoc. Inc.

(928) 713-6966 www.gsalisburycustomhomebuilders.com

Savage Development, Inc. (See our ad on page 105) (928) 717-0024

Stoney Creek Builders

(See our ad on page 147) (602) 885-3932 www.stoneycreekbuildersinc.com

Sun Pine Homes

(See our ad on page 106) 2480 E. Boulder Creek Ln. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6600 Ext. 7 www.sunpinehomes.com

TLC Construction

(928) 925-1342 www.tlcconstructionofprescott.com

Triple E Construction

Willbuilt Seamless Gutters

Womack Enterprises, Inc.

Habitat For Humanity

(See our ad on page 71) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

(928) 445-6094 www.womack-brothers.com

(See Shower Doors/Mirror/Glass, page 152)

Grass (Artificial/Synthetic Turf)

Handyman/Home Repair

Arizona Stone & Architectural Products

Ability Remodeling & Home Services

(Product Only) (See our ad on page 9) 601 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0828 www.arizonastone.com

CareScape

(See our ad on page 123) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Guardian Landscape, LLC

(See our ad on page 55) 128 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 458-6044 www.abilityprescott.com

Handyman & Construction Services (See our ad on page 50) (928) 771-0405

Thompson’s Remodeling Specialists, LLC

(See our ad on page 70) (928) 778-6407 www.thompsonsprescottaz.com

(928) 379-0063 www.guardianlandscape.com

Health Care Services

Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping

Cornerstone Family Chiropractic

(See our ad on page 119) 8333 E. Pecos Dr. #5 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-6333 www.haciendalandscaping.com

2225 E. St. Rt. 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 237-9477 www.cfc4familyhealth.com

JC Clean Up

3733 Karicio Lane Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 442-0202 www.precisionspinalcare.net

Landscape Now, Inc.

(928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Mortimer’s Custom Landscaping 3166 Willow Creek Rd Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-8000 www.mortimer-nursery.com

Vicente Landscaping

(See our ad on page 14 & 83) (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Zebrascapes, LLC

(928) 830-4061 www.zebrascapes.com

Precision Spinal Care

Prescott Valley Chiropractic

3088 Robert Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-0522 www.prescottvalleychiropractic.com

Highway Construction Safety Guardrail Signs Arizona Highway Safety Specialists (928) 636-8934

Home Automation Lifestyles Home Technology

Grid/Tile Ceiling Systems

(See our ad on page 48) (928) 848-4700 www.lifestyleshometechnology.com

Chartier Drywall, Inc.

Home Builders

(See our ad on page 139) 655 Brannen Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1191

Gutters Arizona Seamless Gutters

(See our ad on this page) 703 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1818 www.arizonaseamlessgutters.com 2016 Building Yavapai

Prescott Area Habitat for Humanity (See our ad on page 62) 1230 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8003 www.prescotthabitat.org

Glass & Mirrors

(928) 830-3480 www.jccleanup.com

144

Prescott Design Center 6640 Inter-Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-0904 www.willbuilt.net

(See General Contractors: Residential, page 143)

Home Furnishings The Picture Window, Inc. (See our ad on page 14) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-0122 www.thepicturewindowinc.com


YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Home Security Systems All West Fire Protection Systems, LLC 6735 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-7861 www.allwestfire.com

B&W Fire Security Systems (See our ad on page 90) 8544 E. Eastridge Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8008 www.bwfiresecurity.com

Safeguard Security & Communication (See our ad on page 77) (928) 772-0155 www.safeguard.us

The Alarm Connection 8816 E State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86314 (928) 445-1609

Energy Savings Heating & Cooling 360 Henry St. Suite A Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-8402 www.energysavingshc.com

Goettl’s High Desert Mechanical 4650 Old Highway 279, #A Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-2200 www.goettlshdm.com

Moyer’s Heating & Cooling

(See our ad on this page) 8146 E. Ashley Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282-2659 www.moyershvac.com

Pitzer’s One-Hour Air Conditioning & Heating

Home Theater

6363 Cooper Hill Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 777-8899 www.pitzersonehour.com

Lifestyles Home Technology

Sun Mechanical Contracting, LLC

(See our ad on page 48) (928) 848-4700 www.lifestyleshometechnology.com

Hotel – Extended Stay/Conference Residence Inn By Marriott (See our ad on back cover) 3599 Lee Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 775-2232 www.marriott.com

SpringHill Suites In Historic Downtown Prescott (See our ad on back cover) 200 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-0998 www.marriott.com

HVAC AC Medic Heating & Air, LLC 4752 S. Senator Hwy. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 848-6224 www.acmedicaz.com

Advantage Home Performance

1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-3828 www.advantagehomeperformance.com

Arizona Heating & Cooling 700 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-9378

3951 E. Columbia St. Tucson, AZ 85714 (480) 447-7630 www.sunmechanical.net

TDK Comfort Systems, Inc. (928) 636-0846 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com

Verde Sol-Air

Advantage Home Performance

1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-3828 www.advantagehomeperformance.com

Arizona State Insulation (928) 775-2403

Banker Insulation of Northern AZ 5790 Fulton Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2544 www.bankerinsulation.com

Gale Contractor Services

11610 E. Santa Fe Loop Road #B Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 778-0222 www.masco.com

Insurance Brown & Brown of Prescott 915 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-3540 www.bbprescott.com

Mosaic Insurance

(See our ad on page 103) 3075 N. Windsong Dr. Ste. B-2 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 458-7374 www.mosaicaz.com

State Farm-Eric Strobel

2485 N. Great Western Dr. #G1 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8338 www.ericstrobel.com

The Mahoney Group

(See our ad on page 102) Clyde Marshall 3636 Crossings Dr. #B Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-1900 www.mahoneygroup.com

Interior Design Heritage Interiors ISI LLC 9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

Prescott Floors

1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life (See our ad on page 75) 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 www.verdesolair.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 128) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

HVAC Supplies & Fixtures Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 128) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

HydroSeeding CareScape

(See our ad on page 123) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Balanced Heating & Air Conditioning

Manzanita Landscaping

(928) 308-4623 www.balancedheating.com

(See our ad on page 91) (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

Chino Heating & Cooling, Inc.

Vicente Landscaping

(See our ad on page 84) 550 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2955 www.chinoheating.com

Insulation

(See our ad on page 14 & 83) (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

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YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Irrigation Materials Earthworks Garden Supply

(See our ad on page 116) 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

Ewing Irrigation

8267 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9803 www.ewing1.com

Mortimer’s Nursery and Landscape Supplies 3166 Willow Creek Rd Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-8000 www.mortimer-nursery.com

Irrigation Systems CareScape

(See our ad on page 123) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Creative Outdoors

Vicente Landscaping

(See our ad on page 14 & 83) (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Zebrascapes, LLC

(928) 830-4061 www.zebrascapes.com

Kitchen & Bath Design Board by Board, Inc.

(See our ad on page 115) (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com

NJ Builders, Inc.

(See our ad on page 49) (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com

Kitchen & Bath Remodeling Ability Remodeling & Home Services (See our ad on page 55) 128 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 458-6044 www.abilityprescott.com

Board by Board, Inc.

(928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com

(See our ad on page 115) (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com

Guardian Landscape, LLC

DeCarol Company

(928) 379-0063 www.guardianlandscape.com

JC Clean Up

(See our ad on page 65 & 89) (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com

(928) 830-3480 www.jccleanup.com

Moloney Construction, LLC

Landscape Now, Inc.

NJ Builders, Inc.

(928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Little’s Landscape & Design 1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

Manzanita Landscaping

(See our ad on page 91) (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

Mortimer’s Custom Landscaping 3166 Willow Creek Rd Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-8000 www.mortimer-nursery.com

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC (928) 710-8244

RRS Landscape & Maintenance (see our ad on page 89) (928) 848-2058 www.rrslandscapeservices.com

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. 140 N. Marina Street Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6116 www.joshuatreescape.com

TLC Sprinkler Repair, Inc.

(928) 541-0061 www.tlclandscapingandsprinklers.com

146

2016 Building Yavapai

(928) 533-3376

Mortimer’s Nursery and Landscape Supplies

3166 Willow Creek Rd Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-8000 www.mortimer-nursery.com

Prescott Dirt, LLC

www.prescottdirt.com Prescott Valley Location 7563 E. Hwy 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9030 Prescott Location 4229 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 636-5844

Yavapai Block & Precast Co. (See our ad on page 120) 1389 Masonry Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4340 www.yblock.com

Landscaping – Erosion Control/Xeriscape/Water Features/Defensible Space Commercial & Residential Autumn Blaze Construction

(See our ad on page 69) (928) 710-4210 www.autumnblazeconstruction.com

CareScape

(See our ad on page 123) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

(See our ad on page 49) (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com

Creative Outdoors

Thompson’s Remodeling Specialists,

Guardian Landscape, LLC

(See our ad on page 70) (928) 778-6407 www.thompsonsprescottaz.com

Land Development / Lots & Acreage Arizona Natural Design (928) 277-1046 www.and-or-tge.com

Prescor Builders

(See our ad on page 87) 609 Western Avenue Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com

Landscaping & Construction Materials Earthworks Garden Supply

(See our ad on page 116) 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

(928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com (928) 379-0063 www.guardianlandscape.com

Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping (See our ad on page 119) 8333 E. Pecos Dr. #5 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-6333 www.haciendalandscaping.com

JC Clean Up

Mortimer’s Custom Landscaping 3166 Willow Creek Rd Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-8000 www.mortimer-nursery.com

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC (928) 710-8244

RRS Landscape & Maintenance (See our ad on page 89) (928) 848-2058 www.rrslandscapeservices.com

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. 140 N. Marina St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6116 www.joshuatreescape.com

TLC Sprinkler Repair, Inc.

(928) 541-0061 www.tlclandscapingandsprinklers.com

Vicente Landscaping

(See our ad on page 14 & 83) (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Zebrascapes, LLC

(928) 830-4061 www.zebrascapes.com

Lighting K’s Lighting, LLC

735 Sixth St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1623 www.kslightinginc.com

Locks Builders Wholesale, LLC 801 White Spar Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber (See our ad on page 45) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Log Home Chinking Stoney Creek Builders

(928) 830-3480 www.jccleanup.com

(See our ad on page 147) (602) 885-3932 www.stoneycreekbuildersinc.com

Jonny’s Tree & Landscaping

Western Sealant Company Inc.

(928) 830-4977

Landscape Now, Inc.

(928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Little’s Landscape & Design 1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

Manzanita Landscaping

(See our ad on page 91) (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

(See our ad on page 80) (928) 778-3112 www.westernsealantaz.com

Log Homes Arizona Natural Design

Log Home Dealer Only – Expedition Log Homes (928) 277-1046 www.and-or-tge.com

Haley Construction Company (See our ad on page 109) (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com


YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Log Homes

Metal/Steel Buildings

Mold Abatement

Mold Testing

Stoney Creek Builders

Circle C Construction

Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling

Western Technologies, Inc.

Marble (Countertops, Shower Surrounds)

High Desert Contracting, LLC

Service Master of Prescott

(See our ad on this page) (602) 885-3932 www.stoneycreekbuildersinc.com

Arizona Tile

(See our ad on page 129) (Stone and Tile Supplier) 625 Holiday Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-1070 www.arizonatile.com

Artisan Stone Surfaces, LLC (See our ad on page 117) Prescott Design Center Solid Surface Tops Only 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.artisanstonesurfaces.com

Greenlee Designer Surfaces (See our ad on page 14 & 27) Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com

Granite Transformations

2205 W. Lone Cactus Dr., #23 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (623) 581-5056 www.granitetransformations.com

Precision Marble & Granite (See our ad on page 36) 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life (See our ad on page 75) 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

Masonry Block/Supplies Yavapai Block & Precast Co. (See our ad on page 120) 1389 Masonry Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4340 www.yblock.com

Mediation Robert C. Kozak, PLLC Bob Kozak 3619 Crossings Dr. Suite B Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7140

Membership Warehouse Costco Wholesale 3911 E. Hwy 69 Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 541-2204 www.costco.com

(See our ad on page 105) 1190 W. Rd. 1 North Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com (928) 232-0101 www.highdesertbuildings.com

Jebco Construction Companies (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

Kenson Construction Co.

6135 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5192 www.kensonconstructionco.com

Prescor Builders

(See our ad on page 87) 609 Western Avenue Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com

(See our ad on page 122) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

8330 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-9205 www.servicemasterofprescott.com

Mold Inspection Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling (See our ad on page 122) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

Service Master of Prescott

8330 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-9205 www.servicemasterofprescott.com

Western Technologies, Inc. 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste.95C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

Municipalities City of Prescott

201 S. Cortez St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-1100 www.cityofprescott.net

Town of Chino Valley 202 N. State Route 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2646 www.chinoaz.net

Town of Dewey-Humboldt 2375 S. Highway 69, Suite 12 Humboldt, AZ 86329 (928) 632-7362 www.dewey-humboldt.net

Town of Prescott Valley 2501 E. Civic Circle Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 759-3000 www.pvaz.net

Stanley Steel Structures

1537 S. Bates Road Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-6703 www.stanleysteelstructures.com

Metal Stud Framing Chartier Drywall, Inc.

(See our ad on page 139) 655 Brannen Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1191

Jebco Construction Companies (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

Millwork MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 64) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

The Arizona Woodworking Co.

8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworkingcompany.com

Timberline Woodworks Inc. 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

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Murphy Beds MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 64) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

Mortimer’s Nursery and Landscape Supplies 3166 Willow Creek Rd Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-8000 www.mortimer-nursery.com

Outdoor Living

We Organize-U

Ability Remodeling & Home Services

(See our ad on page 53) 2675 N. State Rt. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 458-7323 www.weorganize-u.net

(See our ad on page 55) 128 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 458-6044 www.abilityprescott.com

Network Wiring

Arizona Hot Tub Company

Guardian Landscape, LLC (928) 379-0063 www.guardianlandscape.com

JC Clean Up

(928) 830-3480 www.jccleanup.com

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. 140. Marina Street Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 771-6116 www.joshuatreescape.com

Landscape Now, Inc.

(928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Manzanita Landscaping

(See our ad on page 48) (928) 848-4700 www.lifestyleshometechnology.com

(See our ad on page 125) 6947 E. 1st St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9884 www.azhottubco.com

Nursery/Garden Supplies

CareScape

3166 Willow Creek Rd Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-8000 www.mortimer-nursery.com

Lifestyles Home Technology

Earthworks Garden Supply

(See our ad on page 116) 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

Lowes

2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

(See our ad on page 123) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Eric & Sons

(See our ad on page 14) 6640 Inter Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 775-2880 www.ericandsons.net

(See our ad on page 91) (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

Mortimer’s Custom Landscaping

Tuff Spas

7612 N. 71st Ave Glendale, AZ 85303 (623) 939-0851 www.tuffspas.com

Vicente Landscaping

(See our ad on page 14 & 83) (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Zebrascapes, LLC

(928) 830-4061 www.zebrascapes.com

Exceptional Service at Affordable Prices!

Paint & Supplies Dunn-Edwards

6572 E. 2nd St. #A-B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-7748 www.dunnedwards.com

Painting Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling

DOING BUSINESS SINCE 1972

“We will do everything in our power to make sure you’re satisfied with our painting”

(See our ad on page 122) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

Century Painting

(See our ad on this page) 697 N. 6th St., Ste. 304 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-2374 www.centurypainting.com

Certa Pro Painters • All work under warranty • Interior & exterior painting & staining • Skilled, Drug-free crews • High quality painting including low VOC “Green” paint • Professional, Experienced and Reliable • “Painting for a Day” Program • 12 months same as cash (OAC)

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Licensed/Bonded/Insured • ROC #200829

(928) 499-2571 www.certapro.com

Douglas E. Noble Painting

(928) 772-5434 www.douglasenoblepainting.com

J & J Painting

(928) 778-1575 www.jandjpaintingprescott.com

Mile High Painting

(See our ad on page 59) 7760 E. St. Rt. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8854 www.milehighpaintingarizona.com

Pinon Painting

1032 Fair Street Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 778-2902 www.pinonpainting.com

Patio Furnishings Arizona Hot Tub Company (See our ad on page 125) 6947 E. 1st St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9884 www.azhottubco.com

Pavers Autumn Blaze Construction

(See our ad on page 69) (928) 710-4210 www.autumnblazeconstruction.com

CareScape

(See our ad on page 123) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Creative Outdoors

(928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com

Guardian Landscape, LLC (928) 379-0063 www.guardianlandscape.com

Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping (See our ad on page 119) 8333 E. Pecos Dr. #5 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-6333 www.haciendalandscaping.com

JC Clean Up

(928) 830-3480 www.jccleanup.com

Landscape Now, Inc.

(928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Little’s Landscape & Design 1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

Manzanita Landscaping

(See our ad on page 91) (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

Mortimer’s Custom Landscaping 3166 Willow Creek Rd Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-8000 www.mortimer-nursery.com

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. 140 N. Marina Street Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6116 www.joshuatreescape.com


YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Vicente Landscaping

(See our ad on page 14 & 83) (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Planting Soil

Plumbing Fixtures/Supplies

Earthworks Garden Supply

The Plumbing Store

Zebrascapes, LLC

(See our ad on page 116) 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

Pavers – Material Only

Mortimer’s Nursery and Landscape Supplies

(928) 830-4061 www.zebrascapes.com

Arizona Stone & Architectural Products (See our ad on page 9) 2601 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0828 www.arizonastone.com

Mortimer’s Nursery and Landscape Supplies 3166 Willow Creek Rd Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-8000 www.mortimer-nursery.com

Yavapi Block & Precast Co (See our ad on page 120) 1389 Masonry Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4340 www.yblock.com

Pest Control Cowboy Critter Control (See our ad on page 81) (928) 237-9544 www.cowboycritter.com

Hughes Pest Solutions

(928) 899-3346 www.hughespestsolutions.com

Orkin Pest Control

(See our ad on page 34) 8230 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-2419 www.getorkin.com

Truly Nolen of America 6594 E. 2nd St., Ste #D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-4261 www.trulynolen.com

Plan Rooms A & E Reprographics

www.a-erepro.com Prescott Location 1030 Sandretto Dr., Ste. F Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-9116 Prescott (Downtown) Location 222 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3815 Prescott Valley Location 8010 E. Hwy. 69, Ste. D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0054

3166 Willow Creek Rd Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-8000 www.mortimer-nursery.com

Prescott Dirt, LLC

www.prescottdirt.com Prescott Valley Location (928) 775-9030 7563 E. Hwy 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9030 Prescott Location 4229 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 636-5844

(See our ad page 111) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating

JACK – “Cottonwood & Quad Cities” 94.7 FM www.jackfmarizona.com

KUGO – “Travelradio at the Grand Canyon” 102.5 FM www.travelradioUSA.com

Printing/Copying

3841 Superior Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85404 (602-470-1311 www.foundationrepairsaz.com

A & E Reprographics

(928) 775-6550 www.allserviceplumbing.com

Benjamin Franklin Plumbing

Sir Speedy

Arizona All Service Plumbing

1130 AM & 99.9 FM www.kqna.com

(See our ad on page 128) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

www.a-erepro.com Prescott Location 1030 Sandretto Dr., Ste. F Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-9116 Prescott (Downtown) Location 222 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3815 Prescott Valley Location 8010 E. Hwy. 69, Ste. D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0054

Plumbing Contractors

KQNA – “Talk of the Quad Cities”

Radon Testing/Remediation Arizona Foundation Solutions

Western Technologies, Inc. 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

Rainwater Harvesting Arizona Seamless Gutters

(See our ad on page 144) 703 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1818 www.arizonaseamlessgutters.com

6363 Copper Hill Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 777-8899 www.benjaminfranklinplumbing.com

1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

Dan D Plumbing, LLC.

Promotional Products

(See our ad on page 123) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Sir Speedy

Ewing Irrigation

(928) 775-5739

Paragon Plumbing, Inc. (See our ad on page 133) (928) 775-2343

Perfection Plumbing (928) 301-7702

R.E.D. Plumbing

11800 E. Berry Dr. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 772-9296 www.redplumbinginc.com

The Plumbing Store

(See our ad page 111) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

Verde Sol-Air

724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 www.verdesolair.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 128) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

Propane Barrett Propane

(See our ad on page 23) 1555 W. Iron Springs Road, #5 Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 636-1600 www.barrettpropane.com

Yavapai Bottle Gas 2170 Concord Dr. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 776-9007 www.yavapaigas.com

Radio Partners Arizona’s Hometown Radio Group

3755 Karicio Lane Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8289 www.azhometownradio.com

KDDL – “Cattle Country” 94.3 FM & 103.1 FM www.cattlecountryradio.com

CareScape

8267 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9803 www.ewing1.com

Landscape Now, Inc.

(928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Loomis Tank & Trough 150 S. St. Rt. 69 Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 632-5002 www.loomistank.com

Mortimer’s Custom Landscaping 3166 Willow Creek Rd Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-8000 www.mortimer-nursery.com

Vicente Landscaping

(See our ad on page 14 & 83) (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 128) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

KPPV – “The Mix”

106.7 FM & 100.7 (Flagstaff) www.kppv.com

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Real Estate/ Residential & Commercial Homes & Land Magazine (See our ad on page 101) (928) 717-0010 www.homesandland.com

Prescor Builders

(See our ad on page 87) 609 Western Avenue Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com

Vista Del Oro Investments, LLC 11250 E. State Route 69 #2167 Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 710-4487

Acklin Brothers Construction

(928) 778-4007 www.acklinbrothersconstruction.com

Aspen Valley Homes

Haley Construction Company

Board by Board, Inc.

(See our ad on page 50) (928) 771-0405

(See our ad on page 115) (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com

Branson Custom Homes & Remodeling

Recycling Patriot Disposal

Circle C Construction

Remodeling/Restoration Contractors Ability Remodeling & Home Services (See our ad on page 55) 128 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 458-6044 www.abilityprescott.com

Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling (See our ad on page 122) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

(See our ad on page 65 & 89) (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com

(See our ad on page 143) 697 6th Street, Suite 503 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-9877 www.aspenvalleyhomesaz.com

(See our ad on page 56) (928) 776-4212 www.bransoncustomhomesaz.com

9434 E. Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9000 www.patriotdisposal.com

DeCarol Company

(See our ad on page 105) 1190 W. Rd. 1 North Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com

Circle D Builders

1035 Vantage Point Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0208 www.circledbuilders.com

Crystal Creek Builders, LLC (See our ad on page 90) 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

Culhane Contracting, LLC

(See our ad on page 66) (928) 713-8199 www.culhanecontractingllc.com

Thompson’s Remodeling Specialists, LLC

(See our ad on page 70) (928) 778-6407 www.thompsonsprescottaz.com

(See our ad on page 109) (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

TLC Construction

Handyman & Construction Services

Triple E Construction

Kenson Construction Co.

6135 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5192 www.kensonconstructionco.com

Moloney Construction, LLC (928) 533-3376

(928) 925-1342 www.tlcconstructionofprescott.com (See our ad on page 71) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Womack Enterprises, Inc. (928) 445-6094 www.womack-brothers.com

Yavapai Design Build

NJ Builders, Inc.

(See our ad on page 49) (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com

5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-4953 www.ypeinc.com

Prescott Builders of AZ, LLC

Retaining Walls – Masonry

(See our ad on page 124) (928) 717-0147 www.prescottbuildersofaz.com

Renovations, Your Complete Remodel Resource (See our ad on page 82) 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8506 www.renovationsaz.com

G. Salisbury & Assoc Inc.

(928) 713-6966 www.gsalisburycustomhomebuilders.com

Stoney Creek Builders

(See our ad on page 147) (602) 885-3932 www.stoneycreekbuildersinc.com

Autumn Blaze Construction

(See our ad on page 69) (928) 710-4210 www.autumnblazeconstruction.com

CareScape

(See our ad on page 123) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Creative Outdoors

(928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com

Guardian Landscape, LLC (928) 379-0063 www.guardianlandscape.com

Laipple Construction (928) 445-6865

Landscape Now, Inc.

(928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Little’s Landscape & Design 1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC (928) 710-8244

Thomas W. Kincaid Masonry, Inc. (928) 772-8520 www.twkmasonry.com

Vicente Landscaping

(See our ad on page 14 & 83) (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Zebrascapes, LLC

(928) 830-4061 www.zebrascapes.com

Retaining Walls – Stone Autumn Blaze Construction

(See our ad on page 69) (928) 710-4210 www.autumnblazeconstruction.com

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CareScape

(See our ad on page 123) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Creative Outdoors

(928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com

Dunbar Stone Company, Inc. 1041 Commerce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7880 www.dunbarstoneinc.com

Guardian Landscape, LLC (928) 379-0063 www.guardianlandscape.com

Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping (See our ad on page 119) 8333 E. Pecos Dr. #5 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-6333 www.haciendalandscaping.com

Landscape Now, Inc.

(928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Little’s Landscape & Design

BZ Roof’N

(See our ad on page 46) (928) 237-0788 www.bzroofnprescott.com

Central Basin Roofing, Inc. (See our ad on page 85) 331 N. Arizona Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-5819 www.centralbasinroofing.com

Granite Basin Roofing

(See our ad on page 82) 1011 E. Commerce Dr., Suite #E Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 772-9222 www.granitebasinroofing.com

Legacy Roofing, LLC

(See our ad on page 93) 9386 E. Florentine #900 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 460-4430 www.legacyroofingllc.com

Roofing Systems of Prescott (928) 778-5017

Superior Roofing of Northern AZ (928) 775-0060 www.superiorroofingofaz.com

1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

Saw/Tool/Small Engine Repair

Manzanita Landscaping

(See our ad on page 97) 625 Miller Valley Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6371 www.ablesaw.com

(See our ad on page 91) (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

Able Saw

(928) 710-8244

Screen Doors/Retractable Doors

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co.

DC Solutions (DBA) Arizona Breeze Retractable

140 N. Marina Street Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6116 www.joshuatreescape.com

Vicente Landscaping

(See our ad on page 14 & 83) (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Prescott Screenmobile

Rock (See Flagstone/Rock Supplies, page 141)

Roofing – Residential & Commercial Badger Roofing

(See our ad on this page) 8800 E. Long Mesa Dr., Ste. A Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 771-8770 www.badgerroofing.net

Bradshaw Mountain Roofing 8734 E. Long Mesa Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-1145

(See our ad on page 74) 600 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-7900 – Prescott (928) 204-1222 – Sedona www.prestigesecuritydoors.com

Septic & Water Tank Manufacturer Loomis Tank & Trough 150 S. St. Rt. 69 Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 632-5002 www.loomistank.com

Yavapai Block & Precast Co. (See our ad on page 120) 1389 Masonry Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4340 www.yblock.com

Septic Repair/Inspections/ Cleaning JT’s Septic

(See our ad on page 133) (928) 632-7077

Ringler Excavating (928) 899-0012

Savage Development, Inc. (See our ad on page 105) (928) 717-0024

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Arizona All Service Plumbing (928) 775-6550 www.allserviceplumbing.com

Paragon Plumbing, Inc. (See our ad on page 133) (928) 775-2343

R.E.D. Plumbing

11800 E. Berry Dr. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 772-9296 www.redplumbinginc.com

The Plumbing Store

(See our ad on page 111) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 128) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Prestige Security Doors

Road/Driveway Chip Sealing (928) 775-2795

Prestige Security Doors

Septic System Design & Installation

Screens (Doors & Windows)

Zebrascapes, LLC

Earth Resources Corporation

(928) 713-8684 www.screenmobile.com

(928) 533-3336 www.azretractable.com

(See our ad on page 74) 600 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-7900 – Prescott (928) 204-1222 – Sedona www.prestigesecuritydoors.com

(928) 830-4061 www.zebrascapes.com

Prescott Screenmobile

(928) 713-8684 www.screenmobile.com

Triple E Construction (See our ad on page 71) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Security Doors & Screens A-Action Welding

1514 Shoup St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-2579 www.a-actionwelding.com

First Impression Security Doors 1415 N. Mondel Dr. Gilbert, AZ 85233 (480) 588-4811 www.firstimpressionsecuritydoors.com

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Shower Doors/Mirrors/Glass

Siding

Bennett Glass & Mirror

Reliant Capitol, LLC

(See our ad on this page) 722 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1180 www.bennettglassaz.com

Precision Marble & Granite (See our ad on page 36) 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com

Showers: Tile, Marble, Travertine Accustom Tile and Stone (928) 308-8188

Greenlee Designer Surfaces (See our ad on page 14 & 27) Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com

Shredding Services Sir Speedy

1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

725 N. 73rd Ave., Suite 124 Phoenix, AZ 85043 (623) 388-8899

Signs/Banners A & B Sign Company

691 6th St., Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6995 www.absignco.com

A & E Reprographics

www.a-erepro.com Prescott Location 1030 Sandretto Dr., Ste. F Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-9116 Prescott (Downtown) Location 222 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3815 Prescott Valley Location 8010 E. Hwy. 69, Ste. D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0054

Morgan Sign Company 704 E. Moeller St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6336 www.morgansign.com

Sir Speedy

Signs – Highway Construction Guardrail

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

Arizona Highway Safety Specialists

Vicente Landscaping

(928) 710-8244

Snow Removal

(See our ad on page 14 & 83) (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

CareScape

Zebrascapes, LLC

(928) 636-8934

(See our ad on page 123) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

(928) 830-4061 www.zebrascapes.com

Guardian Landscape, LLC

128 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 277-8460 www.blazingsky.com

(928) 379-0063 www.guardianlandscape.com

JC Clean Up

(928) 830-3480 www.jccleanup.com

Solar Energy Blazing Sky Energy Group

EV Solar Products, Inc.

Landscape Now, Inc.

(928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

(See our ad on page 73) 2655 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2201 www.evsolar.com

Little’s Landscape & Design

Pur Solar & Electrical

1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

Manzanita Landscaping

(See our ad on page 91) (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

www.pursolaraz.com Cottonwood Location 1505 E. Cochise St. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 639-1267 Prescott Valley Location 7433 E. Addis Ave Prescott Valley, 86314 (928) 788-0285

BENNETT GLASS & MIRROR Full Service Glass Shop Since 1975

AUTOMOTIVE | RESIDENTIAL | COMMERCIAL | MIRRORS | SHOWERS

Free Estimates in Your Home • Senior Citizen and Military Discounts www.BennettGlassAZ.com • 928.445.1180 722 E Sheldon St. Prescott • ROC 304638 152

2016 Building Yavapai


YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Rooftop Solar, LLC 16 E. St. Rt. 66 #203 Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (928) 213-5670 www.rooftopsolar.us

Southface Solar Electric

2122 W. Lone Cactus Dr. St. #2 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (480) 636-1800 www.southfacese.com

Prescott Window & Door

(See our ad on page 14 & 26) Skylights Only 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-0438 www.prescottwindowanddoor.com

The Door & Window Store

Solar Plumbing

487 E Z St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6400 www.prescottdoors.com

Arizona All Service Plumbing

Spas/Saunas/Hot tubs

(928) 775-6550 www.allserviceplumbing.com

EV Solar Products, Inc. (See our ad on page 73) 2655 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2201 www.evsolar.com

R.E.D. Plumbing

11800 E. Berry Dr. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 772-9296 www.redplumbinginc.com

TDK Comfort Systems, Inc. (928) 636-0846 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com

Verde Sol-Air

724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 www.verdesolair.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 128) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Solar Tubes & Skylights Arizona Window Wizard Installation & Service (928) 775-8964

Badger Roofing

(See our ad on page 151) 8800 E. Long Mesa Dr., Ste. A Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 771-8770 www.badgerroofing.net

Builders Wholesale, LLC

Arizona Hot Tub Company (See our ad on page 125) 6947 E. 1st St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9884 www.azhottubco.com

Tuff Spas

(928) 308-8188

Greenlee Designer Surfaces (See our ad on page 14 & 27) Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com

Mile High Tile

(Tile Only) (928) 713-2924 www.milehightile.com

140 N. Marina Street Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6116 www.joshuatreescape.com

Landscape Now, Inc.

(928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Mortimer’s Custom Landscaping 3166 Willow Creek Rd Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-8000 www.mortimer-nursery.com

Vicente Landscaping

Tree Removal/Trimming Big Bear Tree Care

(See our ad on page 14 & 83) (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Zebrascapes, LLC

(928) 925-5786

(928) 830-4061 www.zebrascapes.com

CareScape

Stock Troughs

Guardian Landscape, LLC (928) 379-0063 www.guardianlandscape.com

(See our ad on page 122) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

JC Clean Up

Arizona All Service Plumbing

Loomis Tank & Trough 150 S. St. Rt. 69 Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 632-5002 www.loomistank.com

Stone (See Flagstone/Rock Supplies, page 141)

Stucco/Plastering Sanders Plastering Systems (See our ad on this page) (928) 632-5008 www.sandersplastering.com

Taylor Plastering, Inc. (928) 772-7522

Sun Rooms/Pergola Shade & Patio Covers Stanley Steel Structures

1537 S. Bates Road Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-6703 www.stanleysteelstructures.com

Eric & Sons

Surround Sound Systems

(See our ad on page 82) 1011 E. Commerce Dr., Suite #E Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 772-9222 www.granitebasinroofing.com

Accustom Tile and Stone

(See our ad on page 123) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Sunburst Patios

Granite Basin Roofing

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co.

7612 N. 71st Ave Glendale, AZ 85303 (623)939-0851 www.tuffspas.com

801 White Spar Road. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com (See our ad on page 14) 6640 Inter Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 775-2880 www.ericandsons.net

Tile Repairs

6263 Copper Hill Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8229

Lifestyles Home Technology

(See our ad on page 48) (928) 848-4700 www.lifestyleshometechnology.com

Telephone & Internet Cable One

(See our ad on page 131) 3201 Tower Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-4511 www.cableone.net

Tub/Shower Conversion Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling

(928) 830-3480 www.jccleanup.com

(928) 775-6550 www.allserviceplumbing.com

Jonny’s Tree & Landscaping (928) 830-4977

SP S SPimply ut...

Stucco Restoration anders lastering New Stucco Systems ystems LLC  

the finest Stucco Restoration and new Stucco you will find!

SPanders romise: We will do what we say!

We will create an expectation… then exceed it! www.sandersplastering.com

• Conventional Stucco • Stucco Restoration Systems • Residential/Commercial

Call for a FREE inspection and consultation

SINCE 1993

928-632-5008 ROC 291273

ROC 291272

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YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Granite Transformations

2205 W. Lone Cactus Dr., #23 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (623)-581-5056 www.granitetransformations.com

Moloney Construction, LLC (928) 533-3376

Precision Marble & Granite (See our ad on page 36) 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com

Reliant Capitol, LLC

725 N. 73rd Ave., Suite 124 Phoenix, AZ 85043 (623) 388-8899

The Plumbing Store

(See our ad on page 111) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

Thompson’s Remodeling Specialists, LLC

(See our ad on page 70) (928) 778-6407 www.thompsonsprescottaz.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 128) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Southwest Waste Services, Inc. (See our ad on page 104) 2671 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-8446 www.azsws.com

The Plumbing Store

(See our ad page 111) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

Water & Fire Damage Restoration

Waterproofing

Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling

AZ Decks Appeal

(See our ad on page 122) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

Moloney Construction, LLC (928) 533-3376

Service Master of Prescott

8330 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-9205 www.servicemasterofprescott.com

Triple E Construction (See our ad on page 71) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Water Purification Arizona All Service Plumbing (928) 775-6550 www.allserviceplumbing.com

Kinetico Quality Water

331 N. Arizona Avenue Prescott, AZ 896301 (928) 771-0364 www.azdecksappeal.com

Western Sealant Company Inc. (See our ad on page 80) (928) 778-3112 www.westernsealantaz.com

Weed Control CareScape

(See our ad on page 123) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Guardian Landscape, LLC (928) 379-0063 www.guardianlandscape.com

JC Clean Up

(928) 830-3480 www.jccleanup.com

Landscape Now, Inc.

(928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Underground Utilities: Excavation & Installation

www.kineticonaz.com 7485 E. 1st St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-5020

Earth Resources Corporation

Perfection Plumbing

(928) 775-2795

(928) 301-7702

3166 Willow Creek Rd Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-8000 www.mortimer-nursery.com

Savage Development, Inc.

R.E.D. Plumbing

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

Utilities

11800 E. Berry Dr. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 772-9296 www.redplumbinginc.com

Arizona Public Service

The Plumbing Store

(See our ad on page 105) (928) 717-0024

(See our ad on page 12) 120 N. Marina St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-3636 www.aps.com

(See our page 111) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

UniSource Energy Services

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating

6405 N. Wilkinson Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 771-7298 www.uesaz.com

Waste Hauling Patriot Disposal

9434 E. Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9000 www.patriotdisposal.com

Prescott Valley C&D Landfill 2640 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 759-9400

(See our ad on page 128) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Water/Waste Water Piping Supplies Loomis Tank & Trough 150 S. St. Rt. 69 Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 632-5002 www.loomistank.com

Mortimer’s Custom Landscaping

(928) 710-8244

RRS Landscape & Maintenance (See our ad on page 89) (928) 848-2058 www.rrslandscapeservices.com

Vicente Landscaping

(See our ad on page 14 & 83) (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Zebrascapes, LLC

(928) 830-4061 www.zebrascapes.com

Welding A-Action Welding

1514 Shoup St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-2579 www.a-actionwelding.com

Wells/Pump Installation & Servicing Dan McGee Drilling & Pump (928) 636-4576

R.W. Turner and Sons 3471 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2771

154

2016 Building Yavapai

Window Coverings & Shutters Blind Brothers Arizona (See our ad on page 25) (928) 710-1962 www.hunterdouglas.com

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC 9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

Interior Logic

(See our ad on page 52) 710 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0900 www.interior-logic.com

Prescott Design Center

(See our ad on page 14) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com

Prescott Floors

1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life (See our ad on page 75) 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

The Blind Brothers (DBA) Blinds Shutters & Shades 437 S. Main St., Ste. 3 Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-2423 www.theblindbrothers.com

The Picture Window, Inc. (See our ad on page 14) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-0122 www.thepicturewindowinc.com

Window Tinting (Auto, Office, and Home) Protint, LLC

(See our ad on page 54) 6264 E. Highway 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-5971 www.protintaz.com

Windows Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling (See our ad on page 122) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

Builders Wholesale, LLC 801 White Spar Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com


YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber (See our ad on page 45) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Pella Windows & Doors Mountain West

120 E. Corporate Place Suite 16 Chandler, AZ 85225 (928) 710-4253 www.pella.com

Prescott Window & Door

(See our ad on page 14 & 26) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-0438 www,prescottwindowanddoor.com

ProBuild

(See our ad on page 35) 6601 E. 2nd St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-1221 www.probuild.com

Reliant Capitol, LLC

725 N. 73rd Ave., Ste. 124 Phoenix, AZ 85043 (623) 388-8899

Renewal by Andersen of Northern Arizona 2485 N. Great Western Dr. #D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3159 www.renewalbyandersen.com

The Door & Window Store 487 E Z St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6400 www.prescottdoors.com

Triple E Construction (See our ad on page 71)

Pella Certified Contractor 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Architectural Services/Architects

Concrete Contractors & Suppliers

Arizona Natural Design

Asphalt Paving & Supply

Lovdahl Contracting, Inc. (928) 277-5247

Architectural Services/Designers Sterling Design Group (928) 499-5718

Asphalt Maintenance/ Paving/Seal Coating Vulcan Materials Company (Material Supplier) (928) 220-7400 www.vulcanmaterials.com

(928) 772-6363 www.ashpaltpavingsupply.com

Countertops Northern Arizona Woodworking (928) 772-3779

Duct & Dryer Vent Cleaning ArrowSeal

(See our ad on page 114) (928) 925-5353 www.arrowseal.net

Duct Sealing ArrowSeal

Banking /Lending & Financing Services

(See our ad on page 114) (928) 925-5353 www.arrowseal.net

Country Bank

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating

(See our ad on page 6) 597 E State Route 89A Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 639-0020 www.countrybankaz.com

Cabinets/Custom/ Refacing/Refinishing Northern Arizona Woodworking (928) 772-3779

Cable TV Cable One

(See our ad on page 131) (928) 445-4511 www.cableone.net

Arizona Window Wizard Installation & Service (928) 775-8964

Windows – Replacement Bennett Glass & Mirror (See our ad on page 152) 722 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1180 www.bennettglassaz.com

Reliant Capitol, LLC

725 N. 73rd Ave., Suite 124 Phoenix, AZ 85043 (623) 388-8899

Triple E Construction (See our ad on page 71) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Windows N More

Moloney Construction, LLC (928) 533-3376

6616 E. 2nd St. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-1085 www.windowsnmore.com

Prescott Window & Door

Window World of Northern Arizona

(See our ad on page 14 & 26) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-0438 www.prescottwindowanddoor.com

(See our ad on page 115) 101 Airpark Road #L Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 649-9111 www.windowworldnoaz.com

Renewal by Andersen of Northern Arizona 2485 N. Great Western Dr. #D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3159 www.renewalbyandersen.com

YCCA VERDE VALLEY DIRECTORY (928) 277-1048 www.and-or-tge.com

Windows/Sliding Door Repairs

(See our ad on page 128) (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

YCCA VERDE VALLEY DIRECTORY Engineering/Testing/Structural Special Inspections/Foundations

Fire Sprinklers

Core Structure Group

(928) 776-7861 www.allwestfire.com

(928) 899-8696 www.corestructuregroup.com

Escrow & Title Services Yavapai Title Agency

(See our ad on page 100) Sedona Office 2855 W. State Rt. 89A Suite 8 Sedona, AZ 863336 (928) 282-4141 Camp Verde Office 527 S. Main Street, Suite 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-0590 Cottonwood Office 716 S. Main Street Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-7591 www.yavapaititle.com

Equipment Rentals & Dealers Bingham Equipment Company

Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 451-2326

(See our ad on page 140) 2694 S. Union Dr. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 646-5388 www.binghamequipment.com

Energy Building Consultants

Fireplaces, Woodstoves & BBQs

ArrowSeal

Banker Insulation of Northern AZ

Electrical Contractors Bice Electric

(See our ad on page 114) (928) 925-5353 www.arrowseal.net

All West Fire Protection Systems, LLC

Flagstone/Rock Supplies Asphalt Paving & Supply (928) 772-6363 www.ashpaltpavingsupply.com

Gates – Ornamental Iron Prestige Security Doors

(See our ad on page 74) 513 S. Main St. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 204-1222 www.prestigesecuritydoors.com

General Contractors: Commercial C&B Construction

1360 S. Bates Rd. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-8453 www.greyfoxridge.com

General Contractors: Engineering, Excavation, Grading & Paving Asphalt Paving & Supply (928) 772-6363 www.asphaltpavingsupply.com

(928) 772-2544 www.bankerinsulation.com

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YCCA VERDE VALLEY DIRECTORY General Contractors: Residential/Custom

The Mahoney Group

(See our ad on page 102) (928) 445-1900 www.mahoneygroup.com

C&B Construction

1360 S. Bates Rd. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-8453 www.greyfoxridge.com

Irrigation Systems

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC (928) 710-8244

RRS Landscape & Maintenance

Home Furnishings

(See our ad on page 89) (928) 848-2058 www.rrslandscapeservices.com

The Picture Window, Inc. (See our ad on page 14) 634 E. State Route 89A Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-8442

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

Home Security Systems

Landscaping – Erosion Control/Xeriscape/ Water Features/Defensible Space Commercial & Residential

All West Fire Protection Systems (928) 776-7861 www.allwestfire.com

YCCA VERDE VALLEY DIRECTORY Plumbing Contractors Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 128) (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Retaining Walls – Masonry

Telephone & Internet

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co.

Cable One

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

(See our ad on page 131) (928) 445-4511 www.cableone.net

Retaining Walls – Stone

Tree Removal/Trimming

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co.

(928) 710-8244

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co.

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC The Joshua Tree Landscape Co.

Screens (Doors & Windows)

HVAC

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

Balanced Heating & Air Conditioning (928) 308-4623 www.balancedheating.com

RRS Landscape & Maintenance (See our ad on page 89) (928) 848-2058 www.rrslandscapeservices.com

Goettl’s High Desert Mechanical 4650 Old Highway 279, #A Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-2200 www.goettlshdm.com

Lighting K’s Lighting, LLC

Moyers Heating & Cooling

(928) 445-1623 www.kslightinginc.com

(See our ad on page 145) 2400 E. Hwy 89 #A Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 282-2659 www.moyershvac.com

Metal/Steel Buildings Stanley Steel Structures

1537 S. Bates Road Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-6703 www.stanleysteelstructures.com

TDK Comfort Systems, Inc. (928) 636-0846 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com

Verde Sol-Air

Murphy Beds

724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 Toll Free: (866) 700-5757 www.verdesolair.com

MCK Woodworks, LLC

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 128) (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Banker Insulation of Northern AZ

Cottonwood, AZ (928) 634-7223

(See our ad on page 125) (928) 775-9884 www.azhottubco.com

Insurance

Pest Control

Mosaic Insurance

Cowboy Critter Control (See our ad on page 81) (928) 237-9544 www.cowboycritter.com

(See our ad on page 103) (928) 458-7374 www.mosaicaz.com

Prestige Security Doors

(See our ad on page 74) 513 S. Main St. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 928-204-1222 www.prestigesecuritydoors.com

2016 Building Yavapai

Tub/Shower Conversion Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 128) (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Water Purification Kinetico Quality Water 2697 W. St. Rt. 89A Sedona, AZ 86336 (928) 282-2115 www.lineticonaz.com

Weed Control Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC (928) 710-8244

RRS Landscape & Maintenance (See our ad on page 89) (928) 848-2058 www.rrslandscapeservices.com

JT’s Septic

Window Coverings & Shutters

(See our ad on page 133) (928) 632-7077

Snow Removal (928) 710-8244

Solar Energy Pur Solar

1505 E. Cochise St. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 639-1267 www.pursolaraz.com

Solar Plumbing Verde Sol-Air

724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 Toll Free: (866) 700-5757 www.verdesolair.com

Spas/Saunas/Hot tubs Arizona Hot Tub Company (See our ad on page 125) (928) 775-9884 www.azhottubco.com

156

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

Septic Repair/Inspections/ Cleaning

Blazing Sky Energy Group (928) 277-8460

Arizona Hot Tub Company

Wolf Insulation

Security – Doors & Windows

Pavers

Patio Furnishings

(928) 772-2544 www.bankerinsulation.com

(See our ad on page 74) 513 S. Main St. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 204-1222 www.prestigesecuritydoors.com

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

Insulation

Prestige Security Doors

(See our ad on page 64) (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co.

1537 S. Bates Road Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-6703 www.stanleysteelstructures.com

(928) 710-8244

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

(928) 710-8244

Stanley Steel Structures

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

(See our ad on page 77) (928) 772-0155 www.safeguard.us

Safeguard Security & Communication

Sun Rooms/ Pergola Shade & Patio Covers

The Blind Brothers (DBA) Blinds Shutters & Shades 437 S. Main St., Ste. 3 Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-2423 www.theblindbrothers.com

The Picture Window, Inc. (See our ad on page 14) 634 E. State Route 89A Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-8442 www.thepicturewindowinc.com

Windows – Replacement Window World of Northern Arizona (See our ad on page 115) 101 Airpark Road #L Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 649-9111 www.windowworldnoaz.com

Window Tinting (Auto, Office, and Home) Protint, LLC

(See our ad on page 54) (928) 772-5971 www.protintaz.com


The Space You Need,

the Lifestyle You Deserve H O M E S

Q u a l i t y. I n t e g r i t y. Va l u e.

TogetherHweOcan M build E S your dream home on one of our home sites in these premier communities: • The Enclave at The Dells • The Reserve at Willow Hills • Mollie Rae in Chino Valley

• • • • •

Talking Rock Ranch The Viewpoint North StoneRidge Hassayampa or on your own site

You will be impressed with our included features, come visit with us today and start building your dream. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

E. GEORGE ROTHFUSS II Principal C: 928.710.8801 georger@reservebuilders.com

AZROC# 281594

PAULA S. THOMAS Realtor ® Team Lead C: 928.710.0845 paula@reservehomes.net

Contact our sales department at (928) 237-9998 info@ res er v eh o m es.net • w w w.res er v ehome s.ne t


Profile for YCCA

YCCA 2016 E-MAG  

YCCA 2016 Yavapai County Contractors Association Prescott, Prescott Valley, Arizona

YCCA 2016 E-MAG  

YCCA 2016 Yavapai County Contractors Association Prescott, Prescott Valley, Arizona

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