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BUILDING YAVAPAI By Sandy Griffis, Executive Director

June of 2013: The power of our very own Yavapai County banded us together in a time of extreme crisis. Totally stunned, we were nonetheless a community that was amazing and full of love. Thousands of hearts, hands and minds from all backgrounds and viewpoints worked in concert to generate wherewithal and resolve. The often overwhelming demands of life, love, work, and loss splintered our attention. Challenges surrounded us. Unwavering optimism defined us. WE ARE YAVAPAI COUNTY! Tragedy abruptly reminded us that the work day is not just another few hours at the desk or on the job site. We recognized that we – as a community – are all about life and family and building cooperative spirit. Every day of our lives – on the job or off – we focus on doing what needs to be accomplished for the support of all. Each year while compiling our Building Yavapai magazine, we look back invigorated at all we have accomplished professionally in our community and how we see the future of our industry. Construction has experienced a mild recovery, although it has surfaced much more unevenly and far slower than most of us would have wished. We must keep positive and stay on course. With every push forward in 2014, our passion to prosper will galvanize us in the months and years to come. Let’s be thankful for what we have and find new ways to build upon and share it. 2013 was a year each of us navigated cautiously amid a lagging economy and deeply divided lawmakers who were in pursuit of regulatory policies changing our industry and affecting you, the people we serve. We triumphed daily by overcoming setbacks and finding solutions to obstacles. We stretched our resources, firmed our resolve and made headway under challenging circumstances beyond our control. We have so much to be grateful for. Let’s all get inspired and pass it on. YCCA, as with so many other businesses, waded through uncertainty and unfavorable industry conditions to offer you and our members and the communities we serve the information you sought to maintain perspective and keep moving forward. Right beside you, we put our promises into action for the betterment of our families, our community and our industry. It is so important that we know how the decisions made nationally and at the state level impact us. Our past – and future – need not be remembered only by sluggish growth or congressional stalemates. What makes our corner of the world exceptional arises from the buoyancy of Yavapai County in embracing new ideas to enhance our way

2014 Annual Publication Yavapai County Contractors Association

of life. With our communities’ vitality engulfing us, there is an endless river of dreams we are able to realize.

Building

YAVAPAI

Stagnant growth and recession are giving way to renewed hope for improved economic conditions. Arizona is experiencing a “slow but mildly accelerating economy,” according to Arizona Economist Elliott Annualmeeting Publication Yavapai County D. Pollack in 2014 an annual presentation to the Prescott Chamber Contractors Association of Commerce in January. “(The year) 2014 will be better than 2013 (and) 2015 should be a good year.” It’s time to look up and not down. Watching our plodding feet discourages and depresses. Keeping our focus forward enthuses and empowers. Sights on target ensure better probability for bull’s eyes. Our aim is true, our motivation worthy. I am so proud that YCCA has been able to continue publishing this magazine despite the economic decline. Our industry members on these pages enrich advocacy for our industry and the communities in which they are proud to live. We must prepare ourselves and our colleagues to thrive in an evolving market. We must build the relationships that will make us more productive, our work more enjoyable and our results most impactful. There is no better single source than YCCA for high-quality education and community awareness. The tremendous relationships we build are the key benefit for most of us in belonging to YCCA. And the measure of our success is you walking away feeling better equipped to handle and understand your construction project. The year ahead holds promise. YCCA will help you take advantage of every opportunity and cope with any challenge likely to occur with industry recovery. We were here in 2013 to hear you and provide tools for keeping our citizens educated. Our 2014 commitment is to become even more visible as your beacon for optimism and to empower you with the tools you must have to manage and to understand the construction industry. In my decades of roaming this planet, I am inspired daily. I guess you could say I am an eternal optimist. I am always searching for a glow and gleam of hope. I know it is a nice outlook, but not always an easy attitude. We have those enthusiastic work weeks, only to be confronted by every hurdle imaginable and then finding ourselves looking down and not up. That is the construction industry in a nutshell. Our industry still faces challenges and obstacles and hurdles, but optimism will reign. So here is to peace and optimism in your world, and our commitment that YCCA will continue our tradition of advocating for you, our industry and Yavapai County.

Publisher

Cover

Design & Layout

Yavapai County Contractors Association

Cover designed by Alec Kozak. Born and raised in Prescott, Alec Kozak is a local illustrator and graphic designer. Alec graduated from Northern Arizona University in 2012 with a BA in Electronic Media & Film and a minor in Graphic Design. He has self-published several comic books and stories and has had his work recognized in several Arizona businesses, newspaper, and films including the NAU Lumberjack and the Sedona Film Festival. Email: alec.kozak@gmail.com Drawing: Torrey, 3rd Grade, Student at Primavera School

©2014 Yavapai County Contractors Association. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Every effort has been made to provide dependable data in an everchanging market. As a result, the publisher does not warrant the data herein is complete or accurate.

810 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 928-778-0040 Fax: 928-541-9882 ycca@cableone.net www.ycca.org 4

2014 Building Yavapai

www.ycca.org

Sweet Designs, Stephanie Sweet 480-837-3688 Steph@SweetDesignsAZ.com


YCCA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Matt Greenlee

Chuck Merritt

Dave Barrett

Chris Welborn

YCCA BOARD PRESIDENT Greenlee Designer Surfaces

YCCA 1st VICE PRESIDENT DeCarol Company

YCCA 2nd VICE PRESIDENT Barrett Propane

YCCA SECRETARY/TREASURER Vicente Landscaping

Greg Barstad

Brian Bombardieri

Ken Coleman

Mike Enders

Tom Haley

Granite Basin Roofing

B’s Contractors

Sir Speedy Printing

Benttree Custom Homes

Haley Construction

John Heisley

Bob Kozak

Wyatt Orr

Ty Scott

Ty Smith

Fann Contracting

Robert C. Kozak PLLC

Earth Resources Corporation

Builders Wholesale

Yavapai Block

The mission of the Yavapai County Contractors Association is to properly manage a construction industry association that transfers and promotes education, safety, political action, services and networking for the benefit of its members and the communities of Yavapai County. Yavapai County Contractors Association has proudly been serving the communities of Yavapai County for more than 53 years.

YCCA Board members, past and present, laid the groundwork and structured a clearly defined mission that not only addresses challenges faced by the licensed and bonded contractor, but also encourages and aggressively provides consumer protections within the same framework. As Yavapai County grows, so does the importance of Yavapai County Contractors Association (YCCA). “We take our responsibility very seriously and our Building Yavapai magazine, the official YCCA publication, is just one tool that we use to strengthen and build a relationship between government,contractors, suppliers, the consumer and our community,” said Sandy Griffis, YCCA Executive Director. We hope that you enjoy the articles and tips within Building Yavapai, and we encourage you to do business with our members. Tuck this issue away it will be a valued resource for years to come!

Remember, Don’t Start Without Us!

Sandy Griffis EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Use Licensed, Local, Bonded and Insured Contractors Yavapai County Contractors Association 810 E. Sheldon St. | Prescott, AZ 86301 | 928-778-0040 | Fax: 928-541-9882 | ycca@cableone.net | www.ycca.org

www.ycca.org

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MEET THE WRITERS

Matt Ackerman Matthew B. Ackerman, LEED-AP AIA is the founding partner at Catalyst Architecture – a full-service, award-winning sustainable design firm located in downtown Prescott. Matt was awarded the US Green Building Council’s LEED professional accreditation in the spring of 2003, making Matt the first LEED accredited architect in Yavapai County. Matt is a co-contributor of the Daily Courier’s Eco_Logic Blog – Your Common Sen$e Guide to Going Green. Judy Bluhm Judy Bluhm is a writer and a realtor with Century 21 Arizona West. She writes a weekly column, Around the Bluhmin’ Town, for the Prescott Courier. She has been a successful realtor for over 15 years and is a Prescott / Phoenix relocation expert.

Prescott Creeks

6

Sandy Griffis Sandy has been living in Prescott for 17 years  and loving every minute of those 6,205 days and nights. As Executive Director of Yavapai County Contractors Association, she feels privileged to have the best job ever! Sandy has a BA in Journalism and an MBA in Business from San Diego State. She loves golf, enjoys hiking, is an able violinist and seriously embraces, hugs and takes on life with a smile. Ann Haver-Allen Ann has more than 25 years’ experience as a writer, editor and graphic designer. During her career, she has received more than 50 professional awards recognizing her achievements in writing, editing, photography and graphic design. She is listed in Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who of American Women, and Who’s Who in the World, among other biographical listings. She enjoys hiking, photography and gardening.

Prescott Voice for Riparian Conservation • Prescott Creeks is a 501c(3) nonprofit Organization with the mission to promote, protect and celebrate the ecological integrity of riparian systems And associated wetlands in the central Arizona watersheds Through conservation, restoration and education.

2014 Building Yavapai

www.ycca.org


MEET THE WRITERS

Bob Kozak

Sue Marceau

Bob Kozak is a Prescott attorney who has been in practice for more than 30 years. He is also a professional mediator and arbitrator. He sits on the Boy Scouts of America Grand Canyon Council Executive Board and has two Eagle Scout sons. In his spare time, he is an active backpacker, scuba diver and triathlete.

Sue Marceau is a writer, editor and marketing professional who enjoys infusing raw concepts with optimal word pictures to engage the hearts and minds of readers.

Lauren Millette Sandy Moss Sandy Moss lives in Prescott, Arizona, with her husband, Michael. She was an award-winning newspaper and AP journalist for more than a dozen years, then a broadcaster with Arizona Hometown Radio Group, (KPPV, KQNA, KDDL, KPKR, and KUGO) for the past 11 years, where she remains the Entertainment Reporter. In January 2014, Sandy also took over as host of KAZ-TV’s Morning Scramble program which airs live at 8:30 a.m. Monday through Friday.

Lauren Millette has worked as a journalist for more than 20 years. She’s reported for The Arizona Republic, Phoenix Gazette, Scottsdale Progress, The Verde Independent, The Daily Courier, KYCA Radio, Prescott ENews and Prescott Woman’s Magazine, among others. She graduated from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Telecommunications at Arizona State University. She loves the outdoors, gardening, cooking and spending time with family. She works part time at Trader Joe’s and is helping launch Blue Rose Heritage and Culture Center in Prescott Valley. 

YCCA your local go-to contractor organization for referrals, questions, and assistance. Call us anytime (928) 778-0040. We are your tool-box of information. Read our “Ask The Contractor” column every Friday front page of the Real Estate Section in the Daily Courier or online www.dcourier.com. Send us your questions and we will answer them in our column. Visit ycca.org under Ask The Contractor tab and read the most frequently ask questions/answers.

www.ycca.org

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CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS In Arizona, all construction contracts greater than $1,000 must contain at a minimum: ❏ The name and business address of the contractor. ❏ The contractor’s license number. ❏ The name and mailing address of the owner. ❏ The jobsite address or legal description. ❏ The date the owner and contractor signed the construction contract. When Hiring a contractor: Make sure your contractor is licensed. Ask for references. Plan your project carefully and make detailed plans if necessary. Get at least three detailed bids. Ask what problems may come up during the project. Get a written contract. Make sure you understand the terms of the contract before signing. Be cautious about advancing monies for work not yet completed. Put all changes into writing. Make frequent inspections.

❏ Estimated completion date of the work. ❏ A description of the work to be performed. ❏ Total dollar amount to be paid to the contractor for all the work, including all taxes. ❏ The dollar amount of any advance deposit paid or scheduled to be paid to the contractor by the owner. ❏ The dollar amount and stage of construction for any progress payments to be made to the contractor. ❏ Specific information, prominently displayed, explaining how to file a written complaint with the Registrar of Contractors. ❏ Prompt Pay details for owner, occupants.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

14

Donors Help Fire-Devastated Community Rebuild Hopes, Dreams and Homes

19

Old West Spirit Injects Energy into Today’s Downtown

24

Yavapai County Ancient Land – Visionary People

30 12

2014 Building Yavapai

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Strange How Life Can Throw You up Against the Very Things You Don’t Think You Like? Such as Water …


FEATURES 32 Luxurious Home Spas 34 Home on Wheels 36 Fall in Love with Your House All Over Again 38 The Strength and Beauty of the New Concrete 40 Designing Your Home 42 Rainwater Harvesting 44 Septic Systems 45 No Water Hogs Among These Plants 46 The Hard Truth About Hard Water 52 Countertops Lighting Up 55 Take Your Garage Back 56 Home Inspections: Not Just for Buyers and Sellers 58 Landscaping with Pavers 60 Drywall: The Finish That Matters! 62 Tune Ups Preserve Windows & Sliding Doors 66 Master Gardeners Help Keep Yavapai County Growing 68 How to Give Your Bathroom a Facelift 70 Paint: The Colors of Your Life 72 Outdoor Living in Good Ol’ Prescott, Arizona 74 Why Should We Hire an Arborist? 76 Finishing Touches Can Make Your Dream Home a Reality 80 Contracting for Success 82 At Work and at Home – Together 86 Plants and Our Wildlife 88 Prune for Safety, Plant Health and Pleasing Appearance 92 Perfect Lawn Without All the Labor 94 Mold Can Be Found Almost Anywhere 96 HVAC Work Before or After Building Improves Performance 98 Home Insulation 103 Extending the Life of Your HVAC System

MEET YOUR YCCA TEAM

4 Message from Sandy

YCCA Executive Director

5 YCCA Board of Directors 6 Meet the Writers 8 Contract Requirements 48 Smiling Faces of YCCA 104 2014 YCCA Membership Directory

32

52

68


Donors Help Fire-Devastated Community Rebuild Hopes, Dreams and Homes

YARNELL, AZ – Massive property loss from the devastating Yarnell Hill Fire became a stark reality as citizens and volunteers dug through rubble, sifted ash and recovered what remained. No civilians died in the 8,400-acre blaze on June 28, 2013. But the fire tragically claimed the lives of 19 firefighters, who valiantly had fought to contain the flames. New hopes and dreams gradually returned to Yarnell, mainly through the efforts of volunteers committed to rebuilding what dramatic winds and raging flames had destroyed. The property toll stood at 127 – or 25 percent – of the homes in the unincorporated communities of Yarnell and Peeples Valley. Volunteers – individually and collectively – poured the “foundation” of recovery through donations of time, goods and money. United Way, the Yavapai County Community Foundation (YCCF), Church of Joy (Glendale, AZ) and the Yarnell Hill Recovery Group are only a few of the many organizations that have contributed to rebuilding Yarnell. “We were amazed with how many volunteers stepped in with compassion and were trying to help out with clean-up efforts and anything they could do to help this community,” said Mike Manone, who with his wife, first arrived as volunteers with the Church of Joy. New hopes and dreams gradually returned to Yarnell, mainly through the efforts of volunteers committed to rebuilding what dramatic winds and raging flames had destroyed.

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2014 Building Yavapai

After several visits, Manone decided to make Yarnell his home. He established residence and became an active member of the community, joining the Yarnell-Peeples Valley Chamber of Commerce and the Yarnell Community Garden Project. Manone launched Yarnell Homes, after evaluating how he could incorporate his experience and skills to help rebuild the community. The firm opened in November of 2013 with an office on Y ­ arnell’s Main Street and has completed two homes for survivors of the Yarnell Hill Fire. Manone worked with local residents to build the first replacement home and has continued to collaborate with a handful of other homeowners to keep the mission moving forward. “It took a lot of the sting out of what happened to be able to get into back our own home,” said Stacey Pizzirusso. “Not just us – Roy and Stacey – but Yarnell as a community” and those who feel connected – “watching us…rebuild and get our lives back together.” The new home builds and publicity about the fire’s devastation are bringing people to Yarnell. “Yarnell is starting to be considered a cabin community,” Manone said. “There are a lot of empty lots and the ‘new Yarnell’ is rising out of the fire. More people are coming to town and the building effort is bringing in new businesses and new development. I think this is a positive thing and I want to be part of it and make Yarnell my home for a long time.” An even larger community effort was undertaken in the formation of the all-volunteer Yarnell Hill Recovery Group, which first met and organized at the Yarnell Community Presbyterian Church “to identify the unmet needs of residents and businesses in the Yarnell Hill Fire area and to identify ways to meet those needs,” according to Kathy Montgomery, communications chairman for the group. A steering committee was formed with leaders from five key organizations which have long served area residents: the Yarnell-

www.ycca.org


Peeples Valley Chamber of Commerce, the Yarnell Community Center, the Yarnell Community Presbyterian Church, the Fire Depart­ment and Weaver Mountains People Who Care.

Your Local News Since 1882

A dozen volunteer sub-committees were formed to provide resources for emergency housing and financial assistance, cleanup, donor information and rebuilding guidelines. The Fundraising Committee established a goal of $6 million to help rebuild the community, including reconstructing homes for the uninsured and meeting needs of the underinsured, as well as assisting the Yarnell and Peeples Valley fire departments, the Y ­ arnell Water Improvement Association and the Shrine of St. Joseph of the Mountains. Uninsured homeowners receive “like for like” replacement homes, Montgomery said. “If they had a manufactured home, they receive a manufactured home of comparable size. If they had a site-built home, they receive a site-built home of comparable size, according to the tax rolls.”

In Print &

Most of the labor for these homes was provided by three volunteer groups: the Apostolic Christian World Relief, Southern Baptist Disaster Relief and the Mennonite Disaster Services. The Yarnell Hill Recovery Group’s operating plan identified three phases of progress. Phase I provided assistance to the uninsured who were registered with and vetted by the Arizona Division of Continued on next page

Online

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2014 Building Yavapai

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Emergency Management. Phase II offered help to the under­ insured. Phase III will address unmet community needs. Many homeowners could not recoup losses because they had not obtained construction permits, nor had their property valuations been brought up to date, according to Yavapai County A ­ ssessor Pam Pearsall. All emergency service allocations are based on property values from before and after the fire. “In order to access the balance of the funds that Yavapai County Community Foundation is holding, a process (is in the works) for creating a three-year strategic plan that will address the infrastructure needs of the community that go beyond recovering from the fire,” Montgomery stated. Fundraisers to assist Yarnell and Peeples Valley residents took place across the county, state and country. As insurance claims were settled and donations rolled in, one thing has remained certain: The dream of building a “new Yarnell” gradually is coming to fruition. YCCA Fundraisers to assist Yarnell and Peeples Valley residents took place across the county, state and country.

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2014 Building Yavapai

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For the latest & greatest in home improvement ideas,construction tips, and new trends...

WAKE UP WITH

Hammer Time

and YCCA

Yavapai County Contractors Association

Tune in Saturday Mornings at 7am

KQNA 1130 AM in Quad Cities or 99.9 FM in Prescott Or Stream On-Line: www.kqna.com

Meet your community leaders and other organizations that inspire us and have major impacts on Yavapai County. Hear it all on…

Hammer Time

“I am proud to have YCCA’s Hammer Time on “I enjoy being our KQNA air waves – this is the wing-man in Hammer more than just a local program, it’s Time – this is a great show and I’m our local community members talking proud to represent YCCA and bring the about construction and sharing their knowlcommunity such great information” edge with homeowners. It is a great show, great Mike Enders fun and Sandy and her wing-man Mike are terrific.” Benttree Custom Homes Sanford Cohen Owner - Arizona’s Hometown Radio Group

If you miss us Saturday morning, catch a repeat on Sunday, same time, same great station! KQNA 99.9 FM

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Old West Spirit

Old West Spirit

By Sue Marceau

Injects Energy into Today’s Downtown

PRESCOTT – The Old West essence of Arizona is nowhere more vibrant than in our very own downtown Prescott. Historic markers identify the buildings and sites where legends lived and history was made. Days of old come alive with the power of imagination. For anyone who favors show-and-tell, downtown offers tours, reenactments and costumed ambassadors to more vividly chronicle the past. The Courthouse Plaza and Whiskey Row evoke memories of ­western episodes playing out over the decades. Picture cowboys

coming off the range into town with hard-earned wages slapped down at the Row’s many a watering hole. Victorian ladies shopping for staples and fashions at the mercantile. Larger-than-life characters downing whiskey, placing faro card game bets, chowing down and maybe even shooting up the town. Rowdy and wild, rough and tumblin’, alive and kickin’ – the Prescott of yore races full throttle with today’s restaurants, art galleries and shops galore inside the facades of old. New boutiques and specialty shops replace most of the more than 40 saloons which at one time tempted the Old West’s heroes and villains. Continued on next page

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Old West Spirit

The Palace Restaurant & Saloon, on the National Register of Historic Places, serves today’s patrons on the same bar that that supplied Doc Holiday and Wyatt Earp, and wondrously, survived the Great Fire of 1900. The Jersey Lilly Saloon, located upstairs in the same historic building, boasts the only balcony overlooking the Courthouse Plaza. Seating is coveted during parades and other Whiskey Row events. When J.I. Gardner began constructing his mercantile at the corner of Cortez and Willis streets in 1890, he could have had no idea that his building ultimately would undergo a full restoration, land on the National Register of Historic Places and house M ­ urphy’s Restaurant, one of Arizona’s premier dining destinations. ­ Murphy’s maintains Gardner’s guarantee of first class goods by “Serving Prescott’s Finest” in turn-of-the-century ambiance in the downtown historic district. The Prescott Chamber of Commerce, located in the former jail at 117 W. Goodwin Street, draws both tourists and locals seeking information about what to see and do in the downtown area on any given weekend, summer evening, Fourth of July extravaganza or celebration of Arizona’s Christmas City. And did we mention the ghosts of everything past? Check out two favorite haunts – the Hotel Vendome and the Hassayampa Inn – for details about the apparitions des­ cribed by individuals who witnessed them. Today’s downtown area extends for several blocks around the Courthouse Plaza with restaurants, stores, tourist attractions and entertainment. Tight parking on downtown streets doesn’t stop most folks from 20

2014 Building Yavapai

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­ njoying commerce and modern conveniences against a backdrop e of historic significance. A parking garage has replaced hitching posts to accommodate newer modes of transportation, so there’s no lack of covered parking a short block from the Courthouse Plaza.

Old West Spirit

Lunch Dinner Dinner Theater •

Downtown Prescott offers virtually anything a shopper, diner or tourist would seek: ›› Shopping, boutique and dining clusters, including Bashford Courts, the Old Firehouse Plaza and St. Michael’s Alley ›› Food establishments, including the mercantile-themed Murphy’s Restaurant, cooking up old favorites and new genres ›› Lodging steeped in history at the Hassayampa Inn, Hotel St. Michael, Hotel Vendome, The Grand Highland Hotel and bed and breakfast inns ›› Art galleries displaying local, regional and national talent ›› Whiskey Row favorites, including the Jersey Lilly Saloon, Matt’s Saloon and the Palace Restaurant & Saloon ›› Antique shops too numerous to mention ›› Live Theatre: the Elks Opera House and the Prescott Center for the Arts ›› Music and entertainment (often suitable for families) day or night on the Courthouse Plaza and downtown streets The spirit of the Old West thrives among merchants proud of their community’s rich history, historic preservation and downtown commercial district. YCCA

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105 N. Cortez St. 928-771-0921 www.ycca.org

2014 Building Yavapai

21


Explore the arts & outdoors of Prescott -beauty inside & out

For a complete list of festivals, events and attractions go to

visit-prescott.com


ADVERTORIAL

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Don has worked with numerous businesses during a 30 year career as a Commercial Banker with Wells Fargo until his retirement in 2010. Ardis completed her 20 year career as an educator with Prescott High school, touching the lives of thousands of students.

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Yavapai County

Ancient Land – Visionary People

Yavapai County is a region of breathtaking natural beauty dotted with quaint, mountain communities. It is small-town living with a Wild-West flavor amid the most stunning scenic wonders nature has to offer. Universities, airports, shopping, golf and world-class medical facilities are all conveniently located. And Arizona’s majestic Grand Canyon is only a two-hour drive away. Yavapai County offers something for everyone with its mix of business and casual environments. Also, Yavapai County has the resources and expertise to manage growth and where everyone can live in a comfortable and relaxed lifestyle. For information about building in Central Arizona, call the Yavapai County Contractors Association at 928-778-0040, or visit the website at www.ycca.org.

Location Yavapai County – outlined in blue on the state map below, is the largest county in Arizona. Prescott and Prescott Valley are the largest cities in Yavapai County. Neighboring towns include Chino ­ Valley, Dewey-Humboldt and Mayer. Also in Yavapai County are the towns of Camp Verde, Clarksdale, Cottonwood, Paulden, Jerome, Spring Valley, Cordes Lakes, Congress, Bagdad and Williamson Valley. Sedona straddles two counties: Yavapai and Coconino. Blessed with clean air, a mild year-round climate, endless blue skies and majestic views, residents of Yavapai County enjoy an enviable quality of life.This place has an allure all its own; people come to visit and decide

DISTANCE TO PRESCOTT FROM: (in miles) Albuquerque 400 Denver 780 Flagstaff 73 Las Vegas

268

Los Angeles

347

Phoenix 95 Salt Lake City

610

San Diego

410

Sedona 53 Tucson 212 24

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to stay. Wide expanses of open space and sky, miles of hiking trails, stunning natural beauty, superb recreational activities, thriving economies and all the amenities associated with a larger urban area make north central Arizona one of the most desirable, livable areas in the United States.

Wide expanses of open space and sky, miles of hiking trails, stunning natural beauty, superb recreational activities, thriving economies and all the amenities associated with a larger urban area make north central Arizona one of the most desirable, livable areas in the United States.

Education and Medical Educational opportunities abound in Yavapai County, which is home to Yavapai College, a multi-campus community college system. Additionally, three four-year colleges are in the county: Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Prescott C ­ ollege and Northcentral University. Yavapai Regional Medical Center is a state-of-the-art hospital with campuses in Prescott and Prescott Valley. The Bob Stump Veteran’s Administration Medical Center is located in Prescott.

Outdoors and History Yavapai County is a paradise for nature lovers and outdoor enthusiasts with limitless opportunities for golf, jogging, hiking, backpacking, camping, fishing, biking, bird watching, star gazing, horseback riding, rock climbing, boating and picnicking. History buffs will be interested in the passed-down folklore and historical sagas of the towns and cities that make up Yavapai County. The county is home to the ancient Native American dwellings of Montezuma Castle and Montezuma Well and the ghost towns of Jerome and ­Cleator, among many scattered throughout the county. Visitors can explore old mines, visit Indian ruins, participate in archaeological digs, stroll around the grounds of Prescott’s Sharlot Hall Museum or comb through the museum’s exhaustive archives of documents and photographs.

Henry Ford once said “Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success.” In Yavapai County, Arizona, community leaders along with local business owners and their employees come together with pride and a common purpose-to live and work as a team for the success of their communities. Northern Arizona’s Central Highlands, which includes the city of Prescott and the towns of Prescott Valley Chino Valley, and Dewey-Humboldt, is known for its ideal four-season climate, the business-friendly approach of its municipal governments, and its excellent educational and cultural opportunities. People move to the area because they want the quality lifestyle that it offers. Sandy Griffis, Executive Director of Yavapai County Contractors Association (YCCA) says it’s the spirit of support that makes her job so enjoyable. About YCCA’s membership, Griffis said “I’m surrounded by professionals in so many lines of work who are just brimming with life and community spirit. I’ve never quite seen any other place where people so consistently give so much to their communities! From the way local businesses treat their customers to how they network with other local business owners, including their competitors – so much about their outlook is friendly and cooperative. Prescott’s history is a big part of what attracts people to this area along with our great weather and hometown feeling.

Transportation Prescott can be reached via Arizona Highways 69, 89, 89A and 169. Interstate 17, which runs between Phoenix and Flagstaff, cuts through the southeast edge of Yavapai County. Interstate 40 crosses the northern edge of Yavapai County and is accessible via Highway 89. Commercial flights are available through Prescott’s municipal airport, Ernest A. Love Field. Flights to Los Angeles and Denver arrive and leave daily. The airport is also used as the flight-training center for Embry-Riddle. YCCA

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PRESCOTT VALLEY, incorporated in the 1970s, is home to the Arizona Sundogs hockey team. A bustling entertainment center, pedestrian-friendly downtown and 10 public parks beckon vistors to come play and stay. Glassford Hill, an extinct volcano, is the town’s most notable landmark. Hikers who make it to the top are rewarded with amazing panaromic views.

CHINO VALLEY is a land of wide-open space, populated by pronghorn antelope, breathtaking mountain views and the most amazing sunsets to be seen anywhere. This sleepy ranching and farming community has larger home lots and ranches, where horses and livestock of all kinds are welcome. Chino Valley has many amenities geared toward family enjoyment, outdoor recreation and education. A 37-acre community center includes an aquatic park, picnic areas, lighted ball fields, an amphitheater and miles of trails.

SEDONA, located at the base of Oak Creek Canyon and surrounded by the Coconino National Forest, is most well known for its striking red rock formations. Despite being one of the state’s top tourist dentinations attracting 3 million visitors a year, Sedona remains a quiet, residential municipality.

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Yavapai County

Bagdad

Paulden

Sedona

Chino Valley

Clarkdale Jerome

Williamson Prescott Valley Valley

Cottonwood

Prescott

Camp Verde Dewey-Humboldt Mayer Spring Valley Cordes Lakes

93 Congress

17 PRESCOTT (pronounced “Preskit”) has a population nearing 40,000. With its historic downtown, famed Whiskey Row and picturesque Courthouse Square, this small city exemplifies the Old West. Surrounded by the Prescott National Forest and tucked into the pines, Prescott is routinely included among the top places to live in the United States. Known as “Everybody’s Hometown,” Prescott continues to be a picture-postcard community of neighborhoods with tiny streets secluded in the pines. Residents and tourists alike spend hours strolling through art galleries, combing the many antique stores and shopping in boutiques that line the charming downtown streets.

Downtown Prescott

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COTTONWOOD was named for the majestic cottonwood trees that dot the landscape. The city, with a population of more than 11,000, is surrounded on three sides by mountains and bounded to the north by buttes and mesas. It is home to the Verde Canyon Railway and features the Historic Old Town. CAMP VERDE is home to many tourist attractions, including the historic Fort Verde, built in 1865, and Montezuma’s Castle, one of the most well-preserved cliff dwelling sites in North America, which attracts more than 1 million visitors annually.

Dewey-Humboldt is characterized by rolling hills folded into the foothills of the picturesque Bradshaw Mountains in the Agua Fria Valley. Dewey-Humboldt, which incorporated in 2004, is predominantly a rural, residential community.


Doing Business in Yavapai County: “plus-plus-plus”

Longtime YCCA members Mark and Gary Womack, of Womack Enterprises, Inc., are Prescott natives and licensed construction contractors. The brothers have spent many years literally-building in the area. Regarding life and work in Yavapai County, Gary Womack says, “we love it because of the people here; the personalities we encounter everyday. There’s a real hometown spirit running through this entire area, and it just naturally makes you treat people the way you want to be treated. Our clients are our friends-and every time I pick up the phone to do business, I’m talking to a friend. “I think the Prescott area really attracts people who deeply value quality of life – it’s a wonderful place to live and raise kids,” said Mike Fann of Fann Contracting. “I think it’s very true that like attracts like – so that commitment to quality of life just naturally extends to a desire to help others in need in a place you’ve come to call home.” Fann learned the principles of “giving back” to the community at his late father’s knee. The family moved to Prescott in 1958 and James L. Fann started the business that Mike heads today along with his son Jason.

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“My dad believed that half the fun of building a successful business comes in making enough money to spread it around,” Fann says, “along with encouraging the people who work alongside you to get in the “giving action. So he not only taught me that philanthropy is the right thing to do; by his example, he also engaged lots of others in such efforts locally, too.”

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Strange How Life Can Throw You up Against the Very Things You Don’t Think You Like? Such as Water … By Sandy Moss Michael “Shep” Shepard truly doesn’t like water – except to drink and with which to bathe, of course. He’s never gone in for waterskiing, scuba diving, canoeing, or even swimming. But, fishing? That’s okay. Nonetheless, the greatest adventure of his life was on water – big water – the Pacific Ocean, to be exact. Go figure.

Rising out of the treetops is – aye, matey – an imposing galleon complete with lofty mast and furled sails, a brave bowsprit a la mermaid masthead on the prow, and alas, cannons on deck ...

At age 19, Shep met who would become his best friend in the world, Dave Chamberlain, at college seminary. The two boys, thinking that age 40 was a great distance away, made plans to sail the Pacific Ocean from the verdant shores of San Diego, to the even greener shores of Hilo, Hawaii, to celebrate that fateful birthday. It arrived sooner than they could have imagined. True to their promise, the two readied a trustworthy 20-foot sailboat christened “Mini” and headed out for the long journey in May 1991. They considered the trip to be a “Radical Sabbatical,” a time for reflection and friendship while doing a slightly more extreme travel adventure than most. Unfortunately, their “Crossing,” as they came to refer to it, sailed directly into the teeth of an El Nino storm, the very same weather system that brought down the famous fishing vessel from Gloucester, Massachusetts, on the east coast during, “The Perfect Storm.”

it sails the leafy hills of Shep’s property in Prescott. Rising out of the treetops is – aye, matey – an imposing galleon complete with lofty mast and furled sails, a brave bowsprit a la mermaid masthead on the prow, and alas, cannons on deck in preparation for any pending sea battles. Their lives and ship threatened, the two men faced the ultimate human crisis: mortality. In 2010, this writer penned a book about that journey and its outcome called, “The Terrible Loyalty,” after a quote by British theologian, J.K. Chesterton: “We are all in a small boat tossed upon stormy seas and owe each other a terrible loyalty.” It is a more than fitting metaphor for the Crossing with its blessing of friendship, loyalty, and terrible danger. It’s no secret hereabouts that Shep did indeed survive. And strangely enough, his next renowned adventure was building a pirate ship, albeit on dry land. “I simply thought to make a treehouse of sorts for any grandchildren I might one day have, and it somehow turned into a pirate ship instead,” Shep recounts.

In 2010, this writer penned a book about that journey and its outcome called, “The Terrible Loyalty,”

“The Jacobson,” so named after himself as the son of a man named John Jacob, 30

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Shep began constructing the ship in about 1998, while working at a local lumberyard and salvaging discarded lumber. More than a decade later, the ship was finally


dreds to see the enchanted ship on a hill; to sift through the booty with bright eyes; to hear a story about, “The Wreck of the Zephyr” – all to encourage their love for reading and adventure. They, of course, learned about sailing, too. The ship was also a favorite destination for friends, neighbors, a small pirate enclave, and other guests, bringing magic and joy to those lucky enough to be escorted within. However, in May of last year, scurrilous thieves broke into The Jacobson and stole much of her valuable and sentimental bounty, leaving her stripped and her pirate owner saddened.

finished and furnished with accouterments befitting a crusty sailor who would inhabit such a vessel. Swords and pistols, glistening bottles of port and rum, world maps on tanned hides, and trunks of booty: glittering jewels and coin that indeed had been gathered from ports around the world. For several years, school children were shepherded to The Jacobson by the hun-

Though the booty has yet to be recovered or the burglars apprehended, there is a good ending to the story. News of The Jacobson’s plundering spread far and wide, featured in newspapers, statewide television news segments, and across the worldwide web, as those fascinated by such a thing as a pirate ship in the mountains marveled. Thus, ahoy, a filming company happened upon reports of the treetop treasure and booked it for an episode of “Treehouse

Masters” on TV’s Animal Planet. It will likely air in February. So, happily ever after, as in fairytales and most-hoped for in real life, the man who didn’t like water would eventually sail the largest body of water in the world and return to tell about it, and also eventually build an unlikely pirate ship in the middle of the trees of a mountain town. YCCA

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Luxurious Home Spas By Ann Haver-Allen The hot tub industry is the latest market segment to recognize the buying power of aging baby boomers. Consumers in the age bracket 40 to 64 are drawn to spas for their therapeutic benefits as opposed to consumers who purchase spas as a sign of affluence. “The industry trend is to grow that market because that’s good, solid growth,” said Chris Robinson, business manager at Lucite International, maker of acrylic spa surfaces. “We keep the colors fresh and the patterns and textures modern, maybe even avant-garde, some would say. This is a flashy product. It needs to have a bit of fashion to it.”

from around the world, according to the National Spa and Pool Institute. Colorfast materials won’t fade or dull in sunlight, and chemical- and stain- resistance keeps common household stains (lipstick, ink, crayons) from permanence.

The spa trend is toward natural-looking finishes, including some that mimic granite

Hot tubs are becoming more luxurious and easier to maintain as those aging baby boomers increasingly discover the joys and benefits of home spa ownership.

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The National Spa and Pool Institute estimates that there are 6 ­ million hot tub owners in the United States. But back to those therapeutic benefits. “We are just now realizing what the Ancient Greeks and Japan­ese culture has known for centuries,” Cottrell said. “When we experience hydrostatic pressure it increases our circulation – 104 degree water improves circulation by 120 percent and takes stress off of all our joints.”

Spas help reduce production of stress hormones and contribute to a restful sleep.

Additionally, spas help reduce production of stress hormones and contribute to a restful sleep. YCCA “Every year improvements are made in the efficiency of plumbing, jet performance and filtration,” said Amy Cottrell of Prescott Spas. “The control panels get a little more sophisticated every year, which helps the owner maintain crystal clear water.”

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A major innovation in the hot tub market is the new ACE Salt Water Sanitizing System from HotSpring spas, which is an easy-to-use cleaner that basically makes it an almost chemical-free hot tub. “The ACE salt water system – a registered trademark of HotSpring spas – uses a diamond electrode to create natural chlorine in the water for superior sanitation,” Cottrell said. “We can add the system to any HotSpring and Limelight spa.” Another big trend in hot tubs is integrating sensation – sight and sound – to achieve a total sensory immersion that adds to the luxurious spa experience. Today’s hot tubs have massaging jets that target tired muscles, surround sound music, changeable lighting and hands-off water-care techniques. Some hot tubs are equipped with a “tranquility” mode for the hushed and gentle sound of moving water. Others have waterfalls built right in, and the relaxing sound of water isn’t all you get to enjoy. Some hot tubs come with pop-up, flat-screen, digital televisions as entertaining choices.

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One new hot tub model on the market is a double-decker. A 6-person spa with builtin bar seating at one end and at the other end – on an elevated level – is a giant pool. Included in this over-the-top hot tub is an LCD television, a DVD player, a surround sound speaker system and underwater lighting that adds to the nighttime ambience. YCCA

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HOME

on Wheels By Judy Bluhm The view out of our front picture window might be beautiful, but it can become a little too familiar. Looking at the same old mountains and trees can get to be boring! Well, imagine if you are living in luxury, but your view changes at your whim. No more “stagnant scenery” but a world of endless possibilities, upgraded and spacious living spaces, plus a home that is as mobile as your next vacation dream. This is what the new, sleek and luxury motor home coaches have to offer. “Rolling mansions” as some folks call them, are one way to “live the good life.” These motor coaches are not the little recreational vehicles of past, where you would drive with the kids on summer vacation. The new “luxury coaches” are true homes for a select (and growing number) of baby boomers who are not wanting to be tied to a permanent address. Loaded with amenities such as built-in entertainment centers with computer and flat screen television hook-

ups, gourmet kitchens with solid surface counter tops, stainless appliances and bathrooms like spas, these “rolling homes” offer comfort and mobility like never before. Today’s motor coaches are fitted with the most comfortable air ride seats that allow for hours of sitting with ultimate support. The interiors are as beautifully appointed as any custom home, with wood floors, leather sofas, granite countertops, elegant lighting

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systems, cherry or alder cabinetry, marble or travertine bathrooms with jetted tubs and snail showers. The design features can be so elaborate, that the experience you will get once you are in these luxury coaches is that of a personalized mansion, with all the amenities and conveniences that create timeless elegance. Imagine gliding along the countryside and then pulling into an upscale resort park. Once there, side panels can open up to reveal massive picture windows, gourmet kitchens invite the chef to use top-of-the-line cooktops or built-in stoves to create a delicious meal, perhaps eaten by candlelight in your dining room with the chandelier on dim. Every appliance and design detail is included to ensure that “dining in” never tasted so good. And it only gets better. The plasma television and recliners are beckoning in the living room. Then there is the master spa. Marble, travertine, snail showers with a separate jetted tub and walk-in closets are just a few of the upgrades you’d come to love. Many people looking for adventure want to do so in the comfort of their own “homes”. Ben Been of Affinity RVs in Prescott points out that in Yavapai County, there are approximately 37,000 open space campsites to enjoy. There are also numerous high-end RV resorts that offer pools, stores, clubhouses and the type of amenities you might expect from your planned community, without the HOA fees, property taxes or landscaping. Yes, today the range of upgrades and amenities in a motor home are as vast as they are for a site built home. The sky is the limit when it comes to customization. Most of the folks who own these motor coaches do have a home base, which might require that they contact their local licensed

Every appliance and design detail is included to ensure that “dining in” never tasted so good.

contractor to build one a separate RV garage on their property. A contractor can help these “coach owners” in all aspects of the building process, such as obtaining HOA approval, height and building code regulations with the city or county, and making sure that the specifications are going to result in success. Building an RV garage, for many motor coach owners, is just as important as where their next trip will be! With the range of prices, options and styles as large and diverse as they are in selecting any home, the new generation of luxury home buyers, are often in the market for a permanent address and one that has wheels. Looking for adventure? Contact Ben Been and let the good times roll! Need to park you new “abode” in a safe place? Contact a licensed contractor to help you build the dream garage for your home on wheels. And enjoy those amazing views from your front window ... that can change every day! YCCA Destination? Anywhere you’d like. Adventure? Starting right now.

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Fall in Love with Your House All Over Again By Bob Kozak

The rooms in your house are looking 20 years out of style. The rooms are too small to accommodate visiting family, aging parents possibly moving in and/ or the nest is filling back up with kids. The plumbing and light fixtures appear a little dated, flooring is outdated and the kitchen just needs an uplift. Time to sell the old home, upgrade to a newer house with more spacious rooms and a modern look, right? But, you feel comfortable in your home; you have great neighbors; you have equity in the home. You live in the perfect location close to stores, doctors, and entertainment. Difficult decision? No! “Fall in love with your house all over again,” suggests Tom Reilly, owner of Renovations your Complete Remodel Resource. Remodel your home to be that home you are dreaming of. Money spent remodeling today will give you many more years of enjoyable living in that comfortable home.

Driven by these considerations and by economic forces, more folks are electing to remodel their comfortable old house. Currently the trends in remodeling are to create larger open spaces, install new surfaces, redesign kitchens and bathrooms, and improve energy efficiency. But, before you begin, Chuck Merritt with DeCarol Company cautions that remodeling is not the same as new construction: a contractor with experience in remodeling is necessary

to address unexpected situations which occur when remodeling homes built under old or nonexistent building codes using old techniques and materials. Here in the Southwest with our Spanish and Western styles there are not many remodeling deviations. These styles are more conservative and less influenced by extremes in design fads. But you can “give that old style a new spin” according to Robert and Christie Board, owners of Board by Board Contracting. “Transitional” is the trend in remodeling and merges old ideas and styles with new colors and materials. New countertop surfaces alone can sometimes remake a room. New technologies allows for a wide variety of countertops made from concrete. Natural materials such as marble and granite are dependable options. But, man-made materials such as recycled glass can be custom made in many colors and patterns. Silestone and other similar surfaces offer a spectrum of color and appearances. Small formal living rooms, small formal dining rooms and small kitchens are from a past era. You might be an “empty-nester,”

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but the kids and grandkids are spending more time in your home. Large open spaces within which to socialize, eat, work, and entertain are replacing those individual, small boxy rooms. Rather than merely remodel an old wall, remove it and create a large single room. Kitchens and bathrooms can be remodeled on any budget. Giving that old kitchen style a new spin might begin with installing a new “farm-style” sink made from porcelain, stainless steel, fire clay or copper. Consider a single bowl sink to replace the old double bowl sink. While you’re at it, install a water filtration system or on-demand water heater. Install a pot filler faucet behind your range top. Consider open shelving to display the family’s china, stemware and professional cookware. Paint the old cabinet doors white, beige, grey or “greige.” Install spice racks and storage shelves on pantry doors. The Internet makes available in almost infinite variety of unique and specialty cabinet hardware, lighting fixtures and plumbing fixtures. While stainless steel will remain the appliance surface of choice for many years, homeowners are installing higher-quality/professional grade ranges, refrigerators and dishwashers in their goal to learn to cook “as good as grandma did.” If you are considering new cabinetry, you can choose from many new-fangled shelving contrivances: pull out shelving, multilayer drawers, integrated organizer trays, and rollout racks for under-cabinet trash cans. The trend in bathroom cabinetry is “storage, storage, and storage” according to Christie Board. Bathroom vanities now mimic fine, vintage furniture, and installing a new countertop and plumbing fixtures results in a relatively inexpensive upgrade. A commonly asked question in a bathroom remodel is, “Do I have to keep my bathtub?” No, the bathtub is going the way of the formal living room. There are many styles of custom and ready to install shower units. If you still must have a tub, go with new fangled freestanding tubs and tubs of exciting new colors and materials are welcome replacements for boring, old white porcelain tubs. The common garden tubs of yesteryear are being replaced with storage cabinets or standup showers.

As you may have noticed, incandescent light bulbs are going the way of the buggy whip. Prices of LED bulbs have fallen dramatically. LED lighting today offers a wide variety of quality, color, and fixture size. LEDs not only reduce heat output and energy consumption, but they also provide tiny light sources for small and limited space applications: such as under-cabinet tape with LED “dots” and mini light fixtures, to name but a few. As you consider remodeling kitchens and bathrooms, consider that you will be “aging in place.” Install grab bars or prepare the walls for the future installation of grab bars. Raise the height of countertops to alleviate back strain aggravated by bending over lower countertops. Lower the highest shelves to accommodate­ limited ranges of motion in shoulders and arms. You have the option of price-friendly upgrades: replacing only cabinet hardware, installing a new back splash behind the sink, installing a new countertop, or painting. New technology allows you to

affordably integrate low voltage heated floors, LED light fixtures, USB wall outlets, internet app-controlled thermostats, and durable tile that mimics wood flooring. Don’t scrimp on planning. “Spend your time planning how to spend your money” is wise advice from Tom Reilly. Bob and Christie Board encourage their clients not to give up quality for price. Don’t just replace the old, improve its function recommends Chuck Merritt. Give your old style home a new spin: make an appointment today with a remodeling contractor to discuss your physical needs and design preferences. Take the time to interview various contractors to be certain that their view of your future home matches your view of your future home. Money spent remodeling today will give you many more years of enjoyable living in that comfortable home. Because many remodeling improvements return a high percentage of the money spent on remodeling, you can “live in your savings account” today. YCCA

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The Strength And Beauty Of The New Concrete By Bob Kozak Two thousand years ago Romans used concrete to construct buildings and aqueducts which remain standing today. Greek and Roman sculptors created beautiful statues from marble which are still being admired in museums. Would you consider installing a countertop having the strength of concrete, the beauty of marble, and the durability of both? And, with the added benefit of being able to be completely customized and personalized! Today new concrete materials and manufacturing techniques provide you with this dream countertop surface. Recent experimentation with materials, technologies, curing and sealing has resulted in new forms of concrete which can mimic almost any material, including marble, and yet is three times stronger than traditional concrete. Brian Peterson, owner of Diversified Concrete Crafters, calls these new materials “super concrete.” Because these new concrete materials can be cast in an infinite variety of shapes, and because many materials can be integrated into the concrete during the casting process, concrete provides unlimited opportunities for custom applications.

Polymers, plasticizers, fiberglass, as well as broken glass, and crushed glass provide not only extraordinary strength, but also provide for an extraordinary variety of colors and textures. Surfaces can be polished to a high gloss, cast with a rough surface, or created to any sheen you desire. Dyes, oxides and stains provide virtually any color imaginable. Concrete can be colored, cast and polished to mimic granite or marble. Or to any imaginable surface. It can be cast and left rough to mimic any naturally occurring surface. Surfaces can be cast with integrated geometric or free-flowing shaped insets. Any number of items can be stamped into the concrete surface, such as horseshoes, seashells or paw prints. Any number of items you treasure such as some precious stones, metal, and other solid objects can be cast into the surface and processed to a smooth finish. Sinks of various sizes and shapes can be cast within the countertop. Concrete countertops can be cast in place or precast and installed for more refined and

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detailed projects. Says Brian Peterson, “If you can imagine it, it can be made.” These new concrete surfaces are being installed as interior and exterior surfaces. GFRC (glass fiber reinforced concrete) can be used in multiple applications, such as walls, fireplaces and shower stalls, lighter countertops and furniture, to name but a few. Fiber optics and LED lights are even being used in unique and interesting applications. Properly sealed concrete will last for many years, but improper sealing will expose the concrete to staining, particularly from acids. Specialized sealants are available to resist damage to kitchen countertops caused by hot pots and pans. Concrete countertops like any other countertop can be damaged by knives, so why not use its customizable nature and integrate your favorite wood cutting board design? Depending upon customization and detail, a 100% handcrafted and personalized concrete countertop is approximately the cost of other high-end countertops. But don’t try this on your own: this is not a weekend DIY project. Specialty concrete contractors undergo considerable training to learn to design, cast, install and seal this new technology. Two of the nation’s most respected specialty concrete sources are the Concrete Countertop Institute and Concrete Network. It is well worth a trip to their websites to see the amazing variety of colors, textures and designs being created in concrete today. Put your imagination into high gear and call a specialized concrete contractor today. YCCA


w w w. h a s s a y a m p a i n n . c o m


We have the lot, we have the house idea in our mind, and now the question is: Architect? Designer? Architect? Designer?

Designing Your Home – Tom and Cathy, Prescott

And the question is: Architect? Designer? Architect? Designer? For sure, there are few things that are more exciting that building a new home and the builder and the architect or designer certainly touch and have an impact on the form, function and behavior of your new home. The relationship with an architect or designer and builder is very personal and emotional. Your personality, your vision, your lifestyle will all play an important part in the design of your home, so it is critically important that the professional you select be right for you, fit your budget and understands your dreams.

Dana George, the principal with Sterling Design Group and Designer says “though the answer may seem obvious to some, it may be a bit more complicated for others.”

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Homes built by Beshers Builders, LLC ROC#283403

In a nutshell the difference between an architect and designer is the education, training and professional licensing. Tom Reilly, local general contractor and licensed architect; owner of Renovations Your Complete Remodel Resource said “while design is often thought of as something most anybody could do, there is a level of experience that comes from formal professional training which is not duplicated through years of drafting.” Both an architect and a designer are employed to design buildings. They share many common skills and can offer very similar services if you are planning to have a new home built or to renovate an existing one said George. However, there are differences between an architect and designer. An Architect is a licensed professional, qualified to practice architecture. In most cases an architect has a degree from an accredited college and they have mastered in some cases thousands of hours working under licensed architects as an intern prior to obtaining their degree, in addition to completing very arduous and difficult exams. A designer is someone who does not have an architecture license. Not to say that a designer does not have the skills, they do not have the overall education and certifications that is required to become an architect. However, it goes without saying that a designer certainly could have achieved a master’s degree in architecture but never pursued obtaining their architect license. Architects have a professional code of ethics mandated by the state, which is an overreaching authority looking over their work. That certainly does not mean that designers are not to be considered unethical. In most cases, architects carry liability insurance. Our area has some wonderful designers, quality individuals, hardworking and great at their job and we have many top drawer architects that have been recognized nationally for their project work and sustainability values.


A great design will add value to your project.

A designer usually gains his knowledge through practical experience, often working with skilled, established designers or even architects. They are generally proficient with a cad program and understand proper drafting techniques. To be successful a designer must study and have a good understanding of design trends and remain up to date with new materials, codes and established practices. Architects are well versed in the overall project such as environmental concerns, social impacts, historical preservation and in many cases structural work for the building. Architects are also educated to work hand-in-glove with the builder to obtain the best design for your dollar. There is a common misconception that architects are way too expensive compared to designers and that is not typically the case. There are some accomplished designers out there who are in great demand that command a high price for their plans. Equally, there are many architects who are very reasonable when working on plans. A great design will add value to your project and whether you elect to use a designer or an architect, it is important that that your general contractor review the plans because they will need to understand the design intent. So in a pistachio shell, an architect is a licensed professional, in many cases holding advanced degrees and rigorous testing in order to meet the licensing obligations of becoming an architect. An architect is legally responsible for their design work i.e., to ensure the home does not collapse. There are local homeowner associations that require new homes and/or remodels have plans that are drawn and submitted by licensed architects. A designer can certainly capture your vision and design a set of working documents. They are not required to be licensed and many designers do have construction experience. Regardless of the scope of work for your project, talk to each entity and see their past and current work, talk to their clients, ask them how they would approach your project, what are their fees, talk to other builders they have worked for, how long will it take to develop a set of working plans, what about change orders; how are those handled? Also, it is important to discuss your budget. This is a major investment for you, so hiring the applicable architect or designer will certainly have an impact on the outcome of the project. The most important part of your decision of whether to hire an architect or a designer should be based on his or her knowledge, qualifications, experience and creativity. Look at the work they have done; talk to their clients; examine the homes they have designed; feel comfortable that they will listen to you and design a home that fits your needs and lifestyle. YCCA

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Rainwater Harvesting By Prescott Creeks Lower your water bill and benefit your community through long-term water and energy savings, reduced soil erosion, and reduced water pollution!

IMPERVIOUS SURFACES, DRAINAGE AND RUNOFF Vegetation in a watershed acts like a sponge to slow and absorb water when it rains and snows. When vegetation is replaced with impervious surfaces like streets, parking lots, and rooftops, less water soaks into the ground and, in­stead, flows directly into our creeks. The in­creased runoff may result in flooding, stream­bank erosion, sedimentation, and water pollution. A reduction in natural areas for water to soak in results in diminished groundwater recharge and lower base flow in our creeks.

Get soft on hardscapes Whether you are building a new home, business or simply updating your outdoor space, here are some things you can do: ›› Avoid paving surfaces unless absolutely necessary. Consider permeable alternatives to pavement. ›› Instead of pavement, use bricks or blocks set in sand, gravel, or wood chips. ›› Install gravel trenches along sidewalks and driveways to collect rainwater.  ›› Direct roof downspouts away from paved areas and towards shrubs or trees. Use a rain barrel to collect the water then use it to water your garden or outdoor landscaping.  42

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Did you know?

Steep slopes are common in the Granite Creek Watershed and can increase the erosive force of runoff and cause drainage problems.

One inch of rain on a 1,000 sq. ft. roof can yield roughly 600 gallons of water! Rainwater harvesting is the practice of capturing, diverting, and storing rainwater for plant irrigation and other uses. Active harvesting systems have transport and storage capacity for use at a later time. Passive harvesting systems rely on micro topography to direct water towards depressions in the landscape where water will infiltrate the soil and benefit landscape plants.

›› Slow and filter runoff and let it percolate back into the soil by using: straw bale or log barriers, rock ditches, retaining walls, or slope-stepping around your home or business. ›› Stabilize eroding soils and unstable slopes by spreading wood chips, mill bark, or straw mulch on bare ground and by planting native shrubs, grasses, ground cover, and trees. Active Systems

Passive Systems COMPONENTS

Rain barrels (50 -100 gal); cisterns (100 + gal)

Berms, basins, rain gardens, vegetated swales BENEFITS

Many potential uses for the water

Direct water from roofs, driveways, and walkways to vegetated basins or rain gardens

GETTING STARTED Purchase or make a rain barrel out of a food-grade drum and hose spigot

Less expensive; soil has far greater storage capacity than a tank

Position barrel under a roof downspout

Choose native plants that require little water but can handle periods of inundation TIPS

Plan for overflow; direct towards outdoor vegetation

Recharges groundwater without creating stormwater


Water harvesting systems range from simple to complex. In a simple system the rainwater is used immediately. Most homeowners can design simple water harvesting systems to meet the needs of their existing site. Designing water harvesting systems into new construction allows the homeowner to be more elaborate and thorough in developing a system. In the case of very simple systems, the payback period may be almost immediate.

Active

A simple system usually consists of a catchment area, and a means of distribution, which operates by gravity. Rainwater harvesting cannot provide a completely dependable source of irrigation water because it is dependent on the weather, and weather is not dependable. To get the maximum benefit from rain­ water harvesting, some storage can be built into the water harvesting system to provide water between rainfall events.

Passive

Many people ask whether they can harvest enough water in an average year to provide sufficient irrigation for an entire landscape, it depends. If you are interested in designing a totally self-sufficient water harvesting system, then the amount of water harvested and the water needed for landscape irrigation should be in balance. Storage capacity plays a big role in this equation by making rainwater available in the dry seasons when the plants need it. Personal commitment to a ”water conservation ethic” is becoming more and more important in Yavapai County. Water is a precious resource and we must all play a part and be water smart. Simple rainwater harvesting is an easy way to start. YCCA

TAKE ACTION

Tile, Metal and Shingle Roofing • Single Ply System Modified Membranes • Roof Coatings

Growing a Rain Garden: Your personal contribution to cleaner waterRain Gardens: A how-to manual for homeowners http://dnr.wi.gov/runoff/pdf/rg/rgmanual.pdf ROC072030 | ROC056519

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Septic Systems When operating properly, septic systems remove many pollutants and provide some measure of protection for human health and for the environment. However, even properly functioning septic systems have the potential to impact nearby surface waters and groundwater.

›› Good vegetative cover is important for drain field function and maintenance ›› To avoid damage from tree roots, plant only grass over and near the drain field Architectural & Interior Design Custom Homes Additions Remodels

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www.njbuildersinc.com Then give us a call to discuss your project 

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Pumping the septic tank is the single most impotant thing that

Caring for your drain field

Respect

Did you know?

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can be done to maintain and extend the life of the system!

›› Divert surface water runoff from roofs, driveways, downspouts, etc. away from your drain field ›› Do not drive or park vehicles on your drain field

Inspect regularly ›› Every 3 years to determine if your system is working properly or needs to be serviced

Get pumped ›› Every 3-5 years is recommended

Flush responsibly ›› Wastewater should enter into the system as evenly as possible throughout the day/week ›› Avoid antibacterial products that will harm the bacterial action in the tank ›› Avoid harsh cleaners, bleach, soaps, or detergents ›› Don’t dispose of paint, medication, or chemicals through your septic system YCCA With some care and consideration for your septic tank, it should serve your household well for many years.


No Water Hogs Among These Plants Save water and reduce maintenance by growing drought-tolerant plants. This list includes xeric options that require little-to-periodic deep watering after three years. It is important to research plant characteristics and mature size when planning a landscape. All plants are listed by their common name. TREES Deodar Cedar Oklahoma Redbud Chitalpa Arizona Cypress Arizona Ash Thornless Honeylocust One-seed Juniper Rocky Mountain Juniper Austrian Black Pine Chinese Pistache London Plane Sycamore

Gray Rabbit Brush Purple Smokebush Cotoneaster Desert Spoon Apache Plume New Mexican Privet Red Yucca Juniper Oregon Grape Fremont Barberry Bear Grass Russian Sage

PERENNIALS Yarrow Desert Marigold Coreopsis Grandiflora California Poppy Daylily Red Hot Pepper English Lavender Blue Flax Blackfoot Daisy Mexican Evening Primrose Beardtongue

Buffalo Juniper Hall’s Honeysuckle Creeping Oregon Grape Virginia Creeper Boston Ivy Germander Creeping Thyme

Locust

Mugho Pine Shrubby Cinquefoil Firethorn Sumac New Mexico Locust Pendulous Yucca

Russian Sage Sandpaper Verbena

Feather Reedgrass Blue Fescue Blue Oat Grass Pink Deergrass Deergrass Mexican Feathergrass Plains Switchgrass Little Bluestem

SHRUBS Sagebrush/Wormwood Butterfly Bush Blue Mist Mountain Mahognay

GROUNDCOVERS Lowfast Cotoneaster Emerald Gaiety Blue Carpet Juniper

GRASSES Sidwoats Grama Blue Grama Buffalograss

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Butterfly Bush

Desert Marigold

Mexican Evening Primrose

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The Hard Truth About Hard Water By Paul Scrivens QUESTION: I am having a hard time with hard water! My water pressure is low, my water heater has problems, and I have scale stains on everything - What can I do? Water’s purist form is rainwater from a non-polluted atmosphere. Unfortunately, the atmosphere in most cases is polluted, and once the rainwater hits the ground, many more pollutants contaminate it. The water that arrives at our homes in Prescott has been contaminated with a number of organic, biological and chemical compounds – contaminants that change water properties. The most obvious is the injection of disinfecting chlorine and what is known as hardness in water. Untainted rainwater is considered soft; however, on its way to our homes, groundwater dissolves rocks and minerals that release calcium and magnesium ions that cause water to become hard. The term “hard water” comes from the deposits that are left behind when the water evaporates, leaving a white residue known as scale. These scale deposits buildup on hot water heater elements slowing the heating process, requiring more energy to heat

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the water; and over heating the units heating elements, which shortens life. Scale also corrodes and plugs-up plumbing fixtures and accumulates in water appliances affecting their water pressure and performance. Hard water also interferes with all types of cleaning tasks. Regular soaps combine with dissolved calcium and magnesium to form a white precipitate of soap scum instead of producing lather. This scum is difficult to remove from sinks and appliances. Over time, clothes washed in hard water look dingy and feel harsh and scratchy. Dishes and glassware are spotted when dry. Hard water also causes films on glass shower doors, walls and bathtubs, and has an adverse effect on hair and skin. Water hardness is expressed in grains of hardness per gallon of water (gpg); in Prescott the grains of hardness is between 6.6 and 7.4 gpg, or between moderately hard and hard. The advantage of a softening process is longer life for pipes, faucets, toilets and appliances, including washing machines, dishwashers, and water heaters; less use of household cleaning products such as detergents, as well as personal care products, like shampoo; a reduction of water spotting, and cleaner, softerfeeling clothes. Water softening is often recommended to soften only the water sent to domestic hot water systems. However, it is also important that cold soft water be sent to cleaning appliances such as clothes washers and dishwashers; bathrooms and kitchen sinks; and showers and toilets, as natural evaporation still leave deposits.

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There are a number of softening technologies and a number of manufacturers, all who believe theirs is the best. However, the top two softener technologies are salt-based systems and catalytic non-salt systems. Salt-based systems use a sodium or potassium ion exchange process to remove the calcium and magnesium from the water.


Sodium ions are supplied from dissolved sodium chloride salt, also called brine. As hard water passes through the softener calcium and magnesium ions trade places with the sodium ions. After softening a large quantity of hard water, the exchange medium becomes saturated with calcium and magnesium ions. To clean the exchange medium, it is back flushed with the salt solution, which flushes away the calcium and magnesium ions. While softened water from a salt-based softener is truly softened and highly efficient, it is not recommended for drinking, or for people on a low-sodium diet. Therefore drinking and cooking water should bypass the softener. Salt-free catalytic conditioners use a filter media in a process where atoms are placed in a special structure and form an active surface that the calcium carbonate molecules attach; this prevents attachment to other surfaces such as pipes. The chemical bonds are then said to rinse away with the water flow. The catalytic solutions claim that they isolate the calcium without the use of salt or potassium, or back flushing to operate. There is no wasted water or drains to install, and it is environmentally friendly. However, only salt-based water softeners “soften” water. Catalytic systems that work without salt “condition” the water by preventing it from sticking to surfaces. The hard water components are still present in the water after conditioning and a number of the original hard water issues are still present, including residue on any surface where the water evaporates. Another consideration is cost: A traditional salt-based system costs between $500 and $700, and a non-salt conditioner costs between $1500 and $2500.

The operating cost of a salt-based system is higher than a catalytic system. A two-person household using 98 gal/day per person (Prescott average) of softened water would need a backflush every 10 days, and a family of four a backflush every five days. My LEED home using WaterSense products and Energy Star appliances uses about half the average and runs a backflush every 20 days. This requires 850 gallons ($17) of backflush water a year and three 40 pound bags of salt ($15) a year. This results in a cost break-even point of between 25 and 56 years for the catalyticbased system. If you select a salt-based system, it is imperative that the system is sized correctly, and that the backflush cycles are also calculated correctly; if not, the system will be inefficient, and use a lot of wasted water and salt. Refer to www.apswater.com/water_softener_calculator.asp? for sizing calculations. After my system was installed, I found it had been programmed for standard valves, but I had low-flow valves installed; the difference in back flush water volume was 47 gallons versus 78 gallons per flush. So programming verification is important. YCCA Green Home Energy Advisors founded by Paul Scrivens with a mission to provide independent advice to clients on how to reduce their energy costs by improving their homes sustainability and durability. Paul trained as an electrical engineer and spent his career in the high technology industry. Paul is a local Prescott resident and built his own energy efficient home. Paul has written numerous articles on residential energy efficiency and water conservation. Check out the website at www.greenhomeenergyadvisors.com

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Smiling Faces

Bennett Glass and Mirror (928) 445-1180

Arizona Stone & Architectural Products (928) 772-0828

Foxworth Gailbraith (928) 445-2525

Blinds Shutters & Shades (928) 445-4670

Hammer Time Mike and Sandy with Bob Kozak, Robert C. Kozak PLLC

Barrett Propane (928) 636-1600 48

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A Common Cause


Smiling Faces

Hammer Time Building Officials Jack Judd, Dan Trout and Randy Pluimer

Builders Wholesale (928) 778-6655

Economic Vitality

Catalyst Architecture (928) 778-3508 The Green (Building) Brothers

Douglas E Noble Painting (928) 772-5434

Triple E Construction (928) 778-3056

Ability Remodeling & Home Services (928) 458-6044

Prescott Daily Courier (928) 445-3333 www.ycca.org

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Smiling Faces

Old West Culture

JAGR Construction (928) 227-6705

GBA Remodel (928) 515-4189

NJ Builders (928) 708-0292

YCCA’s Hammer Time Sandy & Mike with Fire Marshal Rick Chase CYFD Fire Marshal Eric Kriwer COP

Healthy Lifestyles JEBCO Companies, Inc. (928) 778-7976

Stoney Creek Builders (602) 885-3932 50

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Money in the Mail (928) 830-5208

Yavpe Connector Fann Contracting


Smiling Faces

Prescott Builders Team (928) 717-0147

Arizona Tile (928) 776-1070

Outdoor Adventure

Bennett Oil (928) 445-1181

Jay’s Bird Barn (928) 443-5900

The Picture Window (928) 772-0122

Able Saw & Small Engine (928) 445-6371 Supporting Cancer Awareness

Earthworks Landscape & Supply (928) 636-3972

Prescott Daily Courier (928) 445-3333 www.ycca.org

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Countertops Lighting Up By Ann Haver-Allen Trends in kitchen countertop colors are lightening up, according to Samantha Stinocher, Showroom Manager for Arizona Tile. “In the past most customers were looking for countertops that were much darker,” she said. “Black slabs with rust and tan patterning were a past trend, but now customers seem to be looking for lighter countertops with less patterning to them.” White, or light-colored surfaces, such as white marble slabs, white quartzite slabs or granites that are lighter in color and pattern, are the newest trends in kitchen countertops, Stinocher said. Nick VanDerHeyden of Engrained Cabinetry and Countertops, said that locally, granite is still king. What are your choices for countertop materials and how do you determine which suits your lifestyle? Yavapai County Contractors Association provides the following primer on kitchen countertop materials to assist you when beginning a kitchen design or redesign.

Stone Countertops Natural stone is the number one material most people want for their kitchen countertops. The most popular stone options include granite, marble and soapstone.

Granite For many years, granite has been the reining king of kitchen countertops and that trend will continue in the foreseeable future. Granite has many positive attributes. It comes in a wide variety of c­olors,

Natural stone is the number one material most people want for their kitchen countertops.

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including grays, greens, whites and beiges. It is durable, tolerates heat and requires little maintenance. Granite is easily cleaned with a mild soap and soft cloth.

Marble Marble comes in a wide variety of colors. No two slabs are just alike, so each marble countertop is unique. Marble is heat resistant and stands up well to hot pots and pans. It doesn’t yellow due to heat exposure. Marble countertops tone down a contemporary feel and bring a touch of classic elegance to the kitchen. “Many customers are looking for white marble slabs, or slabs that give them the same look as a white marble would,” ­Stinocher said. “Some of the most popular white marble slabs are Bianco Carrara and Bianco Venatino.” Marble’s porous nature can be a concern because it absorbs liquids more readily than granite. Spills penetrate the stone quickly and can become difficult or impossible to get out. Sealing is vital to maintaining marble. Another concern of marble

is its softness. It is more easily scratched or chipped than other countertop options.

Soapstone Soapstone comes in various shades of gray, dark grays and greens, and it can have green or white or off-white veins. Unlike other stones, soapstone doesn’t absorb stains and doesn’t require sealers. Surface stains and blemishes can be removed with gentle sanding and applying mineral oil removes most scratches. Wipe the countertop with a soft cloth and warm water daily. Mild household cleansers are suitable. Light gray soapstone darkens over time, accentuating its gray veining. Regular applications of mineral oil enhance its beauty.

Quartz (engineered stone) Countertops Quartz countertops are becoming serious competition for granite. “Locally, quartz is on the rise but cost generally starts in a granite mid-range,” VanDerHeyden said. Quartz countertops are more durable and longer lasting than granite and they do not chip or crack easily. Quartz countertops are nonporous, so they resist staining better than granite, concrete and marble. Because quartz countertops are nonporous, they do not have to be sealed and will not harbor bacteria or viruses. “Stone countertops are losing ground to quartz composite countertops that are nomaintenance and quarts composite is the closest thing to bullet-proof countertop materials available today,” said Kathleen Donohue, an award-winning designer with Neil Kelly Designs. Because quartz countertops are manufactured, the color and

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pattern possibilities are limitless – including varieties that are almost identical to granite or marble. There are also different types of quartz countertops, including Silestone and Avanza.

Laminate Countertops The affordability of laminate ensures that it remains a popular option for kitchen countertops. “Laminate countertops do not cost nearly as much,” VanDerHeyden said. “So this is a better choice if a remodel of your cabinets is in the near future.”

Always Call Before You Dig.

Today’s laminates are more diverse and dramatic than its ancestors. Produced with advanced printing technology, laminates are available in a wide variety of colors, textures and patterns. Laminate countertops are made from layers of plastic that are bonded to particleboard or kraft paper to create a solid countertop surface. Laminates can mimic natural materials such as granite or marble, or even mirror the appearance of stainless steel. Laminates stand up to stains and scratches, but should not be used as cutting boards. Hot items should not be placed directly on laminate countertops. They are cleaned with a mild soap.

www.arizona811.com 811 or 1-800-STAKE-IT (782-5348)

Stainless Steel Countertops Stainless steel is no longer just for appliances, but is rapidly becoming a trendsetting material for kitchen countertops. Stainless steel is gaining popularity as countertops in modern, stylish kitchens. Stainless steel goes with any color and is one of the easiest countertop materials to clean – just wipe it with a cloth and mild soap. Stainless steel is nonporous, a characteristic that prevents bacteria buildup. Over time stainless steel countertops are susceptible to dings and scratches, and they show every little finger mark. A patina finish, rather than a polished or satin finish, will help reduce scratches and etching.

Glass Countertops Glass countertops are increasing in popularity because of the sleek, modern look. They are easy to clean and the nonporous surfaces means it is stain-resistant, which eliminates bacteria buildup Glass countertops can be cut into any shape and stained in any color. It can be an environmentally friendly countertop option by using recyContinued on next page

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cled glass. A glass countertop should be at least 1 inch thick and tempered.

Concrete Countertops Concrete is another material that is becoming increasingly trendy, said Mark Fies of the National Association of the Remodeling Industry. “With concrete you have endless colors to choose from, the ability to shape the surface as you see fit, and you can even embed materials and/or designs right into the surface,” he said. Concrete countertops are highly customizable – stain colors and texture options

are numerous. Aside from its visual appeal, concrete is energy efficient – when the temperature in your home rises, concrete captures the heat and releases it when the temperature cools down. Poured concrete counters are strong and durable, but must be sealed to prevent staining. Hot pots and pans should not be placed directly on the surface because while the concrete is heat resistant, the sealant is not. Cutting should not be done directly on the countertop for the same reason. Otherwise, with a little maintenance, concrete is an attractive and durable countertop option.

Solid-surface countertops Solid-surface countertops, are made primarily from acrylic and polyester – about 33% inorganic binding resins and 66% organic (minerals). Solid-surface countertops were first was sold under the brand name Corian, which is often (erroneously) used as a generic term for it. Today, it’s made by a host of manufacturers and has enjoyed steady popularity over the years. “Solid surface (Acrylics) countertops when installed, can be a seamless, clean look with smooth integral sinks and coved splashes,” VanDerHeyden said. These modern surfaces take on many appearances, including stone, yet shed the shortcomings of their counterparts with a nonporous surface that doesn’t age or develop a patina. Solidsurface countertops are durable and nonporous, which means it resists stains, mildew and bacteria. Scratches can be sanded out because of its unique composition. Solidsurface countertops can be thermoformed into unusual shapes and configurations. Seamless installation means there are no cracks to trap dirt and debris. Because solid-surface countertops are resin-based, they are sensitive to heat and although scratches can be sanded out, cutting boards should be used.

Lifestyle matters

is concerned about your water quality. 537 N. 6th St. Unit D Prescott

Sometimes what you don’t know CAN hurt you and your plumbing. Schedule your complimentary (yes it’s really free) home water evaluation TODAY. The tests are fast and results are immediate. We promise it won’t hurt a bit! GREAT WATER IS ONLY A PHONE CALL AWAY!

928-778-7120

re your home gets the We’re here to make su e. very best water possibl

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HAPPY!

VanDerHeyden said that before replacing your countertops, you should analyze the condition of your cabinets. “Will you be replacing your cabinets in five or 10 years,” he asked. “You should not install new granite countertops if your cabinets are damaged or need to be replaced soon.” Remember, consider your lifestyle when selecting the material for your countertops. Families with children need countertops that are durable and stain-resistant. Gourmet cooks prefer hard working materials. Avid entertainers like something chic and convenient. With the wide variety of countertop materials available today, there’s something for everyone. “The most important thing to consider when selecting new countertops is how they will be used,” Stinocher said. “If you plan to use your kitchen every day and are looking for something that is lower maintenance, then a denser slab is probably going to make you happier in the long run.” YCCA


Take Your Garage Back Where did the garage go? You used to have a place to park your car and in some cases multiple cars. You used to have a place to enjoy woodworking and refinishing furniture. You used to be able to find the kids’ old soccer jerseys in the box in the garage, and now you can’t even find the box.

To take your garage back Dave and Dave suggest the following: FIRST, determine your goals: use your garage to park your car, to store and find what you need, to improve fire safety, or to have that workshop area or man-cave. SECOND, clean everything out of the garage, and they say “everything” and then clean and sweep the floor. THIRD, and this is the hard one, throw out what you don’t or won’t ever need, or haven’t used in the past year. Be honest about this! Throwing stuff away is easier done by strangers such as Dave and Dave of Garage Logic. Or, done by friends or family members who don’t live with you. Give discarded items to one of the area’s many charities: your junk may be another person’s treasure. (You might even want to consider doing this step this every year.)

Dave and Dave of Garage Logic can be with you every step of the way – they clean and organize garages for families that “cannot let go” or for those families that cannot figure out how to organize space and where items should go. “It is rewarding to see the smiles on faces when the car can fit back into the garage” said Dave Edwards. Besides the garage organization, clean-up and sparkling unveiling, they also do small clean-up jobs, hauling “stuff” to the dump, minor yard work, installing lights and ceiling fixtures and so much more. Dave and Dave are here for you! To take your garage back call Garage Logic at (928) 925-4807. YCCA

FOURTH, determine available options for storing those remaining things you can’t live without. Storage options might include overhead racks or bins, permanent shelving, cabinets, rolling storage, etc. FIFTH, put your remaining items away. This might be a good time to consider getting help if you are not comfortable using ladders or putting items up in (always under-utilized) attic spaces. SIXTH, go forth and enjoy your garage. If that wasn’t too painful, now consider professionally installed epoxy coating on your garage floor, or even cleaning out other rooms in your house! Where did the garage go?

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Home Inspections: Not Just for Buyers and Sellers By Sue Marceau Homeowners have begun to recognize the benefits of having their property inspected to ensure the home is safe, maintained to best advantage and sheltered from unexpected and costly future repairs. Home inspections formulate for the client a true picture of the property and how best to preserve the integrity of a home’s foundation, structure and systems. Home inspectors focus on structural components and essential operating systems of the home while also identifying potential safety and maintenance issues. The home inspector’s punch list covers more than 400 items, including roof, foundation, plumbing, electrical, heating and cooling systems, attic and crawl spaces, appliances and drainage. Criteria are set forth in the Standards of Professional Practice for Arizona Home Inspectors and guidance from the Arizona State Board of Technical Registration. “For sellers, a pre-listing inspection can be the competitive edge to obtaining the maximum selling price for a home by providing buyers with peace of mind,” said John Erceg, owner of Beneficial Home Inspection. “It gives the seller an idea of what the buyer may

WaterproofING specialists

find objectionable and provides the seller time to shop ahead for qualified contractors to repair problems before the home goes on market or the buyer discovers them in buyer’s own p ­ re-purchase inspection.” The Due Diligence section of the Arizona Residential Real Estate Purchase Contract recommends a home inspection within a specified window of time after contract acceptance, unless the buyer waives that right. Buyer’s agents generally are strong supporters of home inspections for all properties, including new builds. The section itself was designed by legal experts at the Arizona Department of Real Estate to reduce liability of the parties to the transaction and protect them from less than full disclosure. “The number one reason buyers cancel a purchase contract is how they feel about what is discovered during a home inspection,” Erceg said. Some buyers just walk away instead of asking for repairs or negotiating another solution, such as monetary compensation at close of escrow. Buyers also worry, if a significant number of repairs are advised, that the home they wish to purchase may be a problem waiting to happen due to inattention by current or previous owners.

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“Home buyers know that a pre-purchase inspection will enable them to make an informed buying decision and will protect their largest investment,” according to area Home Inspector Randy West, owner of Professional Building Consultants, Inc. “Well-done inspection reports are a combination of honey-do list and owner’s manual. A good inspection report will tell you where the gas and water values are, where the furnace filter is, information on special or unique features in the home, areas that may require special attention or maintenance…” Many inspectors – including Erceg and West – walk through a property with their clients, following their detailed analysis of the property, to review the inspection report and answer q ­ uestions. Discussion with the unbiased home inspector can help clients understand the seriousness of any situations noted and the rea-


sons for repairs recommended in the inspection report. “We take the time to do the job right,” Erceg explained. “We spend time with you, at the home, clearly explaining our findings, giving you real answers that can help you make the right decision. We understand how important a real estate purchase is to you.” One advantage to home inspection at any time and for every reason is the independent third-party nature of the inspector. “Home inspectors are unbiased and neutral,” Erceg said. “Our job is to report what we observe on a home at a specific moment in time.” Home inspectors are not permitted to repair or otherwise work on any home they have inspected. Additionally, they are prohibited from recommending individuals to perform repairs – with the exception of pest inspectors. Your local Yavapai County Contractors Association is an excellent source for qualified, licensed, bonded and insured tradesmen of all types for home repairs and maintenance. Once the work has been completed, the home inspector may be re-engaged – again as an independent third party – to return to the home and ensure that the repairs have been properly executed. Pricing for a home inspection averages $300 to $600, Erceg said, depending on size, age and location of the home. Home ­inspectors, as in every profession, have different experience levels. Consumers are advised by both West and Erceg to make sure that their home inspector can provide valid recommendations and brings to the task hands-on experience in the construction trade. YCCA

Thinking of Buying or Selling? Then a Home Inspection is a Must ... Call today!

Beneficial Home Inspection John Erceg 928-710-7061 BeneficialHomeInspection.com

“Better Seen Than Sorry” Arizona State Certified Professional Home Inspector • Bonded & Insured Certification #50352

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Landscaping with Pavers Pavers can be an integral part of many landscapes. Whether incorporated into the floor, countertops or fire-pits, pavers serve a large purpose in the landscape industry, so it’s important to keep them healthy. Like many projects, creating a solid foundation is the key to creating a long life for pavers. “Proper installation can ensure your patios will remain durable for a long time,” says Ken O’Neill, Senior Vice President of sales and marketing, Belgard Hardscapes. Installers should consider the surface requirements such as avoid laying concrete pavers over an existing concrete surface. When placing pavers, drainage and spacing should be taken in to consideration. Because pavers are part of a flexible pavement system, they will perform better with a proper base of aggregates placed and compacted per a design, O’Neill says. A solid foundation is so crucial that the amount of maintenance could be significantly reduced because of it. The biggest key to a great paver project is paying attention to detail and installing the pavers according to Brick Industry Association (BIA) and Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute (ICPI) specifications initially as a lot of maintenance tends to revolve

around trying to fix installation issues and not with the pavers themselves. A successful, long-lasting project can come from proper edge restraints, allowing adequate space between the pavers for joint sand and completely filling the joints with appropriate coarse sand.

Most pavers can hold up against even the toughest weather conditions. If you are considering pavers for your hardscape project, look for products that include colorfastness, weather resistance and durability. Belgard Hardscapes uses Colorguard technology that disperses colors throughout the paver to resist UV rays, maintain color and hold up to weather extremes. It is also important to be aware of the effects of deicing salts on pavers. “While deicing salts can effectively eliminate slippery conditions, they also may adversely affect interlocking concrete pavers, often used in the landscape and walkways, by causing visual and structural damage,” O’Neill says. “Resistance to salts is related directly to a low absorption rate and a high compressive strength, and concrete pavers generally outperform solid concrete and asphalt in both areas.” As for genuine clay pavers, Steele says they are completely unaffected by salt because they contain no cement. However, deicers also can have a negative visual affect on clay pavers if landscapers are not careful. 58

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“Deicers can, however, cause efflorescence, which is the white scum on the surface of the pavers caused by the salt drying on the surface of the pavers,” Steele says. “It then has to be flushed off of the pavers with water in the spring or removed with a specialty efflorescence removing product. It doesn’t affect the durability at all, but is unsightly.”

Proper installation can ensure your patios will remain durable for a long time

Deicers made from magnesium chloride do not affect the efflorescence but can be harmful to cement. Because pavers do chip, use a rubber-tipped shovel if removing snow to help reduce the possibility of chipping the edges of the pavers that are not flush. Although pavers appear to be indestructible, and they can withstand a great deal of the elements, one false move, and a paver could be permanently damaged. To avoid breaks and cracks, clay pavers should never be installed without sand between the joints or without enough sand between the joints. This will cause chipped edges and corners over time and the sand is what prevents the pavers from moving and the edges of the pavers from contacting each other. Homeowners should be aware that if the pavers are going to be pressure washed, the nozzle needs to be far enough away from the edges of the pavers or the joint sand could be removed.

Key Factors for Pavers 1. Stay educated on the latest in pavers and always hire a certified paver installer, this will ensure paver performance to maintain their life.

2. Choose quality products – choose products that are high quality and have a warranty to back up the claims. 3. Seal its beauty – sealers are the perfect finishing touch to ensure that outdoor spaces look beautiful season after season and that you’ll have fewer return calls for repairs to recent projects. Periodically wash or sweep the surface to remove any collected dirt or food stains using a detergent such as dishwashing soap or cleaners designed for use on concrete pavers. 4. Continual care – in the event of winter weather, do not over-apply salt; once inclement weather passes, wash off the pavers since the salt can continue to cause degradation even after the ice or snow has melted. YCCA

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DRYWALL: The Finish That Matters! By Judy Bluhm There is an old saying in the drywall industry, “The walls make a house!” Drywall is the finishing on your walls, the surface and texture in your rooms and it is an essential component of any home. Charter Drywall states that, “When customers move into their new home, it is the drywall work that they will see every day.” Making sure that your home is ‘finished” professionally is a matter that is best achieved by a licensed contractor that not only has the experience needed, but the design talent that results in even, flawless, seamless spaces. The type of drywall textures are limited only by the imagination. Some textures

are applied with a pan and a knife or with a hawk and trowel. Certainly, this is the most common way to finish walls in custom homes. Other drywall textures make use of special brushes to stomp or swirl patterns in the mud (a silica compound material). Everything from knives, rollers or brushes

can be used to create patterns in the mud, which makes patching drywall difficult, if not impossible, for the inexperienced lay person. In other words, if you need drywall repair, calling a professional is the only way to go! Drywall textures can be grouped into two categories based on their method of application. There are hand applied drywall textures and those that require a machine to spray texture material, or commonly called spray- applications. The spray application is used for commercial and apartment buildings, where textured mud is pumped through a long hose to a gun operated by hand triggers. The gun causes drywall mud and compressed air to spray onto the wall surface to create a texture. The various types and sizes of nozzles, the amount of compressed air and the type of material all factor into the finished product. Drywall is not just about the finishing, it begins with the hanging of sheet rock. This is what actually creates rooms in a house and becomes our wall surfaces. The first step in drywall application is having the “Hangers” go in and build the walls. Then the “Tapers” come in next. These are the contractors that tape the joints and corners with mud, which is the white substance similar to plaster. The mud is used with joint tape to seal the seams between the sheets of drywall. The last phase in the process is for the “Finisher,” who comes in to create the depth and texture by adding mud with a hawk and trowel.

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The type of drywall textures are limited only by the imagination.

Ken George Drywall points out that “the finishing on drywall is an art form” and it is the unique creation of the finisher that is using hand tools and “artistry” to make your walls look beautiful. Adding that, “each finisher has their own style that can rarely be duplicated,” it becomes apparent that drywall installation and repairs are best left to the professionals. One of the “big mistakes” that homeowners make, according to Ken George Drywall, is “to try and hang drywall, tape the joints and then call for a drywall finisher.” Instead of saving money, it becomes costly and time consuming to try and “create a texture” over drywall that was hung improperly or with seams and joints not taped smoothly. Have you considered a Standard Orange Peel, Full Metal Trowel, Knockdown or Heavy Monterey lately? Well, those are finishing used mostly in commercial or apartment buildings. Of course, there is also Venetian Plaster, Mud Swirl, Skim Coating, Skip Trowel and Sand Skip to add to the long list of options that homeowners have when it comes to making sure your surfaces are interesting, functional and lovely. In the Southwest, the most popular drywall surfaces are the Sand Skip, done by an “artist” by hand with a hawk and trowel. The artwork you hang on your walls is intended to compliment the art that is your walls. Yes, expert drywall finishing is an “art form” that transforms any home. When looking for “finishing touches” to create beauty, the drywall is what you look at most each day and makes a statement about the quality of your home.

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Tune Ups Preserve Windows & Sliding Doors By Sue Marceau While you are putting together that “honey do” list each year, don’t forget windows and sliding doors. Patio doors and windows also need tender loving care to function optimally. Proper cleaning and lubrication lead to better performance and help prevent sticky wickets. Pete Trevillian, owner of AZ Window Wizard, offers maintenance and repair tips, whether you are dealing with single hung, double hung, wooden frames, aluminum frames, newer vinyl frames or virtually any other window or patio door variation.

“Regular tune ups are very important to making sure that you get the most enjoyment from your windows and sliders,” Trevillian said. “When they stick or move sluggishly, you may not even be able to open them without heavy prodding and much aggravation. Spare yourself these annoyances with proper care and maintenance, whether doing it yourself or hiring it out.”

The more windows and sliders are used, the more the frames dry up and problems surface, he said, explaining that there are many types of windows in area homes with a number of things that can go wrong: damaged glass, balancers going bad, springs failing, deteriorating wooden frames, bent aluminum frames, broken latches and malfunctioning locking mechanisms. Patio doors often end up with gouged tracks from forced use when they begin to stick. If not maintained and timely repaired, the tracks or doors may require more expensive replacement. The most common problem with sliding doors that do not open and close smoothly originates with blockage in the roller tracks. The culprits are dust, dirt, debris and moisture. It is not necessary to remove the doors to permit regular cleaning, since each half of the track is accessible – either by opening or closing the patio door. The following routine should be implemented at intervals noted to obtain the best performance of sliding doors: ›› Vacuum the roller tracks several times a week. ›› Wipe the tracks with a damp cloth once a month. ›› Wash the windows and door frames with water and a mild, non-abrasive soap, when appropriate. ›› Check regularly to ensure that the seals on the door remain airtight. ›› Adjust the height clearance of the rollers, as needed, by inserting a screwdriver through the access at the bottom of the door.

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“It’s a lot easier to maintain instead of repair windows and sliding doors,” Trevillian said. “Think of it as you would about changing the oil in your car. Once you reach a certain mileage trigger, the oil and related parts need to be replaced.” And, just like buying the proper oil for your car engine, the product used should be optimal for the task at hand. Trevillian advises against using WD40 on window and patio door frames because it “dries out and gums them up. Silicone spray is best if you can tolerate the smell. Spray up and down the track as needed once or twice a year.” That track spraying can coincide with sliding door removal for roller lubrication and related maintenance. At the very least, sliders should be checked at the first sign of sticking. Perform the following maintenance at least once a year to ensure smoothly operating patio doors: ›› Grab each side of the halfway open unlatched panel to lift straight up, angle out toward the bottom and gently pull down to remove it from the window frame. ›› Flip the door upside down so that the rollers on the inside are facing up. ›› Examine and replace rusted or damaged rollers. ›› Clean and maintain salvageable rollers by spinning them one at a time to assess resistance. ›› Use silicone lubricant on any sticking rollers and spin again until they run smoothly. ›› Dry any moisture in the track with a cloth. ›› Remove dust, dirt and debris from the bottom of the track with a shop vac or similar tool. ›› Spray silicone in moderation inside the upper and lower tracks of the window frame. ›› Turn the panel upright and lift, ease inward and lower the bottom of the panel back into place on the frame.

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Whatever the circumstance, proper maintenance and tune ups can reduce or elim­inate the inconvenience and expense caused by window and sliding door repairs. YCCA

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With so many choices in Real Estate Companies, your only real choice is

Realty Executives Northern Arizona.

Each town in Northern Arizona is home to the Realty Executives Sign and our more than 100 Real Estate Professionals are the top producers in the area! In fact, they’re five times more productive than the National average. We know the Northern Arizona market and we have the right marketing tools to sell or find your next dream home. So why look any further than Realty Executives Northern Arizona?

Where the Experts are with Real Results in Real Estate! Come learn more about the best Real Estate Executives in the business through our offices. Our professionals are consistently winning awards for their expertise in sales and are committed to your real estate needs. You really do pick winners when you choose Realty Executives Northern Arizona. Come see why.

Commerce Center Office 1955 Commerce Center Circle, Suite C Prescott, AZ 86301 Office Phone: 928-778-9726 Toll Free: 866-778-4492 Office Fax: 928-443-1247

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Downtown Prescott Office 110 E. Gurley Street , Suite 200A Prescott, AZ 86301 Office Phone: 928-443-9800 Toll Free: 800-778-7891 Office Fax: 928-443-1635

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Master Gardeners Help Keep Yavapai County Growing Yavapai County’s mild temperatures and abundant sunshine can be seductive to even the most reluctant gardener. But what you may be used to very well might not apply when gardening here. Where to turn for help? Have no fear! Here come Yavapai County’s Master Gardeners to the rescue. What is a Master Gardener? He or she is a volunteer trained by the University of Arizona to help provide science-based information to each county. The Master Gardener program is part of the Cooperative Extension System, a nationwide educational network, and there are many services available through the Extension to help you make the most of your landscaping, gardening and even help you with household skills. A quick trip to the Yavapai County Extension website (http:extension.arizona.edu/ Yavapai) will give you a treasure trove of informational bulletins, a guide to services, and even information on how to become a Master Gardener yourself.

So, what can Master Gardeners do for you? One of the most frequently used services is the Master Gardener help line. By calling the help line (928-445-6590 extension 222) or bringing samples you may ask questions about specific plants, insect problems, watering requirements – anything horticultural really – and get an answer from a trained Master Gardener. If they don’t know the answer, they will find the answer and call you back. In addition to the help line, Master Gardeners also performs a variety of community outreach services. You may see them at the Farmer’s Markets, for example, staffing the information booth and answering questions on the spot. There is also a Speaker’s Bureau where community organizations may request a speaker on a variety of topics and Master Gardeners volunteer their time to share their expertise.

Another type of community outreach is to schools and community gardens, as well as the annual plant sale event, Monsoon Madness, which will be held on July 12th this year. Funds generated from this event help support the many Master Gardener community programs. And, again, at Monsoon Madness Master Gardeners are at the ready to answer your questions. The Cooperative Extension has numerous bulletins and brochures available on topics ranging from “How to Hire a Tree Expert,” “General Landscape Irrigation Guidelines” and “Ten Steps to a Successful Vegetable Garden” to information on Hardiness Zones, Weed Control, Plant Nutrient Deficiencies, Wildlife Control and Native Plants. If you’re new to the area, you can request the “New in Town” packet of gardening information to help you get acquainted with the area and it’s horticulture environments. Free soil testing, plant identification and help with pinpointing plant pests and problems are all part of the free services offered by the Yavapai County Extension. Although Master Gardeners and the Extension Office cannot recommend specific vendors, they can steer you to resources, such as Yavapai County Contractors Association, “Yavapai Builder” and various directories, to help you make your own informed decisions. Think you might like to become a Master Gardener yourself? You’ll be glad you did! Training is offered every year and alternates between the Verde Valley and the Prescott area. If you’re not ready to take the course or would simply like to see what

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it’s all about, the entire Master Gardener Manual is available online in pdf form at extension.arizona.edu/yavapai, along with lots of other useful documents. Gardening in Yavapai County (some call it “Gardening in ­ Granite!”) can be very rewarding if you’re in the know. With the help of the Yavapai County Cooperative Extension and Master Gardeners, you will be! Happy gardening! YCCA

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How to Give Your Bathroom a Facelift By Tom Reilly Nothing dates a house more quickly than a bathroom that time has forgotten. Yet drab or outdated bathrooms can be dramatically revitalized. Bath products abound that can give you as lavish a bathroom as you could possibly want. Many homeowners want their bathrooms to be totally utilitarian, but others want rooms in which to pamper themselves. How about you? Your answer, and your budget, will determine the best way to remodel. Do you want to work within the existing space of your current bathroom? Do you want to expand by taking room from somewhere else? Would you rather build an addition to accommodate your new bath? These are just a few options which vary greatly in cost.

Renovating your current space is usually the least complicated and least expensive option. While the layout of your existing bathroom can be altered to some extent, moving major plumbing fixtures is the most costly aspect of a remodel. Local building codes require minimum clearances between, beside, and in front of fixtures to allow for use, cleaning, and repair. If you have an extra bedroom, you could move the bathroom to this space or expand a current bath into a portion of it. This will mean moving the plumbing but it will also add a modern, spacious bathroom to your home which will increase the resale value. An addition or even a small bump-out could be the solution. This requires the largest investment but will give you just what you want. If you’ve decided to remodel, start with an analysis of your existing bathroom: ›› Does the sink have independent faucets? If so, you know how inconvenient this can be. Why not switch to a single operating lever which is easier to use and gives a better mix of temperatures? ›› What is the condition of the sink, toilet, and tub/shower? If it’s an older, wall-hanging toilet, you might update the  look, perhaps with a low-water consumption style. If your  tub is basically sound, consider re-glazing it. However,  many homeowners are moving up to whirlpool style tubs. ›› Think about reinforcing the walls, adding grab bars, and widening doors for visitors with physical disabilities or for your later years. ›› Is your medicine cabinet small and outdated? Consider the various styles of newer cabinets, perhaps with recessed or decorative lighting. ›› If a wooden window is suffering the effects of humidity, it may be best to replace it and older metal windows with new vinyl windows. Deco glass block has made a comeback and is a good option for adding light and design flair to a bathroom.

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›› How is the tile? If it is chipped and cracked and matching tile is not available, replacement or re-glazing may be your best option. ›› Does your tub include a shower? One can easily be added with a combination tub-shower valve. ›› Many older bathrooms don’t have adequate ventilation. You may want to add a fan to avoid moisture build-up which can deteriorate materials and promote the growth of mold and mildew. ›› Does the sink have a vanity for storage? If it does, but you just don’t like it, consider replacing it with a one of the many beautiful varieties that are available today. ›› Are electrical outlets a problem? Face it, the number of electrical appliances we use in our daily rituals has multiplied since the time many houses were built. That means that you probably want more outlets. New and replacement ones should be protected ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) outlets that are made to shut off automatically when they sense water. Today’s bathroom can be all you want it to be. Enjoy the opportunity to explore the variety of materials, styles, and colors available to you. In the end, you’ll have a well-designed bathroom that functions as beautifully as it looks. YCCA Tom Reilly, local architect and owner of Renovations – Your Complete Remodel Resource. He has been building in Prescott for 30 years. www.Renovationsaz.com

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Paint: The Colors of Your Life By Judy Bluhm According to Century Painting of Prescott, “Interior Painting is where you share your personal touch and taste to make your home your sanctuary and showpiece.” And according to the National Association of Realtors, there is no other improvement that can affordably add value to a house more than a new paint job. Paint creates beauty, covers flaws, makes a statement, refreshes a room and can transform an entire home or business. It is the single most powerful change that we can make to a room, wall or building. Even before the colors are selected, consideration needs to be given to the various types of finishes that are available. Selecting the right finish can be done with the help of a licensed painting contractor, since this decision will determine the best results. There are quite a few finishes for interior home applications, and the way the room is utilized will help in making the correct selection. Matte finish is often referred to as the flat finish and is commonly used on interior walls. It is especially good for camouflaging small imperfections such as bumps or cracks, as this finish does not reflect light. While some flat finishes claim to be washable today, they generally require touchA professional will have the tools of the trade to make every paint job a positive improvement.

up with more paint to cover dirt or marks, making it very important to always have extra paint on hand.

ents who want to paint that room a neutral beige, will need to use a primer over that vivid color.

Flat enamel is a paint with a durable, flat, matte finish. It is a good choice for powder rooms and hallways, as it holds up to an occasional cleaning. The popular eggshell finish has a very low sheen, with only a slight hint of gloss. This finish is ideal for walls and holds up quite well with sponging off dirt than a flat finish. Often used in kitchens or high traffic areas, the egg shell finish is a subtle gloss.

Latex or water-based paints are formulated to be environmentally friendly. Drying time is very short (about an hour) and clean-ups are easy with water. These paints are ideal for most surfaces and are applied with rollers or synthetic bristle brushes.

Satin finish paint has a smooth, velvety look with a bit more gloss. It is commonly used for doors, trim and ceilings. It can be used as wall paint, generally in children’s rooms where it can actually hold up to a light scrubbing. Some people prefer the satin finish in bathrooms, kitchens and hallways for the durability of clean-up. Tinted primer is a base coat and may be tinted to match the surface paint color. Using a primer may eliminate the need for a second coat of finish paint and is especially important when painting over a drastically different color. The teenager who painted his room cobalt blue and the par-

Oil-based paint is what professional artists and painters like to use when painting cabinets, furniture and some trim pieces. The new formulations are non-toxic and do not harm the environment. These paints are best applied with natural bristle brushes or pads. Many a well-intentioned homeowner has decided to “refinish” their kitchen cabinets only to realize they are “downgrading” them because the paint finish looks spotty and “fake.” It is always best to hire a licensed paint contractor who specializes in refinishing projects before taking on the painting of cabinetry. This is an art form. Pinon Painting of Prescott, likes to point out that the old adage “a picture is worth a thousand words” is particularly applicable when it comes to painting. They also say that, “paint not only ensures the life of your home, it dresses it up, making it uniquely yours.” Their website and consultation also offers good tips on how to choose a color. The “wrong color” can create a home that is too vivid or too subtle. The wrong color can make your home look featureless and plain, and too bold of a color can overwhelm all of the architectural features of your house. Colors are the critical component for all paint surfaces. It is almost impossible to select a color based on a one-inch card from a paint store. Even neutrals can have

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undertones, and may look pink in certain lights. That brick red for an accent wall may actually scream out “fire engine” and the light buttercup color for the half bath may look more like canary yellow when you are rolling it on. Once you understand the “theme” and “atmosphere” you are trying to create, then it is narrowing the colors to certain shades. Trying out paint colors on the side of a wall so light can hit it at various times of the day is another crucial element of paining. And a professional painter has a “color palette” of interiors and exteriors that can help you decide what color is really best for you. Another reason to consider hiring a licensed painting contractor is because they have the preparation techniques down to a science. So many homeowners make the biggest mistake in painting. This is not choosing the wrong color, it is not preparing the paint site thoroughly. The old saying that carpenters have, “measure twice and cut once” might be turned into, “prepare well and reduce clean-ups” for painting. The painter’s blue tape is still the standard in the industry. It has a waxy c­ oating

to keep paint from seeping through, is available in several widths and provides a perfect straight edge for painting. It has a magical quality of not allowing paint to seep, yet can be pulled off the surface that it is stuck to without removing the paint underneath. The seal is activated when you put it down onto a smooth surface. Done right, a taped room with the electrical plates and all other hardware removed is the first step to making a paint job successful. Without it, areas around windows, ceilings, and cabinets become messy and require touch-up.

A professional will have the tools of the trade to make every paint job a positive improvement. From spraying equipment for stucco applications, to proper rollers and pads, the “tools, tricks and talent” that goes into a fabulous painting project are what make the job a true “transformation.” Looking for a change of scenery? Maybe it is time to make your “ordinary” walls “extraordinary” with a new coat of paint. Life has many colors, express yourself and enjoy the “makeover” that only new paint can achieve. YCCA

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Outdoor Living in Good Ol’ Prescott, Arizona By Tom Reilly Here outdoor living is a year round experience and there are so many ways to make it happen. Outdoor living when I grew up was on the patio, uncovered, with a picnic table my Dad made, and then we augmented this with lawn chairs. Our picnic table didn’t have an umbrella so no relief from the sun or protection from the rain. Hot sun or even the slightest rain drove the whole outfit indoors. Cold evenings were another challenge. Once the BBQ coals faded, the evening was over. The last roasted marshmallow was eaten, and the s’mores were done, if it was warm out we would linger, cool we went inside. Fast forward to today and we are seeing all manner of outdoor living solutions in all manner of housing types. Urban, suburban, rural, all present unique opportunities to enjoy the great outdoors at home. Urban dwellings such as apartments, condos, and townhomes usually have a patch of ground for a BBQ and some outdoor furniture. This may be associated with a yard area, deck, or a veranda. I refer

to a veranda as a covered space. These spaces are usually a predetermined size and offer the more urban dweller a daily dose of that wonderful out-of-doors. The suburban dwelling, usually a lot smaller than one acre, has more options. Nowdays, the patio is usually covered. Often the outdoor living space has a fire pit, a gas fire ring, and even a fireplace. Sitting outside on a warm summer morning with coffee just

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Sitting outside on a warm summer morning with coffee just before engaging your day can set the tone for your outlook on the day’s tasks ahead.

I Get Homes Sold!

before engaging your day can set the tone for your outlook on the day’s tasks ahead. This setting can be gracefully achieved with an elegantly designed post and beam covering that is solid, keeping the rain off of you, or a ramada style that is open to keep the rain off, but designed to shade the sitting or gathering area. Decks for homes in our mountainous terrain are very popular and they bring new life to many homes. When originally constructed, scant consideration was given to the deck’s orientation to the sun and wind. Usually, these were constructed based on access from a kitchen or living space and with little consideration given to the impact our environment can have. Often these decks were constructed with wood, and rarely the correct type of wood, therefore requiring tons of maintenance. Because of this, they very often fall into disrepair or are rarely used. New owners see the possibilities and want to restore these spaces as a useful and pleasant addition to indoor living. Replacement decking is usually a composite product made from recycled plastic and wood particles. When installed correctly, these products last a long time and require little or no maintenance. Often these products come in a variety of colors that will complement your existing home’s color scheme. While initial cost is higher than a cedar deck, the lack of maintenance over the years allows you to quickly recover that investment. Rural outdoor living (on parcels greater than one acre and usually up to 35 acres), have a different perspective to living the outdoor lifestyle. From separate casitas, to small pavilions, and all manner of spaces mentioned above, the outdoor lifestyle is often a strong component on the larger lots. We have seen some wonderful spaces created adjacent to barns, with small kitchens and areas for entertaining likeminded friends. The barn for some folks is as popular a place as the kitchen for gathering and enjoying the rural lifestyle. Whether you live in the city, subdivision, or a small ranch, outdoor living can be a wonderfully restorative respite. It is never too late to begin that outdoor planning process. Live your dream almost year-round outside in our beautiful area. YCCA Tom Reilly, local architect and owner of Renovations – Your Complete Remodel Resource. He has been building in Prescott for 30 years. www.Renovationsaz.com

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Why Should We Hire an Arborist? By Sandy Griffis An arborist is an individual trained in the art and science of planting, caring for and maintaining individual trees. Arborists are extremely knowledgeable about the needs of trees and are trained and equipped to provide proper tree care. In other words, arborists are certified tree doctors and in Yavapai County we are extremely fortunate to some of the best right here in Yavapai County: The Joshua Tree and Landscape Company, Yavapai Exterminating and Carescape. These companies have staff that have achieved their knowledge through experience and by passing a comprehensive examination developed by some of the nation’s leading experts on tree care. Certified Arborists must also continue their education to maintain their certification and adhere to a Code of Ethics. Hiring an arborist is a decision that should not be taken lightly. Proper tree care is an investment that can lead to substantial returns as well cared-for trees are attractive and can add considerable value to your property. On the other hand, poorly maintained trees can be a significant liability.

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Services that arborists can provide to maintain tree health are:

Pruning An arborist can determine the type of pruning necessary to maintain or improve the health, appearance and safety of trees. Pruning techniques include removing limbs that interfere with utility lines or structures, obstruct streets, are dead, weak or decayed,


are diseased or insect-infested, damaged by storms, increasing light penetration and reducing wind resistance within the canopy.

Proper tree care is an investment that can lead to substantial returns as well cared-for trees are attractive and can add considerable value to your property.

Tree Removal Although tree removal is a last resort, there are circumstances when it is necessary and an arborist can help decide whether a tree should be removed or not. Tree removal is determined if a tree is dead or drying, considered an unacceptable risk, causing an obstruction that is impossible to correct through pruning, crowding and causing harm to other more desirable trees and located in an area where new construction requires removal.

Planting An arborist can recommend what species are appropriate for a particular location. The wrong tree in the wrong location will lead to further problems as a result of limited growing space, insects, diseases or poor growth.

growth and applications to manage certain insect and disease problems are services offered by an arborist.

It is important to remember “the right tree for the right space.” Tree function, form and size, site conditions, soil conditions, drainage, space constraints, human and pet activity, pest problems are all things that should be considered when planting a tree – not just plopping the tree into the ground and/or selecting a tree just because it has nice foliage.

In dense urban areas and new subdivisions, soil is often disturbed, shallow, compacted and subject to drought. Most trees will suffer in these conditions without additional care. An arborist can take soil samples from your yard and test for texture, fertility, salinity and pH and from the results of these tests you can determine which trees are suited for your property.

Tree Health

Whether you already have existing trees on your property, or you are considering planting trees, an arborist can assist you with tree selection. Taking into consideration the factors above, you can ensure the trees in your yard and the new ones you plant will grow and function as desired. YCCA

An arborist will offer tree health care and/or preventative maintenance to keep trees in good health while reducing insect, disease or site problems. Fertilization and soil recommendations are offered for improved tree health. Soil aeration to improve root

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Finishing Touches Can Make Your Dream Home a Reality By Lauren Millette ‘Living the Dream’ is something many folks strive toward daily but might think is beyond reach. Yet, winning the lottery or spending beyond a budget isn’t necessary to accomplishing this goal. Forging a decorating plan, selecting the right accessories for your dream home and adding some inspirational touches can transform your house into the dream home that provides you the serenity and joy you’re seeking.

“Inspiration begins with a single idea that transforms into a living space you fall in love with for its beauty or its practicality over and over again,” says Prescott Design Center CEO Grant Kuckuck. “Bringing your inspiration to life requires a designer who understands your needs and your wants and can realize both through color, material, purpose and vision.” Whether you choose to hire an interior designer to rejuvenate the look and feel of your home or opt to place yourself in that role, there are a number of considerations to examine before diving head first into your project.

How much of a makeover do you really want? Will some simple color, pattern or furniture changes do the trick? Do you desire a fresh look brought through lighting, window coverings, floor coverings or wall coverings? Does your bathroom or kitchen need to be remodeled to meet your family’s changing needs? These are just a few questions you might ask yourself before launching into your dream home makeover. If it’s a full-blown treatment that’s needed, Prescott Design Center Interior Designer Shaynee McMillon suggests going through three interior design phases: The Schematic Phase, the Design Development Phase and the Construction Document Phase. The Schematic Phase is really just getting pen to paper and exhausting every way 76

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a room can be layed-out. “Brainstorming ideas and getting it to that first level of direction is important,” McMillon points out. When you are working with a formally trained designer on a small bath remodel or a home builder, it’s helpful to come in with a basic design. “Even if I don’t know what their space is, I ask them to come to our first meeting with imagery of styles they gravitate toward,” she said. “Bring ideas of what inspires you.” It’s also important to bring existing floor plans to an interior designer, should this be the route you choose to go, to save money, as the designer will not have to charge you to create a new floor plan. The Design Development Phase is the next step, which covers color options, refining ideas and selecting material choices. “This is probably my favorite stage,” McMillon said. “I usually come to that meeting and throw out two or three color palettes just getting to know them. This covers everything from paint to tile to carpet to lighting ideas. It’s where we bring together concepts to see what their gravitating toward. It might not be a distinct pattern they choose but a collection of different concepts I think would work well in their space.” More refined floor plans also are developed at this point before proceeding. The final step in a high-level home makeover is the Construction Document Phase. This stage covers anything from develop-


ing a full working set of drawings to work from and reviewing similar projects to refining concepts and determining costs and budget. In essence, it’s the documenting phase and involves creating a budget spreadsheet.

“Bringing your inspiration to life requires a designer who understands your needs and your wants and can realize both through color, material, purpose and vision.” – Grant Kuckuck

“Working with a designer is helpful through this process and valuable to homeowners,” McMillon said. “Typically, it will save them money in the long run. Basically, I’m here to organize the chaos and there is a lot that goes into redesigning a home. “Designing a dream home is a process that’s worth the time invested to go through that process up front,” she said. “A lot of people will build and don’t think about what they want as their final look before it’s finished. I help people with direction. Many times, when they try to do it themselves, they get overwhelmed. The design planning process helps get that direction and eases the building process. It can be very stressful for people trying to do it on their own.” Homeowners wishing to take on re-design projects themselves or just make some simple changes to spruce up the look of their

homes might wish to study new trends in the design market such as window coverings, color schemes, themes, dissimilar materials and reclaimed materials. Bella Home Furnishings in Prescott offers an eclectic array of home furnishings and a staff of interior designers with more than 100 years of combined experience in the field to assist in decisions on purchasing everything from window coverings, wall paper, draperies, bedding, furniture, light fixtures to whimsical pieces that add personality to every room in a home.

ings market convention in Las Vegas with fresh ideas on the latest trends used by professionals as well as do-it-yourselfers. “Last year, emerald green was the color of the year but this year, wild orchid and purple pillows and rug accents are big,” Rushings said. “Sometimes it’s just a pop of color, like the wild orchid or an indigo blue paired with an interesting vase filled with a bright floral arrangement set against soft beiges or a neutral palette in your home furnishings and flooring that add the fresh, new look you’re after for your home.”

Bella Home Furnishings Interior Designer Julie Rushings just returned from a furnish-

Continued on next page

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McMillon agrees. “Your primary colors are more of timeless touches,” she said. “Peo­ple like to make a statement with their lighting and pops of color. At color forecast seminars, we typically see trends that are determined five years in advance and carry over through fashion, the auto industry and other areas. It generally takes a while before smaller, rural communities pick up on the trends.” Current trends in this region include scaling down furniture size, designing homes to be more functional and more acces­sible, and bringing in more light through windows and ready-made window panels or suncontrol blinds that add soft lighting to the home. However, Rushings points out, in the greater Prescott area, color choices, home decorating styles, floor coverings and basic furniture choices run the gamut. In fact, in an area where one might think Southwestern décor would be predominant, isn’t necessarily the case here. “We work hard to have items that are interesting and different and are seeing a big push toward incorporating vintage pieces and antiques into newer furnishings,” Rushings said. We’re not really seeing a

dramatic change in trends but a greater appreciation for taking favorite items or treasures that people have had in their families for years and working them into their design. Our things tell a story about us and I want to incorporate that so it’s their story that’s being told in their home.” Bright, Suzani needlework, crewel and embroidery pieces are big in adding a touch of vintage to more contemporary rooms, she said. But adding a touch of whimsy also seems to be a winner with clients. Setting a great room, guest room or living room off with a cowhide, a rustic cabin addition or an old urn turned into a lamp or vase is big these days, she said. So is turning an old tapestry or family heirloom throw rug into a headboard on a bed. The bottom line in giving your home that facelift to make it the dream home you want to spend time in is make it yours! Juxtaposition of traditional or formal with whimsical and bright color pops may be the easiest way to achieving that success. From there, let your budget and inspirational ideas lead you down the path that best brings you happiness. YCCA

Lighting Lighting is a key visual element in any home. Not only does it allow you to see where you’re walking it can also set a mood or highlight prized possessions. There are three types of lighting: ambient, task and accent lighting. Ambient Ambient is a hidden source of light that washes a room with a glow. It flattens an interior and creates very little shadow. A wall sconce is an example of ambient lighting. Accent Directional lighting or lighting that adds interest or highlights a certain object or unusual architectural feature in a room. A bulb and some kind of shield to direct the light are all that’s needed for this type of lighting. Halogen spotlights and table lamps with opaque shades are good ways to achieve accent lighting. Task Task lighting provides illumination for specific tasks, such as cooking or reading. Task lighting should be free of distracting glare and shadows and should be bright enough to prevent eyestrain.

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Contracting for Success
 By Matt Ackerman While many factors contribute to the success of a building project and a satisfied client, managing construction cost is certainly one of the most critical. 

 Numerous variables play a part in the final cost of a new home or business, and as such, there are many opportunities to address the building cost – from lot selection; to design complexity; to the materials, systems and finishes specified; to the very method of contracting (project delivery) that the owner chooses in order construct his or her project.

 The most common project delivery method is the 3-step, competitive bid or design-bid-build process (DBB). Other methods include design-build (DB), negotiated bid (NB), construction manager at risk (CMAR), as well as several other less common hybridized approaches to project delivery. While there are advantages and disadvantages to each, there are several distinct advantages – to the owner, the project, as well as to the project team– by using a

hybrid method of contracting to as “TCNB”, or a Team-Centered Negotiated Bid.

 With TCNB clients are assisted with the selection of a contractor early on in the process– usually during design development – which is significantly earlier than with most other project delivery methods. Contractor selection is typically based upon reputation

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and/or past experience and performance, rather than simply the lowest cost. In TCNB, the owner and contractor will eventually work together to settle on a fair price once the design documents are complete– but it’s the upfront participation of the builder during design, that makes TCNB a project delivery method worth considering. Among its many advantages are:

TCNB combines the very best of DBB (protecting the design process, as well as the integrity of the end design), with the typically tighter cost control of DB – without which can result in sticker shock for the owner, if the first real input on cost hasn’t been provided until the construction documents are complete and final bids have been opened. 



1. The establishment of a “project team” early on in the process. A cooperative team approach between builder, architect, and owner-developed in an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect – results in fewer headaches down the road, while setting the stage for creative problem solving for the inevitable challenges that can arise during construction. A cohesive team approach is critical for the overall success of a project.

Competent builders, just like skilled architects, are trained professionals who are continually learning new and better ways to advance their trade. The participation of partnership with your contractor during design, can result in a better and more affordable end product for the client. TCNB is a win for the builder, for the architectural team, and most importantly – for the owner. YCCA

2. With the rapid advancement in building systems, technologies and materials in recent years, a contractor’s participation during design provides the opportunity for appropriate and affordable building strategies to be quickly considered and developed, and/or conversely, quickly rejected – saving the owner time during design, as well as money during construction. 3. A contractor brought on board during design can provide critical and timely feedback with regard to the availability of materials and labor, as well as preliminary input on the likely overall cost of the developing design, critical to keeping the project on target budget-wise.

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At Work and at Home – Together
 By Sue Marceau The area construction industry boasts many husbands and wives who have gone into business for themselves, combining their interests, skills and ambitions to support their families and spur the local economy.

As with anything in life worth taking on, there are ups and downs. Having your own family business “is a challenge,” – Robert and Christy Board for Board

Couples usually create companies by marrying into them, growing up within them or merging shared professional passions. Despite unique challenges and potential tensions, the positives far outweigh the negatives identified by multiple family-owned contractors and suppliers operating in Yavapai County. The advantages of working together, these couples have revealed, include common goals, shared schedules, flexible hours and more freedom for family needs. Ensuring the results they desire takes faith, trust and hard work. Trust is essential for couples in business together, according to local construction company owners Chuck and Cassie Merritt of DeCarol Company. “I have a high level of trust with Cassie that I would not have with anyone else,” Chuck Merritt explained. “I value her opinions and her perspective on things that are not always the same as mine. This allows me, as the operations manager, to make better decisions. For me, the trust factor is the most important benefit of our working relationship.” Cassie Merritt, DeCarol Company’s secretary/treasurer and office manager, echoed her husband’s emphasis on trust. “The benefit of working together is the comfort of knowing Chuck so well and being able to trust him implicitly,” she confided.

Whenever couples, siblings or entire families forge a single mission, there’s heightened reliance and togetherness. Couple-owned firms have discovered that empathy and intuition overcome obstacles and generate rewards. One couple, Michael and Cheryl Lough of MCK Woodworks, described how well-intentioned people had warned them that working together “was a horrible idea,” even predicting “a divorced family within a few years.” Both the company and the family have remained intact since the business emerged in 1998. “Together, we are MCK Woodworks,” Cheryl Lough revealed. “Without one or the other of us, we aren’t so sure that MCK Woodworks would exist. There are always struggles…within the family, within each of us personally…There’s always the economy and what that brings to the table…In the end, there’s nothing like knowing that no matter what, the person beside you will always have your back.” Interior Designer Amy Favour and Brian Meixensperger, an electrician, knew they “wanted to do something together and a lighting showroom is a good use of both of our professional skills,” Favour observed about Max Loves Me, the business they named after their pre-school son. Similarly, Chuck and Debbie Harper “always talked about starting our own business someday.” Married for 43 years and first working together running a water company, they established Circle C Construction. Chuck is president, Debbie executive vice president and their son, Josh, vice president.

“There’s nothing like knowing that no matter what, the person beside you will always have your back” – Michael and Cheryl Lough of MCK Woodworks

The closeness of a demanding business environment intuits a strong sense of what each person needs jobwise, according to Favour, Lough and Harper. “We know what’s going on with each other,” Favour explained, “(so we have) more empathy and understanding. We (also) have more flexibility in our schedules, which helps with raising our son.” Lough recounted her long friendship with husband, Michael: “We have been best friends since high school, so we know each other well. We can communicate without words. We know what needs to

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be done and we work together to accomplish it. Being in business together really works well for us.”

“We know what’s going on with each other, (so we have) more empathy and understanding. – Amy Favour and Brian Meixensperger

That sentiment is echoed by Debbie Harper, who nailed the why of starting a family business, commenting that the “common goal of making our company grow and doing something we are both proud of…is a feeling you can’t replace.” Ron Owsley was vice president of sales at Tucson’s Richmond American Homes in 1996, when he hired Kelly as sales associate for new homes. The couple currently owns Premier Development AZ LLC, Ron became general contractor to Kelly’s chief financial officer. “We have the fortune and opportunity to operate the office from our home (and) share work duties for each other when one needs to be away with friends or family,” Ron Owsley noted. “Setting our own vacation schedules and last-minute weekend getaways has been something we have enjoyed and were unable to do in our former careers at big home building companies.” Any good thing occurring in excess can evolve into something requiring readjustment. The flexibility in time management, for example, also can be risky because “your work life is always intersecting with your personal life,” according to Christie Board, who with husband, Robert, owns Board by Board, Inc. ­ Robert serves as president, while Christie is kitchen and bath designer. “You are together a lot, and if someone drops the ball, you still have to see them before you go to bed.”

There’s also the inclination of “tending to talk about work a lot,” Favour mentioned. “It’s hard to turn it off.” Ron Owsley agreed, acknowledging that they strive to separate work and relaxation to ensure that they have “definitive personal time. It’s easy to allow work to be all-consuming. Once you understand it and see it happen, (you) just rein it in and it works out.” Chuck Merritt divulged a hard-earned breakthrough: “Cassie and I communicate and interact all of our working day, which is usually 12 hours…It took me a long time to figure out that this did not count as quality personal time…Personal time together is very valuable to us.” Continued on next page

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Another potential pitfall is not recognizing “that someone needs to be in charge,” Debbie Harper cautioned. “We have worked around this (by) separating tasks, then round tabling problems that need to be ironed out. Keeping an open mind and staying flexible (is key).” Parental reaction to passing the business baton to their children varied from a “no, definitely not” from the Boards to Josh Harper, the youngest of two sons, who joined Circle C Construction in 2003. The children from these families all have been encouraged to pursue their personal dreams in life and career.

“... Common goal of making our company grow and doing something we are both proud of … is a feeling you can’t replace.” – Debbie and Chuck Harper Circle C Construction

“Both of our sons grew up working in construction,” the Harpers noted. “Josh has been a wonderful asset to our business. His abilities, friendly manner and dedication to his job have been very rewarding to see.” A wait and see attitude is projected by Favour, who quipped “our son is only four, so who knows?” A similar outlook is expressed by the Loughs, whose youngest child, Alex, is five. The Loughs’ three older children – for whom the business was named – “probably knew more about being business owners by the time they entered middle school than most people know when they first start a business…,” Cheryl Lough relayed. “They have always been…very hands on…If there were ever a set of children that had the ability to take over a family business, it would be (them)…(Their interests) are in different areas, so passing it down doesn’t seem to fit right now…We would be proud…if that’s where their honest passion was.”

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Advice from co-owner couples involves everything required of businesses in general, such as industry knowledge, defined goals, delegation by skill sets, optimal work flow, relationship management, professional services (accounting and legal) and access to capital. Then, there’s that variable called communication. “We believe success for our business is good communication skills, keeping an open mind and (showing) respect for each other,” the Harpers noted. “Being open to new ideas and keeping the vision of our company on a direct path. (And) the biggest thing is to keep a very healthy sense of humor to help manage day to day obstacles.” The Boards touted “being on the same page and 100 percent committed to the success of the company. This wouldn’t work if we both didn’t care passionately about our projects and clients… It would be impossible if you had a partner that didn’t carry their share of the weight. The other part to this is respecting each other’s skill set, dividing up the jobs and allowing each of you to do your job. We don’t micromanage each other and yet we have to each be willing to step in to pick up the slack, if necessary. Communication is the biggest part of the equation, lack of communication equals problems.” The Loughs define their achievements in a single word: faith. “With God, all things are possible,” they disclosed. “It is with God that we began. It is with God that we will stand. In our family and in our business, our priorities stand like this: God, family and then business. God has always held us and we remain faithful to that… Our contractors, many of whom are like family and so important to us, are such a blessing. We have been truly blessed (with contractors, friends and customers).” As with anything in life worth taking on, there are ups and downs. Having your own family business “is a challenge,” Christie Board acknowledged. “It takes time to find your rhythm, so to speak. There have been times when we have each wished we did something else for a living.” Cassie Merritt summarized it well: “When you work together professionally as a married couple, you have to separate yourselves from being husband and wife and think as business partners. Other­wise, it’s easy to allow personal emotions to interfere in business dealings.”

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“We have the fortune and opportunity to operate the office from our home (and) share work duties ...” – Ron and Kelly Owsley

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The Boards wrapped up with the best tip they have received: “Any time we go on vacation, the rule is we can’t talk about work or anything serious. It takes a day or so to get into the swing of it, but it is the best advice we have ever been given. That way, when you actually get some down time, you don’t end up getting in an argument or wasting it talking about work. (The work) will be there when you get back.” YCCA

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Plants and Our Wildlife Although deer and rabbits are entertaining to watch, they can also do considerable damage to landscape and garden plants. Diets of these animals will change with wild food availability and yearly rainfall and temperature variations.

Deer

Certain plants are sometimes more desirable when they are young and/or well fertilized. It is difficult to predict what deer and rabbits may find attractive from year-to-year, but this list suggests some plant species that seem to be less palatable. This list was compiled from observations made by gardeners, landscapers, and nursery personnel in North Central Arizona. There are some products and home remedies that purport to repel and/ or discourage these herbivores, but the surest solution to prevent herbivory is to exclude wildlife from your garden using properly designed fences. University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ 1237 Available on-line at: http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/garden/az1237.pdf

Common Name

Botanical Name

SHRUBS Glossy Abelia Abelia grandiflora Manzanita Arctostaphylos spp. Bamboo Many Species Barberry Berberis spp. Butterfly Bush Buddleia spp. Boxwood Buxus spp. Fairy Duster Calliandra spp. Flowering Quince Chaenomeles spp. Littleleaf Cordia Cordia parvifolia Cotoneaster Cotoneaster spp. Dalea Dalea spp. Daphne Daphne spp. Brittlebush Encelia farinosa Turpentine Bush Ericarmeria laricifolia Buckwheat Eriogonum spp. Holly Ilex spp. Jojoba Simmondsia chinensis Juniper Juniperus spp. Chuparosa Justicia californica Kerria Japonica Kerria japonica Lantana Lantana spp. Lavender Lavandula spp. Leucophyllum Leucophyllum spp. Oregon Grape Mahonia spp. Heavenly Bamboo Nandina domestica Cinquefoil Potentilla spp. Firethorn Pyracantha spp. Sumac Rhus spp. Currant, Gooseberry Ribes spp. 86

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Common Name Rosemary Sage Lilac Viburnum

Botanical Name Rosmarinus officinalis Salvia spp. Syringa spp. Viburnum spp.

TREES Fir Abies spp. Vine Apple Acer circinatum Japanese Maple Acer palmatum Albizia Albizia spp. Cedar Cedrus spp. Hackberry Celtis spp. Redbud Cercis spp. Hawthorn Crataegus spp. Cypress Cupressus spp. Ash Fraxinus spp. Maidenhair Tree Ginkgo biloba Magnolia Magnolia spp. Spruce Picea spp. Pine Pinus spp. Douglas Fir Pseudotsuga menziesii Oak Quercus spp. Tex Mountain Laurel Sophora Secundiflora GROUND COVERS & VINES Carpet Bugle Ajuga spp. Dwarf Plumbago Ceratostigma plumbaginoides English Ivy Hedera helix Japanese Spurge Pachysandra terminalis Virginia Creeper Parthenocissus spp.

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Rabbits Common Name Periwinkle Wisteria

Botanical Name Vinca spp. Wisteria spp.

PERENNIALS, BULBS, & ANNUALS Yarrow Achillea spp. Agave Agave spp. Naked Lady Amaryllis belladonna Columbine Aquilegia spp. Pink Sea Thrift Armeria spp. Artemisia (Sage Artemisia spp. Aster Aster spp. False Spiraea Astilbe spp Balsam Impatiens spp. Begonia Begonia spp. Swan River Daisy Brachycome iberidifolia Serbian Bellflower Campanula spp. Centaurea Centaurea spp. Snow-in-Summer Cerastium tomentosum Coreopsis Coreopsis spp. Crocus Crocus spp. Dahlia Dahlia hybrids Bleeding Heart Dicentra spp. Fleabane Erigeron spp. California Poppy Eschscholzia californica Euphorbia Euphorbia spp. Ferns Many Species Blue Fescue Festuca ovina ’Glauca’ Blanket Flower Gaillardia grandiflora Cranesbill Geranium spp. Straw Flower Helichrysum bracteatum

Common Name

Botanical Name

Daylily Hemerocallis spp. Herbs (except Basil Many Species Candytuft Iberis spp. Iris Iris spp. Red-Hot Poker Kniphofia uvaria Dead Nettle Lamium maculatum Lupine Lupinus spp. Crown-Pink Lychnis coronaria Blackfoot Daisy Melampodium leucanthum Bee Balm Monarda spp. Forget-Me-Not Myosotis scorpioides Daffodil Narcissus hybrids Catnip Nepeta spp. Oregano Origanum spp. Oriental Poppy Papaver spp. Beard Tongue Penstemon spp. Moss Pink Phlox subulata Gloriosa Daisy Rudbeckia hirta Santolina Santolina spp. Saxifrage Saxifraga spp. Pincushion Flower Scabiosa spp. Squill (Bluebell Scilla spp. Lamb’s Ears Stachys byzantina Feather Grass Stipa spp. Thyme Thymus spp. Verbena Verbena spp. Speedwell Veronica spp. Sweet Violet Viola odorata California Fuchsia Zauschneria californica


Javelinas Javelina are omnivorous animals with poor eyesight and a keen sense of smell. They browse and eat roots of many plants. Their diet changes with food availability in their environment. Javelina may also nibble on or dig up plants that they do not actually eat. The plant names on this list represent plants less likely to be eaten by javelina, but there are no guarantees that they won’t touch them. The only certain method to prevent plant injury is through exclusion (a fence of other barrier). This list was compiled from a technical report researched and written by Cindy Ticer of the Arizona Game and Fish Depart­ment. Ticer studied urban javelina in the Prescott area in 1993 and used 300 homeowner interviews concerning javelina eating habits. YCCA University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ 1238 Available on-line at: http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/garden/az1238.pdf

Common Name

Botanical Name

Allysum Allysum Allysum spp. Basil Ocimum spp. Butterfly Bush Buddleia spp. Carnations Dianthus spp. Chili Pepper Capsicum annuum Chrysanthemum Chrysanthemum spp. Cosmos Cosmso spp. Cottonwood Trees Populus spp. Cucumbers Cucumis sativus Daffodils Narcissus spp. Dahlias Dahlia spp. Daylily Hemerocallis spp. Deerbrush Ceanothus spp. Easter Lily Lillium longiflorum Eggplant Solanum melogena Fir Trees Abies spp. Geraniums Geranium spp. Gladiola Gladiolus spp. Globe Amaranth Gomphrena spp. Hen & Chicks Echeveria elegans Hibiscus Hibiscus spp. Ice Plant Mesembryanthemum spp. Iris Iris spp. Ivy Hedera spp. Juniper Shrubs Juniperus spp. Juniper Trees Juniperus spp. Larkspur Delphinium spp.

Common Name

Botanical Name

Lilac Syringa spp. Manzanita Arctostaphylos spp. Maple Trees Acer spp. Marigolds Tagetes spp. Mountain Mahogany Cercocarpus spp. Oak Trees Quercus spp. Pampas Grass Cortaderia selloana Pansies Viola spp. Peonies Paeonia spp. Petunias Petunia hybrida Pine Trees Pinus spp. Portulaca Portulaca grandiflora Red-Hot Poker Kniphofia uvaria Rose bushes Rosa spp. Rosemary Rosemarinus officinalis Sage Salvia officinalis Santolina Santolina Shrub Live Oak Quercus turbinella Silktassel Garrya wrightii Skunkbush Rhus trilobata Snapdragons Antirrhinum majus Spruce Trees Picea spp. Sweet William Dianthus barbatus Vinca Vinca spp. Violas Viola spp. Zinnia Zinnia spp.

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Prune for Safety, Plant Health and Pleasing Appearance By Sue Marceau When your outdoor greenery looks sad or unkempt, you may consider employing your own handiwork, a landscaper or “an urban forester” as Arborist Joshua Loveall calls his profession. There is a time and a technique to spruce up nearly any plant. The important thing is to know what’s required and how best to accomplish it. Several local landscapers – including Loveall’s The Joshua Tree & Landscape Company – were approached about what, when and how to prune. All agree on the importance of pruning during dormancy, which could be winter or early spring, depending on the specific plant, shrub or tree. They also identify three main reasons for pruning: safety, health of the tree and aesthetics. Part of the latter is deciding “what you want the tree to be, the shape you want it to have”, said John D. Prentice of Big Bear Tree Care. “Pruning is discipline for plants. It should be done from time they are very young…(so) you won’t have a problem when they get older.”

2014 Building Yavapai

One of the key benefits to aggressive pruning is protection against stress and damage from winds in spring and heat in summer, Loveall said. Failure to prune properly can upset the crown to root ratio and result in trees falling over during storms, he explained. Similarly, topping off can encourage chaotic growth, another unintended consequence.

“The tops of trees produce a hormone that regulates growth, Loveall said. “When a tree is topped off, you remove the growth regulator (causing) thousands of suckers to shoot out everywhere and sending rot and decay down the root. If you want a hollow tree in (its) older life, top it.” The first thing to look for in pruning branches is anything dead, dying or diseased, instructs Marc Vetere, owner of Manzanita Landscaping Inc.: “Get those out right away. From there, start looking at crossing or rubbing branches. Then, adjust the overall structure and aesthetics of the tree. These principals apply to all tree pruning…I have never found any plant that could not have used a little bit of pruning at some point.” Pruning can differ by tree type, so knowhow is essential. Rules of thumb emerged in conversations with the landscaping companies:

After the first year, start pruning off the younger branches… Then, over the years, train (the tree) to be the structure you want.

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Frank Abbott, general manager of CareScape, agrees. Abbott recommends starting “corrective aesthetic pruning when trees are young. It’s easier to get them where you want them. Never prune within the first year of planting. After the first year, start pruning off the younger branches… Then, over the years, train (the tree) to be the structure you want.”

›› Thin the crown by removing cross branches or branches with narrow crotches, which are weak because they consist of more bark than wood. ›› Do not cut more than one quarter of the crown at any one time. Instead, phase in the task over the following two or three years. www.ycca.org


›› Ensure a strong stem by maintaining at least two thirds of the tree’s height while thinning and keeping foliage one third off the ground. ›› Raise the crown for pedestrian, signage and other safety clearances. ›› Remove any limb for which you need to remove half or more of the foliage. ›› Go out on large branches as far as needed to get the weight off on a first cut – followed by a second cut about a foot long – to ensure aclean cut and no peeling of the bark. ›› Remove suckers at the base of the tree (the tops also for fruit trees). ›› Skip sealants because they could trap disease, interfere with natural healing and promote rotting. ›› Disinfect tools with alcohol (not bleach) and avoid using spikes on footwear to prevent spreading bacterial infection from tree to tree. ›› Deflect heat – and sun scald – off the base (as needed) with special thick white paint from a garden center. ›› Fertilize and water all non-native plants, trees and grasses at appropriate times, so you won’t be wondering years out what went wrong.

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Deciduous trees: “Elms, cottonwoods and willows can stand trimming any time of year,” Prentice said, “but watch out for bacterial diseases and fungus (including) slime flux and canker worm. They get into running wounds – where trees have been trimmed – and cause something like a person’s blood pressure problem.” Sap pressure will kill willows, he warned, but cottonwoods and elms can survive for years, despite the “unsightly wounds.” Fruit trees: Some trees bear fruit from existing spurs (older wood), while others produce from tips grown the previous year. It is important to know which variety – or combination – before incorrect pruning ruins a potential harvest. Fruit can be removed as needed to keep branches from breaking and damaging the tree, Prentice suggested.

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“Removing deadwood in a tree is not just aesthetics,” Loveall said. “It also allows the tree to heal up and gets rid of insect hotels. (Deadwood) is like Motel 6 leaving the light on (to welcome guests).”

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Rose Bushes: “Hybrid tea roses and floribundas thrive with annual hard pruning,” explained Chris Welborn, owner of Vicente Landscaping. “The rule of thumb is late winter or early spring after the buds start swelling. When you prune back, you are getting rid of dead and diseased limbs and promoting growth and future buds for flowering. Just use pruners and gloves for the thorns.” Look first for dead or diseased canes or stems and get rid of them. Next, scan for “weird shapes, crossing or rubbing, or growing way out”, Welborn said. Then, thin out from inside the rose plant to allow air and sunlight to penetrate. Finally, cut down to 12 or 18 inches, depending on location and desired height. “Doing all of those things promotes a healthier growth and new buds and gives good shape and size for the New Year,” Welborn advised. “Roses are pretty hardy. Don’t worry if you make a mistake; you are not going to kill the plant.” Perennials: Winter is the best time to prune summer blooming perennials, in­ cluding butterfly bushes, rose of Sharon and purple sage, Welborn said. Keep perennials in check, he added, but preserve size and shape. “You want some foliage – dead or semidead – protecting the plant and root system over the winter,” Vetere noted.

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Evergreens: While pines and other evergreens do not require routine pruning, their health must be properly maintained to guard against bark beetle infestation and fire hazard. Though dormant in winter, bark beetles come out in pines and begin their season when the weather warms. Moisture must be retained after removing fuel – such as leaves, needles and other debris – from around the base of trees. Raking up everything at the foot of pine trees dries out the tops, Loveall said. He warned that removing fuel and failing to water makes trees susceptible to combustion. Fire Wise Precautions: Pruning, watering, feeding and other preventative maintenance are important to prevent disease and reduce fire risk, which continues to heighten with ongoing drought conditions. Winter weather can be deceiving regarding plant maintenance, Welborn said. “When plants have gone two months without measureable precipitation, they need to be watered,” Welborn said, despite the dropped leaves and cold winter nights. Most people turn off and drain their drip system over the winter, he continued. If the drip is not operating in winter, the homeowner needs to provide supplemental water when plants are not getting enough rain or snow. “How much to water depends on the size of the drip,” Welborn advised, explain-

ing that deep watering less frequently is better than watering less deep every day. Deeper and longer watering promotes better root structure and better health of the plant overall.” Loveall stressed watering a tree’s root zone, which averages twice the size of the top. “Ninety plus percent of all nutrient absorption and water is out at the drip line and further,” he said, a fact that many homeowners do not realize. Homeowner or Professional: “The average person can prune, with research and if willing to do it,” Abbott said. “But don’t grab set of pruners and go out. You have to understand why you are pruning... I would recommend a professional 99 percent of the time because most people do not have time to do the research first.” Vetere agreed, noting that many nonprofessionals “cut in ways that leave little stubs that will create problems…so regrowth is unruly and uncharacteristic.” Additionally, homeowners often do not realize their liability in hiring non-insured individuals to help with landscaping and other dangerous home jobs, Lovell said. “Let any Tom, Dick or Harry mow the lawn,” Loveall summarized. “Hire an arborist to fix your tree. Improper pruning definitely is the demise of a tree.” YCCA


Perfect Lawn Without All the Labor Have you ever dreamed of having a lawn that is on par with a well-maintained putting green? Or are your dreams a little less extravagant: Would you settle for a lawn without weeds, yellow spots and without need for watering, mowing, weeding and fertilizing?

In the arid southwest and in central Arizona’s below-freezing winter temperatures, synthetic turf is the ideal way to showcase the perfect lawn year round. “When I go visit homeowners wanting to landscape their yard, there generally is some debating over whether to go with natural grass or artificial grass,” said Chris Welborn of Vicente Landscaping. “Artificial turf by far is much easier to maintain than real grass but that does not mean it is maintenance free and there are pros and cons to both.” Today’s artificial or synthetic turf has evolved well beyond the “Astroturf” installed in the Houston Astrodome in 1964. Today’s manufacturers produce artificial turf offering a wide range of synthetic grass products. “Real grass is much more affordable up front but in the long run, after the money you spend on water, fertilizer and the time you spend maintaining it, artificial turf will be cheaper,” Welborn said.

2014 Building Yavapai

For those who suffer from grass related allergies, symptoms may be reduced. Improvements in the past decade have been astounding: Turf available for purchase even a decade ago is no longer available because of the many improvements. It is virtually visually identical to real grass. You no longer need to water your lawn or repair irrigation systems. Weekly mowing and weeding, and annual fertilizing and thatching will become a distant memory as you sit back and enjoy your iced tea while admiring your perfect lawn. “Some people love the look and smell of real grass and the cooling effect it has in their yard, where artificial turf will absorb

the heat of the sun and will be like a heat island,” he said. Ray Hernandez of Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping sees many benefits to using artificial grass. “The water savings is definitely a plus,” he says. “It doesn’t require any water except an occasional hosing to clean it up and it doesn’t have any insects or pest problems. It is pet friendly and pets will no longer be able to create yellow spots in the stain-proof turf. It is kid friendly and does not harbor bacteria underneath.” Like the carpeting inside your home, ­synthetic turf comes in different grades, colors (to imitate different grass varieties), and length and width of the grass blades. There are different types of turf available for different needs: visual needs, pet yards, lawn sports such as bocce ball and croquet, and children friendly play areas. Synthetic turf is even made for backyard golfers to chip and putt. Cost is dependent upon these various factors. Depending upon the type of artificial grass installed, as a rule of thumb a homeowner might expect to recover the turf’s initial cost within three years, compared to maintaining a live grass lawn.

There are different types of turf available for different needs: visual needs, pet yards, lawn sports such as bocce ball and croquet, and children friendly play areas.

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The most important reason synthetic turf is installed is to minimize watering, according to Chris Welborn, owner of the Vicente Landscaping. Almost as important is the ability to enjoy the lawn year-round.

Hernandez uses a polyethylene turf that is good for the environment and is composed of recyclable material that allows the grass to breathe. It has holes for drainage so water or other liquids can www.ycca.org


permeate through it. Synthetic grass has a porous backing that allows rainwater to drain into the ground at the rate of 40 gallons per hour per square foot. All artificial turf warranties are different. Ask your landscape contractor or turf supplier for the details. In Yavapai county, real grass is being replaced by synthetic turf for a variety of reasons: a growing number of residents are leaning toward it to avoid allergens associated with natural lawns but water conservation is probably the top reason, Hernandez said. Roughly 50 percent of a home’s water is used for outside irrigation and landscape purposes and synthetic turf cuts down on that usage. No over seeding, thatching, aeration or applying chemicals or fertilizers is necessary. It is recommended that a licensed landscape contractor install your turf. Preparation of the ground for a smooth lawn is essential, as is sloping of the ground away from the home to prevent water damage to the home. A professional can better help you understand the products and technologies available to suit your needs. For do-it-yourselfers, artificial turf is available at home-improvement centers and other suppliers. But, be aware that this product is extremely heavy. Improperly joining seams can result in a visually poor lawn. And, do-it-yourselfers are limited in their choice of available products, while a contractor has access to virtually all available turf products. Before you completely doze off dreaming of an idyllic lifestyle in your new yard, be aware that synthetic turf is not entirely maintenance-free. Dog urine needs to be occasionally rinsed off and feces picked up. Autumn leaves will need to be raked, blown or vacuumed. Every few years “lofting” of the turf with a “power broom” may be necessary. Depending upon the product, a contractor may need to replace the rubber crumbs that are used in some turf to help loft the blades. If you like the feel of real grass between your toes, real grass is generally cooler to the touch in full sun than synthetic grass. Sell your lawnmower at the garage sale. Put extra ice cubes in your iced tea, sit back and let your yard be the envy of your neighbors. YCCA

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Mold Can Be Found Almost Anywhere By Sue Marceau People often do not give much credence to mold problems in Yavapai County, given our central Arizona high desert climate. Surprise! Mold can be found almost anywhere, growing on many organic substances when supplied with moisture, oxygen and food. “The most common indoor food source for mold is the cellulose in building materials, such as drywall, insulation and wood,” explained Eppie Vicente, owner of ServiceMaster in Prescott Valley. “We’ve all seen mold at one time or another. It might have been in the shower, on stale bread or wet drywall. The colored, fuzzy growth on a wall, floor, ceiling or other indoor surface can reveal a water damage concern and result in building material damage.” Mold will digest, decay and recycle organic matter in the process of typical growth. It is critical to repair the water intrusion, remove damaged building materials and disinfect the remaining structure to stop damage. Exposure to the tiny “spores” which spread mold can cause mild to severe allergic reactions in the human body, depending on a person’s sensitivity and exposure.

“Although the health effects of exposure are not fully understood and can vary, mold in an occupied building can be suspect in contributing to a range of symptoms (including headaches, nasal irritation, and other allergy or respiratory complaints). With mold exposure in your home, it’s possible to feel that your allergies are more active than usual,” Vicente continued. Particularly vulnerable to mold-related health issues might be pets, seniors, infants, children or anyone with mold sensitivity or lowered immune systems, according to Kathleen Frost, principal and environmental scientist for Western Technologies in Prescott. “If people are basically healthy, they might sneeze a bit,” Frost said. “For those with health issues – infants whose immune systems are not fully mature or seniors on medications – (exposure to mold) could trigger asthma attacks or cause more serious infections.”

Vicente noted that moisture control is critical to managing interior mold growth, naming typical causal conditions such as poor interior ventilation, plumbing leaks, irrigation and drainage problems, roof leaks and weathering. Hidden water leaks behind walls can create an ideal environment for the “establishment and amplification” of mold. Visible clues are constant drips and leaks under cabinets, situations which can go undetected for a long while, until water stains or odors are noted. In one extreme case remediated by ServiceMaster, a client had a leaking humidifier between the ceiling and joists. Despite the very strong musty smell and the client’s breathing problems, the leak was difficult to locate. When they “cracked open the ceiling, mushrooms as wide as my arms were growing…it smelled like a (hot house) nursery,” Vicente related. Mold often is discovered behind a washing machine or in a bathroom, and usually traced to loosely connected parts or corrosion, where the growth has the “one thing it needs: water, humidity, dew point,” Vicente said. “When water intrusion comes in, it takes 72 hours for microbial growth to start happening. With a water spill after three days…mold can become established…If you have a leak, get it dried as soon as possible. That’s the key thing: wet to dry.” Vicente urges anyone who suspects a leak to have it examined by a mold remediation company with an Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC). The priority for that company will

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be identifying any mold source by using instruments such as moisture meters and infrared cameras. Care must be taken when disturbing affected areas to prevent the release of mold spores and aggravating the situation, according to both Frost and Vicente, who cite containment and filtration as major precautions to limit “fugitive� mold spores from being released to other areas. “One of the things I have seen periodically is a well-intending contractor who offers to help the homeowner and starts ripping into a water damaged area and inadvertently causes a more severe problem by releasing spores into the home,� Frost said. Anti-Microbial Remediation Specialists (AMRTs) are trained to construct containment facilities around an area of concern and control air flow with High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filtration systems. Water damaged materials then are removed and the remaining framing and support systems are cleaned and disinfected. Post-remediation testing helps ensure that the area has been sufficiently treated. An

independent third party, such as Western Technologies, provides testing services important to both building owners and occupants for investment and liability protection. Checks also should be made to confirm the water intrusion has been corrected and the remaining building materials are fully dried before installing new components. Vicente and Frost calm homeowners’ fears by reassuring them that moisture or mold discovery does not cause an “irresolvable� situation. It does, however, require careful and prompt response by experts to protect both occupants and investment.

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“Don’t panic,� Vicente advised. “The media has made mold bigger than what it is. It can be dangerous, but it can be remediated.� Resolving any water damage discoveries by using industry professionals “will give you peace of mind,� Frost said. “And then you can go back to enjoying the good byproducts of mold, such as your blue cheese, sour dough bread and many liquid beverages.� YCCA

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HVAC Work Before or After Building Improves Performance By Paul Scrivens QUESTION: Why do heating and cooling ducts impact energy costs so much, and why do I regularly see advertisements in the Courier for duct maintenance and cleaning services? Houses with forced-air heating and cooling systems use conduits called ducts to distribute conditioned air throughout the home. But in many homes, up to 40 percent of the air that moves through the duct system is lost due to leaks and poorly connected registers. The result is higher utility bills, cold rooms and difficulty keeping the homes temperature stable and comfortable. For new construction it is imperative that the HVAC contractor perform an engineering analysis following the Air Conditioning Contractors Association (ACCA) manual J, S and D computer simulations. The D simulations determine duct layout and sizing based on room heat gain/loss, air flow and static pressure. The primary objective is to seal all the major metal trunk joints and connections with screws, tape and mastic, minimize bends and kinks in the flexible ducting and ensure all room registers and boots are

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sealed. Insulation integrity also is important especially in vented attics and crawl spaces. It also is imperative that installation follow a set of standard procedures like those listed at http://www.greenhomeenergyadvisors.com/articles-and-technical-information/ heating-and-cooling-systems/duct-design-and-installation/ It is recommended that these specifications be attached to a new, replacement or upgraded HVAC duct system contract. It is also recommended that verification of compliance to these specifications, and testing for leakage be completed before the HVAC unit is installed or insulation applied. A duct system that meets the ACCA


standards and is properly sealed and insulated can make your home much more comfortable, highly energy efficient, and healthier. For existing homes numerous studies conducted by nationally recognized research organizations have shown that testing and sealing leaky duct systems is one of the most cost-effective energy improvements available; if done correctly! In addition to the energy savings duct leakage repair improves homeowner comfort and reliability by allowing the HVAC system to work as designed. Signs that your home may have a duct problem include above average summer and winter utility bills; rooms that are difficult to heat or cool; stuffy rooms that never seem to feel comfortable; and high levels of dust and pollution; and this maybe why your ducts need cleaning. Because air leaking from ductwork is out of sight, most leaks go unnoticed by homeowners. In addition, ducts are often installed in difficult-to-reach spots like attics and crawlspaces, or are “buried” inside building cavities. The largest impact on performance is leaks in the supply ductwork causing conditioned air to go directly outside or into a vented attic or crawlspace rather than delivered to the home. Leaks in the return ductwork suck outside air into the home reducing both efficiency and capacity. Return leaks also draw air into the building from crawlspaces, garages and attics bringing with it dust, mold spores, insulation fibers, radon and other contaminants. Leakage also occurs within conditioned space, but the energy efficiency penalty is thought to be much less significant. Although

duct leakage in homes with indirectly conditioned attics and crawlspaces steal conditioned air away from the living space. Leaky return ducts also can depressurize the water heater or furnace location and draw back carbon monoxide into the home. These problems all suggest that controlling duct leakage to the inside may be just as important as leakage to the outside. Most homeowners choose to hire a professional contractor for duct maintenance. However, make sure the contractor you choose inspects the whole duct system, including the attic, crawlspace, garage and basement. Establish duct leakage with a duct tester and evaluate the system’s supply and return air balance and static pressure before work begins. They should then repair damaged ducts, straighten out flexible ducts, seal all leaks and connections with mastic and metal tape and seal all registers and grills tightly to the ducts. They also should insulate ducts in unconditioned areas with duct insulation that carries an R-value of 6 or higher. Finally, they should conduct a combustion safety test after the ducts are sealed, and evaluate air flow and leakage levels comparing the before and after results. YCCA Green Home Energy Advisors founded by Paul Scrivens with a mission to provide independent advice to clients on how to reduce their energy costs by improving their homes sustainability and durability. Paul trained as an electrical engineer and spent his career in the high technology industry. Paul is a local Prescott resident and built his own energy efficient home. Paul has written numerous articles on residential energy efficiency and water conservation. Check out the website at www.greenhomeenergyadvisors.com

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Home Insulation By Ann Haver-Allen After a big snowstorm, have you ever wondered why snow remains on some roofs for days or even weeks while it melts almost immediately from other roofs? Well, wonder no more. The mystery can be solved with one word: insulation. Snow lingers on rooftops in two scenarios: if it is an unheated building, or a heated building with a properly insulated attic. Snow disappears rapidly from heated buildings with inadequate attic insulation since heat escaping through the roof quickly melts accumulated snow. Because heating and cooling our homes is one of the biggest expenses faced by most homeowners, an evaluation of your home’s insulation may be advantageous. And the first step is to find out how much insulation you have and where it is. You may prefer to obtain a qualified home energy audit, which will provide an analysis of your home’s insulation and make recom-

mendations if additional insulation would make your home more comfortable, energy efficient and economical. Remember that many factors come play when deciding what type of insulation to use and in what amount. “Customer needs are driven by costs; the type, size and cost of the house; comfort; health; lifestyles; and energy efficiency,” said Shane Burginger, division manager at Gale Contractor Services. Specific issues to be considered include: climate, durability, cost effectiveness, toxicity, flammability, ease of installation and environmental sustainability. Frequently, an optimum solution incorporates a combination of different types of insulation rather than a single type.

TYPES OF INSULATION 1. Blanket – batt and roll insulation Blanket insulation is the most common and widely available form of insulation. It consists of flexible fibers, most commonly fiberglass, but is also made from mineral (rock and slag) wool, plastic fibers and natural fibers, such as cotton and sheep’s wool. Fiberglass and mineral wool insulation accounts for insulation in nearly 90 percent of U.S. homes, according to the Insulation Institute, an industry educational resource. Standard fiberglass blankets and batts have a thermal resistance or R-value between R-2.9 and R-3.8 per inch of thickness. Highperformance (medium-density and high-density) fiberglass blankets and batts have R-values between R-3.7 and R-4.3 per inch of thickness. “Compared to other insulation materials, fiberglass has a relatively low R-value per inch,” said John Duke, Prescott Valley branch manager of Banker Insulation. “Fiberglass loses R-value when it’s compressed, overly ‘fluffed’ or wet, and fiberglass can’t stop air leaks, even when it’s perfectly installed. To attain its maximum R-value, fiberglass batt insulation must be in a ‘still’ space, undisturbed by air leakage.” “One advantage of fiberglass is that it is cheap and easy to install when compared to other types of insulation,” Duke said. “Because the material can be easily cut, it can be put into almost any crevice or small area. Batt insulation is made from inorganic materials and it is resistant to fire, making it very helpful in not spreading a fire 98

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within a home. Fiberglass performs admirably in both the heat and the cold at keeping your home at a good temperature, and it will last for an extremely long time.” “The fact that fiberglass batt insulation is easy to install using basic tools comes with an important caveat: Even small installation errors can dramatically diminish the insulation’s performance,” Duke cautioned. “It’s very difficult to complete a fiberglass insulating job without leaving a few gaps in coverage, and even a small void can diminish a wall’s overall R-value by 50 percent.” Environmental concerns of fiberglass blankets: Phenol formaldehyde, linked to cancer, is being phased out as a binder. Labels warning of possible cancer risk from inhaled fibers are being phased out because regulators have concluded the fibers break down quickly in lungs.

2. Loose-fill and blown-in insulation Loose-fill insulation, which consists of small particles of fiber, foam or other materials, is typically blown in by experienced insulation installers. This insulation material conforms to any space without disturbing structures or finishes and makes it well suited for retrofits and locations where it would be difficult to install other types of insulation. The most common types of materials used for loose-fill insulation include cellulose, fiberglass and mineral (rock or slag) wool. All of these materials are produced using recycled waste materials. Cellulose is primarily made from recycled newsprint. Most fiberglass contains 20 percent to 30 percent recycled glass. Mineral wool is usually produced from 75 percent post-industrial recycled content. Loose-fill fiberglass insulation has an R-value of 2.2-2.7 per inch. Loose-fill cellulose insulation has an R-value of 3.6-4.3 per inch. “Cellulose insulation is made from recyclable materials and makes it an environmentally friendly choice,” Duke said. “Cellulose is biodegradable and thus doesn’t affect the environment in an adverse way, unlike traditional methods. Studies show cellulose insulated buildings may use significantly less energy than structures with fiberglass, even if the R-value of the insulation in the walls and ceilings is identical.” Loose-fill fiberglass insulation is so fluffy that loose applications may lose up to half their effectiveness at very cold temperatures unless topped by blanket insulation or higher-density loose fill. Loose-fill cellulose insulation may be too heavy for attic installations; ceiling must have at least 5/8-inch drywall or framing every 16 inches. Over time, it can settle almost 20 percent, reducing its effectiveness. Environmental concerns of loose-fill fiberglass insulation: Same as for fiberglass batts and blankets, except that formaldehyde isn’t an issue. Environmental concerns of loose-fill cellulose insulation: Fibers are too big to lodge in lungs; dust is only a nuisance issue. The makeup of cellulose insulation typically is around 85 percent post-consumer recycled paper, plus 15 percent fire retardant. That’s usually a borate compound, which also helps deter pests.

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3. Sprayed foam and foamed-in-place insulation

Insulation can make your home more comfortable, energy efficient and economical

Liquid foam insulation materials can be sprayed, foamed-in-place, injected or poured. It can fill even the smallest spaces, conforming to the shape of the cavity, filling and sealing it thoroughly and creating an effective air barrier. Following installation, an approved thermal barrier equal in fire resistance to half-inch gypsum board must cover all foam materials. Also, some building codes don’t recognize sprayed foam insulation as a vapor barrier, so installation might require an additional vapor retarder. Liquid foam insulation products and installation usually cost more than traditional batt insulation. However, liquid foam insulation has higher R-values and forms an air barrier, which can eliminate some of the other costs and tasks associated with weatherizing a home, such as caulking, applying housewrap and vapor barrier and taping joints. “Spray foam insulation is the type of insulation best suited for ­Arizona’s mountain climate,” Burginger said. Spray foam insulation is either open-cell or closed cell. Open-cell has an R-value of 3.53.6 per inch. Closed-cell has an R-value of 6.0-6.5 per inch. Both open-cell polyurethane spray foam and closed-cell polyurethane spray foam stop air movement. The closed-cell product prevents moisture as well. The open-cell product allows water vapor to pass through, so a moisture barrier is still needed in some situations.

What is a 20-Day Preliminary Notice? Arizona suppliers prepare what is called a 20-Day Preliminary Notice. This notice is issued by the supplier to the owner of the property on which the construction/renovation work is being done and describes the details of the work and the materials provided. In order for suppliers to have Lien rights for all the materials and services provided, these companies serve a Preliminary 20-Day Notice within 20 days after they have first delivered materials to the job site. Every lien claimant, other than a laborer for wages can file a Preliminary 2-Day Notice to the owner or reputed owner, the contractor or reputed contractor, the construction lender and the person with whom the supplier contracts. This notice is not a lien, but is intended to inform you as the property owner about the potential possibility for a lien should your contractor not pay for materials in full. These notices do not mean that your contractor is a dead beat and is not financially responsible and is not a reflection on the integrity of any contractor, subcontractor or supplier. These notices are a mandatory prerequisite to a contractor’s or supplier’s right to later record a lien, or make a claim should the contractor not pay their obligations to the suppliers. Should you receive a Preliminary 20-Day Notice, ask your contractor to furnish a conditional waiver and release signed by the person or firm that sent you the notice before you make payment to your contractor. The second step would be to ask your contractor to furnish an unconditional waiver and release signed by the person or firm that sent you the notice after your make payment to your contractor. 100

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“Spray foam insulation provides all the benefits of any insulating material in terms of energy savings in heating and cooling costs, but it has some distinct advantages and disadvantages when compared to other forms of insulation,” Duke said. “The benefits of foam insulation include its high R-value, its ability to expand and completely fill gaps in small and awkward spaces, and the fact that it can be sprayed on the underside of the attic roof to create a conditioned attic space.” “One disadvantage of this insulation is the expense as it costs significantly more that other types of insulation,” Duke said. “Moreover, the chemical nature of the material makes it flammable, dangerously toxic when burned and a skin and eye irritant while being installed.” Environmental issues of spray foam: Uses blowing agents that have a high global warming potential. Chemicals and VOCs released during application and while curing can cause asthma and other serious health effects, so wait up to three days to re-enter.

4. Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) SIPs are prefabricated insulated structural elements for use in building walls, ceilings, floors, and roofs. When installed properly, SIPs result in a more airtight dwelling, which makes a house ­quieter and more comfortable. SIPs have high R-values and high strength-to-weight ratios. A SIP typically consists of 4- to 8-inch-thick foam board insulation sandwiched between two sheets of oriented strand board (OSB) or other structural facing materials. When installed according to manufacturers’ recommendations, SIPs meet all building codes and pass the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards of safety. In buildings constructed of SIPs, fire investigators have found that the panels held up well. The air supply in an airtight SIP home can be quickly consumed in a fire and the fire will extinguish itself. Because it is so airtight, a well-built SIP structure requires controlled fresh-air ventilation for safety, health and performance, and to meet many building codes. A well-designed, installed and properly operated mechanical ventilation system can also help prevent indoor moisture problems, which is important for achieving the energy-saving benefits of an SIP structure. SIPs are available with different insulating materials, usually polystyrene or polyisocyanurate foam. Polystyrene SIPs come in two versions: Expanded (EPS) is the least expensive and has the lowest


R-value at 3.8 per inch. Extruded (XPS) type is usually blue or pink in color; it’s stronger and blocks moisture better than EPS and has an R-value of 5 per inch. Polyisocyanurate SIPs have an R-value of 5.6-7.7 per inch.

Advantages of polystyrene SIPs: Lightweight, easy to install. Advantages of polyisocyanurate SIPs: The highest R-value per inch of any insulation with a thickness that ranges from ½ inch to 2 inches. It’s often faced with foil, which acts as a moisture barrier, and is easy to install. Disadvantages of polystyrene SIPs: Must be cut to fit around pipes and other wall penetrations, leaving gaps that should be filled with sealing foam. You can’t nail anything to them. Insects and pests can tunnel through them. Best to treat the panels with insecticide before using. Also, they’re so air tight, a well-built SIP structure might need fresh-air ventilation for safety and to meet building codes. Disadvantages of polyisocyanurate SIPs: Because the foil type is a moisture barrier, it shouldn’t be used where there already is an interior moisture barrier. Expensive. Environmental issues of polystyrene SIPs and polyisocyanurate SIPs: Panels emit toxic smoke when burned.

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5. Foam board or rigid foam Foam boards – rigid panels of insulation – provide good thermal resistance and reduce heat conduction through structural elements, like wood and steel studs. It is primarily used for insulating air ducts in homes, and is also used when there’s a need for insulation that can withstand high temperatures. The most common types of materials used in making foam board include polystyrene, polyisocyanurate (polyiso) and polyurethane. These products come in a range of thicknesses from 1 inch to 2.5 inches, and provide an R-value of about R-4 per inch of thickness.

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Foam board insulation has a high R-value, can be airtight if sealed/ taped at the seams, good for narrow spaces that still need high R-value, air can go around but not through this insulation. Foam board insulation is expensive, R-value diminishes slightly over time especially if the foil face is removed, will absorb moisture if wet, degrades in sunlight and is not very fire resistant. Foam board is very slow to biodegrade.

6. Radiant barriers and reflective insulation systems Radiant barriers and reflective insulation work by reflecting radiant heat away from the living space. Reflective insulation incorporates radiant barriers – typically highly reflective aluminum foils – into insulation systems that can include a variety of backings, such as kraft paper, plastic film, polyethylene bubbles, or cardboard, as well as thermal insulation materials. They are generally installed in attics to reduce summer heat gain, which helps lower cooling costs. A radiant barrier reduces the radiant heat transfer from the underside of the roof to the other surfaces in the attic. To be effective, it must face an air space. Continued on next page

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Radiant barriers are more effective in hot climates, especially when cooling air ducts are located in the attic. In cool climates, however, it’s usually more cost-effective to install more thermal insulation. “A radiant barrier blocks the suns heat from entering the attic area and can reduce your cooling costs be keeping the attic cooler so less heat radiates into the home,” Duke said. Radiant barriers and reflective insulation systems are most effective in locations prone to radiant heat loss or gain. It is better at reducing AC costs than heating costs and is most effective in the attic above existing insulation, installed facing up. It also has the advantage of being easier to ship and taking up less trucking and warehouse space and not as irritating to install as fiberglass. This insulation system can act as a vapor barrier and will not mold or mildew.

7. Concrete block insulation and insulating concrete forms Installing insulation over the surface of the blocks either on the exterior or interior of the foundation walls is more effective than filling the cores of concrete blocks with insulation. Additionally, placing insulation on the exterior of concrete blocks contains the thermal mass of the blocks, which can moderate indoor temperatures. In the United States, two varieties of solid, precast autoclaved concrete masonry units are now available: autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) and autoclaved cellular concrete (ACC). This material contains about 80 percent air by volume and has been commonly used in Europe since the late 1940s. Autoclaved concrete has 10 times the insulating value of conventional concrete. The

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R-1.1 per inch blocks are large, light and easily sawed, nailed and shaped with ordinary tools. The material absorbs water readily, so it requires protection from moisture. Insulating concrete forms (ICFs) are basically forms for poured concrete walls, which remain as part of the wall assembly. This system creates walls with a high thermal resistance, typically about R-20. ICF systems consist of interconnected foam boards or interlocking, hollow-core foam insulation blocks. Foam boards are fastened together using plastic ties. Along with the foam boards, steel rods (rebar) can be added for reinforcement before the concrete is poured. When using foam blocks, steel rods are often used inside the hollow cores to strengthen the walls. Concrete block insulation and insulating concrete forms are airtight and structurally strong, but they are expensive.

Conclusion Often times, the most effective insulation for your home is a combination of different forms, which is where expertise proves invaluable. “Good insulation would be a combination of batts and blow,” Burginger said. “A better option is wall blow and R-50 attic blow. The best is spray foam to exterior walls and roof deck. Doing a wall blow systems and an R-50 attic blow is more energy efficient than your standard batt and blow application. “Spray foam insulation is the best application and most energy efficient,” Burginger continued. “The spray foam application makes the house much tighter, and puts the heating and cooling system and ducts in the conditioned envelope.” YCCA

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Extending the Life of Your HVAC System By Bob Kozak Extending the life of heating and cooling systems through routine maintenance can protect one of the most vital investments you’ll ever make in your home. Maintenance not only protects your equipment, it can lower utility expenses, reduce equipment replacement costs and provide healthier living conditions. Improper damper operation is one of the most common problems in HVAC equipment; reducing indoor air quality and increasing utility use. Dampers keep the compressor from running when the outside air temperature drops below 60-degrees F. When not cleaned and lubricated annually, dampers may stick and hamper the system’s cooling potential and overload the cooling coil. Clean evaporator and condenser coils at least once or twice a year. Dirt buildup rapidly deteriorates condenser coils and molds thrive in constant dampness created by evaporator coils. Depending on the degree of cleaning required, proper cleaning may require an expert. Examine the fan, bearings and belts biannually. Fan blades should be cleaned, motors should be inspected to ensure they are running properly and bearings should be checked for excessive noise, vibrations or heat.

Air filters should generally be checked monthly, especially during the heavy use months of winter and summer. Filters should be changed at least every three months, but if it looks dirty after a month, change it. Air filters come in a wide variety of material and styles, so selecting the most appropriate filter to suit your needs may require some research. Washable filters, whole-house filters, pleated filters, electronic filters, spun fiberglass filters and other options are available. No need to spend $15-$20 for a pleated air filter, as those costing $5 or less can do the job. In fact, more expensive filters provide more resistance than necessary catching bad air and may lead to other problems. However, pet owners and families with allergies might want to weigh efficiency ratings of various filters available before selecting which filter is best for their homes.

Generally, name brand filters cost more and generic brands can have the same rating but cost less. HEPA filters remove more dust and allergens because they block even the tiniest particles but may clog quicker and lead to other issues without constant changing. Beware of filters labeled “HEPA-like,” as they may not perform as efficiently. More costly alternatives include electrostatic filters and air-filter systems. Although they are considered lifetime filters, they must be maintained monthly to operate properly. Routine inspections of your HVAC system can save you money and promote greater health. If you don’t feel comfortable doing the work yourself, you can always contact a reputable HVAC-system specialist. Many will inspect your system for free or charge a nominal fee. For help in locating a qualified HVAC specialist, contact YCCA at 928-778-0040. YCCA

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Belts need to be properly aligned with correct tension. This type of work should be performed by a licensed qualified HVAC contractor. Inspecting and changing air filters is a major key to achieving longevity. Dirty filters impede airflow and HVAC-system efficiency, wasting energy and money. A clean filter prevents dust and dirt from clogging your system, leading to costly repairs or early system failure.

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2014 YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Accounting/Payroll/Tax Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106

Doors & Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Acoustical Ceilings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106

Drainage Systems & Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Advertising/Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106

Drywall & Plastering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Apparel Logo Wear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106

Duct & Dryer Vent Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Alarms/Home & Fire (See Home Security Systems) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106

Duct Sealing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

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Fencing – Chain Link/Vinyl/Welded Rail/Wood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110

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Building Inspector (See Commercial Building Inspection/See Home Inspectors) . . . . 106

Fireplaces, Woodstoves & BBQ’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110

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Floor Covering (Tile, Natural Stone, Wood & Carpet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107

Fuel Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

Cabinets/Garage & Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107

Garage Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

Cable TV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107

Garage Floor Coating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

Carpentry/Finish Carpentry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107

Garden Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

Carpet & Tile Cleaning (See Floor Cleaning) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107

Gates – Chain Link/Vinyl/Welded Rail/Wood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

Ceramic, Stone & Tile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107

Gates – Ornamental Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

General Contractors: Commercial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

Chambers of Commerce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

General Contractors: Engineering, Excavation, Grading & Paving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112

Chimney Sweep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

General Contractors: Green Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112

Civil Engineering & Land Surveying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

General Contractors: Historic Restoration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112

Cleaning/Commercial Janitorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

General Contractors: Multi-Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112

Cleaning/Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

General Contractors: Residential/Custom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112

Commercial Building Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Glass & Mirrors (See Shower Doors/Mirror/Glass) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114

Commercial Contractors (See General Contractors: Commercial) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Grass (Artificial/Synthetic Turf) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114

Communications – Low Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Grid/Tile Ceiling Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114

Concrete Contractors & Suppliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Gutters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114

Construction Accounting /Tax Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Habitat for Humanity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114

Construction Clean-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Handyman/Home Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114

Countertops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Health Care Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114

Coupons/Savings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Highway Construction Safety Guardrail Signs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

Deck Coating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Home Builders (See General Contractors: Residential/Custom) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

Decorative Concrete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109

Home Furnishings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115

Developers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Home Inspectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

Direct Mail Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Home Security Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

Disaster Restoration Clean-Up – Fire, Flood, Odor, Personal Property, Trauma, and Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Hotel – Extended Stay/Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

Doors/Screens (See Screens) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

HVAC Supplies & Fixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

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Hydroseeding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

Residential Contractors (See General Contractors: Residential/Custom . . . . . . . . . . 121

Insulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Retaining Walls – Masonry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121

Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Retaining Walls – Stone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122

Interior Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Road/Driveway Chip Sealing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122

Irrigation Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Rock (See Flagstone/Rock Supplies) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122

Irrigation Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Roofing – Residential & Commercial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122

Kitchen & Bath Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Saw/Tool/Small Engine Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122

Kitchen & Bath Remodeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Screens (Doors & Windows) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122

Land Development/Lots & Acreage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Security Doors & Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122

Landscaping & Construction Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

Septic & Water Tank Manufacturer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122

Landscaping – Erosion Control/Xeriscape/Water Features/Defensible Space Commercial & Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

Septic System Design & Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122

Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117

Septic Tank Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

Locks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117

Sewer & Drain Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

Log Home Chinking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

Shower Doors/Mirrors/Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123

Log Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

Shredding Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

Marble (Countertops, Shower Surrounds) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

Siding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

Masonry Block/Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

Signs/Banners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

Mediation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Signs – Highway Construction Guardrail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123

Membership Warehouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Snow Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

Metal/Steel Buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Solar Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

Metal Stud Framing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Solar Panel Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

Millwork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Solar Plumbing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

Mold Abatement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Solar Tubes & Skylights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

Mold Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Spas/Saunas/Hot Tubs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

Mold Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Stone (See Flagstone/Rock Supplies) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

Municipalities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Stucco/Plastering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

Nursery/Garden Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118

Sun Rooms/Pergola Shade & Patio Covers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

Outdoor Living . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Telephone & Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

Paint & Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118

Tree Removal/Trimming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

Painting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Tub Shower Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

Patio Furnishings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

Pavers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Waste Hauling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

Payroll Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Water/Waste Water Piping Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

Pest Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Water & Fire Damage Restoration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

Plan Rooms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119

Water Purification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

Planting Soil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Waterproofing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

Plumbing Contractors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Weed Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

Plumbing Fixtures/Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

Printing/Copying (See Blueprint Copying) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Wells/Pump Installation & Servicing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

Promotional Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Window Coverings, Screens, Shutters, Tinting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

Propane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Window Tinting (Auto, Building, and Home) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

Quickbooks Consulting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120

Windows (See Doors & Windows) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

Radio Partners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120

Windows/Sliding Door Repairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

Rainwater Harvesting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120

Windows – Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125

Real Estate/Residential & Commercial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120

Woodworking (See Carpentry/Finish Carpentry) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

Septic Tank Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

Recycling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Remodeling/Restoration Contractors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121

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Accounting/Tax Preparation Holdsworth & Co. CPAs 3031 Dollar Mark Way Ste C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8633 www.holdsworthcpa.com

Richard L. Joliet, CPA

MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 85) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

Quality Maytag

Crystal Creek Homes built by Beshers Builders, LLC (See our ad on page 40) 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928)445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

Banking / Lending & Financing Services BBVA Compass Bank 923 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3311 www.bbvacompass.com

1129 Iron Springs Road, Suite 202 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-2386 www.richardjolietcpa.com

(See our ad on page 15) 1097 Iron Springs Rd. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-8460 www.qualitymaytagaz.com

Sterling Design Group

Acoustical Ceilings

Westar Kitchen & Bath

Arizona 811

(See our ad on page 7) 107 E. Willis St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-9595 www.countrybankaz.com

“Call Before You Dig” 811

National Bank of Arizona

Chartier Drywall, Inc. (See our ad on page 109) 655 Brannen Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1191

Jebco Construction Companies (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com

Office Locations: Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323

Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

Advertising/Graphic Design Morgan Sign Company 704 E. Moeller St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6336 www.morgansign.com

Sir Speedy 1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

15500 N. Greenway-Hayden Loop, Suite 103 Scottsdale, AZ 85260 (480) 991-6200 www.westar-sw.com

Architectural Services/Architects Catalyst Architecture

Crystal Creek Homes built by Beshers Builders, LLC (See our ad on page 40) 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928)445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

Desert Development & Design, Corp. (See our ad on page 94) P.O. Box 13069 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 777-0022 www.desertdevelopmentaz.com

Living Systems Building Group

Sir Speedy

Michael Taylor Architects, Inc.

1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

118 S. Pleasant St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-0626 www.mtai.net

Alarms/Home & Fire

Renovations, Your Complete Remodel Resource

Arizona Wholesale Supply 2020 E. University Dr. Phoenix, AZ 85061 (602) 258-7901 www.arizonawholesalesupply.com

Lowes 2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

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2014 Building Yavapai

Asphalt Maintenance/Paving/ Seal Coating Eyemark, LLC

Apparel Logo Wear

Appliances

www.arizona811.com (See our ad on page 53)

(See our ad on page 80) 123 E. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-3508 www.catalystarchitecture.com

129 Apollo Heights Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-2413 www.michaelfrerking.com

(See Home Security Systems)

1678 Oaklawn Dr., Ste #B Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 499-5718 www.sterlinghomedesign.com

(See our ad on page 68) 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8506 www.renovationsaz.com

Architectural Services/ Design Blue Line Designs 730 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-2901 www.bluelinedesignsaz.com

www.ycca.org

Country Bank

201 N. Montezuma St., Suite 100 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-6900 www.nbarizona.com

Bath Conversions

6947 E. 1st Street, Ste. B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928)237-0404

(See Tub/Shower Conversion)

Specialty Paving & Grading

A & E Reprographics

P.O. Box 10460 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 777-8411

Prescott Location:

Blueprint Copying www.a-erepro.com

Associations

1030 Sandretto Dr., Ste. F Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-9116

Central Arizona Partnership

Prescott (Downtown) Location:

P.O. Box 3185 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 458-5361 www.centralazpartnership.org

Prescott Lakes Architectural Review Committee

222 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3815

Prescott Valley Location:

www.prescottlakescommunity.org

8010 E. Hwy. 69, Ste. D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0054

Attorney/Legal

Sir Speedy

Gammage & Burnham Kevin J. Blakley 2 N. Central Avenue, 15th Floor Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 256-4467 www.gblaw.com

Robert C. Kozak, PLLC Bob Kozak 3619 Crossings Dr. Suite B Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7140

Auto glass Bennett Glass & Mirror (See our ad on page 80) 722 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1180 www.bennettglassaz.com

1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

Bookkeeping (See Construction Accounting/ Tax Preparation)

Building Inspector (See Commercial Building Inspection) (See Home Inspectors)

Building Materials & Builders Hardware DuPont Tyvek Weather Barriers Serving Yavapai County (800) 288-9835 www.weatherizationpartners.com

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber (See our ad on page 9) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com


2014 YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Lowes

Engrained Cabinetry & Countertops

2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

(See our ad on page 69) www.engrained.com

ProBuild (See our ad on page 41) 6601 E. 2nd St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-1221 www.probuild.com

The Door & Window Store 487 E Z St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6400 www.prescottdoors.com

Cabinet Re-facing Granite Transformations 2205 W. Lone Cactus Dr. #23 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (623) 581-5056 www.granitetransformations.com

Reliant Capitol, LLC 725 N. 73rd Ave., Suite 124 Phoenix, AZ 85043 (623) 388-8899 www.reliantcapitolllc.com

MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 85) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

Northern Arizona Woodworking 8875 E. Laredo Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3779

Cabinet Refinishing Northern Arizona Woodworking 8875 E. Laredo Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3779

The Arizona Woodworking Co. 8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworkingcompany.com

Cabinets Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC (See our ad on page 78) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

B2 Custom Cabinets

Prescott Location 550 N. 6th St. (928) 776-4568

Prescott Valley Location 7129 E. 1st St., Ste. 101 (928) 772-8149

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber (See our ad on page 9) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC 9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

Lowes 2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 85) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

Northern Arizona Woodworking 8875 E. Laredo Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3779

Prescott Design Center (See our ad on page 79) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com

Prescott Floors 1239–1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

The Arizona Woodworking Co. 8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworkingcompany.com

Timberline Woodworks Inc. 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

Cabinets/Garage & Storage

Ceramic, Stone &Tile

Engrained Cabinetry & Countertops

Arizona Stone & Architectural Products

(See our ad on page 69) www.engrained.com 550 N. 6th St. (928) 776-4568

(See our ad Inside Front Cover) 2601 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0828 www.arizonastone.com

Prescott Valley Location

Arizona Tile

Prescott Location

7129 E. 1st St., Ste. 101 (928) 772-8149

(See our ad on page 8) 625 Holiday Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-1070 www.arizonatile.com

MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 85) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

B & L Flooring America (See our ad on page 18) www.bandlflooringamerica.com

ML Sims Frame To Finish

Prescott Location

1896 N. Lapis Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-0142

226 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-1999

The Arizona Woodworking Co. 8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworkingcompany.com

Timberline Woodworks

2710 N. Glassford Hill Rd. #G Prescott Valley AZ 86314 (928) 772-2222

Greenlee Designer Surfaces

1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com

Cable TV

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC 9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

Cable One 3201 Tower Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-4511 www.cableone.net

Lowes

Carpentry/Finish Carpentry ML Sims Frame To Finish 1896 N. Lapis Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-0142

2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

Precision Marble & Granite (See our ad on page 61) 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com

Timberline Woodworks 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

Prescott Floors 1239–1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

Triple E Construction (See our ad on page 64) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life

Carpet & Tile Cleaning

(See our ad on page 53) 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

(See Floor Cleaning)

P.O. Box 3842 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 420-9339

Prescott Valley Location

www.ycca.org

2014 Building Yavapai

107


2014 YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Certified Public Accounts (CPAs)

Commercial Contractors

Countertops

Holdsworth & Co. CPAs

(See General Contractors: Commercial)

Arizona Tile

3031 Dollar Mark Way Ste C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8633 www.holdsworthcpa.com

Richard L. Joliet, CPA 1129 Iron Springs Road, Suite 202 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-2386 www.richardjolietcpa.com

Chambers of Commerce Chino Valley 175 E. Road 2 South Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2493 www.chinovalley.org

Prescott 117 Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2000 www.prescott.org

Prescott Valley 7120 Pav Way, Ste. 102 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8857 www.pvchamber.org

Chimney Sweep Builders Wholesale, LLC 400 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com

Civil Engineering & Land Surveying Shephard-Wesnitzer, Inc. 221 N. Marina St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 282-1061 www.swiaz.com

Cleaning/Commercial Janitorial MTO Janitorial, LLC Serving the Quad City Area (928) 772-0004 www.mtojanitorial.com

Communications – Low Voltage Aspen Communications 7 Kiji-Dava Circle, Suite A Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 774-0992 www.aspentelco.com

Concrete Contractors & Suppliers Asphalt Paving & Supply 2425 N. Glassford Hill Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6363 www.ashpaltpavingsupply.com

CEMEX (See our ad on page 31) 13531 E. Hwy. 89A Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 772-3733 www.cemexusa.com

Diversified Concrete Crafters

108

2014 Building Yavapai

550 N. 6th St. (928) 776-4568

Prescott Valley Location 7129 E. 1st St., Ste. 101 (928) 772-8149

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber (See our ad on page 9) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Granite Transformations

303 N. Summit Avenue Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8811 www.granitekitchenconcepts.com

5001 E. Drake Rd. Paulden, AZ 86334 (480) 219-6670 www.drakeus.com

2205 W. Lone Cactus Dr. #23 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (623) 581-5056 www.granitetransformations.com

Hanson Aggregates

Greenlee Designer Surfaces

5899 Wilkinson Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7305 www.heidelbergcement.com

Laipple Construction 1947 Victoria Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-6865

Construction Accounting/ Tax Preparation Holdsworth & Co. CPAs

Prescott Maid to Order, LLC

(See our ad on page 57) P.O. Box 2558 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 710-7061 www.beneficialhomeinspection.com

Prescott Location

Drake Cement

Richard L. Joliet, CPA

Beneficial Home Inspection

(See our ad on page 69) www.engrained.com

Granite Kitchen Concepts

Cleaning/Residential

Commercial Building Inspection

Engrained Cabinetry & Countertops

(See our ad on page 38) P.O. Box 26400 Prescott, Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 237-0085 www.diversifiedconcretecrafters.com

3031 Dollar Mark Way Ste C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8633 www.holdsworthcpa.com

Serving the Quad City Area (928) 899-8518 www.prescottmaidtoorder.com

(See our ad on page 8) 625 Holiday Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-1070 www.arizonatile.com

1129 Iron Springs Road, Suite 202 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-2386 www.richardjolietcpa.com

Construction Clean-Up MTO Janitorial, LLC Serving the Quad City Area (928) 772-0004 www.mtojanitorial.com

www.ycca.org

Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC 9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

Lowes 2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 85) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

Northern Arizona Woodworking 8875 E. Laredo Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3779

Precision Marble & Granite (See our ad on page 61) 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com

Prescott Design Center (See our ad on page 79) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com

Prescott Floors 1239–1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life (See our ad on page 53) 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

Silver Creek Stone (Granite Only) 1464 Masonry Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-0307 www.silvercreekstone.com

Coupons/Savings Money In The Mail (See our ad on page 126) Willie Lass, Publisher Serving Yavapai County (928) 830-5208 www.nazmoneyinthemail.com

Deck Coating Badger Roofing (See our ad on page 122) 8800 E. Long Mesa Dr., Ste. A Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 771-8770 www.badgerroofing.net

Central Basin Roofing, Inc. (See our ad on page 43) 331 N. Arizona Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-5819 www.centralbasinroofing.com

Granite Basin Roofing (See our ad on page 35) 1011 E. Commerce Dr., Suite #E Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 772-9222 www.granitebasinroofing.com

Western Sealant Company Inc. (See our ad on page 56) PO Box 549 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 778-3112 www.westernsealantaz.com


2014 YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Decorative Concrete Circle C Construction Triple E Construction (See our ad on page 89) Pella Contractor P.O. Box Certified 960 See Our Ad Page 35 Chino 86323 540 Valley, N. 6thAZSt. #F (928) 636-4660AZ 86301 Prescott, (928) 778-3056 www.circle-c-const.com www.tripleeaz.com Diversified Concrete Crafters

Drainage yStemS (See our adSon page & 38)SupplieS P.O. Box 26400 Earth Resources Corporation 8120 Poland Prescott, Valley, AZRoad 86312 Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 237-0085 (928) 775-2795 www.diversifiedconcretecrafters.com

Bennett Glass & Mirror Drywall & Plastering 2013 YCCA Membership Directory (See our ad on page 80) Able & Ready 722 E. Sheldon St. Painting-Remodeling, LLC Duct Sealing energy BuilDing conSultantS Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1180 Advantage Home Performance www.bennettglassaz.com See Our Ad Page 17

1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A Builders Prescott,Wholesale, AZ 86305LLC (928) 445-3828 400 W. Goodwin St. www.advantagehome Prescott, AZ 86303 performance.com (928) 778-6655 ArrowSeal www.buildersprescott.com

See Our Ad Page 94 Serving Yavapai Foxworth GalbraithCounty Lumber (928) (See our925-5353 ad on page 9) www.aeroseal.com

Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-8032 Desert Development & Design, Corp. www.hdsupply.com (See our ad on page 94)

430 N. 6th St. Moyer’s & Cooling Prescott, AZ Heating 86301 See 445-2525 Our Ad Page 102 (928) 8146 E. Ashley Dr. www.foxgal.com Prescott Valley, AZ 86314

P.O. Box 13069 Drywall & plaStering Prescott, AZ 86304 Able & Ready Painting(928) 777-0022 Remodeling, LLC www.desertdevelopmentaz.com See Our Ad Page 54

(928) 710-0142 eDucation

HD Supply

3100 N. Hwy. 89 Developers

7245 E. 2nd St. #C Dorn Homes, Inc. AZ 86314 Prescott Valley, 600 W. Gurley St. #200 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-9427Drywall, Inc. Chartier www.dornhomes.com See Our Ad This Page

655 Brannen Ave. The Fain Signature Group Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1191 3001 N. Main Street Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Taylor Plastering (928) 772-8844 5798 Foxglove Place Prescott, AZ 86305 www.fainsignaturegroup.com

(928) 772-7522

Direct Duct &Mail DryerMarketing Vent cleaning

Sir SpeedyWholesale Builders 1961 Center Circle 400Commerce W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6655 (928) 776-4332 www.buildersprescott.com www.sirspeedyprescott.com

Energy Savings Heating &

Cooling Restoration Clean-Up – Disaster 360 Henry St. Suite A Fire, Flood,AZOdor, Personal Prescott, 86301 Property, Trauma and Vandalism (928) 445-8402 www.energysavingshc.com Service Master of Prescott Moyer’s Cooling (See our ad Heating on page 71& & 95) See Our Ad Page 102 8330 E. Pecos Dr. Dr. 8146 E. Ashley Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 (928) 445-9205 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282www.servicemasterofprescott.com 2659 www.moyershvac.com

Doors/Screens

Pitzers One-Hour Air

Conditioning & Heating (See Screens)

63363 Cooper Hill Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314

Doors & Windows (928) 777-8899

www.pitzersonehour.com Able & Ready TDK Comfort Systems Painting-Remodeling, LLC 1940ourS.adHwy 89, 78) #D (See on page Chino Valley, AZ 86323 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C (928) 636-0846 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com

(928) 775-6178 Yavapai Plumbing & Heating www.ablereadyllc.com See Our Ad Page 10

5860 N. Fulton Dr. Arizona PrescottWindow Valley,Wizard AZ 86314 Installation & Service (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com 8600 E. Turtle Rock

Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 ML Sims Frame To Finish(928) 282Sedona/Verde Valley 2659N. Lapis Dr. 1896 www.moyershvac.com Prescott, AZ 86301

Pella Windows & Foundation Yavapai College Doors Mountain West 1100 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZPlace 86301 120 E. Corporate Suite 16 (928) 776-2063 Chandler, AZ 85225 www.yc.edu (928) 710-4253 www.pella.com electrical contractorS

ProBuild Boxer M Construction, LLC 11971 Vista Dr. (See ourE. ad Mingus on page 41) Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 6601 E. 2nd St. (928) 925-4967

Moyer’s Heating & Cooling

(See our ad this page) Advantage Home 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Performance See Our Ad Page 17 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A (928) 775-6178 Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-3828 www.ablereadyllc.com

www.advantagehome performance.com Chartier Drywall, Inc. (See our adPublic on page Service 109) Arizona 655 Ave.Page 59 SeeBrannen Our Ad 120 N. AZ Marina Prescott, 86301 St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1191 (928) 776-3636 www.aps.com Taylor Plastering, Inc. 5798 Foxglove Place & Cooling Moyer’s Heating See OurAZAd Page 102 Prescott, 86305 8146772-7522 E. Ashley Dr. (928) Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282Duct & Dryer Vent Cleaning 2659 www.moyershvac.com Builders Wholesale, LLC 400 W. Goodwin St. TDK Comfort Systems, Inc. Prescott, 8630389, Ste. D 1940 S.AZHwy. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 778-6655 (928) 636-0846 www.buildersprescott.com

www.tdkcomfortsystems.com Energy Savings Heating & Cooling UniSource Energy Services 360 A 59 SeeHenry OurSt. AdSuite Page 6405 Wilkinson Prescott, AZ 86301 Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-8402 (866) 467-1229 www.energysavingshc.com www.uesaz.com

Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Delta Diversified Enterprises (928) 772-1221 See Our Ad Page 43 www.probuild.com

2606 Centerforce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 Reliant Capitol, LLC (928) 708-0066 725 N. 73rd Ave., Ste. 124 www.deltadiv.com

Phoenix, AZ 85043 Mar388-8899 Dez Electrical, Inc. (623) PO Box 709 www.reliantcapitolllc.com Chino Valley, AZ 86323

(928) 642-8073 Renewal by Andersen of Ponderosa Electric Northern Arizona See N. Our AdWestern Page Dr. 11#D 2485 Great 418 N. Washington Ave. #F Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-3159 (928) 717-1790 www.ponderosaelectric.net www.renewalbyandersen.com S &Door M Electric The & Window Store See Our Ad Page 45 487 E St. 10006 P.O.ZBox Prescott, AZ 86301 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 778-1871 (928) 778-6400 www.sandmelectricinc.net www.prescottdoors.com Thomas Electrical Contractors Triple E Construction (Commercial Contractor) (See on page 4636ourS.ad 35th St., 63) Ste. 1 Phoenix, 85040 Pella CertifiedAZ Contractor (602) 268-8620 540 N. 6th St. #F www.teci.us Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 SerViceS employment www.tripleeaz.com

Labor Systems Temporary Services

Drainage & Supplies 701 MillerSystems Valley Road Prescott, AZ 86301 Earth (928)Resources 541-0010Corporation www.laborsystems.com P.O. Box 1420 Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 775-2795

2013 Building Yavapai

Prescott, AZ 86301 Pitzer’s899-8696 One-Hour Air (928) Conditioning & Heating www.corestructuregroup.com 6363 Cooper Hill Dr.

Western Technologies PrescottSandretto Valley, AZ 86314 1040 Dr., Ste. C (928) 777-8899 Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.pitzersonehour.com www.wt-us.com TDK Comfort Systems, Inc.

eServing nVironmental teSting (molD, Yavapai County 636-0846 SBeStoS , raDon, water Quality) a(928) www.tdkcomfortsystems.com

Western Technologies 1040 Sandretto Ste. C Yavapai PlumbingDr., & Heating Prescott, AZ 86305 5860 N. Fulton Dr. 443-5010 Phone: (928) Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 www.wt-us.com (928) 776-7025

ewww.ypeinc.com Quipment rentalS & DealerS Bingham Equipment Company Duct Union SealingDr. 2694 Cottonwood, AZ 86326 Advantage Home Performance (928) 646-5388 www.binghamequipment.com 1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305

Chino Rentals (928) Our 445-3828 See Ad Page 24 1181 N. Hwy. 89 www.advantagehomeperformance.com Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2026 www.chinorentalsonline.com

Drywall can be finished using a number of techniques and textures. Homeowners can choose from smooth or textured drywall finishes. Some common drywall textures are: • Knockdown • Venetian Plaster • Trowelled • Mud Swirl • Brush Textures • Skim Coating Some drywall finishes are better for walls that are not as flat or smooth and other finishes can help soften the angels of a room and create a great new look.

Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 775-8964

(See our ad on page 115) 8146 E. Ashley Dr. ePrescott ngineering /tAZeSting /Structural Valley, 86314 Cities (928) 772-4346 SQuad pecial inSpectionS /FounDationS Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282-2659 Core Structure Group www.moyershvac.com 621 E. Gurley St.

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ArrowSeal (See our ad on page 97) Serving Yavapai County (928) 925-5353 www.aeroseal.net

Moyer’s Heating & Cooling (See our ad on page 115) 8146 E. Ashley Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282-2659 www.moyershvac.com

Energy Building Consultants Advantage Home Performance 1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-3828 www.advantagehomeperformance.com

Moyer’s Heating & Cooling

Education

(See our ad on page 115) 8146 E. Ashley Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282-2659 www.moyershvac.com

Yavapai College Foundation

TDK Comfort Systems, Inc.

1100 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-2063 www.yc.edu

Serving Yavapai County (928) 636-0846 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com

Electrical Contractors

Engineering/Testing/Structural/ Special Inspections/Foundations

Boxer M Construction, LLC

Core Structure Group

11971 E. Mingus Vista Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 925-4967

Mar Dez Electrical, Inc. PO Box 709 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 642-8073

Ponderosa Electric (See our ad on page 90) 418 N. Washington Ave. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1790 www.ponderosaelectric.net

P.S. Electric 6301 Baja Circle Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 759-2151

S & M Electric (See our ad on page 27) P.O. Box 10006 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 778-1871 www.sandmelectricinc.net

Singletrack Solar and Electric (See our ad on page 83) Serving Yavapai County (928) 925-0914 www.singletracksolarandelectric.com

Thomas Electrical Contractors (Commercial Contractor) 4636 S. 35th St., Ste. #1 Phoenix, AZ 85040 (602) 268-8620 www.teci.us

Employment Services Labor Systems Temporary Services 701 Miller Valley Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-0010 www.laborsystems.com

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621 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 899-8696 www.corestructuregroup.com

Western Technologies, Inc. (See our ad on page 95) 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

Environmental Testing (Mold, Asbestos, Radon, Water Quality) Western Technologies, Inc. (See our ad on page 95) 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

Fencing – Chain Link/Vinyl/ Welded Rail/Wood

Western States Fire Protection

Prescott Fence

Office Locations: Prescott

6576 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928)-445-4211 www.prescottfence.com

Fencing – Ornamental Iron A-Action Welding 1514 Shoup St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-2579 www.a-actionwelding.com

Arc-Tech Welding 8740 N. Lawrence Ln. Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 772-7050 www.arctechwelding.com

Prescott Fence 6576 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4211 www.prescottfence.com

Finish Carpentry MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 85) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

ML Sims Frame To Finish 1896 N. Lapis Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-0142

Moloney Construction, LLC 234 Whitney Street Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 533-3376

Equipment Rentals & Dealers

The Arizona Woodworking Co.

Bingham Equipment Company

8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworkingcompany.com

2694 S. Union Dr. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 646-5388 www.binghamequipment.com

Chino Rentals (See our ad on page 76) 1181 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2026 www.chinorentalsonline.com

Sunstate Equipment Co., LLC 9351 E. Lorna Lane Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-7350 www.sunstateequip.com

Timberline Woodworks 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

Fire Sprinklers B&W Fire Security Systems (See our ad on page 69) 8737 E. Florentine Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8008 www.bwfiresecurity.com

www.wsfp.com

3001 Main St., Ste. #2D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (623) 640-6554

Phoenix 4346 E. Elwood St., Ste. #100 Phoenix, AZ 85040 (602) 272-2200

Fireplaces, Woodstoves & BBQs Banker Insulation of Northern AZ 5790 Fulton Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2544 www.bankerinsulation.com

Builders Wholesale, LLC 400 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com

Eric & Sons 6640 Inter Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 775-2880 www.ericandsons.net

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber (See our ad on page 9) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Flagstone/Rock Supplies Arizona Stone & Architectural Products (See our ad Inside Front Cover) 2601 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0828 www.arizonastone.com

Asphalt Paving & Supply 2425 N. Glassford Hill Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6363 www.asphaltpavingsupply.com

Dunbar Stone Company, Inc. 1041 Commerce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7880 www.dunbarstoneinc.com

Earthworks Landscape & Supply 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

Escrow & Title Services

G&S Gravel

Yavapai Title Agency

11500 E. Finley St. Mayer, AZ 86333 (928) 632-9359

123 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2528 www.yavapaititle.com www.ycca.org


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Prescott Dirt, LLC

B & L Flooring America

Serving Yavapai County (928) 636-5844 www.prescottdirt.com

(See our ad on page 18) www.bandlflooringamerica.com

Silver Creek Stone

226 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-1999

1464 Masonry Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-0307 www.silvercreekstone.com

Floor Cleaning Clean-N-Bright Carpet & Tile Specialists

Prescott Location

Prescott Valley Location 2710 N. Glassford Hill Rd. #G Prescott Valley AZ 86314 (928) 772-2222

Dunbar Stone Company, Inc.

312 White Spar Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-2343 www.clean-n-bright.com

1041 Commerce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7880 www.dunbarstoneinc.com

Greenlee Designer Surfaces

Greenlee Designer Surfaces

Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com

Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com

MTO Janitorial, LLC

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC

Serving the Quad City Area (928) 772-0004 www.mtojanitorial.com

Prescott Maid to Order, LLC Serving the Quad City Area (928) 899-8518 www.prescottmaidtoorder.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life (See our ad on page 53) 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

Service Master of Prescott (See our ad on page 71 & 95) 8330 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-9205 www.servicemasterofprescott.com

Floor Covering (Tile, Natural Stone, Wood & Carpet) Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC (See our ad on page 78) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

Arizona Tile (See our ad on page 8) 625 Holiday Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-1070 www.arizonatile.com

9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

Interior Logic (See our ad on page 74) 710 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0900 www.interior-logic.com

Lowes 2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

Mile High Tile 7680 E. Cocopah Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-2924 www.milehightile.com

Prescott Design Center (See our ad on page 79) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com

Prescott Flooring Brokers (See our ad on page 67) 401 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-2544 www.prescottflooringbrokers.com

Prescott Floors 1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life (See our ad on page 53) 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

Gates – Ornamental Iron A-Action Welding 1514 Shoup St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-2579 www.a-actionwelding.com

Arc-Tech Welding 8740 N. Lawrence Ln. Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 772-7050 www.arctechwelding.com

Fuel Companies Barrett Propane (See our ad on page 55) 1555 W. Iron Springs Road, #5 Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 636-1600 www.barrettpropane.com

Prestige Security Doors (See our ad on page 85) 600 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-7900 – Prescott (928) 204-1222 – Sedona www.prestigesecuritydoors.com

Bennett Oil 810 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1181 www.bennettoil.com

General Contractors: Commercial Acklin Brothers Construction

Yavapai Bottle Gas

1965 Coyote Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-4007 www.acklinbrothersconstruction.com

2170 Concord Dr. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 776-9007 www.yavapaigas.com

Aspen Valley Development

Garage Doors Neumann High Country Doors (See our ad on page 62) 8920 E. Valley Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-9738

(See our ad on page 113) 697 6th Street, Suite 503 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-9877 www.aspenvalleyhomesaz.com

B’s Contractors, LLC 1601 Louis Trail Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 771-9240 www.bscontractorsllc.com

Garage Floor Coating Classic Garage, Inc. P.O. Box 2331 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-9477 www.classicgarageinc.com

Beshers Builders, LLC 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

Garage Floors and More 303 E. Gurley St. #195 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 308-7337 www.garagefloorsandmore.net

Circle C Construction

Garden Center Earthworks Landscape & Supply 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

(See our ad on page 89) P.O. Box 960 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com

Circle D Builders 1035 Vantage Point Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0208 www.circledbuilders.com

Lowes 2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

Concord General Contracting

Gates – Chain Link/Vinyl/Rail/ Welded Rail/Wood

4215 E. McDowell Road, Ste. #201 Mesa, AZ 85215 (480) 962-8080 www.concordinc.com

DeCarol Company (See our ad on page 37) P.O. Box 11348 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com

Prescott Fence 6576 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928)-445-4211 www.prescottfence.com

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Don Savage Building Contractors, Inc.

Prescor Builders

Fann Contracting, Inc.

Living Systems Building Group

3200 Lakeside Village Dr. #201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com

1403 Industrial Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-0170 www.fanncontracting.com

129 Apollo Heights Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-2413 www.michaelfrerking.com

Prescott Builders of AZ, LLC

FNF Construction, Inc.

Prescott Green Builders

P.O. Box 1228 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 445-9572 www.gresethbuilders.com

(See our ad on page 57) 2600 Gentle Breeze Way Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 717-0147 www.prescottbuildersofaz.com

115 S. 48th St. Tempe, AZ 85281 (480) 784-2910 www.fnfinc.com

Serving Yavapai County (928) 925-8674 www.prescottgreenbuilders.com

Haley Construction Company

Ravencrest Builders LLC

Headwaters Construction

(See our ad on page 6) P.O. Box 831 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

518 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-1677 www.ravencrestbuilders.com

6789 Mandan Lane Paulden, AZ 86334 (928) 636-6976

P.O. Box 4198 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 776-0301 www.prescottbuilder.com

Prescott Builders of AZ, LLC

Sun Pine Homes

(See our ad on page 57) 2600 Gentle Breeze Way Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 717-0147 www.prescottbuildersofaz.com

(See our ad on page 96) 4605 N. Twisted Trail Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6600 Ext. 7 www.sunpinehomes.com

Ringler Excavating

Triple E Construction

P.O. Box 2004 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 899-0012

(See our ad on page 63) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

1753 S. Blooming Hills Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1307 www.donsavagebuilders.com

Greseth Builders

Jebco Construction Companies (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com

Office Locations: Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323

Renovations, Your Complete Remodel Resource (See our ad on page 68) 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8506 www.renovationsaz.com

TLC Construction

222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

1940 W. Buena Vista Trail Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 925-1342 www.tlcconstructionofprescott.com

Kenson Construction Co.

Triple E Construction

Prescott Location

6135 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5192

KNA Construction, Inc. P.O. Box 12467 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 778-6932

Laipple Construction 1947 Victoria Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-6865

Lantana Development, Inc. (See our ad on page 34) P.O. Box 12615 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 717-0033 www.lantanacustomhomes.com

LUVCO Construction Serving Yavapai County (928) 778-9181

Malouff and Company, Inc. 325 W. Gurley St., Ste. 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1657

NJ Builders, Inc. (See our ad on page 44) P.O. Box 13051 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com

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(See our ad on page 63) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Womack Enterprises 425 W. Delano Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6094 www.womack-brothers.com

General Contractors: Engineering, Excavation, Grading & Paving Asphalt Paving & Supply 2425 N. Glassford Hill Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6363 www.asphaltpavingsupply.com

CLM Earthmovers P.O. Box 12002 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 445-1918

Desert Development & Design, Corp. (See our ad on page 94) P.O. Box 13069 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 777-0022 www.desertdevelopmentaz.com

Earth Resources Corporation P.O. Box 1420 Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 775-2795

www.ycca.org

Technology Construction 5430 Side Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-0099

Vastco, Inc. 425 Industrial Dr. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3880 www.vastco.com

General Contractor: Green Building Benttree Custom Homes (See our ad on page 32) 1575 Plaza West Dr. #B Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 443-5484 www.benttreecustomhomes.net

Crystal Creek Homes built by Beshers Builders, LLC (See our ad on page 40) 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928)445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

Evergreen Homes (See our ad on page 102) 2008 Forest Hills Rd. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-0006 www.evergreen-homes.com

Haley Construction Company (See our ad on page 6) P.O. Box 831 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

R.E.S. Contracting. Inc.

General Contractors: Historic Restoration Haley Construction Company (See our ad on page 6) P.O. Box 831 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

General Contractors: Multi-Family Jebco Construction Companies (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com

Office Locations: Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323

Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

General Contractors: Residential/Custom Ability Remodeling & Home Services, LLC (See our ad on page 31) 2957 N. Hwy 89, Suite A Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 458-6044 www.abilityprescott.com

Acklin Brothers Construction 1965 Coyote Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-4007 www.acklinbrothersconstruction.com


2014 YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Aspen Valley Homes (See our ad this page) 697 6th Street, Suite 503 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-9877 www.aspenvalleyhomesaz.com

Don Savage Building Contractors, Inc. 1753 S. Blooming Hills Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1307 www.donsavagebuilders.com

Benttree Custom Homes

Evergreen Homes

(See our ad on page 32) 1575 Plaza West Dr. #B Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 443-5484 www.benttreecustomhomes.net

(See our ad on page 102) 2008 Forest Hills Rd. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-0006 www.evergreen-homes.com

Board by Board, Inc.

Granite Mountain Builders of Prescott, LLC

(See our ad on page 84) 2053 Douglas Ln. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com

2025 W. Seven Oaks Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-1802 www.gmbuilders.com

Carrington Homes

Greseth Builders

P.O. Box 2335 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 443-7300 www.carringtonhomesaz.com

P.O. Box 1228 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 445-9572 www.gresethbuilders.com

Circle C Construction

Haley Construction Company

(See our ad on page 89) P.O. Box 960 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com

(See our ad on page 6) P.O. Box 831 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

Circle D Builders

Headwaters Construction

1035 Vantage Point Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0208 www.circledbuilders.com

6789 Mandan Lane Paulden, AZ 86334 (928) 636-6976

Crystal Creek Homes built by Beshers Builders, LLC

(See our ad on page 72) 2866 N. Eldred Road Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 227-6705 www.jagraz.com

(See our ad on page 40) 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928)445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

Culhane Contracting, LLC 7300 Saddle Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 713-8199 www.culhanecontractingllc.com

DeCarol Company (See our ad on page 37) P.O. Box 11348 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com

Desert Development & Design, Corp. (See our ad on page 94) P.O. Box 13069 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 777-0022 www.desertdevelopmentaz.com

Designer Homes By Szabo, LLC (See our ad on page 16) 516 Shadow Mountain Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-9326 www.designerhomesbyszabo.com

Laipple Construction

North Sky Homes

1947 Victoria Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-6865

P.O. Box 10604 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 237-0873

Lantana Development, Inc.

Premier Development AZ, LLC

(See our ad on page 34) P.O. Box 12615 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 717-0033 www.lantanacustomhomes.com

7760 E. State Hwy 69, #C5-400 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 227-2043 www.premierdevelopmentaz.com

Living Systems Building Group

3200 Lakeside Village Dr. #201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com

129 Apollo Heights Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-2413 www.michaelfrerking.com

Prescor Builders

Prescott Builders of AZ, LLC

LUVCO Construction

(See our ad on page 57) 2600 Gentle Breeze Way Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 717-0147 www.prescottbuildersofaz.com

Serving Yavapai County (928) 778-9181

Malouff and Company, Inc. 325 W. Gurley St., Ste. 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1657

Prescott Green Builders Serving Yavapai County (928) 925-8674 www.prescottgreenbuilders.com

NJ Builders, Inc. (See our ad on page 44) P.O. Box 13051 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com

PVO Construction, LLC (See our ad on page 46) P.O. Box 25326 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 710-5873 www.pvoconstruction.com

JAGR Custom Homes, LLC

Jebco Construction Companies (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com

Office Locations: Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323

Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

John Nanke Signature Group P.O. Box 10158 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 899-7259

Kenson Construction Co. 6135 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5192

KNA Construction, Inc. P.O. Box 12467 Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6932

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R.E.S. Contracting. Inc.

Sun Pine Homes

P.O. Box 4198 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 776-0301 www.prescottbuilder.com

(See our ad on page 96) 4605 N. Twisted Trail Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6600 Ext. 7 www.sunpinehomes.com

Ravencrest Builders LLC 518 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-1677 www.ravencrestbuilders.com

Renovations, Your Complete Remodel Resource

TLC Construction 1940 W. Buena Vista Trail Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 925-1342 www.tlcconstructionofprescott.com

Triple E Construction

(See our ad on page 68) 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8506 www.renovationsaz.com

(See our ad on page 63) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Ridge West Homes

Womack Enterprises, Inc.

772 Meadlowlark Lane Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5955 www.ridgewesthomes.com

425 W. Delano Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6094 www.womack-brothers.com

Stoney Creek Builders

Glass & Mirrors

(See our ad on page 117) Serving Yavapai County (602) 885-3932 www.stoneycreekbuildersinc.com

(See Shower Doors/Mirror/Glass)

Grass (Artificial/Synthetic Turf)

Handyman/Home Repair

Arizona Stone & Architectural Products

Ability Remodeling & Home Services, LLC

(See our ad Inside Front Cover) 2601 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0828 www.arizonastone.com

(See our ad on page 31) 2957 N. Hwy 89, Suite A Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 458-6044 www.abilityprescott.com

CareScape

DeCarol Company

(See our ad Inside Back Cover) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

(See our ad on page 37) P.O. Box 11348 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com

Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping

Discount Home Service

(See our ad on page 93) 8333 E. Pecos Dr. #5 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-6333 www.haciendalandscaping.com

(See our ad on page 62) 7640 E. Long Look Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-8209 www.dhs-discounthomeservices-prescott.com

Landscape Now, Inc.

GBA Remodel & Repair

P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Serving Yavapai County (928) 515-4189 www.gbaremodel.com

Vicente Landscaping

(See our ad on page 60) Serving Yavapai County (928) 771-0405

(See our ad on page 3) P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Grid/Tile Ceiling Systems Chartier Drywall, Inc. (See our ad on page 109) 655 Brannen Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1191

ML Sims Frame To Finish 1896 N. Lapis Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-0142

Moloney Construction, LLC 234 Whitney Street Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 533-3376

Prescott Design Center 6640 Inter-Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-0904 www.willbuilt.net

Habitat For Humanity Prescott Area Habitat for Humanity (See our ad on page 81) 1230 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8003 www.prescotthabitat.org

www.ycca.org

(See our ad on page 72) 2866 N. Eldred Road Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 227-6705 www.jagraz.com

Arizona Seamless Gutters

Willbuilt Seamless Gutters

2014 Building Yavapai

JAGR Custom Homes, LLC

Gutters (See our ad this page) 703 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1818 www.arizonaseamlessgutters.com

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Handyman & Construction Services

Thompson’s Remodeling Specialists, LLC (See our ad on page 33) 936 Buck Hill Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6407 www.thompsonsprescottaz.com

Health Care Services Precision Spinal Care 3733 Karicio Lane Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 442-0202 www.precisionspinalcare.net

Prescott Valley Chiropractic 3088 Robert Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-0522 www.prescottvalleychiropractic.com


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Highway Construction Safety Guardrail Signs

Western States Fire Protection

Moyer’s Heating & Cooling

www.wsfp.com

Arizona Highway Safety Specialists

Office Locations: Prescott

(See our ad this page) 8146 E. Ashley Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282-2659 www.moyershvac.com

P.O. Box 3690 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-8934

Home Builders (See General Contractors: Residential/Custom)

Home Furnishings Amy Favour Interior Design, LLC ASID (See our ad on page 83) Serving Yavapai County (928) 925-9427 www.amyfavour.com

The Lite Company 2109 N. 4th St. Flagstaff, AZ 86004 (928) 774-6257 www.thelitecompany.com

The Picture Window, Inc. (See our ad this page) www.thepicturewindowinc.com

Cottowood Location 634 E. State Route 89A Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-8442

Prescott Location 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-0122

Home Inspectors Beneficial Home Inspection (See our ad on page 57) P.O. Box 2558 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 710-7061 www.beneficialhomeinspection.com

Home Security Systems B&W Fire Security Systems (See our ad on page 69) 8737 E. Florentine Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8008 www.bwfiresecurity.com

Safeguard Security & Communication P.O. Box 3923 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 772-0155 www.safeguard.us

The Alarm Connection 1038 Commerce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-1609

3001 Main St., Ste. #2D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (623) 640-6554

Phoenix 4346 E. Elwood St., Ste. #100 Phoenix, AZ 85040 (602) 272-2200

Hotel – Extended Stay/ Conference Residence Inn By Marriott (See our ad Back Cover) 3599 Lee Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 775-2232 www.marriott.com

SpringHill Suites In Historic Downtown Prescott (See our ad Back Cover) 200 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-0998 www.marriott.com

HVAC

HVAC Supplies & Fixtures Yavapai Plumbing & Heating 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

HydroSeeding

Pitzer’s One-Hour Air Conditioning & Heating

CareScape

6363 Cooper Hill Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 777-8899 www.pitzersonehour.com

(See our ad Inside Back Cover) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

TDK Comfort Systems, Inc. Serving Yavapai County (928) 636-0846 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com

Manzanita Landscaping (See our ad on page 91) PO Box 26546 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

Verde Sol-Air 724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 Toll Free: (866) 700-5757 www.verdesolair.com

Vicente Landscaping

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

(See our ad on page 3) P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Advantage Home Performance 1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-3828 www.advantagehomeperformance.com

Arizona Heating & Cooling 700 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-9378

Balanced Heating & Air Conditioning 389 Road 2 South #B6 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-4623 www.balancedheating.com

Chino Heating & Cooling, Inc. (See our ad on page 103) 550 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2955 www.chinoheating.com

Desert Valley Aire, INC 8140 E. State Rt. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 778-0784 www.desertvalleyaire.com

Energy Savings Heating & Cooling 360 Henry St. Suite A Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-8402 www.energysavingshc.com

Goettl’s High Desert Mechanical 4650 Old Highway 279, #A Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-2200 www.goettlshdm.com

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Insulation Advantage Home Performance 1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-3828 www.advantagehomeperformance.com

Arizona State Insulation 9305 N. Coyote Springs Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 775-2403

Banker Insulation of Northern AZ 5790 Fulton Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2544 www.bankerinsulation.com

Gale Contractor Services 11610 E. Santa Fe Loop Road #B Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 778-0222 www.masco.com

Prescott Floors

TK Haley Yard Care

1239–1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

2661 W. Noble Vista Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 830-4061 www.tkhaley.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life

Vicente Landscaping

(See our ad on page 53) 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

Irrigation Materials Ewing Irrigation 8267 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9803 www.ewing1.com

Irrigation Systems

Insurance

CareScape

Brown & Brown of Prescott 915 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-3540 www.bbprescott.com

(See our ad Inside Back Cover) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

State Farm-Heidi Fowler

Creative Outdoors

150 S. Hwy 69, Ste. #9E Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 775-4080 www.heidifowlerinsurance.com

P.O. Box 10095 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com

State Farm-Eric Strobel

Landscape Now, Inc.

(See our ad on page 3) P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Kitchen & Bath Design Amy Favour Interior Design, LLC ASID (See our ad on page 83) Serving Yavapai County (928) 925-9427 www.amyfavour.com

Board by Board, Inc. (See our ad on page 84) 2053 Douglas Ln. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com

NJ Builders, Inc. (See our ad on page 44) P.O. Box 13051 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com

Kitchen & Bath Remodeling Board by Board, Inc.

2485 N. Great Western Dr. #G1 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8338 www.estrobel.net

P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

(See our ad on page 84) 2053 Douglas Ln. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com

The Mahoney Group Clyde Marshall

Little’s Landscape & Design

DeCarol Company

1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

(See our ad on page 37) P.O. Box 11348 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com

3636 Crossings Dr. #B Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-1900 www.mahoneygroup.com

Interior Design Amy Favour Interior Design, LLC ASID (See our ad on page 83) Serving Yavapai County (928) 925-9427 www.amyfavour.com

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC 9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

Prescott Design Center (See our ad on page 79) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com

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Manzanita Landscaping (See our ad on page 91) PO Box 26546 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

GBA Remodel & Repair Serving Yavapai County (928) 515-4189 www.gbaremodel.com

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

Moloney Construction, LLC

2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

234 Whitney Street Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 533-3376

RRS Landscape & Maintenance

PVO Construction, LLC

(See our ad on page 75) Serving Yavapai County (928) 848-2058 www.rrslandscapeservices.com

(See our ad on page 46) P.O. Box 25326 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 710-5873 www.pvoconstruction.com

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. P.O. Box 4462 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

www.ycca.org

Land Development / Lots & Acreage Garden Brook Realty (See our ad on page 67) 340 W. Willis St. Ste #2 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-0020 www.gardenbrookrealty.com

Keller Williams Check Realty Dawn Poulin (See our ad on page 73) 102 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-7355 www.welcomehomeprescott.com

Realty Executives (See our ad on page 64 & 65) Toll Free: 1-800-778-7891 www.realtyexecutives.com

Office Locations: Commerce Center Office 1955 Commerce Center Circle Satellite, Suite C Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-9726

Cottonwood Office 2825 E. State Route 89A Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 204-9300

Downtown Prescott Office 110 E. Gurley St., Suite 200A Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-9800

Payson Office 408 S. Beeline Hwy Payson, AZ 85541 (928) 474-4401

Prescott – Gurley Street 503 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-0257

Prescott Lakes Office 1401 Prescott Lakes Parkway Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-0077

Prescott Valley Office 8100 E. Hwy 89 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-0777

Sedona Office 1835 W. Hwy 89A, Suite 1 Sedona, AZ 86336 (928) 204-9300


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Red Arrow Real Estate

Manzanita Landscaping

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber

www.redarrowrealestate.com

(See our ad on page 91) PO Box 26546 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

(See our ad on page 9) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

Log Home Chinking

Office Locations: Corporate Office 1107 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-2525

Prescott Country Club Office 1338 Prescott Country Club Blvd. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 772-7221

Landscaping & Construction Materials Earthworks Landscape & Supply 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

Prescott Dirt, LLC Serving Yavapai County (928) 636-5844 www.prescottdirt.com

Landscaping – Erosion Control/Xeriscape/Water Features/Defensible Space Commercial & Residential Autumn Blaze Construction (See our ad on page 59) 3071 Pedregal Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-4210 www.autumnblazeconstruction.com

CareScape (See our ad Inside Back Cover) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Creative Outdoors P.O. Box 10095 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com

Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping (See our ad on page 93) 8333 E. Pecos Dr. #5 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-6333 www.haciendalandscaping.com

Landscape Now, Inc. P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Little’s Landscape & Design 1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

Rock ‘N’ Earth Landscaping Serving the Yavapai County Area www.rocknearth.com

RRS Landscape & Maintenance (See our ad on page 75) Serving Yavapai County (928) 848-2058 www.rrslandscapeservices.com

TK Haley Yard Care 2661 W. Noble Vista Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 830-4061 www.tkhaley.com

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. P.O. Box 4462 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

Marble (Countertops, Shower Surrounds) Arizona Tile (See our ad on page 8) 625 Holiday Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-1070 www.arizonatile.com

Stoney Creek Builders

Precision Marble & Granite

(See our ad this page) Serving Yavapai County (602) 885-3932 www.stoneycreekbuildersinc.com

Western Sealant Company Inc. (See our ad on page 56) PO Box 549 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 778-3112 www.westernsealantaz.com

(See our ad on page 61) 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life (See our ad on page 53) 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

Log Homes Stoney Creek Builders (See our ad this page) Serving Yavapai County (602) 885-3932 www.stoneycreekbuildersinc.com

Masonry Block/Supplies Yavapai Block & Precast Co. (See our ad on page 89) 1389 Masonry Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4340 www.yavapaiblock.com

Vicente Landscaping (See our ad on page 3) P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Lighting Amy Favour Interior Design, LLC ASID (See our ad on page 83) Serving Yavapai County (928) 925-9427 www.amyfavour.com

K’s Lighting, LLC 735 Sixth St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1623 www.kslightinginc.com

Prescott Floors 1239–1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

The Lite Company 2109 N. 4th St. Flagstaff, AZ 86004 (928) 774-6257 www.thelitecompany.com

Locks Builders Wholesale, LLC 400 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com

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Mediation Robert C. Kozak, PLLC Bob Kozak 3619 Crossings Dr. Suite B Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7140

Membership Warehouse Costco Wholesale 3911 E. Hwy 69 Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 541-2204 www.costco.com

Metal/Steel Buildings Circle C Construction (See our ad on page 89) P.O. Box 960 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com

JAGR Custom Homes, LLC (See our ad on page 72) 2866 N. Eldred Road Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 227-6705 www.jagraz.com

Jebco Construction Companies (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com

Jebco Construction Companies

Western Technologies, Inc.

Landscape Now, Inc.

(928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com

(See our ad on page 95) 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Mold Testing

(See our ad on page 91) PO Box 26546 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

Office Locations: Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323

Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

Millwork MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 85) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

ML Sims Frame To Finish 1896 N. Lapis Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-0142

The Arizona Woodworking Co. 8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworkingcompany.com

Timberline Woodworks Inc.

Office Locations: Chino Valley Location

1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323

Mold Abatement

Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

Kenson Construction Co. 6135 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5192

Prescor Builders 3200 Lakeside Village Dr. #201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com

Stanley Steel Structures 1537 S. Bates Road Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-6703 www.stanleysteelstructures.com

Metal Stud Framing Chartier Drywall, Inc. (See our ad on page 109) 655 Brannen Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1191

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Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC (See our ad on page 78) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

Service Master of Prescott (See our ad on page 71) 8330 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-9205 www.servicemasterofprescott.com

Mold Inspection

Western Technologies, Inc. (See our ad on page 95) 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste.95C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

Municipalities City of Prescott (See our ad on page 22) 201 S. Cortez St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-1100 www.cityofprescott.net

Town of Chino Valley 202 N. State Route 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2646 www.chinoaz.net

Town of Dewey-Humboldt 2375 S. Highway 69, Suite 12 Humboldt, AZ 86329 (928) 632-7362 www.dewey-humboldt.net

Town of Prescott Valley 2501 E. Civic Circle Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 759-3000 www.pvaz.net

Nursery/Garden Supplies Earthworks Landscape & Supply

Tuff Spas 7600 N. 71st Ave Glendale, AZ 85303 (623)939-0851 www.tuffspas.com

Vicente Landscaping (See our ad on page 3) P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Paint & Supplies Dunn-Edwards 6572 E. 2nd St. #A-B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-7748 www.dunnedwards.com

Painting Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC

Lowes

Century Painting

2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

(See our ad on page 78) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

(See our ad Inside Back Cover) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

www.ycca.org

(See our ad on page 33) 6947 E. 1st St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9884 www.prescottspas.com

(See our ad on page 78) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

Outdoor Living

(See our ad on page 71 & 95) 8330 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-9205 www.servicemasterofprescott.com

Prescott Spas

2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC

Service Master of Prescott

Manzanita Landscaping

CareScape

Eric & Sons 6640 Inter Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 775-2880 www.ericandsons.net

(See our ad on page 71) 697 N. 6th St., Ste. 304 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-2374 www.centurypainting.com

Certa Pro Painters 1801 Jade Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 499-2571 www.certapro.com

Douglas E. Noble Painting Serving Yavapai County (928) 772-5434 www.douglasenoblepainting.com

Emerald Forest Painting Serving Yavapai County (928) 708-0388


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J & J Painting

Vicente Landscaping

Brewer Plumbing, Inc.

2530 W. Copper Basin Rd. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-1575 www.jandjpaintingprescott.com

(See our ad on page 3) P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

P.O. Box 2301 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2351

Patio Furnishings Prescott Spas

Payroll Services

Plumbing Fixtures/Supplies The Plumbing Store (See our ad on page 54) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

Paragon Plumbing, Inc. (See our ad this page) P.O. Box 25844 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 775-2343

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating

(See our ad on page 33) 6947 E. 1st St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9884 www.prescottspas.com

Holdsworth & Co. CPAs

Pavers

Pest Control

R.E.D. Plumbing

Autumn Blaze Construction

Orkin Pest Control

(See our ad on page 59) 3071 Pedregal Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-4210 www.autumnblazeconstruction.com

8230 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-2419 www.getorkin.com

(See our ad on page 47) 8133 E. Pecos Circle Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-9296 www.redplumbinginc.com

The Plumbing Store

CareScape

Truly Nolen of America 6594 E. 2nd St., Ste #D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-4261 www.trulynolen.com

(See our ad on page 54) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

Plan Rooms

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating

(See our ad Inside Back Cover) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

3031 Dollar Mark Way Ste C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8633 www.holdsworthcpa.com

Creative Outdoors

A & E Reprographics

P.O. Box 10095 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com

Prescott Location:

Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping (See our ad on page 93) 8333 E. Pecos Dr. #5 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-6333 www.haciendalandscaping.com

Landscape Now, Inc. P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Little’s Landscape & Design 1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

Manzanita Landscaping (See our ad on page 91) PO Box 26546 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

www.a-erepro.com 1030 Sandretto Dr., Ste. F Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-9116

(See Blueprint Copying)

Promotional Products Sir Speedy 1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

Propane

5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Barrett Propane (See our ad on page 55) 1555 W. Iron Springs Road, #5 Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 636-1600 www.barrettpropane.com

Prescott Valley Location: 8010 E. Hwy. 69, Ste. D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0054

Planting Soil Earthworks Landscape & Supply 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

Prescott Dirt. LLC Serving Yavapai County (928) 636-5844 www.prescottdirt.com

Plumbing Contractors Arizona Green Plumber

Printing/Copying

222 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3815

Serving the Yavapai County Area www.rocknearth.com P.O. Box 4462 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

P.O. Box 5055 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 301-7702

Prescott (Downtown) Location:

Rock ‘N’ Earth Landscaping

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co.

5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Perfection Plumbing

P.O. Box 27971 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 925-6809 www.arizonagreenplumber.com

Benjamin Franklin Plumbing 6363 Copper Hill Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 777-8899 www.benjaminfranklinplumbing.com

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Yavapai Bottle Gas

Great Circle Radio

2170 Concord Dr. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 776-9007 www.yavapaigas.com

(See our ad on page 99) 116 S. Alto Street Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6880 www.gcmaz.com

Quickbooks Consulting Holdsworth & Co. CPAs 3031 Dollar Mark Way Ste C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8633 www.holdsworthcpa.com

KAFF – “Flagstaff Country” 93.5 FM & 930 AM www.country935.gcmaz.com

KAFF – “Kaff Country” 92.9 FM www.kaff.gcmaz.com

Radio Partners

KNOT – “Fun Oldies”

Arizona’s Hometown Radio Group

100.9 FM & 1450 AM www.hits106.gcmaz.com

(See our ad this page) 3755 Karico Lane Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-9289 www.azhometownradio.com

KFSZ – “Hits 106”

KDDL–“Cattle Country” 94.3 FM www.cattlecountryradio.com

KPPV–“The Mix” 106.7 FM www.kppv.com

106 FM www.hits106.gcmaz.com

KTMG – “Magic” 99.1 FM www.magic991.gcmaz.com

KMGN – “The Mountain” 93.9 FM www.939themountain.gcmaz.com

KQNA–“Talk of the Quad Cities” 1130 AM & 99.9 FM www.kqna.com

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Rainwater Harvesting CareScape (See our ad Inside Back Cover) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Arizona Seamless Gutters (See our ad on page 114) 703 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1818 www.arizonaseamlessgutters.com

Ewing Irrigation 8267 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9803 www.ewing1.com

Landscape Now, Inc. P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Vicente Landscaping (See our ad on page 3) P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Real Estate/ Residential & Commercial Garden Brook Realty (See our ad on page 67) 340 W. Willis St. Ste #2 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-0020 www.gardenbrookrealty.com

Keller Williams Check Realty Dawn Poulin (See our ad on page 73) 102 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-7355 www.welcomehomeprescott.com

Realty Executives (See our ad on page 64 & 65) Toll Free: 1-800-778-7891 www.realtyexecutives.com

Office Locations: Commerce Center Office 1955 Commerce Center Circle Satellite, Suite C Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-9726


2014 YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Cottonwood Office 2825 E. State Route 89A Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 204-9300

Downtown Prescott Office 110 E. Gurley St., Suite 200A Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-9800

Payson Office 408 S. Beeline Hwy Payson, AZ 85541 (928) 474-4401

Prescott – Gurley Street 503 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-0257

Prescott Lakes Office 1401 Prescott Lakes Parkway Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-0077

Prescott Valley Office 8100 E. Hwy 89 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-0777

Sedona Office 1835 W. Hwy 89A, Suite 1 Sedona, AZ 86336 (928) 204-9300

Red Arrow Real Estate www.redarrowrealestate.com

Office Locations: Corporate Office 1107 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-2525

Prescott Country Club Office 1338 Prescott Country Club Blvd. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 772-7221

Recycling Iron Man Recyclers 11710 Santa Fe Loop Road Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 775-6894 www.ironmanrecyclers.com

Mattera Enterprises Recycling 685 S. Coldwater Lane Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 775-6894 www.merecycling.net

Patriot Disposal 9434 E. Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9000 www.patriotdisposal.com

Remodeling/Restoration Contractors Ability Remodeling & Home Services, LLC (See our ad on page 31) 2957 N. Hwy 89, Suite A Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 458-6044 www.abilityprescott.com

Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC

Handyman & Construction Services (See our ad on page 60) Serving Yavapai County (928) 771-0405

Acklin Brothers Construction

Kenson Construction Co.

1965 Coyote Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-4007 www.acklinbrothersconstruction.com

6135 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5192

Aspen Valley Homes

Serving Yavapai County (928) 778-9181

Benttree Custom Homes (See our ad on page 32) 1575 Plaza West Dr. #B Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 443-5484 www.benttreecustomhomes.net

Board by Board, Inc. (See our ad on page 84) 2053 Douglas Ln. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com

Circle C Construction (See our ad on page 89) P.O. Box 960 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com

Circle D Builders 1035 Vantage Point Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0208 www.circledbuilders.com

Crystal Creek Homes built by Beshers Builders, LLC (See our ad on page 40) 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928)445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

Culhane Contracting, LLC

(See our ad on page 33) 936 Buck Hill Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6407 www.thompsonsprescottaz.com

TLC Construction 1940 W. Buena Vista Trail Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 925-1342 www.tlcconstructionofprescott.com

JAGR Custom Homes, LLC (See our ad on page 72) 2866 N. Eldred Road Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 227-6705 www.jagraz.com

(See our ad on page 113) 697 6th Street, Suite 503 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-9877 www.aspenvalleyhomesaz.com

Thompson’s Remodeling Specialists, LLC

(See our ad on page 37) P.O. Box 11348 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com

(See our ad on page 78) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

7300 Saddle Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 713-8199 www.culhanecontractingllc.com

DeCarol Company

Triple E Construction (See our ad on page 63) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Womack Enterprises, Inc. 425 W. Delano Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6094 www.womack-brothers.com

LUVCO Construction

Yavapai Design Build

Moloney Construction, LLC

(See our ad on page 77) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-4953 www.ypeinc.com

234 Whitney Street Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 533-3376

NJ Builders, Inc. (See our ad on page 44) P.O. Box 13051 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com

Residential Contractors (See General Contractors: Residential/Custom)

Prescott Builders of AZ, LLC

Retaining Walls – Masonry

(See our ad on page 57) 2600 Gentle Breeze Way Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 717-0147 www.prescottbuildersofaz.com

Autumn Blaze Construction (See our ad on page 59) 3071 Pedregal Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-4210 www.autumnblazeconstruction.com

Prescott Green Builders Serving Yavapai County (928) 925-8674 www.prescottgreenbuilders.com

CareScape (See our ad Inside Back Cover) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

PVO Construction, LLC (See our ad on page 46) P.O. Box 25326 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 710-5873 www.pvoconstruction.com

Creative Outdoors

Renovations, Your Complete Remodel Resource (See our ad on page 68) 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8506 www.renovationsaz.com

P.O. Box 10095 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com

Laipple Construction 1947 Victoria Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-6865

Little’s Landscape & Design

Stoney Creek Builders

1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

(See our ad on page 117) Serving Yavapai County (602) 885-3932 www.stoneycreekbuildersinc.com

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Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

Creative Outdoors

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

Superior Roofing of Northern AZ

2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

P.O. Box 10095 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com

2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

P.O. Box 27444 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 775-0060 www.superiorroofingofaz.com

Dunbar Stone Company, Inc.

Serving the Yavapai County Area www.rocknearth.com

Thomas W. Kincaid Masonry, Inc. 7450 E. Acre Way Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 772-8520 www.twkmasonry.com

Vicente Landscaping (See our ad on page 3) P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Retaining Walls – Stone Autumn Blaze Construction (See our ad on page 59) 3071 Pedregal Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-4210 www.autumnblazeconstruction.com

CareScape (See our ad Inside Back Cover) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

1041 Commerce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7880 www.dunbarstoneinc.com

Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping (See our ad on page 93) 8333 E. Pecos Dr. #5 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-6333 www.haciendalandscaping.com

Landscape Now, Inc. P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Little’s Landscape & Design 1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

Manzanita Landscaping (See our ad on page 91) PO Box 26546 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

Rock ‘N’ Earth Landscaping

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. P.O. Box 4462 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

Vicente Landscaping (See our ad on page 3) P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Road/Driveway Chip Sealing Earth Resources Corporation P.O. Box 1420 Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 775-2795

Rock

Screens (Doors & Windows) All Seasons Retractable Screens 2535 Copper Basin Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 533-3336 www.allseasonsretractable.com

Prestige Security Doors (See our ad on page 85) 600 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-7900 – Prescott (928) 204-1222 – Sedona www.prestigesecuritydoors.com

Roofing – Residential & Commercial

(See our ad on page 63) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Badger Roofing

(See our ad on page 75) 8734 E. Long Mesa Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-1145

BZ Roof’N (See our ad on page 25) 1715 S. Reed Road Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 237-0788 www.bzroofnprescott.com

Central Basin Roofing, Inc. (See our ad on page 43) 331 N. Arizona Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-5819 www.centralbasinroofing.com

Granite Basin Roofing (See our ad on page 35) 1011 E. Commerce Dr., Suite #E Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 772-9222 www.granitebasinroofing.com

Roofing Systems of Prescott PO Box 687 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 778-5017

www.ycca.org

(See our ad on page 54) 625 Miller Valley Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6371 www.ablesaw.com

Triple E Construction

Bradshaw Mountain Roofing

2014 Building Yavapai

Able Saw & Small Engine

(See Flagstone/Rock Supplies)

(See our ad on this page) 8800 E. Long Mesa Dr., Ste. A Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 771-8770 www.badgerroofing.net

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Saw/Tool/Small Engine Repair

Security Doors & Screens First Impression Security Doors 1415 N. Mondel Dr. Gilbert, AZ 85233 (480) 588-4811 www.firstimpressionsecuritydoors.com

Prestige Security Doors (See our ad on page 85) 600 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-7900 – Prescott (928) 204-1222 – Sedona www.prestigesecuritydoors.com

Septic & Water Tank Manufacturer Yavapai Block & Precast Co. (See our ad on page 89) 1389 Masonry Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4340 www.yavapaiblock.com

Septic System Design & Installation Ringler Excavating P.O. Box 2004 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 899-0012


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Septic Tank Cleaning

Shredding Services

JT’s Septic

Sir Speedy

(See our ad on page 102) PO Box 1346 Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 632-7077 www.jtseptic.com

1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

Septic Tank Inspections JT’s Septic (See our ad on page 102) PO Box 1346 Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 632-7077 www.jtseptic.com

Siding Early Bird Siding Serving Yavapai County (928)301-1607

Reliant Capitol, LLC

Sewer & Drain Cleaning

725 N. 73rd Ave., Suite 124 Phoenix, AZ 85043 (623) 388-8899 www.reliantcapitolllc.com

Arizona Green Plumber

Signs/Banners

P.O. Box 27971 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 925-6809 www.arizonagreenplumber.com

Brewer Plumbing, Inc. P.O. Box 2301 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2351

A & B Sign Company 691 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6995 www.absignco.com

A & E Reprographics www.a-erepro.com

P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

(See our ad on page 91) PO Box 26546 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC 2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

R.E.D. Plumbing

222 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3815

The Plumbing Store

8010 E. Hwy. 69, Ste. D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0054

(See our ad on page 54) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

Morgan Sign Company

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating

Sir Speedy

5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Shower Doors/Mirrors/Glass Bennett Glass & Mirror (See our ad on page 80) 722 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1180 www.bennettglassaz.com

Precision Marble & Granite (See our ad on page 61) 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com

704 E. Moeller St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6336 www.morgansign.com 1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

Signs – Highway Construction Guardrail Arizona Highway Safety Specialists P.O. Box 3690 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-8934

Snow Removal CareScape (See our ad Inside Back Cover) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

R.E.D. Plumbing (See our ad on page 47) 8133 E. Pecos Circle Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-9296 www.redplumbinginc.com Serving Yavapai County (928) 636-0846 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com

(See our ad on page 3) P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Blazing Sky Energy Group

(See our ad on page 95) 2655 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2201 www.evsolar.com

TDK Comfort Systems, Inc.

Vicente Landscaping

(See our ad on page 119) P.O. Box 25844 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 775-2343

Prescott Valley Location:

EV Solar Products, Inc.

Manzanita Landscaping

Solar Energy

(See our ad on page 47) 8133 E. Pecos Circle Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-9296 www.redplumbinginc.com

P.O. Box 27971 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 925-6809 www.arizonagreenplumber.com

1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

1030 Sandretto Dr., Ste. F Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-9116

Prescott (Downtown) Location:

Arizona Green Plumber

Little’s Landscape & Design

Prescott Location:

Paragon Plumbing, Inc.

Solar Plumbing

Landscape Now, Inc.

Verde Sol-Air 724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 Toll Free: (866) 700-5757 www.verdesolair.com

(See our ad on page 23 & 27) 1097 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 277-8460 www.blazingsky.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

EV Solar Products, Inc.

Solar Tubes & Skylights

(See our ad on page 95) 2655 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2201 www.evsolar.com

Arizona Window Wizard Installation & Service 8600 E. Turtle Rock Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 775-8964

Pur Solar 1505 E. Cochise St. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 639-1267 www.pursolaraz.com

Badger Roofing

Singletrack Solar and Electric (See our ad on page 83) Serving Yavapai County (928) 925-0914 www.singletracksolarandelectric.com

Southface Solar Electric 2122 W. Lone Cactus Dr. St. #2 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (480) 636-1800 www.southfacese.com

(See our ad on page 122) 8800 E. Long Mesa Dr., Ste. A Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 771-8770 www.badgerroofing.net

Builders Wholesale, LLC 400 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com

Eric & Sons 6640 Inter Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 775-2880 www.ericandsons.net

Solar Panel Cleaning The Solar Scrubber

Granite Basin Roofing

Serving the Great State of Arizona (928) 308-4970 www.thesolarscrubber.com

(See our ad on page 35) 1011 E. Commerce Dr., Suite #E Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 772-9222 www.granitebasinroofing.com

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Sun Rooms/Pergola Shade & Patio Covers

The Door & Window Store 487 E Z St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6400 www.prescottdoors.com

Stanley Steel Structures 1537 S. Bates Road Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-6703 www.stanleysteelstructures.com

Spas/Saunas/Hot tubs Prescott Spas

Sunburst Patios

(See our ad on page 33) 6947 E. 1st St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9884 www.prescottspas.com

6263 Copper Hill Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8229

Telephone & Internet

Tuff Spas

Cable One

7600 N. 71st Ave Glendale, AZ 85303 (623)939-0851 www.tuffspas.com

3201 Tower Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-4511 www.cableone.net

Stone

Communications Center 1038 Commerce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 778-0750 www.communicationscenteronline.com

(See Flagstone/Rock Supplies)

Stucco/Plastering Sanders Plastering Systems

Tree Removal/Trimming

(See our ad this page) Serving Yavapai County (928) 632-5008 www.sandersplastering.com

CareScape (See our ad Inside Back Cover) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Taylor Plastering, Inc. 5798 Foxglove Place Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 772-7522

SPanders lastering Systems SPimply ut... the finest Stucco Restoration and new Stucco you will find! SPanders romise:

Stucco Restoration  New Stucco Systems 

LLC

We will do what we say! We will create an expectation… then exceed it!

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co.

UniSource Energy Services

P.O. Box 4462 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

(See our ad on page 96) 6405 N. Wilkinson Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 771-7298 www.uesaz.com

TK Haley Yard Care 2661 W. Noble Vista Dr. Prescott, AZ 85605 (928)830-4061 www.tkhaley.com

Vicente Landscaping (See our ad on page 3) P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Tub/Shower Conversion Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC (See our ad on page 78) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

Arizona Green Plumber P.O. Box 27971 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 925-6809 www.arizonagreenplumber.com

Granite Transformations 2205 W. Lone Cactus Dr., #23 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (623)-581-5056 www.granitetransformations.com

Precision Marble & Granite

•  Conventional Stucco  •  Stucco Restoration Systems •  Residential/Commercial

Call for a FREE inspection  and consultation

SINCE 1993

928-632-5008 ROC 278623  ROC 278624

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2014 Building Yavapai

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Patriot Disposal 9434 E. Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9000 www.patriotdisposal.com

Prescott Valley C&D Landfill 2640 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 759-9400

Southwest Waste Services, Inc. (See our ad on page 60) 2671 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-8446 www.azsws.com

Water/Waste Water Piping Supplies The Plumbing Store (See our ad on page 54) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

Water & Fire Damage Restoration Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC

(See our ad on page 61) 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com

(See our ad on page 78) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

The Plumbing Store

Service Master of Prescott

(See our ad on page 54) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

(See our ad on page 71 & 95) 8330 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-9205 www.servicemasterofprescott.com

Thompson’s Remodeling Specialists, LLC

Triple E Construction

(See our ad on page 33) 936 Buck Hill Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6407 www.thompsonsprescottaz.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating

www.sandersplastering.com

Waste Hauling

5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Utilities Arizona Public Service (See our ad on page 87) 120 N. Marina St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-3636 www.aps.com

(See our ad on page 63) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Water Purification Arizona Green Plumber P.O. Box 27971 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 925-6809 www.arizonagreenplumber.com

Kinetico Quality Water www.kineticonaz.com

Prescott Valley Location 7485 E. 1st St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-5020


2014 YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Sedona Location 2697 W. St. Rt. 89A Sedona, AZ 86336 (928) 282-2115

Perfection Plumbing P.O. Box 5055 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 301-7702

R.E.D. Plumbing (See our ad on page 47) 8133 E. Pecos Circle Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-9296 www.redplumbinginc.com

The Plumbing Store (See our ad on page 54) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Waterproofing Western Sealant Company Inc. (See our ad on page 56) PO Box 549 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 778-3112 www.westernsealantaz.com

Welding A-Action Welding 1514 Shoup St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-2579 www.a-actionwelding.com

Arc-Tech Welding 8740 N. Lawrence Ln. Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 772-7050 www.arctechwelding.com

Wells/Pump Installation & Servicing Dan McGee Drilling & Pump P.O. Box 2939 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4576

R.W. Turner and Sons 3471 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2771

Window Coverings & Shutters Blind Brothers of Prescott (See our ad on page 61) Serving Yavapai County (928) 710-1962 www.hunterdouglas.com

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC

Weed Control

9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

CareScape

Prescott Design Center

(See our ad Inside Back Cover) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

(See our ad on page 79) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com

Landscape Now, Inc.

Prescott Floors

P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life

2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

RRS Landscape & Maintenance (See our ad on page 75) Serving Yavapai County (928) 848-2058 www.rrslandscapeservices.com

Vicente Landscaping (See our ad on page 3) P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

(See our ad on page 53) 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

The Blind Brothers (DBA) Blinds Shutters & Shades 437 S. Main St., Ste. 3 Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-2423 www.theblindbrothers.com

The Picture Window, Inc. (See our ad this page) www.thepicturewindowinc.com

Windows – Replacement

Cottowood Location 634 E. State Route 89A Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-8442

Bennett Glass & Mirror (See our ad on page 80) 722 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1180 www.bennettglassaz.com

Prescott Location 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-0122

Renewal by Andersen of Northern Arizona

Window Tinting (Auto, Building, and Home)

2485 N. Great Western Dr. #D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3159 www.renewalbyandersen.com

Bennett Glass & Mirror (See our ad on page 80) 722 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1180 www.bennettglassaz.com

Triple E Construction (See our ad on page 63) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Protint, LLC 6264 E. Highway 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-5971 www.protintaz.com

Window World of Northern Arizona (See our ad on page 28 & 29) 101 Airpark Road #L Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 649-9111 www.windowworldnoaz.com

Windows (See Doors & Windows)

Windows/Sliding Door Repairs

Woodworking

Arizona Window Wizard Installation & Service

(See Carpentry/Finish Carpentry)

8600 E. Turtle Rock Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 775-8964

We Have Blinds for EVERY Budget! Providing Fabulous Window Fashions Since 1978 Drapes • Blinds • Shutters Shades • Solar Rollers Motorization • Awnings Outdoor Shades

Call today for your FREE on-site estimate!

928.772.0122 www.ThePictureWindowInc.com Licensed/Bonded/Insured • ROC #146362, #256797

Janet@ThePictureWindow.com

www.ycca.org

2014 Building Yavapai

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Profile for YCCA

YCCA 2014  

Yavapai County Contractors Association Prescott, Prescott Valley, Arizona YCCA is proud to offer the Building Yavapai publication, allowing...

YCCA 2014  

Yavapai County Contractors Association Prescott, Prescott Valley, Arizona YCCA is proud to offer the Building Yavapai publication, allowing...

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