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BUILDING YAVAPAI

Yavapai County Contractors Association • 2015

Building

YAVAPAI

Yavapai County Contractors Association • 2015

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New Technology Helps Protect Your Home, Family

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Maximize Sale Potential with Home Staging

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Smooth Move Relocating Made Easy

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Old West Spirit Lives on IN Downtown Prescott

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Find Out What’s Cooking in Kitchen Design Trends


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PUBLISHER

Building Yavapai ...

Bigger and better in 2015 By Sandy Griffis, Executive Director Yavapai County Contractors Association (YCCA) is pleased to present the 2015 edition of Building Yavapai, a guide to local building and supplier resources. Building Yavapai lists trusted contractors, suppliers and service providers in the Prescott area and beyond, and offers ideas to help you create your dream house, from construction through décor. As the nation’s economic recovery gains traction, the positive effects are evident all around the quad-city area. Builders are ramping up to meet the rapidly growing need for new homes and commercial buildings. Suppliers and installers of cabinets, flooring, fixtures, surfaces, lighting and more are helping homeowners design or refurbish their living spaces as they become more confident about investing in their current comfort and future resale prospects. Landscapers are beautifying yards and gardens, adding curb appeal as well as quality of life. “Green” builders are increasingly improving efficiency to save energy and money and promote sustainability. However, in the wake of the Great Recession, people are still highly budget-conscious, and with good reason. But it’s important to keep in mind the old saying, “You get what you pay for.” You might be able to find someone who is willing to do a job for a lower price than licensed contractors and established businesses. That could be because the worker in question doesn’t have to pay the overhead costs of business offices, licenses and insurance, among other things. On a more impactful level to the customer, the low bidder might not have the training or experience required

of a reputable professional. If an unlicensed contractor does a shoddy or incomplete job, the client has little if any recourse. YCCA is happy to provide referrals, check a company’s standing with regard to issues or complaints, and ensure licenses are up to date, and appropriate for the job at hand. One local resident told YCCA that she had hired a company to do several thousand dollars’ worth of landscaping. The business was licensed – for concrete work only, not landscaping. They nevertheless advertised themselves as qualified landscapers, the customer didn’t check into the credentials, and she was left with a yard full of dead plants, weeds, and drainage issues. The good news is Yavapai County has a wide array of wonderful contractors who are experienced, meticulous, professional and customer-oriented. But you need to do your due diligence. Fortunately, that part is easy. Just call YCCA at 778-0040 or email ycca@cableone.net before committing to a contract. There’s a good reason why YCCA’s motto is “Don’t start without us!” A quick status check – which YCCA is the ounce of prevention that has saved many ­homeowners from unwise investments. In addition to helping community members find the perfect partners for their projects, YCCA aims to inspire with updates on the latest products and industry developments. This edition of Building Yavapai contains articles on a variety of topics to help you improve, beautify and preserve your home while minimizing your environmental footprint. Additionally, for the 37th year, YCCA hosts a local Home & Garden Show featuring hundreds of local vendors showing off their top offerings. And check out YCCA’s weekly “Ask the Contractor” column in The Daily Courier for up-to-the-minute news and tips.

BUILDING YAVAPAI

Yavapai County Contractors Association • 2015

Building

YAVAPAI

Yavapai County Contractors Association • 2015 Another major goal of YCCA is to strengthen the dialogue between our members, the community and local and state government, because clear communication and cooperation can lead to positive changes that are beneficial to everyone.

We are fortunate to live in the quad-city area, with its temperate climate, forests, lakes, hiking, biking, array of culture and amenities, Old West flair, and warm community spirit. Now, more and more families and businesses are discovering the region’s appeal and opportunities. And our Yavapai County contractors are working every day to “build” on that momentum. YCCA is enthusiastic about this community and our organization. We invite everyone to share their thoughts, concerns and feedback with YCCA so that we can continue to evolve our efforts and vision. YCCA is proud to advocate for you and help make our community the very best it can be. We are dedicated to furthering the ever- changing construction industry. Many of our members play a key role in the financial well-being of our community by contributing time, money and other resources, because YCCA has the desire and strength to “give back.” I am so proud to represent YCCA. Our Board of Directors is made up of community leaders who give so unselfishly, expect nothing in return, and who are so inspiring. We all look forward to continuing to be magnanimous and industry-responsible for the protection of our citizens and community. All of us at YCCA know that our work extends far beyond the world of contracting. For us, the ultimate goal is to touch, enhance and try to protect the lives of all those who share our good fortune in calling Yavapai County “home.”

Sandy

Publisher

Cover

Design & Layout

Yavapai County Contractors Association

A local site-specific residential home in Yavapai County designed by Otwell Associates Architects. Otwell design aesthetic ranges from modern to southwest to craftsman, striving to celebrate the qualities of natural building materials. Otwell and team always incorporates passive solar strategies in their residence. Architecture is the application of art and science to provide solutions to everyday questions and the goal of Otwell Associates is to design high quality, long lasting structures that express the culture and nature of a location.

©2015 Yavapai County Contractors Association. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Every effort has been made to provide dependable data in an everchanging market. As a result, the publisher does not warrant the data herein is complete or accurate.

810 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 928-778-0040 Fax: 928-541-9882 ycca@cableone.net www.ycca.org 2

2015 Building Yavapai

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Sweet Designs, Stephanie Sweet 480-837-3688 Steph@SweetDesignsAZ.com


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YCCA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Chuck Merritt

Greg Barstad

BOARD PRESIDENT DeCarol Company

Granite Basin Roofing

Matt Greenlee Greenlee Designer Surfaces

Brian Bombardieri John Heisley

B’s Contractors

Fann Contracting

Dave Barrett

Mike Enders

Bob Kozak

VICE PRESIDENT Barrett Propane

Benttree Custom Homes

Robert C. Kozak PLLC

Ken Coleman Ashland Enterprises

Chris Welborn SECRETARY/TREASURER Vicente Landscaping

Tom Haley Haley Construction

Ty Scott Wyatt Orr

Builders Wholesale

Earth Resources Corporation

Ty Smith Yavapai Block

The mission of the Yavapai County Contractors Association is to properly manage a construction industry association that transfers and promotes education, safety, political action, services and networking for the benefit of its members, the citizens and the communities of Yavapai County. YCCA Board members continue to lay the groundwork and configuration for a clearly defined mission that not only addresses challenges faced by the licensed and bonded contractor, but also encourages and aggressively provides consumer protections within the same framework. As Yavapai County grows, so does the importance of Yavapai County Contractors Association, proudly serving the communities of Yavapai County for more than 55 years. “We take our responsibility very seriously and our Building Yavapai magazine is just one tool that we use to Sandy Griffis strengthen and build relationship between government, contractors, suppliers, the consumer and our community. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR We hope that you are inspired by our magazine, articles and enterprising advertisers. Thank you all for invariably overloading our phone lines and e-mails with your friendship, thank-you calls and warm and tender sentiments for the help that you received by calling YCCA.” Happy reading and enjoy the articles and tips within Building Yavapai, and we encourage you to do business with our members.

Remember, Don’t Start Without Us! Use Licensed, Local, Bonded and Insured Contractors 4

2015 Building Yavapai

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Building

YAVAPAI

Yavapai County Contractors Association • 2015

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BOOTS & BURGERS An Arizona Handbook for Hungry Hikers

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OLD WEST SPIRIT Injects Energy into Today’s Downtown

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33 2015 Building Yavapai

www.ycca.org

LIVE A HEALTHY LIFE Quad-city area benefits from top-quality medical facilities

GET TO KNOW Yavapai Regional Medical Center


FEATURES 12 Prescott Dining 18 Mile High Trail System 39 Past, Present and Future – Log Cabin Homes

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50 52 56 58 48

62 64 65 66 61

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72 70

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What? My Home Doesn’t Have a Permit for That? Get it in Writing Amazing Adobe Home Staging Kitchen Design Trends Fire Alarms and Smoke Detectors Saving Lives through CPR Frame It ... Enhance It Beautiful Tile Spills and Spotting Tips Ask Your Contractor: Building Costs Ask Your Contractor: Unused Vents Universal Design Makes Homes Safer Flooring Hardwood – What, Where, How? Hardwood Floors: Basic Care Scrubbed to Satisfaction – Choosing a Dishwasher Home Faucets Always on Alert – Home Security Homeowners Insurance

MEET YOUR YCCA TEAM

90 92 94 96 88

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Reverse Mortgage Moving 101 Feng Shui Harvesting Rainwater Rock Stars – Boulders in Landscaping Choosing the Perfect Toilet

Gutters and Foundations 102 Know Your Local Fire 100

2 Message from Sandy Griffis YCCA Executive Director

4 YCCA Board of Directors 8 Meet the Writers 11 Contract Requirements 130  2015 YCCA Membership Index

132  2015 YCCA Membership Directory

Sprinkler Codes Before Building Begins

Trash Talk – Recycling 106 Septic Systems 108 Wallpaper is Back 110 Ask Your Contractor: 104

Energy Efficiency

When Going ‘Green’ 114 Fresh Air 116 Plants and Our Wildlife 118 Energy Audit 120 Better Sleep 122 What is Paving & Grading 123 The “Garage Room” 124 Garden Art 126 Bird House 112

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Do’s and Don’ts

Termites 152 Perfect Lawn Without 128

all the Labor

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MEET THE WRITERS Matt Ackerman Matthew B. Ackerman, LEED-AP AIA is the founding partner at Catalyst Architecture – a full-service, award-winning sustainable design firm located in downtown Prescott. Matt was awarded the US Green Building Council’s LEED professional accreditation in the spring of 2003, making Matt the first LEED accredited architect in Yavapai County. Matt is a co-contributor of the Daily Courier’s Eco_Logic Blog – Your Common Sen$e Guide to Going Green. Sandy Griffis Sandy has been living in Prescott for 17 years and loving every minute of those 6,205 days and nights. As Executive Director of Yavapai County Contractors Association, she feels privileged to have the best job ever! Sandy has a BA in Journalism and an MBA in Business from San Diego State. She loves golf, enjoys hiking, is an able violinist and seriously embraces, hugs and takes on life with a smile.

Bob Kozak Bob Kozak is a Prescott attorney who has been in practice for 30+ years. He is also a professional mediator and arbitrator. He sits on the Boy Scouts of America Grand Canyon Council Executive Board and has two Eagle Scout sons. In his spare time, he is an active backpacker, scuba diver and triathlete. Sue Marceau Sue Marceau is a writer, editor and marketing professional who enjoys infusing raw concepts with optimal word pictures to engage the hearts and minds of readers.

Christine James Christine James is a recovering Angeleno whose work has appeared in The Hollywood Reporter and Entertainment Weekly. Her career as a writer, editor and graphic designer spans years in the double digits, though she declines to specify which digits those might be.

YCCA your local go-to contractor organization for referrals, questions, and assistance. Call us anytime (928) 778-0040. We are your tool-box of information. Read our “Ask The Contractor” column every Friday front page of the Real Estate Section in the Daily Courier or online www.dcourier.com. Send us your questions and we will answer them in our column. Visit ycca.org under Ask The Contractor tab and read the most frequently ask questions/answers.

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2015 Building Yavapai

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Haley Construction is a 60 year old, family owned and operated General Contractor serving Prescott, AZ and the surrounding Quad-city area in Northern Arizona.

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CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS In Arizona, all construction contracts greater than $1,000 must contain at a minimum:

WHEN HIRING A CONTRACTOR:

❏ The name and business address of the contractor. ❏ The contractor’s license number. ❏ The name and mailing address of the owner.

 ake sure your M contractor is licensed.

❏ The jobsite address or legal description. ❏ The date the owner and contractor signed the construction contract. ❏ Estimated completion date of the work. ❏ A description of the work to be performed. ❏ Total dollar amount to be paid to the contractor for all the work, including all taxes. ❏ The dollar amount of any advance deposit paid or scheduled to be paid to the contractor by the owner. ❏ The dollar amount and stage of construction for any progress payments to be made to the contractor. ❏ Specific information, prominently displayed, explaining how to file a written complaint with the Registrar of Contractors. ❏ Prompt Pay details for owner, occupants.

Ask for references. P lan your project carefully and make detailed plans if necessary. G et at least three detailed bids. A sk what problems may come up during the project. Get a written contract.

Call Yavapai County Contractors Association First! An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a

Pound of Cure Call YCCA Before You Step on the Scale! Yavapai County Contractors Association

928.778.0040 Remember... “Don't start without us!”

 ake sure you M understand the terms of the contract before signing. B e cautious about advancing monies for work not yet completed. P ut all changes into writing. Make frequent inspections.

www.ycca.org

ycca@cableone.net

www.ycca.org

2015 Building Yavapai

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Prescott Let Us Bring Your Favorite Restaurant to You! Bon Appetit Dine In Delivery

By Christine James What makes Prescott such a popular destination? Most likely, it’s because Everybody’s Hometown has something for every taste. And that’s literally the case for Prescott’s dining scene.

We Deliver

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Call us at 928.227.2044 | Delivery starting at $4.99 Prices subject to change without notice. 18% Gratuity will be added to all orders.

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Local restaurant options appeal to every palate

PIE

Come by to pick out your freshly baked pie, or place your custom order. Check out our bakery and enjoy our coffee, soups, and cheesecakes. Open Mon – Sat: 8:00 - 5:00 pm 802 Valley St • Prescott, Arizona 928-778-1223 • RusticPieCompany.com

Y’ALL COME HUNGRY

Visitors interested in the authentic cowboy town experience are sure to seek out a good old-fashioned steak-andpotato meal. First stop: the Palace Restaurant and Saloon, which has been around since Prescott’s beginnings. The Palace – named one of the 10 Most Historic Bars in America by USA Today – was built in 1877, though “it burned down a couple of times,” notes owner Dave Michelson. The Great Fire of 1900 devastated downtown’s Whiskey Row, but fortunately, the Palace’s ornately carved bar was rescued. “They knew they couldn’t save the building, so they wanted to get the bar out, because they realized what a great bar it was,” Michelson recounts. “Or maybe they just wanted to keep drinking; I don’t know what their reason for doing it was,” he adds with a laugh. “But we’re certainly glad they did.” The Palace was beverage-only until Michelson brought food service to the establishment in 1996 as part of a major renovation. “We worked really hard to keep it as it was back in the day,” says Michelson, who also improved upon the ambiance by adding numerous local historical photos and antiques. “Even before customers sit down and dine, their jaws drop just looking at the interior.” To maintain the Old West feel, the Palace presents some of its steakhouse-and-seafood offerings on wood planks and in ice pails. The Lone Spur Café, which serves breakfast and lunch, also plays to Prescott’s history, offering “great cowboy décor, cowboy/cowgirl service, and breakfast items with a cowboy twist,” says general manager Travis Brown, citing Filet Mignon Benedict covered in hollandaise sauce as an example. Brown adds that Lone Spur regulars come for

(928) 445-8202 www.TheLoneSpur.com 106 W Gurley St. • Prescott, AZ Daily 6:30-2:30 • Friday 6:30-2:30 & 4:00-8:00

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Dining the French toast; cinnamon raisin bread covered in cornflakes and powdered sugar; and charbroiled pork chops with eggs and hash browns. The Western theme will always thrive in Prescott. However, as the city has grown, so too have its dining options. Almost every category imaginable is represented: Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Thai, East Indian, Mexican, German, Southwestern, and classic American among them. There’s haute cuisine and mom-and-pop sandwich shops. There are popular chains and one-of-a-kind cafes. Breweries and wine bars. Seafood and barbecue. Healthful and decadent. El Gato Azul is an example of the eclectic options available here. Billed as “Prescott’s Quirky, Cozy, Friendly Place to Meet,” El Gato has a diverse menu that offers more than 60 different tapas, salads, sandwiches, and Southwest and Mediterranean specialties. “El Gato’s intimate dining room and creekside patio offer a variety of dining (settings), whether for a romantic ­special occasion, or meeting coworkers for happy hour,” says owner Barry Barbe. “Live music with a mix of jazz, blues, and originals adds to the experience.” Barbe observes that what’s popular in Prescott dining is “constantly evolving,” but says “it’s hard to stray from your favorites once you’ve found them.

~

“There are several places that are known for their signature dishes: Rosa’s for the Sicilian pizza, Biga for cocktails and lunches, Prescott Brewing Company for great beer and burgers, Esoji for the Las Vegas Roll, Soli for great Street Tacos and casual fare, Iron Springs for gumbo, N ­ astee Dogs (hotdogs), and then you have historic places like The Palace and Murphy’s.” The fact that Barbe doesn’t hesitate to name the restaurants that top his list despite the fact that they’re competitors is an example of the unity that can be found in the dining community here. “There’s a great variety of restaurants from casual to upscale with vast menus,” agrees Brown. “Anyone can find something they like at more than one great place.”

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Boots & Burgers:

An Arizona Handbook for Hungry Hikers By Roger Naylor Roger Naylor is a Southwest travel writer and humorist. He is a regular contributor to the Arizona Republic. His work has appeared in USA Today, Arizona Highways, Western Art & Architecture, Go Escape, Route 66 Magazine and many more. He is a senior writer for The Bob and Tom Show, a nationally syndicated radio program. Besides Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook for Hungry Hikers, he is the author of books, Arizona Kicks on Route 66 and Death Valley: Hottest Place on Earth. For more information, visit www.rogernaylor.com. Let me introduce you to my latest book. Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook for Hungry Hikers is my dream book, one I’ve had in my head for years. It’s actually a love letter to Arizona, disguised as a hiking and dining guide. Here’s the idea: Spend a morning hiking miles on a beautiful trail, enjoy some solitude, see some wildlife, and afterwards grab a juicy burger. That’s my favorite day of all. Beyond trail descriptions and restaurant info, I provide suggestions for local attractions and activities. I add historic tidbits, fast facts, rambling thoughts and big dollops of quirkiness. When you spend as much time on the trail as I do, lots of weird notions ricochet through the old noggin. Most of all it’s packed with great days, amazing days, my best days. Peel off some for yourself. Lace up the boots and explore the scenic wonders of Arizona’s epic landscape. Then unwind in a comfortable hideout, where burgers leap off the grill like trout from a stream. Want fries with that?

“You can find your way across this country using burger joints the way a navigator uses stars.” – Charles Kuralt Here’s a snippet of Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook for Hungry Hikers to get you started. Excerpted from Boots & Burgers: An Arizona Handbook for Hungry Hikers by Roger Naylor

Thumper Loop, Cottonwood While it may not be as dazzling as trails at Grand Canyon or even nearby Sedona, this is my home field. Located just minutes from my house, I have logged more miles on the dirt paths in Dead Horse Ranch State Park than anywhere else in Arizona. Perched on the Verde River and sheltering a rare cottonwood and willow riparian forest, Dead Horse is a crown jewel in the Arizona state park system. The Thumper Loop consists of three trails: Lower Raptor Hill, Thumper and Lime Kiln. And I hike one portion or another weekly. The trail is always there for me. It soothes me during hard times, celebrates my victories, gives me a quiet place to think, entertains me, inspires me, keeps me healthy and most of all, vanishes me. That’s the magic of a trail.

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2015 Building Yavapai

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Mountain bikers tackle the loop clockwise from the Lower Raptor trailhead. I prefer to start at Lime Kiln with parking at the lagoons, which bustle with activity. Ducks drift across the water, redwing blackbirds chatter in the cattails and gangly great blue herons stand on the shore, all legs and curious necks, preening like it’s prom night. From November through March, the lagoons are stocked with trout, luring bald eagles that winter on the Verde River. The trail traces a limestone ridge past the remains of an old kiln. After a short, steep climb known as the Stairs, the route levels off and slices through hills, dotted with junipers, pines and bowed crucifixion thorns. Big sky and sweet views all the way. After a couple of miles, hang a left onto Thumper. This is a lovely segment, rambling across rolling plateaus, dipping in and out shallow canyons. After 2.25 miles on Thumper, turn left on Raptor Hill. You begin a gradual descent dropping via terraced ridges. Along the way you’re treated to sprawling views of Cottonwood, Clarkdale, Jerome and the ruins of Tuzigoot National Monument, a prehistoric pueblo site perched dramatically above a bend in the Verde River. The trail ends at a campground and a series of pathways leads back to the lagoons where your vehicle is parked. The loop is 7.2 miles but you’ll total about 8 by the time you reach your ride. Fast Fact: In the late 1940s the Ireys family looked at ranches in Cottonwood, including one with the bleached bones of a


deceased equine. When the father asked which property they liked, the kids said “the one with the dead horse.” They christened their new home Dead Horse Ranch and in 1973 when it was sold to Arizona State Parks, the Ireys made retaining the name a condition of the sale. Where: From Cottonwood, drive northwest on Main Street following the signs to Dead Horse Ranch State Park. Length: 8 miles • Difficulty: Moderate Admission: $7 per vehicle Details: 928-634-5283 www.azstateparks.com

Verde Lea Market Deli & Grill, Cottonwood I love grocery store burgers. Maybe it’s a southern thing but it seemed like every little country market I visited in Kentucky and Tennessee had hamburgers sizzling behind the deli counter. These rural outposts had to supply many needs and those hand-formed burgers still haunt my dreams. Verde Lea Market, a neighborhood grocery,

Out of Africa Wildlife Park Nestled in the high desert of Camp Verde, just minutes from Cottonwood, Out of Africa provides a comfortable sanctuary for 400 exotic animals, and features dozens of large predators. The preserve is spread across 104 acres of rolling terrain in the Black Hills, a setting that bears a striking resemblance to many regions of Africa. The sprawling, natural habitats eliminate much of the stress-induced behavior noticeable in animals held in captivity. The boredom of more traditional zoos seems nonexistent here.

maintains that tradition and feeds work crews from all over the Verde Valley. The burgers are grilled masterpieces of fresh ground chuck. Buns are baked daily. The Frisco comes laden with cheddar and green chili on a sourdough bun. The Crown, topped with tangy pastrami, snaps your head back at first bite. But by far the most popular item is not a burger but the burly sandwich known as the torta. Owner Bill Murray credits his torta with keeping the business afloat during the first lean years. It starts with telera bread Verde Lea Market Deli & Grill – Photo by Rick Mortensen for a hint of sweetness, followed by a thin layer of beans a heaping portion of carne asada, grilled onions, lettuce, tomato and a fistful of jalapenos to create a savory jaw-unhinging sandwich that customers call addictive. Details: 516 N. Main St., 928-634-8731, www.verdelea.com.

Wildlife Aplenty I’ve seen wildlife aplenty during my years of hiking. One of my favorite sightings was during a morning hike on Lower Raptor. Suddenly a jackrabbit exploded over the top of a small hill running flat out with a coyote hot on his heels. The jack sprinted right towards me – either by design or happy accident – then zoomed past as I stood motionless. Suddenly, the coyote spotted me and swerved away at the last second. To put it in basketball parlance, I set a pick for a jackrabbit. If it had been a roadrunner being chased by a coyote – especially a coyote wearing a rocket-powered roller skates from the Acme Corporation – it would have been the greatest day of my life.

Remodels •

Custom Homes • Steel Buildings

Tiger Splash is the signature show of Out of Africa. There is no training and no tricks. The daily show is all spontaneous, just animals frolicking with their caretakers. Fierce tigers engage in the sort of activities every housecat owner will recognize. It’s just the grand scale that makes it so impressive. 928-567-2840, www.outofafricapark.com.

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2015 Building Yavapai

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The Beauty, Heart

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“How glorious a greeting the sun gives the mountains!” – John Muir

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Soul of Yavapai County “Every mountain top is within reach if you just keep climbing” – Barry Finlay

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“You’ve only got three choices in life ... Give up, Give in, or Give it all you’ve got”

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Mile High Trail System By Sue Marceau Absorbing natural habitat along 70 miles of public pathways in the City of Prescott’s Mile High Trail System (MHTS), musings of locals among nearly 2,000 daily users might veer toward how they could be lucky enough to experience this splendor in their municipal backyard. The trail for thiswhodunit quickly leads to community pride and involvement. Working together, lawmakers, volunteers and staff from civic, private and public sectors have sculpted access to an awe-inspiring playground linking people and pets with nature. Thanks to preservation choices by voters, advocacy by city leadership, management by parks and recreation staff, and the dedication of more than 100 citizen volunteers, the community’s trail system has become a dividend for tourism, economic development, wildlife protection, watershed preservation and quality of life. Basking in the high desert sun 5,100 to 6,800 feet above sea level, the city’s trails wind through nearly every terrain – dappled with flora and dotted with fauna – from valley floors to rocky heights to sun-kissed waters.

Connecting Natural Parkland Most of Prescott’s trail system exists within its 2,200 acres of natural parkland, linked through easements and license agreements with another 800 miles of national forest trails, according to Chris Hosking, trails and natural parklands coordinator.

ing downtown Prescott, along Granite and Miller creeks). Geographically, the MHTS extends as far north as 89A and Granite Dells Parkway, south to Goldwater Lake, west to Enchanted Canyon and Sierry Peaks subdivisions, and east to the new Sundog Trail.

The MHTS includes the Prescott Circle Trail System, Rails-to-Trails projects along the former Santa Fe Railroad, and the ­Greenways Trail System (urban passageways serv-

“The trails are getting more and more popular every year,” Hosking said of the system that began in 1998, and “gets busier and busier,” even with ongoing expansion. Joe Baynes, recreation services director, explained that trail counting devices on 48 miles of Prescott trails in 2014 logged about 567,000 users, averaging more than 1,500 a day. An additional 500 users a month are estimated for the remaining (non-counted) trails, establishing overall annual usage at 700,000 visits, or nearly 2,000 daily. Beyond area residents, the tallies include state, national and international visitors.

Every Monday morning for three hours, 25 to 35 Over the Hill Gang volunteers “come out to help build and maintain” the trails, Hosking said.

The flagship Peavine Trail garnered its highest monthly visitor count in January 2015, Hosking said, increasing from 28,000 visits a year nearly nine years ago to 60,000 this year. That rise coincides with his management of trails design, construction and maintenance. 18

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Users include individuals who like urban trails in the downtown area for commutes to work, school, college or shopping, Hosking said, along with dog walkers, exercisers, bird watchers and anyone who just enjoys being outdoors. “A lot of people don’t want to be on the road, so they use the trails instead,” he added. “They also go walk the trails after work,” often starting with their own subdivisions. “We find that developers and new developments use the trail system to help sell and to market their homes,” Baynes said. “There are trail systems within the subdivisions that link to other trails … It’s an amenity to the development. The proximity to trails adds value to homes.”

Vision and Volunteers With an annual budget for only a coordinator and $7,500 in materials – and a separate allocation to purchase land and obtain easements – open space management in Prescott funnels down to vision and volunteers. “Chris leads a large contingent of volunteers, most notably the Over the Hill Gang,” Baynes acknowledged, along with

labor from juvenile probation and community restitution programs. Eagle Scouts, local businesses, construction trades and the Yavapai County Contractors Association lend support in various ways, while schools and land developers enable access. “It’s amazing how much gets done,” Hosking said. “It’s really the volunteers that make it happen. For me, contracting out (what they do) would be impossible (due to cost). We really rely on the volunteers. They just want to come out and be together and have some physical activity, and building trails fits it all. They want to give back.” Every Monday morning for three hours, 25 to 35 Over the Hill Gang volunteers “come out to help build and maintain” the trails, Hosking said. Another group of 15 to 20 show up each Friday. If it rains, the groups frequent local restaurants for breakfast. Those Over the Hill Gang efforts on the trails now total more than 5,000 hours a year from a pool of about 100 volunteers. George Sheats, volunteer coordinator for the Over the Hill Gang’s activities with

the city, also oversees a juvenile probation crew picking up trash and running wheelbarrows on weekends. Starting with Prescott Lakes trail construction in 2008, Sheats now presides as president for both the Yavapai Trails Association and the Open Space Alliance, and serves as a Planning and Zoning commissioner. From those roles, Sheats has a very good idea what’s needed on the trails and how to get it done, as do the many other volunteers who have retired from city service, contracting, construction, engineering and other trades.

‘No Rules’ Philosophy “The reason they are so successful is that they have no rules,” Baynes confides; “ex­cept that they have to listen to me,” Hosking quickly quips; and Sheats later affirms. “Chris Hosking is very flexible in not trying to micromanage anybody working out there,” Sheats said. “They are a self-­ motivated and self-instructed group … These are individuals who like to work on trails and see something accomplished at the end of the day.”

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Mile High Trail System – continued On a typical morning in the field, ­Hosking explains the day’s goals from “Point A to Point B” and the group of men and women dig in, Sheats said. The volunteers take on whatever tasks appeal to them and for which they have the qualifications. Needs range from whacking weeds and moving boulders to more complex projects, such as putting up guard rails, building retaining walls and making steps. There’s something for everyone in a day’s work on the trails. About one-tenth to three-tenths of a mile of trail is completed each week with the help of an anonymously donated miniexcavator and the Over the Hill Gang. While the mini-excavator tackles the more backbreaking jobs, the volunteers shape and cut back the slope. The way in which the trails are designed and constructed ensure their appeal and longevity, Baynes and Hosking agreed. Every trail is constructed for the type of usage it is going to receive, with optimal design, grade, drainage and aesthetics.

“When sculpting a trail into a hillside,” Hosking reflected. “I think about how to drain it, how it will be used and how to make it fun … how it flows and transitions from one turn to another … You don’t want the whole trail to be at the same pitch … Mountain bikers or hikers are not used to altitude. They need areas to catch their breath, get their heart rate down … You want people to enjoy the trail and not feel that they are trudging up a hill … Hikers want to see the views, the vantage points … I locate anchor points and try to link them together to create an experience out there. It’s not about the destination; it’s about the journey on the trail.”

Destination Venue Prescott’s Circle Trail System hosts its first sanctioned ultra-marathon this year and is becoming a recognized venue for mountain bikers. Completing the last six miles of the loop this year also has significant implications for tourism and residents’ quiet enjoyment. The city considers the completed Circle Trail a “destination” for day trips and multi-day backpacking ventures, Baynes said, noting that “there are not that many backpacking locations (where) hikers could change their minds” and enjoy city amenities only a few miles away. There’s also the “opportunity for outfitters to supply people and combinations to the Circle Trail,” he continued. “They could do three days and camp out, or be picked up and brought back to town, see Whiskey Row for the evening, replenish calories and go back out the next day.” To “truly explore” all that Prescott offers in its trails system, Baynes reckons, would have required getting out every week of the 31 years he has lived here, while Hosking said he tries to “do as many as I can. I don’t even get around to my whole quota every month. I have to go after work and for a bike ride to see my own trails.”

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Tips for Hiking Proper preparation for the trails could make all the difference between an enjoyable sunny morning with nature, or getting lost and/or inviting other personal discomfort, experts say. Chris Hosking, trails and natural parklands coordinator for the City of Prescott, provides tips for a hike: 1. Get a map online or download the smart phone app at www.prescotttrails.com 2. Wear sturdy shoes 3. Bring a hat for shade 4. Carry plenty of water 5. Adapt to the seasons with protective clothing and reasonable goals 6. Walk or hike with another person. If you do set out alone, let someone know where you are going. Paper maps and guides also are available, according to George Sheats, volunteer coordinator for the Over The Hill Gang. Free copies the Recreation Map are available at various city locations, including the parks and recreation department, trailheads and city hall. Produced by the city and various trail groups, with printing funded by advertising sponsors, the map also is sold at the Prescott Chamber of Commerce and bike shops for a $1 handling fee. A more comprehensive Circle Trail Guide has been authored and produced by Nigel Reynolds, vice president of the Yavapai Trails Association. It can be purchased for $10 from the trails association, recreation shops and the Prescott Chamber of Commerce.

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Old West Spirit

Old West Spirit

By Sue Marceau

Injects Energy into Today’s Downtown

PRESCOTT – The Old West essence of Arizona is nowhere more vibrant than in our very own downtown Prescott. Historic markers identify the buildings and sites where legends lived and history was made. Days of old come alive with the power of imagination. For anyone who favors show-and-tell, downtown offers tours, reenactments and costumed ambassadors to more vividly chronicle the past. The Courthouse Plaza and Whiskey Row evoke memories of western episodes playing out over the decades. Picture cowboys com-

ing off the range into town with hard-earned wages slapped down at the Row’s many a watering hole. Victorian ladies shopping for staples and fashions at the mercantile. Larger-than-life characters downing whiskey, placing faro card game bets, chowing down and maybe even shooting up the town. Rowdy and wild, rough and tumblin’, alive and kickin’ – the Prescott of yore races full throttle with today’s restaurants, art galleries and shops galore inside the facades of old. New boutiques and specialty shops replace most of the more than 40 saloons which at one time tempted the Old West’s heroes and villains. Continued on next page

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Old West Spirit The Palace Restaurant & Saloon, on the National Register of Historic Places, serves today’s patrons on the same bar that supplied Doc Holiday and Wyatt Earp, and wondrously, survived the Great Fire of 1900. The Jersey Lilly Saloon, located upstairs in the same historic building, boasts the only balcony overlooking the Courthouse Plaza. Seating is coveted during parades and other ­Whiskey Row events. When J.I. Gardner began constructing his mercantile at the corner of Cortez and Willis streets in 1890, he could have had no idea that his building ultimately would undergo a full restoration, land on the National Register of Historic Places and house Murphy’s Restaurant, one of Arizona’s premier dining destinations. Murphy’s maintains Gardner’s guarantee of first class goods by “Serving Prescott’s Finest” in turn-of-the-century ambiance in the downtown historic district. The Prescott Chamber of Commerce, lo­cated in the former jail at 117 W. Goodwin Street, draws both tourists and locals seeking information about what to see and do

in the downtown area on any given weekend, summer evening, Fourth of July extravaganza or celebration of Arizona’s Christmas City. And did we mention the ghosts of everything past? Check out two favorite haunts – the Hotel Vendome and the Hassayampa Inn – for details about the apparitions described by individuals who witnessed them. Today’s downtown area extends for several blocks around the Courthouse Plaza with restaurants, stores, tourist attractions and entertainment. Tight parking on downtown streets doesn’t stop most folks from enjoying commerce and modern conveniences against a backdrop of historic significance. A parking garage has replaced hitching posts to accommodate newer modes of transportation, so there’s no lack of covered parking a short block from the Courthouse Plaza.

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Old West Spirit Downtown Prescott offers virtually anything a shopper, diner or tourist would seek: ›› Shopping, boutique and dining clusters, including Bashford Courts, the Old Firehouse Plaza and St. Michael’s Alley ›› Food establishments, including the mercantile-themed Murphy’s Restaurant, cooking up old favorites and new genres ›› Lodging steeped in history at the Hassayampa Inn, Hotel St. Michael, Hotel Vendome, The Grand Highland Hotel and bed and breakfast inns ›› Art galleries displaying local, regional and national talent ›› Whiskey Row favorites, including the Jersey Lilly Saloon, Matt’s Saloon and the Palace Restaurant & Saloon ›› Antique shops too numerous to mention ›› Live Theatre: the Elks Opera House and the Prescott Center for the Arts ›› Music and entertainment (often suitable for families) day or night on the Courthouse Plaza and downtown streets The spirit of the Old West thrives among merchants proud of their community’s rich history, historic preservation and downtown commercial district.

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Live a Healthy Life

Live a Healthy Life

By Christine James

Quad-city area benefits from top-quality medical facilities

“To your good health and happiness” is the ultimate benevolent blessing. Unlike the darkly wry “May you live in interesting times,” said to be a translation of a Chinese curse, a wish for one’s physical and emotional well-being holds only the most positive intentions.

to feed their kids properly and offers breastfeeding support, and Health Start, a free-of-charge home-based support system (to give parents information about) pregnancy, nutrition and child development.”

Happiness without health is difficult to achieve. A debilitating condition or chronic pain can be all-consuming, and the hindrances may trigger a domino effect of tribulations in every aspect of life. The way to regain control in that situation is to proactively pursue the best course of treatment. Yavapai County residents are fortunate to have top-quality medical facilities equipped with the latest technology and staffed by experts in most every aspect of health.

Other YCCHS programs include chronic disease self-­management; HIV prevention and control; Smoke-Free Arizona; Healthy Lifestyles; and injury prevention and nutrition education. YCCHS also provides back-to-school shots and travel immunizations.

Yavapai Regional Medical Center, with campuses in Prescott and Prescott Valley, boasts “hundreds of physicians in multiple specialties,” according to yrmc.org. “What started as a simple community hospital … is today a state-of-the-art healthcare system with two acute care hospitals, a network of primary and specialty care clinics, outpatient health and wellness centers, cardiac diagnostic centers, and outpatient medical imaging centers.” YRMC provides medical and wellness care to Prescott, Prescott Valley, Chino Valley, Dewey, Humboldt, Mayer, Paulden, Bagdad, Yarnell, Kirkland, Skull Valley and Crown King. Another valuable local resource is Yavapai County Community Health Services, whose mission, says Community Relations Specialist and Public Information Officer David McAtee, is to “provide leadership, information and services that contribute to improving the health and well-being of Yavapai County residents. We do that through several different programs. Through our community health center, we offer medical, dental, some pre-natal services, reproductive health services, and a well-woman health check. We also have care coordination, with people who will follow up with (a patient) to make sure they’re getting their medication, eating the right foods, getting the right exercise.

Continued on next page

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“(YCCHS is) unique in that we are a public health department as well as a community health center,” McAtee explains. “Our public health side includes many different programs, including WIC – Women, Infants and Children – which teaches new parents how

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Live a Healthy Life Additionally, YCCHS disseminates information about food recalls, outbreak alerts, and other urgent health notifications. Mental health is also a top priority in Yavapai County, and the West Yavapai Guidance Clinic aims to make treatment available to all who need it. “West Yavapai Guidance Clinic is a 501c3 nonprofit provider of mental health, crisis and substance abuse services, with treatment sites based in Prescott, Chino Valley and Prescott Valley,” says Director of Development and Communication Laura Norman. “WYGC has been providing behavioral health services since 1966 and serves people of all ages through programs such as outpatient individual and group counseling; outpatient psychiatric services; prevention

services for older adults; residential and outpatient substance abuse services; an inpatient psychiatric hospital; peer support services; 24-hour crisis intervention services; and much more.” The majority of WYGC clients have coverage through AHCCCS/ Medicaid; however, WYGC – which is licensed by the Arizona Department of Health Services – can accept other coverage and fund sources depending on the service, says Norman. Another important factor in ensuring local residents’ health is timely and effective crisis management. Emergency responders from police and fire agencies, hospitals and ambulance services work together to expedite patient treatment and transport. Out of more than 8,000 calls for assistance last year, the Prescott Fire Department answered 5,800 calls for medical aid, according to PFD Battalion Chief Cory Moser, who says the average response time is just under seven minutes. “The PFD guarantees a minimum of one paramedic on board each of its engines” as well as “a full complement of advanced medical gear,” says Moser. “All firefighters are qualified at a minimum of EMT (Emergency Medical Technician) – Basic. So, when you call for assistance, you do not have to wait for an ambulance to show up to receive medical aid.” For most emergencies, both an engine and an ambulance will respond, says Moser. “This is to ensure that the closest unit to you is sent, making sure you get care as fast as possible. Addi-

PRESCOTT NURSING AND REHABILITATION CENTER Prescott Nursing and Rehabilitation Center provides a comprehensive rehabilitation program with consistent, dedicated and reliable service. SKILLED SERVICES • Pain Management • Physical Therapy • Gastrostomy and N.G. Tube Feedings • Diabetes Management • Occupational Therapy • Pressure Ulcer Care • Wound Care • Speech Therapy • Oxygen Therapy • Respiratory Care • I.V. Therapy • Ostomy Care

Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapy • Skilled Nursing Behavioral Health Unit • Respite Care • Hospice Care • Long Term Care Assisted Living in Boulder Gardens 30

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864 Dougherty St Prescott, AZ 86305 Phone | 928-778-9667 www.prescottrehab.com


Live a Healthy Life tionally, for most medical emergencies, a minimum of five personnel on scene has been shown to be optimal – something that is most efficiently provided through a dual response.” Moser urges people not to hesitate to call 911 when needed. “Care given by our department is covered by your tax dollars. You will never receive a bill from the PFD for calling 911 for help,” he stresses. “This means that if you are unsure if your symptoms are severe or not, you can ask us to check you out and make the best decision for your health without fear of incurring a huge cost.” Yavapai County’s medical and emergency professionals’ numberone priority is the health and safety of local residents. Be sure to do your part with regular check-ups and proactive care. Good health is easier maintained than regained, and should never be taken for granted.

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BOULDER GARDENS ASSISTED LIVING CENTER RETIREMENT LIVING • Join friends on the patio for a tall glass of lemonade or to savor a soft breeze. • Enjoy dining three meals a day, prepared by a dietary staff who cater to your preferences and deliver nutritionally balanced meals. • Wake each morning to spectacular views of the Prescott Mountains.

• No need to worry about the doing the dishes or laundry, those are all included in your daily rate, as well as housekeeping services. CONTINIUM OF CARE • Whatever your care needs now or in the future we have you covered. • We are one of the few full-service retirement communities in Prescott that offers

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BUILDING BRIGHTER FUTURES YOUTH DEVELOPMENT Preschool  Day Camps Youth Sports Gymnastics After School Care Dance  Cheer Swim Lessons

HEALTHY LIVING Group Fitness Classes Cardio  Weight Room Silver Sneakers Personal Training Martial Arts

SOCIAL RESPONSIBILTY Community Garden Scholarships Available Social Groups Outreach Events

PRESCOTT YMCA

750 Whipple Street www.prescottymca.org 928-445-7221

The Prescott YMCA hosts a 4 building, non-profit facility, offering programs in three areas of focus: youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. With over 75,000 square feet of fitness space, 10,000 pounds of free weights, two heated indoor pools and 95 hours of classes each week, we have something for everyone, at every stage of life. The Prescott YMCA does not turn away those in need. Scholarships are available and supported through our Annual Campaign.


Get to Know

Get to Know

Yavapai Regional Medical Center

Western Yavapai County residents have an excellent healthcare partner with Yavapai Regional Medical Center (YRMC). Whether

you’re new to our communities or a long-time resident, this is a good time to get to know YRMC.

YRMC East in Prescott Valley

YRMC West in Prescott

YRMC: Frequently Asked Questions What kind of healthcare organization is Yavapai Regional Medical Center (YRMC)? We’re a private, not-for-profit, integrated healthcare provider that offers diverse healthcare services to our growing region. YRMC is proud to be both your healthcare provider and the largest employer in Yavapai County.

How many people comprise the YRMC team? Our team includes 227 physicians, 1,715 dedicated employees and 730 compassionate volunteers.

What kinds of healthcare services does YRMC provide? With two acute care hospitals, a robust network of primary and specialty care clinics, and a comprehensive array of outpatient services, YRMC supports the healthcare needs of our growing region. Look for more information about our services in Building Yavapai or visit www.yrmc.org.

Where is YRMC located? Here are just a few places you’ll find YRMC throughout our communities: ›› Providing health information at local health fairs. ›› Caring for children in schools through the Partners for Healthy Students program. ›› Delivering healthcare services at 14 YRMC PhysicianCare primary and specialty clinics. ›› Serving patients at one of our two acute care hospitals. YRMC West 1003 Willow Creek Road • Prescott, Arizona 86301 (928) 445-2700 YRMC East 7700 East Florentine Road • Prescott Valley, Arizona 86314 (928) 445-2700 www.ycca.org

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Get to Know You and YRMC: Partners for Healthy Living The phrase – the best of both worlds – is often linked to living in western Yavapai County.

An integrated healthcare system, YRMC features:

“There are few areas that combine small-town friendliness and charm with urban advantages, like advanced, high-level medical services,” said John Amos, President and CEO, Yavapai Regional Medical Center. “We’re fortunate to enjoy all of this in western Yavapai County and Yavapai Regional Medical Center is honored to serve as our communities’ healthcare provider.”

›› Acute Care Hospitals – YRMC West in Prescott and YRMC East in Prescott Valley serve residents throughout western Yavapai County. ›› Primary and Specialty Clinics – YRMC PhysicianCare clinics provide Primary Care, Pediatrics, Cardiology, Gastroenterology, Palliative Care, Neurosurgical Medicine, Neurology, Physiatry, Breast Surgery, General Surgery, Endocrinology and Industrial Medicine. ›› Surgical Services – Top surgeons specialize in Cardiothoracic Surgery, Neurosurgery, Orthopaedic Surgery, Breast Surgery and General Surgery.

YRMC cares for our communities with two acute care hospitals and 14 YRMC PhysicianCare primary and specialty clinics.

They Grow Quickly Help them Grow Healthy with Ponderosa Pediatrics

I

nfant, toddler, adolescent, teen–children grow up fast. Parents need doctors that understand children and their ever-changing healthcare needs. The outstanding team at Ponderosa Pediatrics provides high-quality service in a comfortable, friendly setting where children and parents can feel at ease. • Board-certified pediatricians • Certified pediatric nurse practitioners • Caring, child-focused team • Walk-in clinic for minor illnesses and injuries • Hours to accommodate working families

Baby on the way? Schedule a meet and greet with our team.

PONDEROSA PEDIATRICS 2120 Centerpointe West Drive Prescott, AZ 86301 • (928) 778-4581 www.ponderosapediatrics.com 34

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›› The James Family Heart Center – Personalized, comprehensive heart care that combines adult cardiothoracic surgery, interventional radiology, cardiac catheterization laboratories, angiography services, critical care ­services, patient education, cardiac rehabilitation, and peer-to-peer ­support through Mended Hearts. ›› The BreastCare Center – State-of-the-art diagnostic services, patient navigation, community education and Arizona’s only breast MRI designed specifically for breast imaging. ›› The Family Birthing Center – Family-centered delivery, comprehensive obstetrical services and a certified Continuing Care Level II Nursery for newborns needing a higher-level of care. ›› Emergency and Trauma Care – 24/7 emergency and level IV trauma care in Prescott and Prescott Valley. ›› Medical Imaging Services – Comprehensive imaging services at convenient locations throughout our communities. ›› Rehabilitative Services – Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy and a Lymphedema Management Program provide exceptional healing services. ›› Advanced Wound Care Center – Expert wound care services and two hyperbaric oxygen chambers.


Get to Know Your Source for Healthy Information Are you searching for health information online? Seeking a support group? Interested in recruiting a health expert for a community presentation? Yavapai Regional Medical Center (YRMC) is your local, reliable source for this information and more. “People in our communities recognize YRMC as their source for health information,” said Robbie Nicol, Executive Director, YRMC Community Outreach and Philanthropy. “We’re committed to ensuring our communities receive the most up-to-date health information.” YRMC’s programs, presentations, wellness classes and more are highlighted in YRMC’s monthly Health Connect calendar. Explore the complementary, downloadable calendar at YRMC’s website (www.YRMChealthconnect.org) and like us on Facebook, where you’ll find information on YRMC Health Connect events. Prefer an e-mail or mail? Contact YRMC Community Outreach at (928) 771-5738 to have the Health Connect calendar delivered to you each month.

Health and medical information that’s comprehensive and current is also available on YRMC’s website with the Healthcare Reference Library (www.yrmc­healthconnect.org). Free printed versions of the Healthwise ­Handbook and Healthwise for Life also are available by request at YRMC’s website or by calling YRMC Community Outreach at (928) 771-5738.

No matter how you receive Health Connect, you’ll find: ›› Health education and wellness classes that bring together healthcare experts with community members for classes on childbirth, diabetes management, knee replacement surgery, nutrition and more. ›› Support groups that provide ongoing help and information for those facing breast cancer, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Parkinson’s disease and other medical conditions. ›› Information on health-related topics from YRMC Speakers Bureau experts who present at community meetings. ›› Announcements about upcoming health fairs and other community events that include YRMC.

The Women’s Health Pavilion AT YAVAPAI REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

Just For You.

You’re busy . . . managing your world and juggling countless priorities. When it comes to healthcare, it’s good to know there’s a place just for you: The Women’s Health Pavilion at YRMC. Designed for the healthcare needs of women at every stage, the Women’s Health Pavilion features:

• The Family Birthing Center

– Comfortable, private delivery suites and the latest in patient-centered obstetrical care, including the Continuing Care Level II Nursery for newborns needing a higher level of care.

• The BreastCare Center

– State-of-the-art digital screening mammography, advanced diagnostics and care coordination tailored to your individual needs.

• Wellness and Education

– Classes that get you ready for baby and support you after delivery as well as a Community Resource Library focused on breast health.

The BreastCare Center at YRMC The Family Birthing Center at YRMC 7700 E. FLORENTINE RD., PRESCOTT VALLEY, AZ

(928) 445-2700 • www.yrmc.org www.ycca.org

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Get to Know

You Will The James Family Heart Center

Leading the Way to A New Kind of Healthcare Strong partnerships are the foundation of exceptional healthcare delivery. At Yavapai Regional Medical Center (YRMC), we work to build partnerships with providers, patients, our communities and more. That’s why YRMC is helping lead the formation of North Central Arizona Accountable Care (NCAAC). A Medicare Shared Savings Program Accountable Care Organization, NCAAC focuses on delivering healthcare that emphasizes wellness, prevents disease and manages chronic disease for Medicare beneficiaries (people 65 years and older). NCAAC also coordinates services to improve care and avoid duplication. NCAAC brings together the healing resources of two healthcare delivery systems – YRMC and Northern Arizona Healthcare – with a network of independent healthcare practitioners (physicians, physical therapists, dietitians and others).

World-class cardiac care is a heartbeat from home at the James Family Heart Center at YRMC West. Your personal care team includes world-class heart surgeons, cardiologists, clinical practitioners, nurses, therapists and technologists who combine their unique individual talents to get you back on your feet and doing what matters most to you.

Our Heart-Healing Environment Features: • Extensive Patient Education and Consultation • Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory and Angiography Department • Adult Cardiothoracic Surgery

“The launch of North Central Arizona Accountable Care is a tremendous opportunity for the YRMC family and for the communities we serve,” said John Amos, YRMC President and CEO. “NCAAC expands and strengthens partnerships with providers in our region who share our commitment to provide highly coordinated, community-based healthcare.” For more information about NCAAC, visit www.myhomeforhealth.org.

YRMC: Recognized for Excellence ›› 2014 HealthCare’s Most Wired Award*

• Interventional Radiology Services

›› Top 10 in the Nation for Safe Surgery

• Cardiopulmonary Services

›› 8-Time Consumer Choice Award Winner

• An Advanced Patient Blood Management Program

›› Internationally Recognized for Patient Blood Management

• Cardiac Rehabilitation and Preventive Medicine

›› Top 3 in Arizona for Orthopaedic Surgery ›› A Solucient Top 100 Hospital Nationally

*YRMC was one of only four hospitals in Arizona to earn this national recognition, which salutes hospitals that use information technology to improve clinical quality and patient safety.

YRMC West 1003 WILLOW CREEK ROAD PRESCOTT, ARIZONA 86301 (928)445-2700 • www.yrmc.org

1003 Willow Creek Road • Prescott, Arizona 86301 (928) 445-2700

YRMC East 7700 East Florentine Road • Prescott Valley, Arizona 86314 (928) 445-2700

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Discover Home. Discover Health. There’s lots to discover and decide when you move to a new community. One of the most important decisions you’ll make concerns your healthcare. In western Yavapai County, turn to Yavapai Regional Medical Center for comprehensive, compassionate healthcare. Nationally recognized healthcare services right in your community. That’s a welcome discovery.

• Two Full-Service, Acute Care Hospitals – YRMC West in Prescott and YRMC East in Prescott Valley • The James Family Heart Center MAIN SWITCHBOARD:

(928) 445-2700 www.yrmc.org

• The BreastCare Center • The Family Birthing Center • YRMC PhysicianCare – Primary and Specialty Care Clinics • Ponderosa Pediatrics


Prescott Country Club Live • Relax • Play

Come and Enjoy the Quiet Serenity of the Prescott Country Club, a community of 1600 homes, nestled in the cool pines of the Bradshaw Mountains of Central Arizona. Anchored by the 18 Hole Championship layout of the Prescott Golf and Country Club we enjoy year round Golf, Hiking, Biking, Tennis, Swimming, Family Dining, Outdoor Grilling or just a relaxing evening stroll with your favorite Best Friend.

monthly magazine Open 7 Days a week featuring Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 928 772-8812 www.RandallsTheRestaurant.com

Mailed monthly to all the residents of the Prescott Country Club Since 1994 For advertising rates or editorial 928 772-0849 www.PCCMagazine.com

PP R OT T TT R EE S SC CO GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

Open Daily for Public Play For Tee Times and Rates 928 772-8984 www.PrescottGolf.net

Prescott Country Club Property Owners Association 1133 N Old Chisholm Trail, Dewey, AZ 86327 • 928 772-6118 • www.pccpoa.com


Past, Present and Future Local builder crafts log cabin homes with modern-day amenities By Christine James Many people who move to Prescott are drawn by its Old West history and cowboy culture. Some residents take living in the past literally, with the help of a local contractor who specializes in log cabin houses. Robert Holden, owner of Southwest Framing & Handcrafted Homes, is pas­ sionate about the pioneer days. His niche as a homebuilder is combining the rugged 1800s frontier look with innovative touches and 21st-century conveniences. “I like the rustic and the stone and the log and the timbers. That’s my forté,” Holden says. Holden, a general contractor and framer in business here for more than 25 years, also builds homes with more standardized exteriors, but will add wood and stone elements inside to customers’ specifications. “I always try to do a lot of log accents, slab countertops, trick stuff,” he notes. “He’ll put logs to the ceiling throughout the home. Instead of a beam, you get a real tree,” says Robert’s wife, Perriann, who laughingly describes herself as the “brains” to her husband’s “brawn.” “The owners who are building their homes are heavily involved in their project. They’re the boss,” Perriann adds. “We’re here to make their dream come true.” Robert says his work is characterized by “a lot of handcrafted touches. Instead of going out and buying something, I go out in the woods to get what I need and make it cool. I’ve got a lot of good ideas, from books and magazines and TV.”

His homes are a mix of logs, beams, and j­utting stone – “something different instead of just drywall and siding.” The effect is magical: Crossing the threshold is like stepping into a 19th-century homestead or even a medieval storybook cottage. Unique touches include stone shelves protruding from cobbled rock walls; sturdy log archways; support beams with branch nubs that serve as hat and accessory hooks; and outhouse-motifed bathroom doors, complete with crescent moon cut-outs. (Behind the door are state-of-the art fixtures.) “His work is for the customer who wants something unique, different, one-of-akind,” explains Perriann. “You walk in, and it’s just the wow factor.” Robert uses reclaimed logs whenever possible, as well as cleared material from the lot on which he’s building. On a recent project, “all the trees I cut (from the lot), I used for posts inside the house. One cool thing I did was put half a log underneath the loft, and then I just continued the tree up to the roof.”

“He uses the rock and stone from the property. So it has more meaning,” says Perriann. “People like that. It’s more personal. They talk about it with guests.” Holden reflects that he’s had a lifelong interest in “the old days.” “I was born with it,” he declares. “Cowboys and Indians, since he was a little guy,” Perriann says with a smile. “I’m really Native American-obsessed. A lot,” Robert agrees. That fascination inspired him to use logs from the 2013 Doce fire and transform them into striking eight-foot totem poles, complete with wings and painted symbols, that draw a lot of attention from passersby. “I’ve had a zillion people stop and look at them,” Robert says. “Two of (the totem poles) are Apache, and one’s more plainsIndian, Sioux influence. I put a lot of work into them.” Between the totem poles and the log and stone home, it’s like finding yourself back in time. “Everybody who drives by here says how cool it looks. It’s one-of-a-kind, that’s for sure.” Between the totem poles and the log and stone home, it’s like finding yourself back in time.

www.ycca.org

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The Beauty, Heart

and

“The most wasted of all days is one without laughter.” – E.E. Cummings

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WHAT?!!

My Home Doesn’t Have A Permit For That? You have decided to remodel the shower and bathroom in the master bedroom of your recently purchased 12 year old home. You hire a licensed contractor as YCCA Director Sandy Griffis recommends. You work with the architect. You go through countless catalogs with the design experts to select cabinetry, countertops, plumbing fixtures, and lighting. A licensed contractor provides you with an estimate. And you have the money to do this dream job! The construction contract is signed. The contractor goes to the local building department to obtain a permit. Bummer! You find out that the old bathroom was previously remodeled without a building permit. Worse yet, you find out that the master bedroom was remodeled and enlarged without a building permit. And horror of horrors, you also learn your five-bedroom home is only permitted under the original – and only – building permit to have three bedrooms. Not very likely to happen, right? According to Jack Judd, Yavapai County Development Services Chief Building Official, problems like this come to his department on a daily basis. Such problems usually originated so many years ago that the homeowner at the time of the non-permitted “improvement” has long passed from the scene. The identity of the contractor or unlicensed person performing the work is not known. The applicable legal time periods to file a lawsuit expired many years ago. The building department is immune from such lawsuits. What do you do now? Can you even proceed with your dream plans? Yes. The current policy of the Yavapai County Development Services Building Department is generally to work with the current homeowner to try and solve the problem on a case-by-case basis. The department will generally begin by requiring the new homeowner to submit “as-built” plans to allow the department, the homeowner, 44

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and the contractor to determine the scope of the non-compliance. Sometimes the department may require that walls or ceilings be opened to permit inspection and determine whether potential life and safety issues exist because of the non-compliance. Life and safety issues may exist with construction involving noncompliance with structural, electrical, gas and plumbing. The department will then require the submission of detailed plans to address these non-compliance issues, particularly those involving the life and safety concerns. The department may assess an increased permit cost for the new construction. Interim and final code compliance inspections will occur throughout the new construction process to bring the structure into compliance. Although this policy is similar to other building departments, it is important to contact the applicable jurisdiction in which you live to determine the specific corrective action to be taken should you find out you have on permitted improvements in your existing structure. If there ever was a situation which cried out for application of the admonition “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” this is the situation. Before going through with the purchase of any home, certainly a home built or remodeled more than 20 years ago, Mr. Judd recommends going to the local building department to do the “due diligence” referred to in the standard real estate purchase contract. Local building inspector Randy West echoes Mr. Judd’s advice. With just the street address (ordinarily) the building department can provide you with the permit history of that home. The home’s file will reveal the scope of the original building permit issued, and the date and nature of permits issued later. At the present time Yavapai County, for example does not charge a fee to a homeowner or potential homeowner for this assistance (but be prepared to pay for copying charges). Armed with such permit information, or information that no permit was obtained, the homebuyer should negotiate a lower price with the seller for the costs which will be incurred to bring the home into compliance. Paying for a building inspector to go over the home does not include checking for permits, and is not a code compliance inspection. Sometimes a building inspector may include a comment in the inspection report that there are obvious signs of major improvements, for example room additions, which waves the red flag that it is time for the buyer to check out the building permit history at the building department.


In addition to checking out the building permit history, Mr. West suggests that buyers during negotiations carefully review the seller’s disclosure statement and ask specific, detailed questions about every improvement made to the home. John Erceg, owner of Beneficial Home Inspection elaborated on additional critical points that could come into play with un-permitted structures or portions of structures: ›› When an identified or proposed additional to an existing structure exceeds a certain percentage of the total new proposed square footage, the entire structure both new and existing portions may have to be brought up to current building code standards. ›› When the method of construction or potential structural concerns are observed to the addition a structural engineers analysis may be required in order to satisfy the municipality. ›› Waste disposal systems may have to be changed (ie tank size, setbacks, waste disposal field enlarged and type of system may have to be altered).

›› Properties with wells with have to contend with well setbacks that may be affected by new additions. In addition of a shared well is present restrictions on the size of the home (ie water use) may apply. ›› Property insurance and property taxes may increase due to the increased and now properly permitted and code approved square footage. “These are just a few critical examples of issues that could arise with unpermitted structures” said Erceg, a local home inspector for 6 years. “There is no relatively easy issue to correct with unpermitted work, compounding issues seems to be the case.” John said But, doesn’t homeowners insurance or title insurance cover construction problems when no permit was issued or inspections performed? No. Plain and simple. Brenda Martinez, Chief Title Officer and Vice ­President with Yavapai Title, advises homebuyers to consider purchasing an ALTA (Arizona Land Title Association) policy which might cover a few – but not all – problems relating to construction permits. Because ALTA policies have many excep-

Remember, nothing beats “an ounce of prevention.”

tions and exclusions, a conversation is recommended with the escrow/title officer about the details of this type of policy. Remember, nothing beats “an ounce of pre­vention.” Working with the building de­partment before purchase can reveal problems, and even provide you with knowledge to negotiate a lower sales price to include the cost of repairing the problems. If it is too late for that, contact a reputable, licensed contractor to work with the building department and help that dream remodel project come true.

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Get it in Writing!! Arizona law requires that all construction contracts for more than $1,000 between a homeowner and a contractor must be in writing. Granddad never used a written contract because “a man’s word was his bond.” Why are contracts required now? Because today’s business and legal environment are completely different than when your grandfather gave his word. Disputes arise in construction matters because of many reasons such as differing memories, misunderstandings, or lack of clarity. Disputes – and lawsuits – are unfortunately a fact of modern life. When disputes occur the Registrar of Contractors’ investigator, the trial judge, or the arbitrator is asked to determine the actual terms of a verbal agreement. They don’t automatically believe the homeowner. And they don’t automatically believe the contractor. It is very difficult to figure out who is the most honest and believable party in order to determine what was the parties’ actual agreement. Written construction contracts go a long way toward resolving disputes. The most important terms in a construction contract and the most common potential disagreements are addressed in an Arizona statute. This statute requires a contract be in writing and at a minimum include the following information:

›› Name of the contractor, business address, phone number and license number. ›› Name and address of the owner and the jobsite address. ›› Date the parties entered into the contract. ›› Estimated date of completion of all work to be performed under the contract. ›› Description of the work to be performed. ›› Total dollar amount, including all taxes, to be paid to the contractor by the owner. ›› The dollar amount of any advance deposit paid or to be paid, and the requirement that the contractor provide to the owner a receipt for any deposit paid. ›› A clear and detailed explanation of how payment will be made to the contractor.

›› Information on how to file a written complaint with the Arizona Registrar of Contractors. Construction projects require flexibility. Flexibility means changes, changes which will have to be made to the written contract. These changes are made by written “change orders.” Unfortunately, a large number of disputes arise out of such changes: unfortunate because change orders are so simple to create and thus avoid the dispute. A change order must be in writing, state the date the change was made, the dollar amount the change will increase or decrease the written contract amount, and the number of days that the change will expedite or delay the estimated date of completion. Most importantly, the change order must be signed by both the contractor and the owner. If it becomes necessary to make a complaint with the Arizona Registrar of Contractors, investigators now require the written construction contract, all written change orders, and copies of payment checks. Payment should always be by check made payable to the licensed company/contractor and never to an individual who is not the named contractor on the business invoice or letterhead. Avoid paying by cash, but if you must do so get signed and dated receipts from the contractor on a letterhead or invoice clearly displaying the contractor’s name. Be wary of any contractor who is unable or unwilling to provide you with a written contract: it’s the law. Be wary of any contractor who is unwilling to give you a written change order: it’s smart.

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LOVE WHAT YOU BUILD. Inspiring Ideas for Home Projects. ProBuild offers a complete solution for all of your building and re-modeling needs. With high quality lumber and a robust selection of building products, we can provide you with the best materials for your home. We recognize the importance of offering products that meet your high standards and lumber and building materials are what we know best. But ProBuild doesn’t stop there. We also offer a full line of windows and doors to put the final touches on a product you will be proud to put your name on. If you need it, we have it. Please call or come in today with all of your building needs.

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Amazing Adobe When it comes to alternative construction methods, little else is as authentic and time tested as adobe. Adobe structures can be found across the globe, and comprise some of the oldest remaining structures on the planet. Similarly here in the US, adobe construction is one of the oldest building techniques that is still in use today for contemporary structures. Essentially used as a block material, adobe was originally composed of nothing more than moistened dirt, formed into crude bricks, and then set out to dry in the open air. Early improvements included the addition of straw or other fibrous components for added strength. Once dried, the roughly uniform blocks can then be stacked like bricks to form walls. With a proper sub-floor, the right sealant and routine maintenance, adobe can be used for earthen flooring as well. Adobe’s longevity can be attributed to the fact that it is both load bearing and insulating. Local building codes will dictate the minimum compressive strength required of the individual adobe bricks, which are typically quite adequate structurally – except in areas with high lateral stresses, or that are at risk for strong earthquakes.

ing departments, an organic alternate for stabilized adobe is also available by adding processed animal manure and ash to the sand and clay mix, instead of cement.

Making Adobe

Pressed Versus “Puddled” Adobe

While the presence of clay is considered problematic when it comes to foundations, the most durable adobe is composed of at least 15 to 30% clay, which is needed to bind the more granular components of the base mix together. More clay than that can lead to shrinking, swelling, and the eventual cracking of the adobe over time. Less than that and it becomes difficult to form solid bricks for drying. Adobe blocks can be either formed by hand using open wood trays or “ladders”, or can be mechanically compressed into uniform bricks using a hydraulic press.

In addition to determining whether or not your next building ­project will require stabilized adobe, another option to take into consideration is whether or not to use machine pressed bricks versus the handmade variety – which are also referred to as ­ “puddled” adobe.

Contemporary adobe construction often calls for cement or other emulsifying agents to be added to the adobe base mix in order to protect against deterioration. Known as “stabilized adobe”, many building codes now require this in order to approve plans for permit and construction. Although not recognized by most build-

Laying up puddled adobe bricks by BeyondAdobe

For larger projects constructed on tighter timeframes, machine pressed adobe provides several advantages. Pressed adobe is appreciably stronger than hand-made, and is faster and more efficient to construct due to its greater uniformity in shape and size. Machine pressed adobe is also considerably more dense than puddled adobe, providing a more efficient thermal mass. Because of the reduced labor, pressed adobe bricks can also be produced much more quickly, and in far greater numbers than with puddled adobe. Additionally, pressed adobe requires little to no drying time, as nearly all residual moisture is mechanically squeezed from the blocks by the hydraulic force of the press. Pressed adobe bricks can be ready for construction the same day. By comparison, puddled adobe bricks will need anywhere from one to four weeks to dry, depending on the weather. Because of its reduced moisture content, pressed adobe can also be made year round – whereas handmade/puddled adobe prefers moderate temperatures and low-humidity conditions for effective drying and construction.

Making puddled adobe. Image by BeyondAdobe

Handmade individual bricks formed with puddled adobe can be a better choice where the pressures of schedule, available labor, and thermodynamic performance are not overbearing. The primary advantage of puddled adobe is that it has a less uniform and more organic character, yielding a slightly more rugged, authentic looking, and visually appealing aesthetic. 50

2015 Building Yavapai

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Natural clay plaster interior by American Clay Plaster

Growing With Yavapai County

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OPEN SPACE How much are we willing to pay for it?

PURCHASED PARCELS

With the streets/open space tax set to expire, open space a hotly-debated political issue By CINDY BARKS The Daily Courier cbarks@prescottaz.com

PRESCOTT – An unobstructed view of Thumb Butte; a hike through the towering spires of the Granite Dells; a stroll along the banks of Granite Creek. Anyone who has enjoyed those or any number of other Prescott outdoor amenities recently has one major funding source to thank: The streets and open space sales tax. Since voters approved the 1-percent tax in 2000, the City of Prescott has used the revenue, in part, to buy more than 320 acres of undeveloped land (open space) throughout the community. That, in turn, has allowed the Prescott Recreation Services Department to build 17 miles of new trails through some of the Les Bowen/The Daily Courier

See SPACE, page 7A

SHORT RESPITE

Warmer temps expected to push fuel costs up

Thermodynamic Performance Because of adobe’s ability to diffuse heat more slowly than comparable materials such as concrete, stone, and most concrete block, it is an ideal choice for our southwestern climate of warm days and relatively cool nights. The high thermal mass of adobe allows for an exceptionally efficient “thermal flywheel”, which helps keep the structure cool inside during the day (spring, summer, and fall months) as the building passively stores heat within its exterior walls, then releasing that stored warmth to the interior during the cooler nighttime hours. An adobe building can significantly reduce or even eliminate the need for supplemental heating or cooling of the structure. An off-grid home powered only by photovoltaic panels is easily achievable with adobe construction.

SCHOOL SAFETY

Answering a need Page 6

PrescottValleyTribune

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Cell tower OK’d

PVtrib.com

By LES BOWEN The Daily Courier lbowen@prescottaz.com

PRESCOTT – After crude oil prices fell to a sixyear low this week, gas prices in Arizona dipped again downward. Gas prices in Prescott averaged $2.35 for regular unleaded Thursday, March 26, according to AAA’a Daily Fuel Gauge Report, 3 cents below the statewide average of $2.38.

Gasoline prices in Arizona remain lower than the national averages as well, at $2.42. The lowest average prices in Arizona are in Tucson, and the highest are in Flagstaff. The country’s lowest average prices are in South Carolina, at $2.11. California continues to have the highest prices in the continental U.S., at $3.23. The Thursday average price in Prescott is 8

The Prescott Valley Town Council unanimously approved the antenna site lease for a cell tower located at Viewpoint Park during its regular meeting Thursday, March 26. The town, in 1999, entered into an agreement for a right-of-firstrefusal to the wireless t e le c om mu n ic at ion s company Allynx Corp to lease town property—allowing for a sublease with Verizon Wireless, according to a town report. For years, Verizon customers in the Viewpoint and Pronghorn subdivisions have lodged complaints—from poor cell reception to dropped calls. Residents have voiced concerns regarding how to reach emergency services if they have to drive down the street to use their phones. In addition, many homeowners stop by the side of the road to use their phones, as they can’t use them inside their homes. In letters provided to the council, some homeowners expressed worry regarding the location of the town, namely pointing out that if a medical helicopter needed to land, the 60-foot tower would prevent a safe airlift situation. Also, the tower enclosures would sit behind the soccer goal posts, potentially causing safety issues for the children. The homeowners that did speak during the public comment portion of the meeting voiced

16 Pages

Scrambling for those eggs

CHINO VALLEY

UP THE POLE

Hands-on expo gives students feel for careers

BY SALINA SIALEGA Chino Valley Review

Les Stukenberg/PNI

It didn’t take the 8-to 10-year-olds long to clean the lawn of eggs at the annual Prescott Valley Easter Egg Hunt Saturday.

Crowds gather at Prescott Valley’s Family Art Festival By JASON WHEELER Special to the Tribune jwheeler@prescottaz.com

The lives of Michael and Sharon Orley focus on helping others, through their church and in the community. So when the Chino Valley Police Department’s (CVPD) Block Watch program came along two years ago, it was a perfect fit for the couple. Married 37 ‘We’re the eyes years and living and the ears of the in their Chino Meadows 2 neighborhood. neighborhood We watch out for 12 years, the couple says for each other.’ many of their — Michael and Sharon Orley neighbors see them as a people to count on. “We like helping. We’ve learned almost all of our neighbors names and their information, including their children,” Sharon said. “For example, it could be a single woman, and elderly person or a group home or the mentally disabled. It’s a big melting pot and some of our neighbors are from different countries. And not everyone stays; we have rapid turnover.” Michael, who is an ordained church deacon, serves as captain for the group of six families that participates in the program, as well as the 26 other families that benefit informally. They meet regularly to share communication and for Michael to distribute useful information to the members, such as Neighborhood Watch Manuals and tips, and police department community news and events, and websites, such as one that lists local sex offender information (www.azdps.gov). The more people watching out for the neighborhood, the more “intelligence”

BY SALINA SIALEGA Chino Valley Review

With activity names such as Bucket Drop, Up the Pole, Hot Stuff and You’re in Control, people going to the Energy Education Expo Saturday at the Yavapai College Chino Valley campus were bound to have a bucket-load of fun. Konrad Riensche, 14, of Chino Valley got excited trying almost every activity, although he was there mainly to learn more at the “Hot Stuff” activity, which was about the welding classes offered at the college. Trying out several events in the Electrical Utility Technology, however, got him thinking. “That was fun, really cool, I love doing it,” Konrad said after climbing a utility pole wearing gear, being raised several feet into the air in a bucket lift truck to drop bean bags onto a target, and screwing nuts onto bolts wearing insulated rubber gloves. “I’m just checking out everything, and although I’m leaning toward welding, this looks fun, too.” Konrad, an 8th-grader at Heritage Middle School, attended the expo with his mother Stephanie Kaufman, who said the expo is an excellent way for her son to get career ideas. “We came here for the welding, but he’s expressed interest in the other things, so we will give it a go,” Kaufman said. “We are encouraging him to pick a trade, not to attend a four-year college. He needs a trade that he will love and will enjoy the work.” Daniel Lozada, a senior at Tri-City Prep high school in Prescott, wants to become a lineman (works on utility lines statewide) after high school, and came to the expo to look into the various courses at the college. At the “You’re In Control” event, Daniel talked to folks from the Electrical and Instrumentation Technology program, who showed him a board full of

See EXPO, page 12 Konrad Riensche Review/Salina Sialega

See WATCH, page 9

Get those baskets ready! Egg hunt, games free on Saturday Les Stukenberg/PNI

Madison Kimes, 7 from Prescott Valley, gets her face painted by Bradshaw

See FEST, p. 6 Mountain High School’s Cora Sirovy at the annual Prescott Valley Easter Egg Hunt Saturday, March 28.

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The Chino Valley free community Easter Egg Hunt will be on Saturday, April 4, starting at 10 a.m. at the Chino Valley Community Center ball fields The hunt for ages from one

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Neighbors helping neighbors Block Watch becomes ‘extended family’ for group leaders

Easter and the arts collided on Saturday, March 28 with the Prescott Valley Arts and Culture Commission’s 12th annual Family Art Festival. Among the festivities were a petting zoo, a meet and greet with the Easter Bunny, egg hunts and performances by choirs, school bands and ballet dancers. Judith Berry, commissioner of the Arts and Culture Commission, said that the turnout for the festival was greater than it had been in previous years, citing the weather and an expanded performance schedule. “I think it turned out really nice and we had See TOWER, p. 6 good weather for that,” she said. “It’s been really cold the last couple of years, we had a bigger performance schedule; and I think because the © 2015 PRESCOTT VALLEY weather was so nice, I think we got quite a few TRIBUNE people compared to some years.” Children of all ages were at the festival, such as Cheri Rowling’s teenager, 12 year old and baby Volume 43 Number 13

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PLANT SALE Page 6

Inevitable conversations Page 11

By BRIANA LONAS Prescott Valley Tribune

The City of Prescott’s Granite Gardens trails showcase the unique rock formations and creek beds of the Granite Dells area. The city opened the new trails – located off Highway 89 on Granite Gardens Drive – in 2013, after buying the 35-acre parcel in 2008 for $3 million. (Cindy Barks/The Daily Courier)

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CHINO VALLEY— Firefighters dealt with a stubborn house fire Saturday night in an effort that stretched into Sunday morning, a CVFD spokesman said. When they first arrived at the two-story home on Roadrunner Lane near Coyote Trail, it was heavily involved with flames, and a porch that led to a door had been destroyed, making entry into the house a challenge, Firefighter Rob Zazueta said. The family of four, which was already outside when fire crews got there, had to jump out of a window to escape the flames, because the doors were blocked by fire, he said. A pet cat was killed, and a second cat required oxygen, administered by the fire

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crew, and was taken to a veterinarian. Zazueta said the family is being assisted by the Red Cross. “The fire was an extended battle for crews,” he said, and CVFD was assisted by the Prescott Fire Department.

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Architectural Considerations Design-wise, several factors are critical for successful adobe ­ construction. Among these are proper building orientation with the long axis of the structure running east/west; broad roof overhangs all the way around to help protect the adobe from rain and water damage; a water-resistant base course to keep ground moisture from wicking up into the walls; modest ceiling heights of 10 feet or less; and of course the proper window size, placement, and glazing type for its specific orientation. For passive solar integration, the relationship between the ­thickness of the adobe, the amount and type of glazing in the structure (as a percentage of floor area), and other details such as the insulative quality of the roof, floor, and windows, will all contribute to the overall comfort and energy performance of your building. While adobe walls can be left unfinished, lime-plaster top coats are a natural and beautiful way to complete your adobe home or business. Many other exterior and interior finishes are possible as well, although any product or material that traps moisture within the adobe walls should be strictly avoided.

Summary Adobe is a time tested, readily available, energy saving, and inex­ pensive construction method. When properly designed and detailed, adobe construction can be an excellent choice for your live, work, or play space. Be sure to consult with your architect or an adobe construction specialist to see if adobe is the best option for your next project.

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Home Staging Preparing a home for sale, first and foremost, demands a mindset reversal for the seller. That home must be divested of personal charm and its fond memories locked away in the heart, as the structure reverts to a house, a property, a product to pique a buyer’s interest and entice the very best offer. Realtors sell houses, properties, amenities and lifestyle – not necessarily “homes.” It’s the realtor’s task to market and obtain offers on structures that buyers imagine as theirs, surrounded by their belongings and anticipating the remembrances that they themselves will create within those walls. The merchandise again becomes a “home,” when the new family moves in and inaugurates its own look and feel. “Until the time a house goes on market, it’s personal,” explains Janet Bussell ­Eriksson, president and senior designer at ­Bussell Interiors. “When someone wants to sell their home, they truly need to consult with a professional – someone who has no personal attachment to the home. A home that appears to be ‘move-in ready’ – with or without furniture present – will allow potential buyers to visualize their lives, possessions and personal style in the space.” Home staging becomes a “collaborative endeavor” between the stager and the homeowner so that “most homeowners come to understand and actually enjoy the process,” confides Sheri Congdon, owner of Ducks In A Row Organizational and Design Services. “A stager assists the homeowner “Simplicity relaxes the eye and the mind, and that’s what you want people to feel about your house, even if they don’t consciously know it.”

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with the process of withdrawing mentally, physically and energetically from their home – emotionally seems to follow … The idea is to showcase the home – less is more – (triggering) just the suggestion of use.” Sam Dumas, associate broker and premier properties director for Windermere Real Estate Northern Arizona, confirms that “staging can make the difference between a sale or sitting on the market for a prolonged period of time. Proper staging can create an inviting visualization for the buyer to see themselves living that lifestyle. We are selling lifestyle.” With the ever-increasing popularity of the internet for property searches and the expanding syndication of listings, Dumas elaborates, prospective buyers often arrive with a list of properties they want to see, based on photos and virtual tours they have viewed on the web.

“Though virtual tours, the buyer is able to tour a home without ‘getting the carpet dirty,’” Dumas counsels her sellers. “Staging is important to put the property in its best light and prepare it for photography, which is essential in this buyer’s market. Our resale inventory of homes not only competes with the house down the street, but also the model homes in the new subdivisions. In order for a home to make the ‘short list’ for a buyer, it must look current, uncluttered and inviting.” The National Association of Realtors® calculates the average staging investment between one and three percent of a house’s asking price, estimating a return of eight to 10 percent on that outlay. ­Congdon, quoting statistics from homegain.com, suggests that staged homes accrue 83 percent less time on market. Considering that three to seven seconds are all a buyer needs to form a first impression – and decide to look further inside or move on to the next property – the importance of proper staging magnifies. Packing family photos and removing clutter help enormously to ensure that ­ buyers feel comfortable viewing the home, Congdon points out: “Prospective buyers often feel like voyeurs when presented with a wedding photo in a master bedroom. I have seen them stop at the door and peek into a bedroom. You want to provide every advantage for them to enter and get a feel for your home.”

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A welcoming feel, easy navigation and demand creation are important for revealing a home to best advantage, Dumas indicates. “A professional who is in the business of interior design can create a flow in a property and help the homeowner create an inviting lifestyle image for the buyer to want that particular property and narrow down the choices,” she advises. “When a home is move-in ready, it can create a sense of urgency to buy that home.” Dumas has partnered with B ­ ussell-Eriksson on numerous projects and is “always amazed at the transformation she creates. She can work with a property and move existing furniture and accessories to create the ‘wow’ factor. She delivers an honest, professional assessment with a menu of services for the homeowner to choose the best avenue for their personal situation.”

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Ducks In A Row’s Congdon employs her own professional approach to staging a property: “I do not fill the home as though lived in. I create vignettes throughout the space and touches here and there to soften the space. Again, (offering the) suggestion of use.”

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Home Staging – continued The many local thrift stores – “and Ross in a pinch” – provide an ample supply of props and furnishings for staging, ­Congdon recommends. “Staging a home truly gives the sellers an ‘edge,’” Bussell-Eriksson emphasizes. “It gives them the knowledge and ability to make sure that their home is presented and shown in the best ways possible so that from day one – when the house goes on the market – it is buyer ready.” Since rising days on market tend to devalue a property in the eyes of consumers, a launch accentuating the property’s best features at the outset could means thousands of dollars to a seller. Bussell-Eriksson said that she often is invited to help evaluate why a particular home has been languishing and not selling. “Stage your home before you go on market,” she recommends. “Your days on the market start the second your home is listed, so why not put your best foot forward? Give yourself an edge from the start.” ­

Tips for Staging Home staging artist Janet ­Bussell-Eriksson, president and senior designer at Bussell Interiors in Prescott, suggests several simple things a seller can do – with or without a professional stager – to help prepare the property for quickest sale at top dollar. “You are moving, right?” Bussell-Erickson affirms. Keep that in mind as you step back and assess how your property might look to a buyer or agent on first impression. The advantage of hiring a professional, of course, is that the slash and stage assuredly will have the clean and objective look most attractive to buyers as they imagine how their belongings will look in the rooms. Use the following guide while walking through the house with an unemotional and detached perspective: 1. Impersonalize – Remove personal items, photos and collectibles. 2. Pack and Store – Box and store all the items you do not use on a daily basis. Be sure to remove the items from the house. Stack taped boxes neatly in the garage, shed or a storage rental. 3. Clean – Make sure your house sparkles. Nothing turns off buyers more quickly than looking at someone else’s dirt. 4. Organize – Be certain that everything has a proper place and that you don’t have clutter. If something causes clutter, the Pack and Store process should be revisited. 5. Spruce Up the Yard and Outside Areas – Remove any cobwebs and replace ­non-working light bulbs. Remove weeds. Mow the lawn. Get rid of any items “just sitting around.”

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Kitchen Design Trends By Christie Board We are living in a world where we can personalize anything and everything. You can add a personalized ring tone to your phone, meaningful wall paper to your iPad, and that cup of coffee can be just exactly how you want it. It’s not surprising that people are looking to put that same individual touch into their kitchens. With that being said, here is what the design world is saying about kitchen trends in 2015. ›› Farm house sinks come in a variety of materials and styles. From contemporary stainless to rustic stone. The classic fireclay farm house sink will be a choice that will age beautifully not only in style but durability. ›› Maximizing storage in the kitchen is a goal for most people. There are so many great ways to create storage for specific cooking appliances and cookware. From utensil bins to dividers for baking pans there are so many creative solutions. We are also seeing many clients wanting an updated appliance garage. A place for a coffee station or small appliances that is larger and more functional than what we were seeing years ago. “A much more eclectic mix of finishes and styles is now available as homeowners strive to make kitchens uniquely their own.”

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›› White is the most common cabinet color. It’s clean, its classic and homeowners are loving it. We are seeing a lot of fun color accents on islands and individual focal point cabinet pieces. Look for pops of color in grey, green, red and even some purple! ›› An open floorplan that creates a social space. Clients are anxious to get rid of the old soffits, poor lighting,and closed off kitchens often found in dated homes. They want to create a place where friends and family can gather. ›› Quartz countertops are giving granite a run for its money. With increasingly amazing patterns and solid colors they offer


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great design options with virtually no maintenance required. They are quickly becoming a new favorite.

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›› Furniture-look cabinets. More and more we are designing islands and cabinets that look more like furniture. With the addition of decorative legs and other moldings it creates a bespoke cabinet. ›› A backsplash that is simple but beautiful. Using tile that is a creative shape, but in a solid color versus a busy ornate backsplash of a few years back. It creates a subtle but timeless accent to the kitchen.

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›› Clients love the warmth of wood floors as a way to soften some of the hard, shiny surfaces found in the kitchen. Floor color is moving towards a lighter and warmer color than the dark espresso stained floors of a few years ago. ›› Last but not least cabinet hardware has made a strong come back. With 100’s of options in every style and finish imaginable you can express yourself and add that perfect finishing touch to your cabinets. With the desire to make their kitchens uniquely their own we are seeing a much more eclectic mix of finishes and styles. The term transitional has become a popular one. It is a mix of two or more ARIZONA TILE 2015 Yavapai Ad beHalf Page and Horizontal styles blended together. My Advice? Be brave, transitional don’t be afraid to personalize your space!

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Fire Alarms and Smoke Detectors Protecting family and belongings from life-threatening injury or catastrophic loss in a fire entails two equally important tasks: installing and maintaining. Not only should fire prevention and alerting systems be fitted properly, experts say, they also must be monitored regularly to ensure optimal functionality. A non-working safety measure, after all, is about as useful as the clichéd screen door in a submarine. Consider the sobering fact from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) that three in five fire deaths (more than 3,000 people each year in the U.S.) occur in homes with non-existent or non-working smoke alarms. Fire protection s­ ystems provide no safeguard to anyone or anything, if broken or not performing to specifications. Fire safety experts highlight three potentially life-saving tools – fire sprinkler systems, smoke alarms/carbon dioxide detectors and fire extinguishers – when explaining to homeowners the advantages of fire monitoring and defense systems for their properties. Choose a multi-purpose extinguisher large enough to put out a small fire, but also light enough to be easily managed.

Guidelines essential to continued protection with fire, smoke and carbon dioxide alert systems include: integrating a home’s fire suppression system with its security system and appropriately winterizing the sprinkler component; checking batteries on smoke alarms twice a year and replacing the unit after 10 years; and inspecting the gauges on fire extinguishers yearly and ensuring regular testing by a licensed fire equipment company.

Integrating / Winterizing Sprinklers Residential fire suppression systems are generally integrated into a home security system to provide both intrusion and fire protection. The anti-fire component is implemented with smoke and heat detectors placed throughout the residence and monitored through a third party alarm company. The homeowner should ensure that all chemicals, pesticides, CAT 5 wiring and spray foam are kept away from the fire suppression piping. It also is important that responsible individuals know where the water shutoff valve is located and how to use it. A “flow” test should be conducted on the system annually to verify that the exterior bell rings within 60 ­ seconds. ­Multiple local firms offer installation and monitoring services to area home­owners and businesses. Automatic sprinkler systems are available in several types. Two of the most common for residential use are wet (water-filled from

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an automatic source) and dry (air filled at a pressure lower than the water supply). The dry system most often is used in colder climates where a water-based system ­ might be vulnerable to freezing. The majority of commercial systems in this area are dry, while home installations lean toward wet pipe systems, according to Rick Chase, fire marshal with the ­Central Yavapai Fire District (CYFD). Serving a large portion of the county, CYFD also oversees the towns of Prescott Valley and Dewey-Humboldt, along with Prescott’s Williamson Valley area, while the City of Prescott Fire Department coordinates fire suppression and management within its respective boundaries. No matter the local jurisdiction, both wet and dry fire sprinkler systems should be winterized to help prevent breaking pipes and resulting water damage. For a wet pipe configuration, that process is very similar to winterizing a drip landscaping system. Either the homeowner, or a hired expert (if the homeowner is not familiar with automatic fire suppression systems), should conduct a thorough examination of the physical plant to eliminate susceptibilities to freezing pipes. In the case of an automatic fire sprinkler system, anything allowing cold air to penetrate the home should be located and corrected. This includes cracked walls, ­ broken windows, insufficient insulation, roof problems and loose siding. Drafts and


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cold air, major causes of freezing pipes, should be eliminated from the system’s environs, with the objective of keeping all areas at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. Particular attention should be paid to attics, stairways, skylights and spaces between floors and ceilings, where cold air may become trapped. Windows, doors and vents should remain closed when not used during winter months. Water control valves should stay open. A glycol loop, if applicable, should be checked in multiple places for proper concentration of antifreeze. Just as sporadic drafts and cold air can wreak havoc on wet pipe system, so can the opposite condition of too much accumulated heat. Areas of the home near heating units should be evaluated to ensure that sprinkler settings are adjusted (usually moderate to high) to guard against accidental activation. For dry pipe systems, all water and condensation should be drained. Replacements to missing or broken pipe hangers should be made. The compressor is located in a cool, dry place to prevent condensation and that the system’s air content will withstand a cold weather pressure drop. Again, these checks should be completed by someone knowledgeable about fire sprinkler systems and their operations.

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Installing and Replacing Smoke Detectors Smoke detectors are in all new homes built today, mandatory per the 2012 International Building Code (IBC). These systems are hardwired to ensure that one alarm going off will trigger all the others. Battery-only smoke detectors also are very good, Chase said, but only go off when smoke reaches them. In a situation where seconds may matter, one advantage of a hardwired system is ensuring rapid notification to everyone simultaneously that they should quickly exit the home. Per the Building code, smoke alarms must be installed inside every bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home. If you are self-installing smoke alarms, they should be located on the ceiling or high on a wall, with extra detectors in larger homes, and keep detectors at least 10 feet from a stove to reduce false alarms. To maintain the units for proper operation

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Fire – continued and warning signals, all ­batteries should be checked at least ­semi-annually and do not go longer than a year without checking the batteries. Smoke alarms should be replaced with then are 8-10 years old. Homes heated with natural gas or propane, or featuring gas fireplaces or woodburning stoves, also are required since 2012 to have carbon monoxide detectors, which can be placed in outlets near gas appliances and fireplaces or hardwired into ceilings along with the smoke detectors.

Testing and Inspecting Fire Extinguishers A portable fire extinguisher can save lives and property, but safely getting everyone out of a burning or smoke-filled home always should be the top priority. Putting out a small kitchen fire or containing it with a fire extinguisher is an admirable effort, as long as lives and safety are not compromised. Along those guidelines, experts recommend only using a portable fire extinguisher under

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the following conditions: the fire is confined to a small area (such as a wastebasket or kitchen stove) and not expanding; the fire department has been called or simultaneously is being contacted; humans and pets have left the building; and the room is not filling with smoke. When researching what to purchase for a portable fire extinguisher, know that there are two key types: stored pressure (the most popular) and cartridge-operated. Stored pressure units accommodate the expellent and firefighting agent in the same chamber. Nitrogen is the typical ex­pellent in dry chemical extinguishers, while air utilized in water and foam models. Choose a multi-purpose extinguisher large enough to put out a small fire, but also light enough to be easily managed. Ensure that the product is labeled by an independent testing laboratory before buying. Install the extinguisher close to an exit (kitchens and garages are ideal) and always make sure a clear exit remains at your back while using the device.

Read the instructions that come with the fire extinguisher and become familiar with its parts and operation before a fire breaks out. To operate a fire extinguisher, experts suggest remembering the word “PASS” to trigger the following steps: ›› Pull the pin by holding the extinguisher with the nozzle pointing away and releasing the lock ›› Aim low, pointing the extinguisher at the base of the fire ›› Squeeze the lever slowly and evenly  Sweep the nozzle from side to side. Advice for maintaining fire extinguishers includes examining the gauge to verify that the needle is in the green area. Additionally, B&W’s Cupp recommends that a licensed fire equipment company be engaged to check the unit. Since the life expectancy of a fire extinguisher is 20 years after the manufactured date, he also suggests that the homeowner track the age of the device for replacement purposes.


Saving Lives February is American Heart Month but every month should be Heart Month. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and nearly half of sudden cardiac deaths occur outside of a hospital. Be alert and be Proactive! Lesa West, owner of New Life NA said the most important question anyone should be asking is “Can I save someone”? Over 80% of all heart attacks happen at home and we need to be prepared when this happens. 9-1-1 is not around the corner and it is important that we understand that WE ARE THE FIRST RESPONDER! Learning CPR is simple and once you understand “why you do what you do” then the skills make sense. Always remember WHO you will performing CPR on, family, friends, the people you ‘hang around with’. We need to be doing something quicker because we are a community. The horror of standing and NOT knowing what to do I think would be incredible!” One of the biggest misconceptions about CPR is that it completely revives the person rather than just keeping the brain alive. “All you are doing is keeping the body going until 9-1-1 arrives with a defibrillator or even better, have an AED at your work, home and public facilities”. Another mistaken belief is that AEDs are complicated and you are liable if you have one. “They are very simple to use and it is not going to hurt someone if their heart is in rhythm. So, if someone is not responsive and not waking up, never be hesitant to put the AED pads on someone. We are protected by the Good Samaritan Law so make an investment in your family and your business! AEDs make a difference” Lesa said. Basic CPR – if you can visualize you are placing your hands in the center of the chest of the victim – you will then push 2” in depth – your job is to “squeeze the heart” so you are actually taking the breast bone and pushing against the heart which is pushing to the back bone, therefore “squeezing” the blood out when you lift your hands up the blood comes back into the heart chamber and you then squeeze the heart out again. The heart is a pump and NOW you are the pump. You will pro

ceed to do 30 compressions and then you will give 2 breaths. The breaths will keep the “oxygen” in the blood while you are circulating. When you give the breath, you want to put your left hand on the forehead and tilt the head as far back as you can. You will pinch the nose and take your mouth and cover over the victim’s mouth and give a good slow, smooth breath, watch the chest rise and then continue the 30 compressions and 2 breaths. When we do CPR our job is to keep oxygenated blood to the brain. CPR is not for the heart, but for the brain!

actually do the skill, it will not ‘sink in’. That is why it is important to be trained in CPR and to renew your skills because it is not something you perform on a daily basis.

CPR is a muscle learning skill so when you are in a CPR Class, your entire body will help you retain the skills. It is like riding a bicycle said Lesa, “I can tell someone all day long how to do CPR, but until you

Be smart when it comes to a cardiac emergency and be prepared should you have to manage one.

New Life is a locally owned company and their goal is to help make Yavapai County the safest county to live in! Lesa wants to community to step up to the plate and learn CPR and know what to do in an emergency situation as home, work or play. New Life will come to your home, your office, your school or church or a community location to train you in CPR.

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CPR and Defibrillator (AED) Training CPR can help SAVE a life, NEW LIFE can teach you how 928-445-5024 | www.NewLifena.com | Lesa@NewLifena.com www.ycca.org

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Frame it ... Enhance it There is an art to framing and a frame done right and properly will complement and harmonize the art and/or object and the item can last a lifetime. Now, there is nothing at all wrong with purchasing ready-made frames, but keep in mind the tradeoff is permanency and durability. In many cases, ready-made frames fail to protect the art from moisture damage and light infiltration. There is no shortage of choices when it comes to frames and the biggest challenge is selecting the mat, the glass type and the frame design to compliment the art.

Why Custom Framing? Custom framing serves to create a unique presentation of your artwork. It can reflect your personality and enhance your living space while providing protection from deterioration and damage. Without professional framing, air pollution, light, moisture, insects, acidic materials and household cleaners can damage your photos, artwork and memorabilia. Investing in custom framing will ensure that your most important memories will survive to share with future generations.

Remember the perfect frame, matting, and glass will enhance whatever it is that you want to preserve and enjoy.

There are ornate frames, metal frames, plastic frames, wild colored frames.

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Beautiful Tile Tile is beautiful, durable, and generally easy to clean, but cleaning grout? That’s a different story. Because of its (typically) light coloring and porous composition, grout is prone to staining. In a tiled entry or garage entry dirt and grime are the usual culprits, while in the kitchen, spills are more likely to blame. Soap, mold, and mildew meanwhile make it difficult to maintain clean grout in bathrooms. Fortunately, cleaning grout effectively is possible using only common household products and a bit of elbow grease. With any cleaning project, it’s always best to start off with the mildest cleaning solution. When in doubt about a cleanser, test it in a hidden spot – behind or under an appliance, for example. The following suggestions for cleaning grout are ranked from the mildest to the strongest: ›› The best way to begin is with plain water and a stiff-bristled brush; most home centers and hardware stores carry an assortment of brushes specifically designed for this purpose. Simply spray warm water on the grout lines and scrub in a circular motion, then let dry. ›› For heavier dirt and mild stains, turn to that trusty old standby, vinegar. Fill a spray bottle with a half-and-half solution of vinegar and warm water. Spray on the grout, let it stand for five minutes, then scrub with a stiff brush.

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›› To bring even more cleaning power to the party, make a paste of baking soda and water, cover the grout lines with the paste, then spray on the vinegar solution. Once the mixture stops foaming, scrub with a brush and rinse with plain water. ›› For moderate stains, you may want to use hydrogen peroxide, which is available in most drug stores. You can use the product straight or make a paste with baking soda and hydrogen peroxide. ›› For tougher stains and really grimy grout, try using oxygen bleach (most often sold in powdered form). Some common brands include OxiClean, Clorex OxiMagic, and Biokleen Oxygen Bleach Plus. Read and follow the manufacturer’s directions, and make sure the area is well-ventilated. Generally, you will want to let the oxygen bleach solution work for 10 or 15 minutes before rinsing. Always rinse with clean water so that the dirt doesn’t resettle into the grout lines. ›› Chlorine bleach and commercial cleansers can be used sparingly in extreme cases. Caustic cleaners used long-term will erode grout, so these products should be used on a limited basis. To keep your grout clean and stain-free, it’s a good idea to spray it with vinegar and wipe it down once a week. You can also wipe grout with alcohol to keep mold and mildew at bay. In any case, just a few spritzes and wipes a week can save you a lot of time and effort cleaning, preserving the attractive appearance of your home in the process. Fortunately, cleaning grout effectively is possible using only common household products and a bit of elbow grease.


Building Costs Quite often calls will come in from other states from people inquiring about relocating to Prescott. This is a very common question and one whose answer is based on the complexity inherit in the construction industry.

Q A

Ask Your Contractor

What the cost is per square foot to build a home?

P  er Tom Reilly, owner of Renovations Your Complete Remodel Resource, and local architect and builder in Prescott for over 30 years, “square foot pricing is a ratio of the total costs of a projects components divided by the size of the livable portion of a house in most instances.”

Be sure to read our YCCA “Ask the Contractor” column in the Daily Courier Real Estate Section every Friday or online at

Since the components that make up a project can be so different from project to project it is impossible to predict a price per square foot with any accuracy. Defining the total cost of a projects components without first going through a design process, or at a minimum a detailed written project scope will most certainly leads to a level of speculation that will generate hard feelings. Unless you are building a tract home, on the same terrain in the same area, square footage pricing is not the way to analyze the best course of action for your project. The more unscrupulous among

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the industry will use the complexity of real pricing to low ball their way into a project. If you have decided to do a project, do it well. Form a budget, get qualified assistance from reputable contractors and determine if your goals and your budget mesh. Do not fall prey to the speculation of shopping square foot pricing.

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Unused Vents We all know that saving energy, detecting energy waste and managing your energy wisely can reduce household utility bills as well as conserve our precious natural resources. A home energy audit is often the first step in making your home more efficient.

Ask Your Contractor

Q

We have several bedrooms that, as empty-nesters, we do not use. It seems logical to close the AC/ heating vent in each of the unused rooms and then close the door to each of those rooms so that we are not heating rooms that we do not use. I have been told that this is not a good idea. Can you explain why?

A

 Closing off registers and closing doors to unused rooms may create a pressure imbalance in the heating system for the rest of your home.

Be sure to read our YCCA “Ask the Contractor” column in the Daily Courier Real Estate Section every Friday or online at

You are forcing the remaining return air ducts to take in more air, which may throw your system into negative pressure. A forced-air heating system is ex­pected to be a “closed” system, which means that whatever air goes through the return air grill is the same air that flows out of the supply grills. If you restrict the air supply, the return still will attempt to move the same amount of air and will find the air from somewhere else.

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Supply diffusers are not made to be closed off. If you do not want air coming out of those registers, the easiest and most affordable fix would be to remove the register, cover it with a piece of sheet metal and seal the hole. It is recommended, however, that if you do this, you should contact an HVAC contractor to ensure your system will continue to operate efficiently and safely.

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Universal Design By Sue Marceau Designing living spaces and products to address the needs of people with disabilities has morphed into a more inclusive concept so that everyday living remains “safer, easier and more convenient for everyone.” Dubbed “universal design” by American Architect Ronald L. Mace in 1997, this standard encourages living environments – and the products within them — to be “aesthetic and usable to the greatest extent possible by everyone, regardless of age, ability or status in life,” according to www.universaldesign.com. Mace, founder and former program director of The Center for ­Universal Design at North Carolina State University, led a think tank of architects, designers and engineers in the establishment of seven principles for the “process of embedding choice for all people in the things that human beings design.” Local area companies such as Michael Taylor Architects, Inc. and local builder, Premier Development AZ LLC both incorporate universal design standards into their home designs and home construction, both acknowledging that the public recognizes the tweaks more than the terminology. The average new home client, for example, is not going to walk into a builder’s office asking for a “universally-designed” home. Rather, that prospective buyer might inquire about amenities which might accommodate existing or approaching frailties, life-altering accidents or injuries, unex-

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pected illnesses, reduced mobility and/or other limitations affecting daily living. It is the Mace think tank’s seven principles – equitable use, flexibility in use, simple and intuitive use, perceptible information, tolerance for error, low physical effort, and size and space for approach and use – which offer guidance for accommodating people’s lifestyles regardless of body size, posture, mobility, or sensory loss. “Everyone, even the most able-bodied person, passes through childhood, periods of temporary illness/injury and old age,” Mace’s advocates assert. “By designing for this human diversity, we can create things that will be easier for all people to use.” Forging theory into reality into reality in their respective practices, Premier Development and Michael Taylor Architects consult every day with people and situations which can – and do – benefit from the integration of universal design principles. “None of us is getting any younger,” noted Ron and Kelly Owsley, owners of Premier Development. “It seems we all know someone with short and/or long term mobility issues. In our immediate families alone, we can name four individuals who have had knee or hip replacement surgeries, two more in need of such surgeries and currently two utilizing wheelchairs or scooters.” Michael Taylor, president of Michael Taylor Architects, also addressed the inevitability that “mobility and access become more and more crucial” as people age. He urges consideration in the present to home design and enhancements easily translatable to whatever the future holds. Much of the architectural firm’s work integrates universal design, he indicated, citing typical reasons for owners to look at these concepts: aging of the homeowner, current or anticipated health issues, housing for aging family members and/or simplifying access for children of all ages with special needs. “Building a home thinking only about your current situation could mean having to move into another home at a time when that may


not be desirable,” Taylor counseled. “Being able to accommodate those affected by these things within your home is easier in a home designed to universal design standards. Most of our residential clients are retired or nearing retirement, and they consider how their homes will operate as they become less able-bodied in the future.” Premier Development reports similar client considerations over the past three years, while constructing 10 new semi-custom homes, with “features to help accommodate mobility issues. Our homes typically feature designs which, while accommodating possible mobility challenges, are not readily evident as to make the homes so unique they are objectionable in any way.” Typical requests relating to universal design include single-level living, accessible bathrooms, wider hallways and fewer square feet. Three elements described by Taylor as imperative in universal design are single level structures, accessible maneuvering within the home, and functional approaches to appliances and fixtures. Adaptations to ensure that homes remain accessible and convenient to everyone, the Owsleys and Taylor suggest, often contain elements such as: ›› ›› ›› ›› ›› ›› ›› ››

No step access entry from the garage to the home Wider doors Lever door handles Walk-in showers with no step access Large numbers on thermostats Grab bars in showers and at commodes Taller “comfort height” toilets Single doors versus sliding glass doors

Grab bars in showers and at commodes.

“Single level living is by far the highest priority in universal design,” Taylor pointed out. Elevators and stair lifts can be included, but could reduce enjoyment of the home and are considered specialized design. Understanding consumers’ challenges and charting functionality and convenience into routine navigation of a home are fundamental to the adaptive process, he continued. Once room to room connectivity has been established, the next task is assuring universal ease of use at kitchen appliances, bathroom fixtures and laundry facilities. The Owsleys attributed their understanding of aging buyers’ needs to the adult demographics of our area. “The mobility friendly features are in response to our understanding today’s new home buyer profile,” they shared. “The majority of buyers in this area in our current market are generally empty nesters and retirees. These buyers are often looking to build their last home and expect to age in place as long as possible.

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Flooring By Sue Marceau Wood and tile have been replacing carpet, vinyl and laminates as the people’s choice in flooring products over the past 10 years. Cost and maintenance continue to play a supporting role in consumer purchases and placement. Installed on location in various rooms of an average home, materials and texture are scripted for usage. Under-floor heating triumphs in special effects to warm the tootsies in bathrooms and radiate opulence. This year’s flooring extravaganza was presented live from ­Greenlee Design Center and hosted by Owner Matt Greenlee, an expert on style and direction. Recognition for best actor in a leading role swept the floor in a dramatic three-way tie, with consumers most often pulling from a seasoned cast of installations: ›› Carpet – the preferred choice in bedrooms ›› Tile – a perfect companion in the laundry, kitchen and bathrooms ›› Wood – a prime time performer resurging in other areas of the home Advances in engineered wood production have brought costs down to a level not much higher than tile installation, Greenlee lauded during an opening monologue promoting the new technologies. Engineered wood also is easier to maintain than tradi-

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Moving further into the woods, he visualized audience raves for engineered hardwoods, faux wood porcelain tile, and faux wood vinyl. Each nominee portrayed its own unique character in finishes, installation and maintenance. Viewing the short clips from each entry, the audience quickly grasped the persuasive traits of each role: ›› Hardwood floors – have become more popular due to what can be created at the factory and installed with minimal extra work. Factory-applied top coat finishes are more durable than what could be installed onsite with traditional hardwoods. Less expensive custom finishes are engineered so that less actual wood is used, resulting in an industry nomination for saving the environment. ›› Faux wood porcelain tile products – are looking even more realistic with digital ink technologies while also spanning the lower maintenance trends. ›› Faux wood vinyl – packs a punch with easy replacement of damaged planks, inexpensive products and significant durability (though less than porcelain). Imaginative shades of grey overshadowed the red carpet as beauty after beauty sashayed into the picture. “Grey is in” as a color, Greenlee asserted, alluding to the graphically interpreted screenplay. “I know it sounds boring, but you will be surprised with what grey looks like on a wood floor or (using) grey as an undertone on a wood floor.”

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tional site-installed hardwood floors, adding to drastic reductions in installation time as another star factor.

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Employing the Christian Trevelyan Grey theory on color may be risqué for some, but selecting the appropriate flooring material


“Tile is ideal for laundry rooms, kitchens and bathrooms.”

for a home is a simple process following Greenlee’s guidelines. By asking themselves the following questions, consumers can step with confidence into the challenge of flooring decisions: 1. What is your budget? How much you can afford and what you want to spend on flooring may be two very different numbers. However, it gives the consultant an idea of where your thoughts are heading. 2. What are your cleaning habits? Some consumers are fanatical about keeping floors clean, while others are not. Cleaning habits definitely have bearing on the right material for the specific consumer. There is no such thing as a maintenance-free floor, so how much time you are willing to apply towards maintaining your floor is important. 3. What is your lifestyle? If you have three children, two dogs and a parrot, travertine probably is not the right flooring for you. You may want to look into a porcelain floor or perhaps a luxury vinyl plank treatment. 4. How long are you going to live in the home? If you plan to stay in the home long term, think about spending more money on your flooring. As a general rule, the more you spend on your floor product, the better it is constructed and the longer it will last. If you are going to live in the home only for a couple of years, you may want to spend less. Chances are the person buying the home from you is going to change some of the floor coverings anyway to suit their individual lifestyle. Greenlee wrapped up the production mimicking Hollywood’s excesses with a tempered message of personal satisfaction: “If you are in a home for the long term, you should pick the finishes that you make you feel good – even if they are a little more than you want to spend. You will appreciate them that much more!”

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Hardwood – What, Where, How? First, all hardwood is not created equal and it is important to know that.

What are the types of wood construction, species, and styles? There are 3 basic construction types, solid, engineered, and hybrid. Solid hardwood is what most of us know, its 3/4" thick and milled with a tongue and groove for easy installation. Often, it is unfinished and will be sanded and stained on site (in your home). Solid hardwood is a great investment and will last for generations. Because most solid hardwoods have and 1/4" or greater top layer of wood you are able to sand it down and re-stain it multiple times so as interior colors change you can change your flooring color without having to do a completely new floor. Maintenance on solid hardwood will need to be done approximately every 10 years and if you are not considering a color change a quick “pad and recoat” is all that is necessary.

degrees with each ply to create dimensional stability for the product. Engineered wood floors are factory finished to allow for a more durable and longer lasting finish and most engineered woods come with a 15 plus year warranty.

Engineered hardwoods are layered plies of hardwood with the grains turned 90

Because, of our geographic location and the fluctuations in humidity engineered

wood floors have a much larger portion of the wood market. Unlike solid hardwoods you can install engineered wood floors directly to a concrete slab without any extra costs. The last type of wood flooring is a hybrid and they have been gaining in popularity because they are even more dimensionally stable than engineered wood floors and offer some economic benefits. Hybrid hardwood floors use a high density fiber core in lieu of layered wood ply’s for the interior core. This high density fiber core makes the wood harder and more durable to denting and scratching. Ok, where to and where not to install hardwood floors. First and foremost hardwood flooring plus installation is going to be a significant investment so protect it by installing a humidifier system onto your HVAC system. If you have questions regarding the humidifier system you should reach out to an HVAC company. Hardwood floors should never be installed in the wet areas bathrooms, utility rooms, and kitchens. Many homeowners want hardwood in their kitchen, but be cautious and make sure your home owners insurance policy covers the appliances and wood flooring because it is Murphy’s Law that at some point the dishwasher will break, the ice maker line

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Because, of our geographic location and the fluctuations in humidity engineered wood floors have a much larger portion of the wood market.

has been leaking for 3 months, the washing machine will over flow and there goes the wood floor. Other than the wet areas in a home, hardwood floors can be installed everywhere else.

Engineered hardwoods are layered plies of hardwood with the grains turned 90 degrees with each ply to create dimensional stability for the product.

Now, if budget is a concern focus on the main living areas where you will get to enjoy the beauty of the hardwood in an open space. If you take a look at most bedrooms over 60% of the room is usually covered by the bed and other furniture so ask yourself if you want to spend that kind of money on something you will never see. Ok, how much should you expect to invest if you’re looking to have hardwood flooring installed? Well, you get what you pay for. Alright, here are some rules of thumb to use to find out a ballpark budget for the project. Economic entry level wood flooring should run around $9 -$10 per square foot not including any tear out of existing floors or prep work that may need to be done. A midgrade hardwood floor will run around $13$18 per square foot and will offer you a richer higher quality finish and often times a better construction process.

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Hardwood Floors: Basic Care Speed up the cleaning process by first dusting the floor with a dusting agent to pick up dust, dirt, and pet hair that might scratch the floor surface. For weekly or biweekly cleaning, vacuum with a floor-brush attachment on a vacuum cleaner or an electric broom. Do not use a vacuum with a beater bar attachment, which can scratch a wood floor’s finish. For quick dusting, use disposable electrostatic cloths. Consider your floor’s finish before trying to remove a mark. If the stain is on the surface, your floor probably has a hard finish, such as urethane. If the stain has penetrated through to the wood, the floor probably has a soft oiled finish – common in older homes whose floors have not been refinished and resealed. Wipe surface stains from a hard finish with a soft, clean cloth. Never use sandpaper, steel wool, or harsh chemicals on such a surface because they can permanently damage the finish. The following remedies are for hardwood floors with soft oiled finishes: ›› Dark spots and pet stains: Rub the spot with No. 000 steel wool and floor wax. If the area is still dark, apply bleach or vinegar and allow it to soak into the wood for about an hour. Rinse with a damp cloth. ›› Oil-base stains: Rub the area with a soft cloth and dishwashing detergent to break down the grease. Rinse with clear water. If one or more applications don’t work, repeat the

procedure. Keep children and pets out of the room until you’re done. Let the spot dry, then smooth the raised grain with fine sandpaper. ›› Water marks or white stains: Rub the spot with No. 000 steel wool and floor wax. If the stain goes deeper, lightly sand the floor and clean with fine steel wool and odorless mineral spirits.

FIRST THINGS FIRST – Determine the Finish Before you grab a bucket of water and a mop, it’s best to find out how your hardwood floor is sealed – if at all. Why? The finish, not the wood type, determines how you clean and care for the floor. Surface-sealed floors: Most new wood floors are sealed with urethane, polyure-

thane or polyacrylic. Surface-sealed floors are stain and water-damage resistant and easiest to care for and clean: Sweep, mop and you’re done! Penetrating-seal-treated and oil-treated floors: Also common, a penetrating seal or oil finish soaks into the wood grain and hardens. This type of floor must be pampered and protected with liquid or paste wax. Lacquered, varnished, shellacked and untreated floors: Although technically surface finishes, lacquers, varnishes and shellacs are not as resistant to moisture, spills and wear as the other sealants mentioned. Treat floors with these finishes and floors with no finish as you would penetrating-seal-treated and oil-treated floors.

Not sure what kind of finish you have? To tell the difference in a pinch, just rub your finger across the floor. If no smudge appears, the floor is surface sealed. If you do create a smudge, the floor has been treated with a penetrating seal, oil finish, shellac, varnish or lacquer, and then waxed.

Cleaning Surface-Sealed Floors Don’t use straight ammonia, alkaline products or abrasive cleaners. They’ll dull or scratch the finish. Do use a floor-cleaning product recommended by the floor finisher or opt for plain soap and water. 74

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3 MUST-FOLLOW RULES

Wipe surface stains from a hard finish with a soft, clean cloth.

To extend the life of your hardwood floor no matter what the finish, keep in mind these three simple rules: ✔ Sweep or vacuum often. ✔ Ground-in dirt destroys wood floors. To prevent buildup, clean floors once or twice a day in high-traffic areas, like the kitchen and dining room. No time? Cut down on sweeping time by placing a doormat at each entrance to your home. (Some estimates suggest that doormats eliminate 80 percent of the dirt tracked inside!) ✔ Wipe up mud and spills immediately. Wood is easily damaged by water.

Don’t rely on water alone or a vinegar and water solution to clean hardwood floors. Mopping with water will result in dingy-looking floors and won’t-budge dirt buildup. Vinegar and water is not as effective as soapy water and – some suggest may dull floors sooner.

Routine Cleaning In high-traffic areas, like the dining room and kitchen, you should sweep daily, if possible, and mop once or twice a week. Mop less-trafficked areas once a month or once a season.

Mopping Technique Remember: Water is wood’s worst enemy (even on sealed floors!), so use a damp mop rather than a soaking wet one. Dip the mop into the bucket of prepared cleaning solution, wring it out completely, mop in the direction of the wood grain and repeat. When the water gets dirty, empty the bucket, mix a new batch of cleaning solution and continue mopping. When finished, go back over the entire surface with clean water to rinse.

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Scrubbed to Satisfaction By Elise Riley Reproduced with permission by The Arizona Republic/Republic Media Custom Publishing A shiny new kitchen with all the bells and whistles can be one of the most attractive parts of buying a new home. But picking which dishwasher you want to make your glasses sparkle can leave you feeling a little, well, cloudy. So listen up and learn a bit about today’s quiet, energy-efficient dishwashers. And when you’re ready to choose your kitchen appliance package, be sure to ask your builder what options are available to you.

5 Expert Tips on How to Choose a Dishwasher If you have the opportunity to select a dishwasher for your new home, follow these expert tips when you compare models. 1. Sound it out: Pick a unit with decibel levels of 50 or lower if a quiet dishwasher is important to you. 2. Look inside: Stainless steel interiors aid in faster and more efficient drying. 3. Build it in: An integrated control panel on the top of the door won’t fall victim to button-happy kid-fingers. 4. Assess custom needs: Specialized racks for stemware or flatware might be worth the investment if you plan on using them. 5. Consider maintenance requirements: Find out if your unit includes a disposal or a filter that must be periodically cleaned. are going. 76

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Quiet comforts If your floor plan has an open-concept kitchen and family room, you might want to consider a dishwasher whose noise level won’t interrupt homework or televisionwatching. “This is something that’s fairly new – how quiet dishwashers are,” said Eric Cooper, a sales representative for Whirlpool. “I always say the sweet spot where you don’t have to pay an exorbitant amount is around 50 decibels. You can stand three feet away from it and it’s not going to interfere in a conversation.”

We find that many dishwashers get those dishes clean.” Lehrman also noted that washing cycles for full loads are getting longer. “It’s not unusual to have a dishwasher that has a two-hour cycle,” she said. “If you’re somebody who likes to unload the dishwasher in the evening, or if that long cycle is a problem, you want to look for a dishwasher that has a quick cycle.”

Energy-saving benefits

Cooper said an extra-quiet dishwasher can have a rating as low as 38 decibels. But if your kitchen isn’t in a wide-open space, diverting your budget toward sound reduction might not be necessary.

Manufacturers provide estimates on how much an appliance will cost to run annually. Those that are especially efficient are given an Energy Star designation by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) so be sure that the appliance you have your eye on has an Energy Star sticker affixed to it.

Cleaning capabilities

Why’s that?

While dishwashers have gotten more efficient – a typical model might only use 3 to 7 gallons of water per load now – their cleaning abilities haven’t suffered. In fact, they’ve gotten so good that the age-old ‘rinse the dishes before you wash the dishes’ process isn’t necessary.

Lehrman said that an Energy Star product uses less water and energy. “They’ll save you about $40 a year on your utility bill and 1,300 gallons of water over its lifetime, according to Energy Star,” she said.

“Don’t rinse them – you really don’t need to,” said Celia Kuperszmid Lehrman, deputy home editor at Consumer Reports. “It wastes a huge amount of water to rinse your dishes. We conduct tough tests – we call it our monster mash of difficult-toclean items – and we leave them overnight.

Esthetics While stainless steel is a popular finish, it tends to show fingerprints easily. “I’ve seen a big trend change toward white and black with stainless steel accents,” Cooper said. “Some people are getting away from stainless steel because of the fingerprints and smudging.”


It’s worth pointing out that most stainless steel dishwashers feature integrated controls located on the top of the door. It gives a smooth look – one that’s prone to smudging, yes – that also might prevent accidental washes. “From the esthetic point of view, it looks a lot cleaner and more sleek than to have the controls on the front,” Cooper said. “And if you have children in the home, they want to push buttons. With the controls hidden on the top, you might not have the dishwasher accidentally running.”

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No matter your preference, one thing is certain about a new dishwasher: It’ll save you one housework headache. “Dishwashers in that way are my favorite appliance,” Lehrman said. “Just put your dirty dishes in the dishwasher. It takes you less work and by doing less work it’s actually good for the environment and ­ good for your wallet. It’s where being lazy pays off!” If you have the opportunity to select a dishwasher for your new home, follow these expert tips when you compare models.

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Home Faucets Kitchen faucets are among the hardest working fixtures in your home. Along with the kitchen sink, the faucet gets used numerous times a day and should be durable and reliable enough to provide years of worry free service. The right faucet for your kitchen should be attractive and fit with the decor, however, since it is such a hardworking fixture in your kitchen it can’t be “just another pretty face” to ensure it provides years of trouble-free operation day after day. Whether you are remodeling your kitchen and installing updated fixtures, or just looking to replace a tired old kitchen faucet, chances are you may find yourself somewhat overwhelmed by the array of faucet choices. There is much more involved in choosing a kitchen faucet than just its finish and handle configuration. When you have a better understanding of the differences among the various technologies you will be able understand the basic faucet specifications and descriptions, and you will be able to better decide on a faucet that works best for you, based on your needs and budget. In addition to the various types of kitchen faucet available, there are 4 key factors to consider, which include: ›› ›› ›› ››

Configuration Style Finish Construction and Valve Type

Configuration The configuration of a faucet refers to things like the quantity of handles, mounting style (wall or countertop) and the configuration of the spout (conventional or pull-out/pull-down). You need to decide whether you want a two-handle or a single lever configuration. Two-handled faucets generally have a more traditional look and provide one handle for each of the hot and cold water. A single-lever faucet combines the operation of hot and cold water together through the operation of a single lever. The orientation of the lever will regulate the amount of water coming out of the spout as well as the temperature. The number of handles and any other options like side sprays and filtered water dispensers will also determine the number of holes required in your sink, countertop or both. A single-lever faucet without any additional accessories requires only one hole, whereas a faucet with two-handles and a side sprayer will require 4 holes (one for each handle, the spout and the side sprayer). The mounting style refers to where the faucet is mounted (on the countertop or wall mount). Wall mounted faucets include both the primary faucets as well as specialty items like pot fillers. The main factor here is that how your faucet is mounted will determine where the associated plumbing needs to be. If you’re just replacing an existing faucet with no additional remodeling, you’ll need to stay with the original location. If you’re doing a more extensive 80

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remodel or building from scratch, you have a choice of mounting options.

Faucet Styles A faucet’s style primarily refers to its functional and aesthetic design. When you start looking for a new faucet you typically look for a style that appeals to you and then proceed to the other deciding factors. Style features to consider include things like spout design (conventional or gooseneck), location of the lever for single handle faucets (on the side or behind the spout), faucet handle shape and size (smooth, multi-lobed, minimalist) as well as design like traditional, contemporary or professional style. However, style isn’t only aesthetic. Style also has some bearing on how the faucet will function. Conventional spouts, which extend out at roughly a 45-degree angle usually have good reach but might not be ideal for filling large pots. Gooseneck faucets, on the other hand, typically do a better job at accommodating large pots because the spout opening is higher over the sink.

Finish A faucet’s finish refers to the surface coating on the spout and handles. The finish provides both a decorative appeal and a protective coating. There are several different faucet finishes available and they include chrome, brushed nickel, bronze, hand-rubbed bronze, stainless steel, brass and many others. In addition to these colored finishes is the process by which some of them are applied. An increasing amount of faucets are receiving a “PVD” finish, or Physical Vapor Deposition. This is a process that adds metallic ions in a vaporous form on the surface of the faucet. It provides a very tough surface protection, making the faucet very resistant to corrosion, tarnish and even scratching. Finishes that are meant to “age”, as in the case of hand-rubbed bronze, don’t have a PVD finish. Chrome faucets also don’t have the finish because chrome provides it’s own protection against tar-


nishing. However, test have proven that PVD coatings are over 20 times more resistant to abrasion than chrome. Some types of PVD finishes include brushed bronze and nickel, as well as, polished brass, gold and nickel. Colored coatings are another type of faucet finish, which are usually applied using a powder-coating process that’s baked on. These finishes offer an alternative to the metallic finishes.

There are several different faucet finishes including chrome, brushed nickel, bronze, hand-rubbed bronze, stainless steel, brass and many others.

Construction and Valve Type of Faucets A faucet’s construction is the material it is made from, as well as, how its made and the type of valve it uses to control the flow of water. All the beauty and style aside, this is what determines how well the faucet operates and how long it will last. Kitchen faucets are now made from a wide variety of materials including stainless steel, brass and even plastic. Plastic faucets are made in a wide variety of finishes and colors, including nonmetallic colors. However, where durability and longevity of wear are concerned, they don’t come close to their brass and steel counterparts. Brass faucets come in two varieties: cast brass and tubular brass. Cast brass is usually thicker and more durable than tubular in most cases. Brass also needs to be coated to prevent tarnishing. Common coatings include chrome plating and any of the other PVD coatings we mentioned. Stainless steel offers strength and durability, combined with excellent corrosion resistance. It also provides a good match to kitchens with stainless appliances and/or sinks.

One of the most important parts of the faucet, in regards to reliability and delivery of the water, is the faucet valve. If there is going to be any part that will eventually wear or cause problems, it is the valve. There are four types of faucet valves: compression, ball, cartridge and ceramic disk. The most important distinction between these types of valves is the relationship between their construction and their overall level of reliability.

Compression Valve Faucets Compression valve faucets are noticeable by separate hot and cold water handles. They are the oldest and simplest form of valve, controlling the water by turning a screw-like handle that compresses a valve against a seal, usually a rubber washer. These valves tend to wear out the fastest, causing dripping faucets. However, they are usually easy to maintain.

Ball Valves Ball valves are in single lever faucets. Slots within the ball valve regulate and mix the hot and cold water flow through the back and forth, side to side motion of the lever on top of the valve

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Home Faucets – continued

In

The pull-off faucet allows the user to remove the faucet’s spout head.

body. These valves don’t have washers but do have more parts making them a bit more complex.

Cartridge Valve Faucets Cartridge valve faucets use a brass and plastic cartridge that is more reliable than the washer system used in compression faucets. There are also fewer problems with this type of faucet because they aren’t as complex as the other types of valves. This also means they are easier to repair when something does go wrong.

Ceramic Disc Faucet Valves A ceramic disc faucet valve uses two highly polished and very hard ceramic disks that slide across each other. This movement controls the water flow by opening or restricting the passage of water through openings in the disk. This type of faucet construction is considered the most durable and long-lasting. However, it is more expensive than other types of valves to fix when something goes wrong. Choose a faucet size that complements your sink. A large faucet will tend to overpower a small sink, while the opposite is true when a small faucet is used with a large, three-bowl sink. Make sure the faucet you choose has adequate reach, meaning that it can swing in an arc large enough to dispense water to a good portion of the sink’s basins. The faucet’s reach is determined by the horizontal distance from the spout opening to where it connects to the sink or countertop.

regards to pull-out and pull-down faucets, this isn’t really an issue because these features effectively increase the range of where the water can be delivered.

Faucet Technologies Even though the main purpose of a kitchen faucet is to deliver water, with current faucet technology, today’s faucets do offer an amazing array of conveniences and functional options. You owe it to yourself to look into all of the new advancements in kitchen faucets before making a decision. Some of the advancements in kitchen faucet technology include:

Adjustable Height Faucets Being able to adjust your faucet’s height up or down can be a huge convenience. This is a huge benefit when filling tall pots and containers, as well as doing other kitchen activities.

Water Filtration Faucets Installing a kitchen water filtration faucet can help take care of water taste and purity. These types of faucets are used along with a water filtration system, usually a filter cartridge that installs below the sink.

Hands Free Operation / Motion Sensor Faucets Hands free faucets provide added levels of convenience. If your hands are dirty or if you have touched raw meat, you can just put your hands in front of the faucet to turn on the water and wash them off. Motion detectors are operated by a remote electronics package that operates off the household electricity or batteries. These faucets have a battery backup in case of a power outage. Water temperatures and flow times can be pre-set giving you additional control over faucet operation.

Touch-Sensitive Operation The user is able to turn the faucet on and off with just a touch to the handle or spout. This is another way to avoid contaminating the handle from soiled hands because you can just touch the spout with your wrist or forearm to control the water.

Pull-Down, Pull-Out and Pull-Off Faucets This style faucet borrows the concept of the side spray faucet and allows the user to remove the faucet’s spout head, which is connected to a hose that snakes through the spout. This greatly increases the reach and accessibility of the faucet stream. 82

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Variable-Flow Heads Several faucets are now designed to conserve water and that’s achieved by regulating the water flow through the faucet head.

Easy-Clean Surfaces Surface coatings offer a finish that resists spotting and soiling and enables easy cleaning with a dry cloth. These types of coatings allow your faucet to look clean longer between cleanings.

High Temperature Limit Stops These faucets have an added sensor that you set the maximum temperature to eliminate the risk of scalding. The stop restricts the movement of the handle so that it’s impossible to run water that’s too hot.

Aerator Faucet Heads This option adds air to the spray stream for a more gentle spray stream for a more gentle spray when you need it. Aerator faucet heads are ideal for washing fragile fruits and other delicate items or to avoid splash.

Water Conserving Faucets Several faucets have a water conservation feature which use less water without any reduction in water pressure or flow. Faucets are a combination of aesthetics and functionality. You want to choose one that looks good but that also works well for you. There is a huge variety of choices out there and while it may seem a bit overwhelming, it doesn’t need to be.

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Always on alert Home security systems can save property – and lives By Christine James Your home is your castle. Although fortification methods have changed over the centuries, the need for defenses has not. Once upon a time, we used moats, arrow-slits and cauldrons of boiling oil to beat back incursions. Now, a small keypad or computer tablet is all a homeowner needs to keep intruders at bay. Coming home to the aftermath of a burglary is a heart-sinking moment. The sense of violation is rivaled only by panic as you race to check if your family and pets are all right, and whether your most valuable and irreplaceable treasures have been pilfered. The regret of not having taken precautions against a break-in is a haunting one. The feeling of vulnerability, victimization and loss is hard to shake. The solution is to utilize the protections made available to us by an industry devoted to crime prevention and emergency response. The tools of the trade are evolving daily as technology leaps forward, allowing security experts to fine-tune options that close the net around would-be thieves. The key is to be consistent about arming your system, says EW Bratcher, president of Prescott Valley-based B&W Fire Security Systems LLC. “Most of the time it happens kind of like car accidents, when you’re just going down the street and don’t put your seatbelt on. You’re just running a quick errand and you forget to put your security system on – that’s the time when someone decides to break in real quick, get in and get out.” While anti-burglary technology is advancing all the time, the chief methods to deter criminal activity will never change. “Your good old standbys still work,” says Bratcher. “Lock your doors. We are in Prescott, and all of us have the habit of thinking ‘nothing bad ever happens here.’ Unfortunately, it does. So lock windows and doors and leave some lights on. Criminals don’t want to be seen. Don’t let your hedges and bushes get too overgrown around your windows,” as dense foliage can provide cover for nefarious activities.

For those who worry about false alarms and potential policeissued fines, Bratcher points out, “There’s no such thing as a false alarm. Something set it off; we just need to figure out what it is. “Not too long ago, I went to see a customer who has a restaurant in the Prescott area, and he was mad because he was going to get a false alarm charge,” Bratcher recounts. “I said, ‘Let’s go check out the door that set off the alarm.’ Sure enough, I see huge pry marks. I said, “Were these pry marks on the door before?” He says, “No, those are new.” So someone had a pry bar and the lock hadn’t broken yet, but the door (opened far enough) to set off the alarm. (The owner) had just assumed it was a false alarm because the door was still shut.” Another concern some residential customers have is that pets will set off a system’s motion detectors. “They’ve made a lot of headway on the motion detectors,” Bratcher assures. “They’ve got what they call ‘pet-immune’ motion detectors, and those are weight-sensitive. So you can adjust them from zero pounds all the way up to 100 pounds, and the motion sensors will discriminate that much mass. Heat mass is what it’s looking for, and you can adjust that. “We try not to go too high on that weight scale,” Bratcher stressed, indicating that an especially large dog could be heavier than a flyweight thief. Another option is to use the “stay mode,” which arms only the entry points – doors and windows. “A lot of people say, ‘I’m going to be home, and I can’t hear if anyone comes in downstairs.’ You can leave your system in the ‘stay mode,’ so that if anyone opens a door or a window, it will set the alarm off. There are a lot of twostory homes here, and people are concerned if someone breaks in, they won’t know until it’s too late.” In that way, alarms can literally be lifesavers, as an unexpected confrontation with an intruder is a highly risky situation.

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The Future is Now

‘Smart homes’ are no longer just science fiction The world’s tech visionaries are still working on flying cars and robot maids, but we’re already living a “Jetsons” lifestyle. The 1960s Hanna-Barbera cartoon depicts a gadget-centric futuristic society in which all of life’s conveniences are just a button-press away. In many ways, that day has arrived – with help from the home security industry, which has been a leader in developing and implementing interconnected, remote-controlled “smart home” technology. “The biggest advances are user access via smartphones, smart devices,” says Bob Clark, Northern Arizona general manager for Safeguard Security. “(Customers) can arm and disarm their systems and get notifications something is going on at their house through their smartphones.” “Now, it’s more than just a security system – it’s home automation,” adds EW Bratcher, president of B&W Fire Security Systems LLC. “A popular feature is controlling your thermostat. Customers can log in (remotely) and turn up the air or the heat and come into a comfortable house. You can log in with your phone, your tablet, your computer, and (adjust) your lighting, air conditioning and heating – you can pretty much control anything now. That just keeps getting easier and easier and more adapted, more accessible.” Controlling lights from another locale has a crime prevention benefit: It “lets bad guys know there might be somebody in that house,” says Clark. “In the Prescott area, a lot of our customers are second-home people. Being able to use a smart device for lights, thermostat, things like that, is pretty important. They don’t have to drive up,” Clark explains. “You can do all kinds of great stuff. You can put a locking device on your front door so you can open the door remotely for a worker coming over without having to be there. You can open a garage door, you can turn lights on and off, you can turn thermostats up and down – pretty much administer your entire system remotely.” Anti-gravity dog treadmills and floating space cities just don’t seem that far-fetched anymore, do they? A security system can also be the difference between life and death through its medical and fire alert options. “We don’t charge any more a month for that,” Bratcher says. “Every system comes with it built in; you just have to program a button on the keypad for a medical emergency, a fire emergency. You can also buy water-resistant (devices) that you wear as a wristband or necklace, and it will connect wirelessly to the security. You just buy that device (with a one-time cost). “If you decide to get some smoke detectors or carbon monoxide detectors that are made for the alarm system, there’s no extra charge for that (alert service) either – just the (one-time cost for) the devices.” Another new security system feature that’s gaining popularity is leak detection, says Bob Clark, Northern Arizona general manager for Safeguard Security. “We put little water-sensing devices throughout the house wherever you think there might be a water leak – by the toilets, water heater, dishwasher, and on and on. It ties to the water main in the house, and we can automatically shut the water off, so it limits the damage. And any insurance company out there loves that.” In fact, most insurance companies offer a discount to homeowners who install a security system – an incentive that usually increases with the number of property-protecting features. Is a security system worth the cost? The monthly fees can be surprisingly affordable. And the peace of mind is priceless.

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Homeowners Insurance 3 reasons to re-evaluate homeowners insurance Maybe you purchased homeowners insurance and then never thought about it again. After all, once taken care of, it’s not something we have to think about again, right? Wrong. Your home insurance should be an accurate reflection of your needs at all times. What most people do not realize, however, is that your needs change over time. Your insurance needs can change from year-to-year as you expand or remodel your home, or if it experiences the general wear and tear all homes do. It’s important to re-evaluate your homeowners insurance policy every year to make sure that your home is fully covered. If you don’t re-evaluate your policy once a year, you could find yourself paying more for less home insurance coverage. Here are three reasons why you should update your policy every year.

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1: New Property One of the main reasons to take stock of your homeowners policy every year is to see if you can save money. The same rule applies for the property you purchase. If, since you updated your policy, you’ve purchased a new television, exercise equipment, or any other property of value, then you’ll want to update your policy to make sure you’re covered. This is particularly true if you have replacement cost coverage, which reimburses you for the price you paid for the item without factoring in depreciation. With that in mind, it’s a good idea to hold on to the receipts of all high-value items you purchase so that you can help expedite the reimbursement process if you experience a loss. Some personal property items have policy limits and the need for a personal articles policy may be warranted so it is important to discuss this with your agent about the particular value of items.

2: Home Improvements Another good reason to reevaluate your homeowner policy on an annual basis is to make sure that any changes that you have made to your home have the appropriate coverage. Whenever you expand or remodel your home, you need to make sure that your home insurance policy reflects the increased property value. Major changes often cause property values to shoot through the roof. The home you own is simply worth more after a few simple changes. You need to make sure that your new, more valuable, home is well covered. Prescott Resort Amenities: Full Service hotel & casino conference facilities 16,000 square feet of meeting space full service salon & spa fitness center

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You can also often save money on your policy if you add a home security system to your house. These systems reduce the chances of a burglary, often meaning that insurance companies can offer you the same coverage with less risk. Most insurance companies will pass the savings on to you in the form of lower rates.


If you miss your chance to re-evaluate your policy limits, you may find yourself paying a premium that does not reflect your circumstances. Don’t let this happen to you.

3: Adjust for Inflation This could be the most important reason to update your policy every year. The value of your property, and the cost to rebuild it, can increase over time due to inflation. That doesn’t mean, however, that the amount of coverage you have will increase with inflation, which could leave you drastically underinsured if you experience a total loss of your home. Fortunately, many insurance policies come with inflation guard coverage, which automatically increases your coverage by a certain percentage every year.

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Inflation guard coverage is typically available for homeowners who cover 100% of the value of their home. If you cover 80% or less your insurance company may not be obligated to cover all of the cost of rebuilding your home. By revisiting your policy once a year, you can be sure that every inch of your home has appropriate coverage.

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If you just take a few minutes every year to look around and take note of changes, you can save a lot of money, and ensure you have adequate coverage, in the long run.

928.708.0292 www.njbuildersinc.com MYLES BAXTER Exclusive Agent/ Personal Financial Representative 1301 E. Gurley St Prescott, AZ 86301 928-776-0976 | 928-925-3141 mylesbaxter@allstate.com

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Reverse Mortgage The reverse mortgage concept is surprisingly simple. Senior homeowners borrow against the equity in their principal residence in pretty much the same fashion as any home-equity refinancing. The principal money may be advanced to the borrower in installments or in a single, lump-sum advance and thereafter accrues interest like any ordinary mortgage. The difference, however, is that the borrower never has to make any interest or principal payments (although the borrower must still pay the taxes and maintenance and repair costs for the mortgaged property). It takes its popular title, the reverse mortgage, because the lender advances to the borrower and never expects any installment payments in return. So colloquially, it’s the reverse of most mortgage financing scenarios. This isn’t, of course, to suggest the borrower miraculously never has to pay any interest or pay back the principal ­borrowed. Of

course, the borrower has to pay interest and pay back the principal borrowed but just not in regular installments. Instead, all interest and principal continually get added to the amount owing and are all payable in one lump-sum balloon payment at the end of the term.

The older the borrower is, the more the lender can advance. A truly lucky borrower (for many reasons) is the one who takes out a reverse mortgage and then far outlives the anticipated age of the death. The borrower could in effect, “beat the bank”. You will never owe more than the market value of the home.

REVERSE MORTGAGE TURN EQUITY INTO CASH

What if: A borrower needs to sell his/her house prior to death, in order to move into assisted living or another family member’s home, or simply wants to downsize to a smaller house?

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Answer: The borrower owns the home and can sell it at any time. They or their heir’s only obligation is to pay off the loan when the house is sold or the last spouse permanently leaves the home.

Bill Binkey

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A reverse mortgage’s term to maturity is unusual. The reverse mortgage doesn’t mature at a fixed time. Instead, reverse mortgages mature whenever the borrower dies or permanently moves out. (in effect being paid by the borrower’s heirs or by the sale proceeds)

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Another option for seniors, the net proceeds may be added to a reverse (no monthly payments required) loan to buy the ‘downsized’ home. At the end of the day, it’s still pretty simple; will a Reverse Mortgage, with no payments required, make a positive difference in your life?


Moving 101 By Sue Marceau Moving a household across town, from one coast to another, or anywhere in between makes little difference in how relocation should be approached, planned and executed. The only distinction between sweet dreams or nightmarish chaos accrues to someone trust worthy and knowledgeable to blaze the trail. That could be you, a family member, or a hired professional. Good advice at the journey’s outset could avert breakdowns on the trail, echoing an Old West wagon master’s triumph over uncharted territory while successfully delivering unprepared city slickers to Gold Rush country. That grizzled cowboy, or the wagon train’s handsome scout in the old Westerns, for example, might have cautioned that a piano would not fit in the small covered wagon and was a bust for value long before the first glimpse of Pike’s Peak. Today’s backdrop doesn’t include the covered wagon, but the script matches for many individuals or families rightsizing into their next phase of life. Whether acquiring a larger home for a growing family or scaling back an empty nest, what to take and how to move it remains a challenge. The modern wagon master is someone akin to Barbara Kult, owner of In Your Space Consulting, a local firm specializing in senior move

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management, along with de-cluttering, planning, organizing, staging, and multiple related services. As a member of the National Association of Senior Move Managers (NASMM), Kult’s practice targets the specialized relocation needs of adults 50+ and older. However, her recommendations for a smooth transition apply to any transfer of home and hearth, and have benefited diverse client groups. The map to the gold mine reads the same regardless of personal situation: older or younger, do-it-yourself mover or candidate for professional assistance, higher income or lower income, rental property or owned residence. Everyone confronts the same squeaky wheel of reality checks, leaving behind things that no longer make sense, and/or being drawn into situations that stretch finances, test perseverance and defy logic. In a family with young children, siblings may not want to leave behind their schools and friends. The desired career path of a trailing spouse might not be available in the new area. Aging parents may prefer to muddle along in their home of 40 years. Often, it’s other members of the family making the decision to relocate, leaving those directly affected feeling “like a deer caught in the headlights.” Elements to consider in making any household move include floor planning, sorting, packing, move coordination, unpacking, settling in, liquidation, putting a house on market, staging and cleaning empty houses.

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Walking through one of the most difficult relocation scenarios – a senior parent not acknowledging that it’s time to accept help, or perhaps, move into a different living arrangement – offers guidance for how to think about and implement any household move. Even people not ready to relocate may recognize the advantages of aging in place by de-cluttering living spaces, clearing rooms of navigational hazards, and making similar preparations to lighten a


later journey to the mother lode. Some forward thinkers put their home and private affairs in order before unanticipated circumstances spiral beyond their control and compel their children to take up the slack. Kult’s journey began with moving her 87-year-old mother from Illinois to Prescott. She recalled sorting through 60 years of her mother’s life, helping her packing up, traveling together across country, moving her mother into a new residence one morning days later, and participating in a welcome party that afternoon. As others expressed awe that it all had occurred so quickly and seamlessly, Kult realized she had a gift. “There were no fights, arguments or tears,” she said, of the preparations she had made with her mother for the move. “It became about finding an avenue to teach people that there is a better way.” A major milestone in rightsizing or relocation is the person “understanding, accepting and embracing change” she explained. Once that emotional acceptance plays out, efforts turn to laying out the new location and what reasonably can be placed within it. Kult provided several tips for a smooth rightsize and relocation: ›› Allow at least two months to organize and complete the move Make a floor plan of the new living space ›› Maintain a notebook, with the floor plan and all ­movingrelated documents, in one place ›› Retain material things that deliver joy or functional value ›› Look for ways to replace single gadgets with multi-functional devices

›› Make decisions while you are able (and not leave them to others) ›› Choose a moving company based on time in business and references, liability coverage, professional attitude and appearance, and quality of equipment (vehicles) ›› Avoid spending money and bringing more things into the home as you weed out the old ›› Plan for the unpack, grouping items for the rooms in which they will be placed, not necessarily where you packed them ›› Keep calm and stay organized ›› Stop, step back and successfully complete smaller tasks, if you start feeling overwhelmed ›› Manage expectations to reduce disappointment by asking for facts, not assuming “We have to be realistic,” Kult said. “The first thing to do is a floor plan showing exactly what’s going to fit. There should be no surprises. We are not taking things that will not fit and end up with them sitting in the hallway or out on the lawn … Focus on keeping the best and letting go of the rest. We can all use about 20 percent of what we own; the rest is fluff and stuff … If something makes your heart sing, keep it … A special photo … or piece of furniture … whatever it is … if you look at it and are happy, you need to keep it.” The professional move culminates with a “reveal” or unveiling: “Lights are on. Beds are made. Everything is put away. They just come in and enjoy. We see the looks on their faces. They start to cry. They cannot believe it’s so beautiful. I say to my crew: ‘there’s your reward.’”

Everyone’s Good Daughter ... “What miracle workers and life savers Barbara and her team of angels were ... We were packed, moved, unpacked, settled in and had dinner in our new downsized home all in two days.”

Keeping you independent and involved through the Transitions in Life • Senior Move Manager (sort, pack, move, settle-in) • Decluttering/Organizing/Staging • Life Care Planning/ Mobile Notary • Liquidations/Estate Sales

Barbara Kult

Owner Cell: 928-379-2664 Home: 928-636-0730 KultBarbara@aol.com www.InYourSpaceAZ.com

To continue our care and comfort of our clients In Your Space Consulting is recruiting for team members.

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Feng Shui When we’re hungry for change, we may feel the need to spruce up our living spaces. Rooms that feel cluttered, drab and unappealing drag on our energy. Applying the basic inspired tenets of the ancient Chinese art and science of feng shui can transform and re-energize any space, improving the way we feel. Feng shui is based on ancient science, the wisdom of placement and aesthetic laws, originating over 3,000 years ago in China where palaces and temples were designed to harness the most beneficial chi or life force. To put this simply, feng shui is the design of spaces, offices and total homes that make occupants feel at ease and in ­harmony with their surroundings. Feng shui means “wind” and “water” and it takes into consideration the location, the land, the building shape, neighboring structures, use of rooms, furniture, colors, landscaping and decorative items, all of which make people feel at ease with their surroundings, increasing the

positive chi. Feng shui is not a ritualistic hocus-pocus misconception; it is a practice that has evolved over thousands of years of observing patterns of humans interacting with their environment and discerning what brings a healthier, happier, more successful life.­ Getting started with feng shui can be easy when one starts with the feng shui basics and then you can move on to the more complex and multifaceted components of fine-tuning the chi in your home and life.

Put your home or home search in good hands.

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How does one start with feng shui? Clear out your clutter. Remove everything that you do not love. It is said that this first step is essential because removing stagnant energy is the start of harmonious house chi. Next make sure that your home or office or space has good air quality and good light. Open your blinds and windows and allow for as much natural light as possible to enter your space. Make sure your home or office has the five basic feng shui elements; wood, fire, earth, metal and water. These feng shui elements interact between one another in certain ways which can be productive or destructive.

ing natural elements into a space will aid the circulation of chi and help achieve a balance and yield an indoor environment of peace and calm. Healthy indoor air quality is an essential aspect of good feng shui and materials used inside our homes, such as cleaning products and furnishings can either contribute significantly to poor air quality or support positive feng shui. There is so much more to feng shui – how a room affects our attitudes, our ­personality, how a color affects our mood, where to place mirrors, what walls to put a fireplace on and what earth energies may be under our home. Simple changes can get our life moving and by using feng shui we can bring positive changes into our home, office and spaces. Feng shui is multifaceted, but at its center is a search for balance and harmony.

Each element is also represented by a specific color and color is one of the easiest ways to use these five elements to bring good chi and harmony into a home or office. Wood is represented by green and blue and this element will enhance the energy of heath, vitality and growth in your life. Fire is red, a color of power and vibrancy, which is associated with fame and recognition. Earth is pinks, tans and golds and will support stability and nourishment for your relationships. Metal is white and gray and gives clarity, efficiency, sharpness, precision and will keep us balanced. Water is black and dark blue and gives us a calmness and an ease of communication. Knowing how to use colors can strengthen and improve energy and harmony in any room. When considering how to apply feng shui principles, it helps to have a trained practitioner make a map, or bagua, analyzing how energy, or chi, moves through our home. The bagua will determine ways to help chi flow and settle in appropriate places to support all aspects of life, by creating a symbolic map of life issues which is overlaid on your home or office as well as individual rooms. The bagua includes areas for wealth, fame and reputation, partnership, creativity, travel and h ­ elpful people, career, higher knowledge and family. For example, the far left hand corner at the rear of your home is the wealth area of your home. So if that area of your home is full of clutter and dimly lit or is an area that you do not like, money and abundance issues may manifest in your life. While a complete feng shui treatment may require major revamping, there are lowcost steps to immediately create more harmony while eliminating toxins that are unhealthy and disrupt energy flow. Bring

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Harvesting Rainwater Did you know that the average roof (1,000 sq. ft.) collects 600 gallons of water for every inch of rain one inch of rain. So let’s not let all of that water go to waste! Rainwater harvesting systems provide distributed storm water runoff containment while simultaneously storing water which can be used for plant irrigation and other uses. There are two types of rainwater harvesting systems; active and passive. The components of an active system are rain barrels, usually 50 to 100 gallon and/ or cisterns of 100 gallon capacity plus. There are many potential uses for captured active rain water such as watering plants and washing cars. By “actively harvesting” rainwater this means that you are collecting, storing and recycling water that would otherwise be sent to municipal sewer systems. Arizona Seamless Gutters on 6th Street in Prescott is a wonderful resource for rain barrels and system collection and information. It is relatively easy to get started with an active harvesting system because you just need to purchase or make rain barrels out of a food-grade drum and a hose spigot. The rain barrel needs to be positioned under a roof downspout and when it rains – collection is underway! With an active system, you need to plan for overflow or make sure your direct the excess water to other outdoor

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Passive rainwater collection systems are made from berms, basins, rain gardens and swales that have been created in a yard. Passive systems rely on micro-topography to direct water towards depressions in the landscape where water will infiltrate the soil and benefit the landscape plants. Depending on the size of your yard and area for collection you could achieve a far greater storage area because soil has more capacity than a tank. Water runoff from the roof and/ or driveways would have to be directed to the ponding and retention area. In most cases this would and should involve the work of a landscaper to ensure that the water is being captured correctly and that your plants can handle water inundation and also periods By “actively harvesting” rainwater this means that you are collecting, storing and recycling water.

IRRIGATION DEEP ROOT FEEDING

Arizona Community Tree Council, Inc.

vegetation areas. It is important to keep the rain barrels covered with screens to prevent mosquito breeding and other debris from entering the collection site.

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Active Systems

Passive Systems

CALCULATE RAINWATER HARVESTING POTENTIAL

COMPONENTS

Collection Area (sq. ft.) x Rainfall (in/yr) / 12(in/ft) = Cubic Feet of water/year

Berms, basins, rain gardens, vegetated swales

Rain barrels (50 -100 gal); cisterns (100 + gal)

Cubic Feet/Year x 7.43 (gallons/cubic foot) = Gallons/Year

BENEFITS Many potential uses for the water

Direct water from roofs, driveways, and walkways to vegetated basins or rain gardens

GETTING STARTED Purchase or make a rain barrel out of a food-grade drum and hose spigot

Less expensive; soil has far greater storage capacity than a tank

Position barrel under a roof downspout

Choose native plants that require little water but can handle periods of inundation

contamination of surface water, then try rain water harvesting. Rainwater can be used for nearly any purpose that requires water. Rainwater is especially good for plants because it is free of salts and other minerals that harm root growth. As rainwater percolates into the soil, it forces salts down and away from root zones, allowing roots to grow better and making plants more drought tolerant.

What permits are required to install a Rainwater Harvesting System?

TIPS Plan for overflow; direct towards outdoor vegetation

For example: A 500 sq. ft. roof that gets 36 in/yr will produce 1,500 cubic feet or 11,145 gallons of water per year.

Recharges groundwater without creating stormwater

of dryness. These areas should also be landscaped so it looks like a nature part of the yard. If you are considering installing a passive rainwater collection system, it would be wise to obtain a soil test to determine whether the site is suitable for water collection. Harvesting rain water has been around of decades and going green is becoming increasingly popular and it is important to remember that small steps can make a huge difference. If you want to reduce demand on our existing water supply, reduce run-off, erosion and

NONE for the collection of rainwater to use outside the house. There are no current applications for using rainwater for purposes like toilet flushing or potable water. There are no written codes and/or requirements for dealing with potable water from Rain water Harvesting systems. There are no cross connections allowed and rain water cannot be run into the municipal water systems. There are no plumbing codes because potable water connections are not allowed. There are no written policies for using rainwater by maintaining standards for public health protection. There are no codes to define the means of piping arrangements to protect potable water from becoming contaminated. There are no codes for the purpose of supplying rainwater to hose bibs, water closets, urinals, domestic washers, irrigation, etc.

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decaRol compaNy “We look forward to the opportunity to discuss how the DeCarol team can contribute to the success of your project.” – Chuck Merritt, owner

BEFORE To learn more about DeCarol Company, our integrity, value and quality visit:

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AFTER

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Rock Stars By Christine James Yavapai County homeowners know how to make the most of desert landscaping. We plant drought-resistant trees, shrubs and flowers, and mix things up with brightly colored container gardens and unique yard art. The aesthetically ambitious among us may add water features, fire pits or decorative lighting. But some people want even more drama in their landscape. They want to make a bolder impression. More specifically, they want to make a boulder impression. “Boulders are quite a statement piece when placed strategically into a landscape,” says Sue Burgin, owner of Earthworks Garden Center and Landscape Supply in Chino Valley. “They can have a personality of their own and really add dimension to a yard.” Boulders act as sculptural accent pieces, creating height, texture, interest, character and impact. Yavapai County is fortunate to have a number of rock quarries from which residents can choose boulders in colors like Sedona red, soft pink, bluish-purple, golden, tan, dark brown, gray and more. Rocks with intricate lava flow or swirl patterns. Rustic or fancy. Lichen-covered. Iron-stained. Speckled and dappled. While some might think of boulders as mammoth spheres, they actually range greatly in size and shape. Those used in gardens can be anywhere from 12 inches to several feet in diameter.

Chris Welborn, owner of Vicente Landscaping, makes the distinction between fractured and “Surface Select” boulders. “Fractured boulders are created by blasting an area of solid rock to make smaller rocks. They have sharp edges, cut and fractured in the mining process,” he explains. “Surface Select boulders have naturally been on the surface for years, probably centuries, so they don’t have the rough edges that the fractured boulders do. A lot of times they have lichen on them. When you put a boulder with lichen in your yard, it gives the impression that it’s been there forever.”

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Boulders have their appeal depending on personal preference. “It’s every person’s perspective based on what they are trying to do with their landscape,” says Samantha Leigh, office manager with Prescott Dirt LLC, which carries “all different sizes and colors of rock from all over Arizona.” Lynn Miller, co-owner with husband Tom of G&S Gravel in Mayer, calls their selection “a virtual treasure hunt,” given the variety of shapes, sizes and colors. “Customers are invited to tour the yard and pick whatever boulders strike their fancy,” says Miller. Another factor to consider is the hardness of the boulder. While most are extremely resilient, some mining veins produce a softer variety that’s more vulnerable to erosion. “There are certain types of rock that’s always soft,” says Welborn. “If a customer likes the color of that rock, we make sure they’re aware that it is a soft rock. Some customers don’t care because they know they’re going to refresh it in three or four years as it breaks down and disintegrates. There are soft rocks that are usable; you just have to use it in the right place, and have the right mind-frame that the rock is going to break down over time.” Once you’ve found the perfect boulder, you’ll want to consult with a professional landscaper to ascertain ideal placement. Boulders have good sides and bad sides, and experienced landscapers have the vision to determine the positioning that will show off the rock to its best advantage, creating an impressive silhouette. Haphazard boulder arrangement can undermine the intended effect. “When someone just plops a boulder here, throws one over there, and there’s one over there, (you can tell) they bought five boulders off the back of a truck, rolled them off and plopped them in their yard,” notes Welborn. “It looks like a little boulder farm.” The proper way to install a boulder to look natural, according to Welborn, is to partially bury it. “Rule of thumb is about 25 percent to a third of the boulder should be buried in the ground to give it a natural look, like it’s been there for a while.” “We like to install boulders in groupings, or outcroppings, with plantings around them,” he adds. “(Some people say) ‘I don’t want just rock in my yard, because it’s boring-looking.’ And it can be boring-looking if all you do is have a flat yard that you put rock in. But there are things you can do with the rock, with the different shapes and sizes and colors, that will break it up and give it an interesting look.” “There are literally hundreds of ways to incorporate decorative rock and greenery, cactus, and blooming bushes into your landscaping,” says G&S’s Miller. Rock appeals to homeowners because it’s the ultimate no-­ maintenance garden feature. “Other than pulling a few weeds, there isn’t any maintenance for rocks,” says Prescott Dirt’s Leigh. Of course, you don’t have to water rocks, either – an important consideration in our drought-affected region. And rocks can actually help conserve water, according to Welborn. “Rock acts as a mulch,” he explains. “It can help hold moisture in the ground. Lighter-­ colored rocks especially will reflect the sun and help slow down the drying-out and evaporation of water under the rocks.” That’s good news for your foliage, your water bill, and our natural resources.

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Choosing the Perfect Toilet By Meghan Moravcik Walbert Reproduced with permission by The Arizona Republic/Republic Media Custom Publishing It will last for 30 or 40 years and will be used several times a day, yet many new-home buyers overlook the importance of a toilet’s performance, comfort and style. “When you buy your home, the first thing you use is the toilet,” said Jason Fitzsimmons, a vice president of sales for the United States for TOTO USA, a plumbing products manufacturer. “It is going to be in the house from the first day you’re in your home until the last day, so buying a nicer toilet that meets your family’s needs is essential.”

Performance The most important thing to consider about the toilets in your new home is performance, said Gray Uhl, brand education director for American Standard, a bathroom and kitchen products manufacturer. “It doesn’t matter how good a toilet looks if it doesn’t perform well,” Uhl said. “It should work flawlessly every day without you having to think about it.”

A very good toilet will have a high rating from MaP, an agency that tests and compares how well different toilets remove solid waste, Uhl said. “The homebuyer should ask the builder about the MaP score on the [new home’s] toilet,” he said. “The higher the number, the better the performance. You want one with a score of 800, 900 or preferably 1,000.” Another consideration is the amount of water a toilet uses. “The toilet is one of the biggest water-uses in your house,” Uhl said. “A 1.28-gallon toilet uses much less water and has tremendous performance. It will pay for itself.”

Discover the Difference!

Dual-flush toilets are another option. These models have two flush buttons – a small button that uses less water for liquid waste and a large button that uses more water for solid waste. “If you only push the button for the lower flow for liquid waste and use the bigger button for solid waste, it will average out to use less water overall,” Uhl said. If you opt for a dual-flush model, though, Uhl recommends one that uses a siphoning method to remove waste. “There are dualflush toilets that use a wash-down method rather than a siphoning method; those do a poor job of taking out waste water,” he said.

Comfort

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Taller toilets are becoming popular, particularly among Baby Boomers but also among younger populations, as well. These toilets – known as universal-height, right-height or comfort-height toilets – are easier to access than lower standard-height toilets. Bowl shape can make a difference too, and in fact, an elongated bowl may provide more comfort for some. “An elongated bowl is


good for taller people, while a shorter person may prefer a round bowl,” Fitzsimmons said. “This is something the buyer should consider.”

The toilet may not be considered the most attractive appliance, but for an increase in price [and depending your builder], newhome buyers can sometimes choose models that are a little easier on the eyes.

Style The toilet may not be considered the most attractive appliance, but for an increase in price [and depending your builder], newhome buyers can sometimes choose models that are a little easier on the eyes. Many models of toilets are made in two pieces – the bowl and the tank are made separately and then bolted together for an easier installation. Some toilets, however, are made as one large piece – but generally for about 50 percent more in price. The one-piece benefit? “There are fewer seams in a one-piece toilet, so they’re easier to keep clean,” Uhl said. Colors other than white are another consideration. “In the Southwest, there is a real trend for a warmer color palette; those colors seem to work better with tile and décor commonly found in the Arizona markets,” Fitzsimmons said.

Toilet-makers say they are starting to sell more bidets and high-tech toilets and toilet seats in the United States than in previous years.

While many new-home buyers aren’t ready to take the high-tech toilet plunge, Fitzsimmons recommends having a grounded electrical outlet installed within a foot or two of the toilet when your new home is being built.

“They can do a myriad of things including washing the body with warm, aerated water and drying it, along with helping clean and deodorize the bowl,” Fitzsimmons said. “It’s a more hygienic, more luxurious experience.”

“In five, 10 or 15 years from now, there will be more technologies on the market that utilize electricity,” he said. “The trend now is to put in an outlet so you can use these new technologies as they come out.”

The future

5 Questions to Ask Your Plumber If you have the opportunity to select a dishwasher for your new home, follow these expert tips when you compare models. 1. What is the MaP score on this toilet? MaP is an agency that tests and compares how well different toilets remove solid waste. Toilets are scored on a range from zero to 1,000, with 1,000 being the best. 2. How much water does this toilet use? Industry leaders say a 1.28-gallon-per-flush toilet with a high MaP score will use less water but provide high performance. 3. Is this toilet a universal/comfort height or a standard height? Universal-height and comfort-height toilets are higher – approximately the height of a dining room chair – than standard-height toilets. 4. How loud is this toilet when it is flushed? Toilets with lower water levels use more suction to pull the waste and water out of the bowl, often resulting in a louder flush. 5. Can you install a grounded outlet within a foot or two of the toilet? Installing an outlet near the toilet will allow you to use new technologies in the future.

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Gutters and Foundations By Sue Marceau There’s a five foot rule in the game of water diversion for keeping moisture away from your home’s foundation, whether the paintball parallel is applied to gutters, landscaping or rain harvesting. The aim of each ploy is dodging soil expansion and/or contraction to prevent cracking and heaving of stucco, drywall, foundations, driveways and sidewalks. “This isn’t as much of a time issue as it is a consistency issue,” strategized Travis Stedman, president/CEO of Arizona Seamless ­Gutters, Inc., of battling the enemy forces. “Soil likes familiarity. So, if you make a drastic change to it, effects are much more substantial … Basically, it isn’t the length time or amount of moisture that most affects change in soil-causing (problems), it’s the d ­ ramatic change in the moisture content.” The consistency and behavior of Arizona’s dirt, a type of soil called “caliche,” makes the central Arizona high desert and other arid areas of the state susceptible to water retention and detention challenges. The word, “caliche,” though Spanish, originates from a Latin term meaning lime. Caliche usually is light-colored, but varies from white to light pink to reddish-brown, Wikipedia reports. Generally, such soil appears on or near the surface, but also can be found in deeper subsoil deposits. Layers of caliche can fluctuate from a few inches to feet thick, and a single location might contain multiple tiers. “Caliche is very stubborn, expansive clay soil,” Stedman explained, laying out the rules of engagement. “Unfortunately, the clay minerals in caliche have very intense absorption power for water molecules. When caliche becomes wet, it begins to expand. As soon as it dries, it contracts and may crack. Because of this, a home’s foundation can be affected by shifting or cracking, due to the movement in soil.” But clay isn’t the only target adversely affected by moisture, he stated, because concrete itself can absorb vapor (gaseous water), which infiltrates “the tiny pores in concrete, causing it to swell and expand.”

The best way to protect a home is employing weaponry – such as post-tension slabs and gutters in proper caliber and load – to keep water at bay. For a newly built home, post-tension slabs are a foundation fortress worth discussing with an engineer or company trained and certified in that technology, Stedman said. In post-tension slab construction, cables are run through the center of the slab, rather than employing rebar for reinforcement. If your chosen post-­ tension slab experts agree, this solution “can be a real benefit with the caliche soil in our area. However, if done improperly, (it) could cause more problems to the homeowner than help. “The value of post-tension slabs is (that) the way they are laid, the concrete is already stressed, so when soil moves, the slab is reactively unaffected and offers minimal to no cracking. This compares to rebar-based slabs, which are very strong in battling concrete separation, but struggle with the lateral movement of clay soils.” In addition to attacks from cracking and heaving, damaged foundation assaults from excess moisture also can cause doors and windows to stick and require extra patrols for repair and maintenance. The element of surprise adds an additional dimension to the combat zone. “Foundation issues happen over time,” explained Tim Will, ­president and owner of Willbuilt Seamless Gutters. “However, one strong rainstorm can do terrible damage to your landscape when the rainwater comes pouring off the roof, without properly working gutters and downspouts. (And that’s) not to mention unsightly splashing onto stucco and windows, which means having to repaint more often.”

Homeowners are advised to check that their gutters and downspouts are free and clear of debris.

Gutters also help protect fascia from damage such as peeling paint and rotting wood, which occur regularly with the intense sun and hard rains in this area, Will added. By blocking uncontrolled water from pounding on them during monsoons and snowstorms, fascia may furlough longer between repairing and repainting. 100

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Water should be restrained from “running directly off the roof and onto the soil near the foundation,” Stedman recommended. “The gutter system should be properly flowed with the proper number of downspouts to accommodate for the amount of roof area on the home. The downspouts should have extensions (above or below grade) that cover at least five feet of distance from the home.”

Bringing Your Roof ...

TO LIFE

Homeowners utilizing rainwater harvesting or rain collection barrels should be aware of the imperative that “this unit (be outfitted with) an overflow that has the same diversion specifications as the downspouts and landscaping,” Stedman alerted. “If a rain barrel isn’t properly flowed, it can spill over at much higher rates than normal rain or even downspout ejection. This spillover typically will be directly next to the foundation and can cause severe d ­ amage to it.” On a semi-annual basis, homeowners are advised to check that their gutters and downspouts are free and clear of debris and that water is not damming up and flowing over the tops of the gutters. Gutters filled with leaves, pine needs, toy balls or other debris face higher risk for damming and clogging. Special covers can help keep gutters flowing and unclogged, while also cutting down on routine cleaning, Will shared. So when the semi-annual, busy-beaver, honey-do chores pop up on the home maintenance or reservist calendar, make sure your gutters are dam-free and clearly flowing, or arm your troops with gutter covers to reduce their chances of being overrun. Either way, your gutter guy should be satisfied with your mettle.

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Know Your Local Fire Sprinkler Codes Before Building Begins You may have to install a fire sprinkler if you decided to build a home in Prescott. Prescott is a community built within a national forest, which is one of the reasons people enjoy living here. But, it also means the community is vulnerable to forest fires. While there may be some confusion, based on recent legislation about whether or not municipalities can require sprinklers in one and two family homes, Prescott had its code in place prior to the revised legislation, therefore the city can require sprinklers legally. There is also legislation this year (2015) about whether or not a municipality can require a fire apparatus access road be installed in order to obtain a permit. This was combined with legislation about whether or not a builder could be required to install fire Last summer the sprinkler system in this garage kept a Prescott home from burning; saving valuable contents in the garage, not to mention saving the lives of the occupants.

sprinklers if there was not a code compliant access road to the property. As of today, the answer is yes that a fire department can require a fire apparatus access road be installed to meet the code requirements. Because of this, two fire codes may apply to construction: the 2012 International Fire and Wildland/Urban Interface Code (WUI) and International Fire Code (IFC). The WUI code applies to areas in our community that have been designated as

being heavily affected by surrounding vegetation, topography, and proximity to our neighboring forest. The following criteria will determine if your new home will be required to have a residential fire sprinkler system installed: ›› Is the home more than 5,000 square feet – including the garage and storage spaces, but not including decks and patios? ›› Is a fire hydrant located within 500 feet of your property? ›› Is the street you are building your home on a dead end greater than 1,300 feet in length? ›› Is the grade of your street greater than 12 percent? ›› Is the distance from the street to the most distant point on your house greater than 150 feet? ›› Is your home only accessible through a low-water crossing and there is no other way to access your house if the low-water crossing is impassable? ›› Are there more than 10 people living in your home? ›› Will the home be greater than two stories tall? While most of the above requirements make sense when you consider the ability to get fire trucks and fireman to your home, with water, in all weather condi-

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tions, it’s the “150 foot” rule that stands out as the one that most people do not understand. After reviewing plans looking at home layouts and placement on lots this requirement is really a pretty simple process and makes a lot of sense.

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In Prescott and the surrounding area – as well as a vast majority of other fire departments the length of the fire hoses that are pre-connected and pulled off the truck to attack a fire, are 200 feet long. So, using the 150 foot measurement, the fire department knows that their hoses will reach to the most distant point on the home so they can put water on a fire that is burning inside, and go inside from there if needed. If the home is situated on the lot (beyond the 150 feet) the fire hoses cannot reach the most distant point on the home, and the fire is impossible to contain and control.

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Those are the basic parameters when a standard home in Prescott would be required to have a fire sprinkler system installed. If a property is also in the Wildland/Urban interface, there are some additional criteria and requirements that come into play. They are: If your driveway is longer than 150 feet long (a driveway is anything less than 20 feet wide, engineered and stamped to support 75,000 #’s, an all weather surface, and has 13 feet 6 inches of height clearance). In this case, not only will you have to install fire sprinklers, you will also have to install an “operational platform” next to the home. The operational platform measures 20 x 30 feet with less than a 5% grade. Additionally, you will be required to install a turnaround for fire apparatus in the form of a cul-de-sac (96 foot diameter), a 120 foot hammerhead, or a 60 foot “Y”. Prescott Fire will be happy to meet with anyone that would like to hear more about these requirements, either at their station, at your property and with your builder at any time.

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Trash Talk Don’t want to live on Planet Landfill? Recycle Remember the Great Garbage Avalanche of 2505? By Christine James All right, so it’s a catastrophe that takes place five centuries from now in a fictional movie. But the 2006 satire “Idiocracy,” which en­visioned a devolved society of simpletons, could be right about Planet Earth’s trash getting disastrously out of control – unless we make recycling a priority. Some countries are far more advanced than others in this regard. Austria, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Switzer­ land are among the world’s frontrunners, recycling up to 63 percent of their waste, according to the European Environment Agency(EEA). However, the EEA found that, overall, only 35 percent of all waste in Europe was being recycled as of 2010. That percentage must be increased to 50 percent by 2020, the European Union has mandated. “Recycling can reduce greenhouse gases and save valuable resources,” states the EEA website. “It benefits the environment by diverting waste away from landfills and by providing raw materials for new products. Recycling can also encourage innovation and create jobs.” Many world governments are boosting recycling through public awareness campaigns and by providing easy-to-use pro-

grams. And some slap fines on those who don’t separate recyclables from their garbage. A number of cities and countries charge by quantity for waste disposal, while recycling is free. The United States is lagging significantly in its recycling efforts, with a 34.5 percent rate as of 2012, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). On the positive side, the EPA notes, “recycling and composting prevented 86.6 million tons of material away from being disposed in 2012, up from 15 million tons in 1980.” More good news: According to prescottaz.gov, the City of Prescott beats the nation’s average by 4 percent, with a landfill diversion rate of 38.5 percent.

But, because America’s recycling infrastructure is still relatively nascent, there is a good deal of inconsistency, causing uncertainty and discouraging compliance. The top recycling mistakes people make involve dirty food containers and unrinsed bottles, which can contaminate the rest of the batch. Many companies also won’t take plastic grocery bags, Styrofoam or certain types of glass. Food, medical waste and diapers are verboten across the board. Some take books and glossy magazines; others don’t. Call your service provider to maximize best practices. Many local waste disposal companies are simplifying things by offering “singlestream” recycling, in which all recyclables can be put in the same bin, without sorting by type. The City of Prescott and Waste Management allow paper, cardboard, chipboard, plastics #1 through #7, glass and metals to be mixed together in provided containers. Patriot Disposal and Best Pick take single-stream convenience a step further: They sort out recyclables from garbage, so customers don’t have to do any separating. This eliminates the guesswork entirely.

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LOCAL RECYCLING RESOURCES RESIDENTIAL PICKUP: Best Pick 928-775-6659 City of Prescott 928-777-1116 Patriot Disposal 928-634-6275 United Disposal 928-636-5203 Waste Management 866-611-1915

CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL: City of Prescott Sundog Transfer Station, 928-777-1116 DLG Networks (electronics), 928-925-8679 Iron Man Recyclers, 928-541-9345 Kuhles Salvage, 928-227-1867

Hazardous materials that must be carefully disposed of at designated sites include paint, household cleaners, fertilizers, pesticides, antifreeze, motor oil, tires, electronics and batteries. A small fee is required for the disposal of certain items. Call the City of Prescott Sundog Transfer Station at 928-777-1116 or visit www.prescott-az.gov/services/ trash/recycle.php for details. That webpage also states that “household alkaline batteries no longer contain hazardous materials and may be thrown away in the garbage,” but people are exhorted to “please choose rechargeable batteries whenever possible. Most battery retailers in the tri-city area will recycle rechargable batteries.” Vehicle batteries cannot be disposed of in the garbage. Call an auto parts store or battery retailer for disposal options. Similarly, local specialty retailers may recycle any number of exhausted items you’re not sure what to do with. Home improvement stores often take fluorescent light tubes, for example, and office supply businesses may recycle printer and copier

toner. When in doubt, call your waste disposal company or a related retailer and ask. Target Corp. has been notably proactive in the recycling field since 2010, offering free disposal of plastic bags, glass, cellphones, MP3 players, ink cartridges and more. “So far, the program has kept thousands of tons of recycled materials out of landfills,” according to Target’s website. Since 2013, Target also has been utilizing the How2Recycle label program, “designed to give consumers clear, on-package recycling instructions and encourage participation in recycling programs.” “Waste not, want not” is a maxim for the ages. Not only does recycling preserve our natural resources, it keeps hazardous materials from polluting our groundwater – and hopefully will avert the Great Garbage Avalanche of 2505. Did you know that each of us puts more than 4 pounds of rubbish into landfills per day? Tossing fewer items into our trash is easier than you may think. Let’s all pledge to be enthusiastic re-users, reducers and upcyclers, and help our community, nation and planet.

Patriot Disposal, 928-634-6275 Prescott Valley Recycling, 928-775-5586 Prescott Waste Tire Yard, 928-713-6641 Southwest Waste Services, 928-634-6275 Waste Management, 866-611-1915 Yavapai Metal Recycling, 928-632-5205 Yavapai Steel & Rebar, 928-583-0998

YAVAPAI COUNTY TRANSFER STATIONS: Bagdad: 928-633-5632 Black Canyon City: 928-713-8847 Camp Verde: 928-713-8910 Congress: 928-427-3876 Cottonwood: 928-649-9733 Mayer: 928-632-1427 Paulden: 928-925-3249 Prescott: 928-777-1116 Seligman: 928-713-9769 Skull Valley: 928-442-7682

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Septic Systems There are many areas in Yavapai County with no connection to a main sewer system, therefore a septic system is the onsite facility and means of sewage disposal. The term “septic” refers to the anaerobic bacterial environment that develops in the tank which decomposes or mineralizes the waste discharged into the tank. Periodic preventive maintenance is required to remove solids that remain and gradually fill the tank, reducing its efficiency. Maintenance requires regular pumping to remove these and it is the home owners’ responsibility to maintain their septic systems. Those who disregard maintenance will eventually be faced with costly repairs when solids escape the tank and clog the clarified liquid effluent disposal system. A properly maintained system will likely not need replacement during the homeowner’s lifetime. A septic tank consists of one or more concrete or plastic tanks of between 4,000 and 7,500 liters (1,000 and 2,000 gallons); one end is connected to an inlet wastewater pipe and the other to a septic drain field. Generally these pipe connections are made with a T pipe, allowing liquid to enter and exit without disturbing any crust on the surface. Today, the design of the tank usually incorporates two chambers, each equipped with a manhole cover, and separated by a dividing wall with openings located about midway between the floor and roof of the tank. Wastewater enters the first chamber of the tank, allowing solids to settle and scum to float. The settled solids are anaerobically digested, reducing the volume of solids. The liquid component flows through the dividing wall into the second chamber, where further settlement takes place. The excess liquid, now in a relatively clear condition, then drains from the outlet into the leach field, also referred to as a drain field or seepage field, depending upon locality. A percolation test is required prior to installation to ensure the porosity of the soil is adequate to serve as a drain field. 106

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The remaining impurities are trapped and eliminated in the soil, with the excess water eliminated through percolation into the soil, through evaporation, and by uptake through the root system of plants and eventual transpiration or entering groundwater or surface water. A piping network, often laid in a stone-filled trench distributes the wastewater throughout the field with multiple drainage holes in the network. The size of the leach field is proportional to the volume of wastewater and inversely proportional to the porosity of the drainage field. The entire septic system can operate by gravity alone or, where topographic considerations require, with inclusion of a lift pump. Certain septic tank designs include siphons or other devices to increase the volume and velocity of outflow to the drainage field. These help to fill the drainage pipe more evenly and extend the drainage field life by preventing premature clogging. A properly designed and normally operating septic system is odor-free and, besides periodic inspection and emptying of the septic tank, should last for decades with minimal maintenance. A well designed and maintained concrete, fiberglass, or plastic tank should last about 50 years. Waste that is not decomposed by the anaerobic digestion eventually has to be removed from the septic tank. Otherwise the septic tank fills up and wastewater containing undecomposed material discharges directly to the drainage field. Not

only is this detrimental for the environment but, if the sludge overflows the septic tank into the leach field, it may clog the leach field piping or decrease the soil porosity itself, requiring expensive repairs. When a septic tank is emptied, the accumulated fecal sludge is pumped out of the tank by a vacuum truck. How often the septic tank has to be emptied depends on the volume of the tank relative to the input of solids, the amount of indigestible solids, and the ambient temperature (because anaerobic digestion occurs more efficiently at higher temperatures), as well as usage and system characteristics. Some systems require pumping every few years or sooner, while others may be able to go 10-20 years between pumping. However, it is recommend to pump your system every 3-5 years. An older system with an undersized tank that is being used by a large family will require much more frequent pumping than a new system used by only a few people. Excessive dumping of cooking oils and grease can cause the inlet drains to block. Oils and grease are often difficult to degrade and can cause odor problems and difficulties with the periodic emptying. Flushing non-biodegradable items such as cigarette butts and hygiene products such as sanitary napkins, tampons, and cotton buds/swabs and baby wipes will rapidly fill or clog a septic tank, so as in other systems, those materials should not be disposed of in that way.


Did you know? Pumping the septic tank is the single most important thing that can be done to maintain and extend the life of the system!

As with all drainage systems, the use of garbage disposals for disposal of waste food can cause a rapid overload of the system with solids and contribute to failure. Certain chemicals may damage the components of a septic tank, especially pesticides, herbicides, materials with high concentrations of bleach or caustic soda (lye) or any other inorganic materials such as paints or solvents. Certain chemicals can kill the septic bacteria needed for the system to operate. Most notably, even very small quantities of silver nitrate will kill an entire culture.

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Trees in the vicinity of a concrete septic tank have the potential to penetrate the tank as the system ages and the concrete begins to develop cracks and small leaks. Tree roots can cause serious flow problems due to plugging and blockage of drain pipes, added to which the trees themselves tend to grow extremely vigorously due to the ready supply of nutrients from the septic system. The flushing of salted water into the septic system can lead to sodium binding in the drain field. The clay and fine silt particles bind together and effectively waterproof the leach field, rendering it ineffective. Excessive water entering the system will overload it and cause it to fail. Checking for plumbing leaks and practicing water conservation will help optimize the system’s operation. Very high rainfall, rapid snowmelt, and flooding can all prevent a drain field from operating, and can cause flow to back up, interfering with the normal operation of the tank. High winter water tables can also result in groundwater flowing back into the septic tank.

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Wallpaper is Back Whether you are decorating your home, office, or something else, choosing the right wallpaper is crucial. Aside from basics like color, pattern, and theme, there are materials and adhesives to consider, and factors like fading, ease of cleaning, and overall durability. The perfect wall covering for a study might be disastrous in the kitchen. Before you begin looking at wallpaper, take a good long look at the room itself. How much traffic does the room get? How much light? Is your goal to make the room look larger or smaller? Smaller patterns add texture while large patterns in dark or very bright colors can make a room seem closed in. Consider whether you want to cover a single wall, two walls, or more.

Soft designs that bring quiet transformations

Before you look at wallpaper swatches, check out websites like Pinterest that offer design ideas you may not have considered. The best wallpaper websites offer slideshows that show off the versatility of their selections. Finally, consider your budget. Keep in mind that wallpaper is typically priced by the individual roll, but sold in rolls of two. Expect roughly 85% of each roll to be usable, though this will vary depending on patterns.

For the most impact, choose a wall with no windows and no doors

Inspired elegance – wallpaper that is just right for a compelling room

Themed wallpaper can make for the cutest designs for nursery dĂŠcor

Wallpaper provides an option for bringing style and color to bathroom / powder room

Striped wallpaper brings an elegant sophistication to any room

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A feature wall with a contemporary look creates a vivid focal point


Energy Efficiency We all know that saving energy, detecting energy waste and managing your energy wisely can reduce household utility bills as well as conserve our precious natural resources. A home energy audit is often the first step in making your home more efficient.

Q A

Ask Your Contractor

Exactly what is an energy audit, how much does it cost and what can a homeowner expect?

 A home energy audit is a systems approach to analyzing your home’s energy performance.

 Using the latest innovations in building science, energy experts will perform a comprehensive in-home energy analysis that will help you prioritize the improvement projects that will deliver the most energy savings at the best value.

Be sure to read our YCCA “Ask the Contractor” column in the Daily Courier Real Estate Section every Friday or online at

You will receive a comprehensive assessment of how your home uses energy. Areas of energy waste will be identified, and you will receive a detailed report of recommended energy efficiency improvements that are tailored specifically for your home. It is important to remember that audits alone do not save energy. You will need to implement some or all of the recommended improvements.

Q

Is there a guaranteed percentage a homeowner can expect to receive on heating and cooling costs if the energy audit recommendations are followed?

A

After evaluating your home, you could save up to 35% annually by selecting the improvements that will improve your thermal comfort, lower your energy bill and create a more affordable home.

Q A

Is it beneficial to have an energy audit performed on a home that is two years old?

Homes built after 2005 are typically more energy efficient due to improved code requirements and construction practices. In most cases the older the home is, the greater the potential savings. As homes age, they offer an increasing number of opportunities for energy savings.

If homes built before 2000 used as little energy per square foot as newer homes, residential energy consumption would drop by more than 22%. It is possible you might require duct sealing, and in a typical home nearly 20% of the air that moves through the duct system is lost due to leaks, holes and poorly connected ducts. It has always been difficult to detect the energy waste that is hiding in our homes, but not anymore with an energy audit. After you receive your completed analysis, you can decide which customized upgrades you want to incorporate into your home. 110

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Q A

What happens during an audit?

 Professional energy assessments generally go into great detail to assess your home’s energy use. The energy auditor will do a room-by-room examination of the residence, as well as a thorough examination of past utility bills.

Many professional energy assessments will include a blower door test. Most will also include a thermographic scan. There’s also another type of test – the PFT air infiltration measurement technique – but it is rarely offered. Before the energy auditor visits your house, make a list of any existing problems such as condensation and uncomfortable or drafty rooms. Have copies or a summary of the home’s yearly energy bills. Auditors use this information to establish what to look for during the audit. The auditor first examines the outside of the home to determine the size of the house and its features (i.e., wall area, number and size of windows). The auditor then will analyze the residents’ behavior:

• Is anyone home during working hours?

•W  hat is the average thermostat setting for summer and winter?

• How many people live here?

• Is every room in use?

Your answers may help uncover some simple ways to reduce your household’s energy consumption. Walk through your home with the auditors as they work, and ask questions. They may use equipment to detect sources of energy loss, such as blower doors, infrared cameras, furnace efficiency meters, and surface thermometers.


When Going ‘Green’ The construction industry has experienced a lot of “green washing” in recent years. Bob Norman of Sun Pine Homes, Ed Stahl of R.E.S Contracting both agree that merely claiming a home is green because it has bamboo flooring, natural paint or the latest slick green components despite a leaky duct system can be misleading. “The most important principle of green design and construction is producing a home that is highly energy efficient and then having it independently tested to prove its performance,” Norman said. “It starts with energy efficient building components and practices verified to Energy Star standards.” “Anyone can say they build an energy efficient home, but having the home certified Energy Star ensures that it is,” Stahl said. “An Energy Star home goes far beyond energy efficiency. The certification standards use the building science system approach to ensure the home is energy efficient, but also ensures that the home has good indoor air quality, is safe from radon buildup, has proper weatherization barriers, window flashing, foundation drainage, ventilation, comfort and is safe and durable.” Green building should be correlated not with just sustainability, but also with quality. It is actually quite difficult to build an energy efficient home that is poor in quality. An Energy Star builder must have a firm grasp on building science. Stahl started building energy efficient homes in the Prescott area in 1987 and recognized that a well built home was not only energy efficient but also much more comfortable. Since 2008, R.E.S. Contracting has built 15 Energy Star Certified homes. R.E.S. Contracting recently completed a Net-Zero home in Las Vegas Ranch. Net-Zero homes generate enough power to completely offset their annual energy costs. These homes incorporate

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energy saving equipment and technologies to reduce energy usage and then offset that reduced amount of energy with solar panels. The result is a Net-Zero home that, over the course of a year, produces as much energy as it uses. Since energy usage is arguably the most important aspect of a green home, this is taking green building to the next level. According to the Solar Energy Industries Association the average cost of a solar electric system has dropped over 50 percent since 2010. The result has been a boom in the number people installing solar panels to save money on their electric bill and take advantage of the tax credits that are available. Sun Pine Homes has been building since 1995 and understands the importance of energy efficiency, a low environmental footprint and


The Energy Star process guarantees that a home will meet or exceed approved standards.

the value of health, comfort, home safety and durability. Norman has built eight Energy Star homes over the past couple of years and is well versed in the Energy Star building process.

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The Energy Star process guarantees that a home will meet or exceed approved standards. “With Energy Star, the builder and homeowner get the added benefit of third party inspections and certification by an approved energy rater,” Norman said.

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The house plans are sent to the energy rater for review and analysis. The rater provides independent, third party verification and looks for key information on the plans to help the builder select the best combination of energy-efficient features to ensure that the house will not only earn the Energy Star label when constructed but also earn a respectable HERS index. This is a comparable numerical score kind of like a “miles per gallon” rating for a home. It compares the energy efficiency of the home to a typical new house built to the latest building code. These raters personally follow the progress of the build with multiple site visits to verify compliance at key intervals.

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“Throughout the construction process, the rater performs a number of on-site inspections and diagnostic tests to verify the proper installation of the selected energy-efficient features and overall energy performance of our homes,” Stahl said. “Good construction will pay back for decades, and as the cost of energy increases, the savings become more and more significant for us and our planet.”

Designing and Building Custom Homes throughout Prescott since 1982.

Stahl said that a recent study of homes sold between 2007 and 2012 documented an average increase of 9 percent in selling price when the home had a green certification label such as the Energy Star Certification. Norman agrees. “Many energy efficient options are good investments and are an asset for resale,” he said. Both of these Energy Star builders agree that the costs to build are 1.0% to 1.5% more than current built homes and the payback time is approximately three to five years. Energy Star and other performance upgrades are adding about $6,000 to the construction price, but are saving the customer about 30 percent minimum in annual energy costs of $2,000 to $3,000.

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“Sustainable materials and conservation are important parts of a green home, but the most important aspect of building green is the energy efficiency of the thermal enclosure,” Stahl said.

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Fresh Air How can we remove stale air from our homes without always opening the windows? NASA figured out the answer. During the Skylab 3 mission in the 1970s, NASA scientists realized the high-tech materials they’d used to build humanity’s first off-world outpost were slowly filling the space station with toxic fumes. Some 300 different volatile organic compounds (VOCs), much like those that often fill our own habitats, were building up in Skylab’s air. Faced with this conundrum, NASA wondered if plants might be the answer to bad moon base air because on Earth, they essentially act as planetary air purifiers. So scientists built a test chamber, filled it with houseplants, flooded it with pollution, and waited. In short order, they had their answer: the plants had indeed filtered the air clean. The study, originally intended to find ways to purify the air for extended stays in orbiting space stations, proved to have implications on Earth as well. Today, newer homes and buildings, designed for energy efficiency, are often tightly sealed to avoid energy loss from heating and air conditioning systems. Moreover, synthetic building materials used in modern construction have been found to produce potential pollutants that can remain trapped in our home and buildings. The EPA reports that indoor air pollution can be 2 to 5 times worse than outdoor pollution in some instances! While it’s a well-known fact that plants convert carbon dioxide into oxygen through photosynthesis, the NASA/ALCA study showed that many houseplants also remove harmful elements such as trichloroethylene, benzene, and formaldehyde from the air. NASA and ALCA spent two years testing 19 different common houseplants for their ability to remove these common pollutants from the air. Of the 19 plants they studied, 17 are considered true houseplants, and two, gerbera daisies and chrysanthemums, are more commonly used indoors as seasonal decorations.

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In the study NASA and ALCA tested primarily for three chemicals: Formaldehyde, Benzene, and Trichloroethylene. Formaldehyde is used in many building materials including particle board and foam insulations. Additionally, many cleaning products contain this chemical. Benzene is a common solvent found in oils and paints. Trichloroethylene is used in paints, adhesives, inks, and varnishes. While NASA found that some of the plants were better than others for absorbing these common pollutants, all of the plants had properties that were useful in improving overall indoor air quality.

A NASA study, originally intended to find ways to purify the air for extended stays in orbiting space stations, proved to have implications on Earth as well.

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The advantage that houseplants have over other plants is that they are adapted to tropical areas where they grow beneath dense tropical canopies and must survive in areas of low light. These plants are thus ultra-efficient at capturing light, which also means that they must be very efficient in processing the gasses necessary for photosynthesis. Because of this fact, they have greater potential to absorb other gases, including potentially harmful ones.

After conducting the study, NASA and ALCA came up with a list of the most effective plants for treating indoor air pollution. Remember that while houseplants excel at removing VOCs and other gaseous compounds from indoor air, they won’t clean up indoor air hazards like particulates, dust, and radon. Still, though your mileage may vary, a home filled with plants will generally enjoy cleaner air than the home without. The key word here is “filled”—a handful of potted plants on a windowsill won’t cut it. Instead, NASA researchers found that one potted plant per 100 square feet of space was needed to create a healthier environment, a small price to pay for air purification that works this hard and looks this good doing it. www.ycca.org


When it comes to houseplants as air purifiers, here are your top 20 best bets in order of effectiveness: 1. Boston fern (Nephrolepis exaltata Bostoniensis) – the #1 plant in overall purifying performance.

Ivy

2. Areca palm (Chyrsalidocarpus lutescens) 3. Lady palm (Rhapis excelsa) 4. Bamboo palm (Chamaedorea seifrizii) 5. Rubber plant (Ficus robusta)

Schefflera

6. Dracaena Janet Craig (Dracaena deremensis) 7. English Ivy (Hedera helix) 8. Dwarf date palm (Phoenix roebelenii) 9. Ficus alii (Ficus macleilandii alii)

Ficus

10. Peace lily (Spathiphyllum sp.) 11. Corn plant (Dracaena fragrans Massangeana) 12. Golden pothos (Epipremnum aureum)

Peace Lily

13. Kimberly queen fern (Nephrolepis obliterata) 14. Florists mum (Chrysanthemum morifolium) 15. Gerbera daisy (Gerbera jamesonii) 16. Dracaena warneckei (Dracaena deremensis warneckei) 17. Dragon tree (Dracaena marginata) 18. Schefflera (Brassaia actinophylla) 19. Spider plant (Chlorophytum comosum) 20. Weeping fig (Ficus benjamina)

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Plants and Our Wildlife Although deer and rabbits are entertaining to watch, they can also do considerable damage to landscape and garden plants. Diets of these animals will change with wild food availability and yearly rainfall and temperature variations.

Deer

Certain plants are sometimes more desirable when they are young and/or well fertilized. It is difficult to predict what deer and rabbits may find attractive from year-to-year, but this list suggests some plant species that seem to be less palatable. This list was compiled from observations made by gardeners, landscapers, and nursery personnel in North Central Arizona. There are some products and home remedies that purport to repel and/ or discourage these herbivores, but the surest solution to prevent herbivory is to exclude wildlife from your garden using properly designed fences. University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ 1237 Available on-line at: http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/garden/az1237.pdf

Common Name

Botanical Name

SHRUBS Glossy Abelia Abelia grandiflora Manzanita Arctostaphylos spp. Bamboo Many Species Barberry Berberis spp. Butterfly Bush Buddleia spp. Boxwood Buxus spp. Fairy Duster Calliandra spp. Flowering Quince Chaenomeles spp. Littleleaf Cordia Cordia parvifolia Cotoneaster Cotoneaster spp. Dalea Dalea spp. Daphne Daphne spp. Brittlebush Encelia farinosa Turpentine Bush Ericarmeria laricifolia Buckwheat Eriogonum spp. Holly Ilex spp. Jojoba Simmondsia chinensis Juniper Juniperus spp. Chuparosa Justicia californica Kerria Japonica Kerria japonica Lantana Lantana spp. Lavender Lavandula spp. Leucophyllum Leucophyllum spp. Oregon Grape Mahonia spp. Heavenly Bamboo Nandina domestica Cinquefoil Potentilla spp. Firethorn Pyracantha spp. Sumac Rhus spp. Currant, Gooseberry Ribes spp. 116

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Common Name Rosemary Sage Lilac Viburnum

Botanical Name Rosmarinus officinalis Salvia spp. Syringa spp. Viburnum spp.

TREES Fir Abies spp. Vine Apple Acer circinatum Japanese Maple Acer palmatum Albizia Albizia spp. Cedar Cedrus spp. Hackberry Celtis spp. Redbud Cercis spp. Hawthorn Crataegus spp. Cypress Cupressus spp. Ash Fraxinus spp. Maidenhair Tree Ginkgo biloba Magnolia Magnolia spp. Spruce Picea spp. Pine Pinus spp. Douglas Fir Pseudotsuga menziesii Oak Quercus spp. Tex Mountain Laurel Sophora Secundiflora GROUND COVERS & VINES Carpet Bugle Ajuga spp. Dwarf Plumbago Ceratostigma plumbaginoides English Ivy Hedera helix Japanese Spurge Pachysandra terminalis Virginia Creeper Parthenocissus spp.

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Rabbits Common Name Periwinkle Wisteria

Botanical Name Vinca spp. Wisteria spp.

PERENNIALS, BULBS, & ANNUALS Yarrow Achillea spp. Agave Agave spp. Naked Lady Amaryllis belladonna Columbine Aquilegia spp. Pink Sea Thrift Armeria spp. Artemisia (Sage Artemisia spp. Aster Aster spp. False Spiraea Astilbe spp Balsam Impatiens spp. Begonia Begonia spp. Swan River Daisy Brachycome iberidifolia Serbian Bellflower Campanula spp. Centaurea Centaurea spp. Snow-in-Summer Cerastium tomentosum Coreopsis Coreopsis spp. Crocus Crocus spp. Dahlia Dahlia hybrids Bleeding Heart Dicentra spp. Fleabane Erigeron spp. California Poppy Eschscholzia californica Euphorbia Euphorbia spp. Ferns Many Species Blue Fescue Festuca ovina ’Glauca’ Blanket Flower Gaillardia grandiflora Cranesbill Geranium spp. Straw Flower Helichrysum bracteatum

Common Name

Botanical Name

Daylily Hemerocallis spp. Herbs (except Basil Many Species Candytuft Iberis spp. Iris Iris spp. Red-Hot Poker Kniphofia uvaria Dead Nettle Lamium maculatum Lupine Lupinus spp. Crown-Pink Lychnis coronaria Blackfoot Daisy Melampodium leucanthum Bee Balm Monarda spp. Forget-Me-Not Myosotis scorpioides Daffodil Narcissus hybrids Catnip Nepeta spp. Oregano Origanum spp. Oriental Poppy Papaver spp. Beard Tongue Penstemon spp. Moss Pink Phlox subulata Gloriosa Daisy Rudbeckia hirta Santolina Santolina spp. Saxifrage Saxifraga spp. Pincushion Flower Scabiosa spp. Squill (Bluebell Scilla spp. Lamb’s Ears Stachys byzantina Feather Grass Stipa spp. Thyme Thymus spp. Verbena Verbena spp. Speedwell Veronica spp. Sweet Violet Viola odorata California Fuchsia Zauschneria californica


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Javelinas Javelina are omnivorous animals with poor eyesight and a keen sense of smell. They browse and eat roots of many plants. Their diet changes with food availability in their environment. Javelina may also nibble on or dig up plants that they do not actually eat. The plant names on this list represent plants less likely to be eaten by javelina, but there are no guarantees that they won’t touch them. The only certain method to prevent plant injury is through exclusion (a fence of other barrier).

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This list was compiled from a technical report researched and written by Cindy Ticer of the Arizona Game and Fish Depart­ment. Ticer studied urban javelina in the Prescott area in 1993 and used 300 homeowner interviews concerning javelina eating habits. University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ 1238 Available on-line at: http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/garden/az1238.pdf

Common Name

Botanical Name

Allysum Allysum Allysum spp. Basil Ocimum spp. Butterfly Bush Buddleia spp. Carnations Dianthus spp. Chili Pepper Capsicum annuum Chrysanthemum Chrysanthemum spp. Cosmos Cosmso spp. Cottonwood Trees Populus spp. Cucumbers Cucumis sativus Daffodils Narcissus spp. Dahlias Dahlia spp. Daylily Hemerocallis spp. Deerbrush Ceanothus spp. Easter Lily Lillium longiflorum Eggplant Solanum melogena Fir Trees Abies spp. Geraniums Geranium spp. Gladiola Gladiolus spp. Globe Amaranth Gomphrena spp. Hen & Chicks Echeveria elegans Hibiscus Hibiscus spp. Ice Plant Mesembryanthemum spp. Iris Iris spp. Ivy Hedera spp. Juniper Shrubs Juniperus spp. Juniper Trees Juniperus spp. Larkspur Delphinium spp.

Common Name

Botanical Name

Lilac Syringa spp. Manzanita Arctostaphylos spp. Maple Trees Acer spp. Marigolds Tagetes spp. Mountain Mahogany Cercocarpus spp. Oak Trees Quercus spp. Pampas Grass Cortaderia selloana Pansies Viola spp. Peonies Paeonia spp. Petunias Petunia hybrida Pine Trees Pinus spp. Portulaca Portulaca grandiflora Red-Hot Poker Kniphofia uvaria Rose bushes Rosa spp. Rosemary Rosemarinus officinalis Sage Salvia officinalis Santolina Santolina Shrub Live Oak Quercus turbinella Silktassel Garrya wrightii Skunkbush Rhus trilobata Snapdragons Antirrhinum majus Spruce Trees Picea spp. Sweet William Dianthus barbatus Vinca Vinca spp. Violas Viola spp. Zinnia Zinnia spp.

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Energy Audit By Sue Marceau Your home is as unique as you are, so when it comes to energy audits and options for reducing energy loss, your specific course of action likely hinges on the size, construction, and efficiency rating of your home and your tolerance surrounding Return on Investment (ROI). A home energy audit assigns an energy efficiency rating to a home and identifies in a 15-page report just where and how the homeowner might realize energy efficiency and resulting savings on utility bills. And, if you play by the rules, you may be able to collect up to $400 with an Arizona Public Service (APS) rebate. Energy ratings follow a standard based on size of home and how many air changes per hour are needed for healthy indoor air quality, according to Bryce Cox, supreme allied commander at ArrowSeal in Prescott Valley. Those ratings, geared to the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) 2012, identify a numeric range from high to low, with the homeowner’s objective “to fall right in the middle.” A whole house review from “roof down to runoff” forms the essence of a home energy audit, Cox explained, identifying as major elements: roof installation, air barriers, thermal barriers, whole home leakage, windows barriers, insulation, ducting, lighting, plumbing, and appliances.

Casey Hyde, building performance analyst and install manager for Moyer Heating & Cooling in Prescott Valley, said he prefers the term “performance test” because it sounds less intrusive to customers and more accommodating of individual needs. In consulting with prospective clients about specific tests and potential recommendations, Hyde said homeowners often want something less than a full-blown energy audit. During an initial client meeting, Hyde said he first determines the motivation behind

Wouldn’t it be great if saving money on lighting were as simple as flipping a light switch? Well, it can be. Spend a few minutes with the APS CFL/LED calculator at www.aps.com and you’ll see how easy it can be to save when you switch from incandescent bulbs to more efficient and longer-lasting LED and CFL light bulbs. 118

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a homeowner’s request – a dust problem, uncomfortably warm or cold rooms, or a home that’s too dry, too humid or otherwise perceived as energy-depleting or health-averse. Age of the home is not always the indicator of whether a residence might be an energy hog. Houses built in the Quad Cities before 2008 likely could benefit ­ from removing barriers to energy efficiency. However, today’s new construction also deserves scrutiny, since a house sealed too tightly could restrict air flow and negatively affect health and safety. While older homes may not be sealed adequately, some newer builds “are constructed so tightly that they are putting the home in an unhealthy situation,” Cox said. “If the home is in negative pressure, it can’t equalize with the pressure outside. So if gas appliances – furnace, water heater, anything vented – are not allowed to vent properly,” the home could be amassing carbon monoxide, or at the very least, circulating stagnant and/or potentially unhealthy air. Every improvement in energy efficiency tightens airflow in a home, Cox said, which is a major reason for another home audit after significant changes, such as new


roofs and room additions. Some additions neglect a corresponding evaluation of the heating and cooling system, Cox continued, resulting in mismatched load volumes and causing “the equipment to work way harder, burn out quicker and cost more to fix.” Cost for an energy audit varies, but prices can range from $299 to $549. Some programs, such as the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® from APS, promote rebates and financing. The APS checkup “is a great way to identify opportunities to improve the comfort, efficiency and safety of your home,” the company’s website states. Conducted through pre-approved contractors, the APS audit reduces the total cost from $499 down to $99, if the homeowner takes advantage of a $400 rebate on recommended fixes. Implementing suggested upgrades could save homeowners up to 30 percent on their energy bills, APS indicates, while also working through their contractor to claim the electric company’s rebates. The APS online application consists of six steps, starting with a five-minute Energy Analyzer and closing with rebate application. In between are the tasks for selecting a participating contractor by zip code, scheduling the checkup, and ultimately, choosing and completing the upgrades. The rebates specifically mentioned relate to ductwork, insulation and window/door seals. The audit itself takes about two hours, starting with a Blower Door Test to depressurize the home and obtain the energy efficiency rating. The auditor (or performance tester) “checks the first two main components that run all

the time – your fridge and your heating and cooling system,” Hyde stated. “Then we move on to the lighting and other appliances, and verify that the home is ventilating properly. We would like to see Energy Star tags on most appliances. It is recommended if your fridge is 15 years old, it is cost-effective to upgrade to a new higher efficiency model.” Duct sealing and insulation usually end up being the most beneficial and costeffective changes to improve energy efficiency, Cox advised, noting that “not all of the changes may be in the homeowner’s best interests.” Swapping out a 10-yearold 80 percent efficient furnace to a model that’s 90 percent efficient, for example, might not provide optimal ROI. An $8,000 expenditure on a new furnace could take 25 years to break-even, along with potentially sacrificing 15-years of remaining life on the removed unit. “We look at the gross violators, see what the homeowner’s budget is and work within that budget to make their home more energy efficient,” Cox said. “We take that audit and make it work best for your home.”

Did you know?

✔ Americans consume 25% of the world’s energy ✔ Our demand for energy grows by about 3% per year ✔ Heating and cooling account for about 56% of the energy used in a typical home ✔ About 25% of all the energy we use to heat our homes escapes through ­single-pane windows ✔ At any one time in most households an average of eight appliances are left on stand-by. (Stand-by is an appliance’s “off” setting), but the appliance continues to use about 85% of the energy it uses while it is on ✔ Our home produce even more CO2 emissions than our cars ✔ Operating our homes accounts for 18% of total emissions ✔ We spend 10% of our electricity bills on lighting ✔ 90% of the energy used by traditional bulbs is wasted in producing heat ✔ Energy-efficient light bulbs last about 12 times longer than ordinary bulbs and consume about 1/5 of the energy

That perspective was shared by Hyde, who said that he “always gets homeowners involved, and if they are do-it-yourself (types), I show them how … We’ve tested a lot of homes … and had great success in eliminating dust – not completely – but most of it.” When choosing a home energy auditor, homeowners should verify that the company’s employees are trained and certified to Building Professional Institute (BPI) standards. Both ArrowSeal and Moyer’s are BPI-certified and coordinate with APS.

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Better Sleep New findings show better sleep linked to improved physical performance. While weary, overextended Americans are turning to “quick fixes” like caffeine and performance-enhancing supplements, which claim to improve everything from their daily workout to their sex lives, they are losing sight of what experts say is essential to improved performance: a good night’s sleep. In fact, according to the Better Sleep Month (BSM) national survey, sponsored by the Better Sleep Council (BSC): Respondents getting nine hours of sleep or more are more likely to engage in higher-intensity workouts (biking, running, weight lifting, etc.). Seven in 10 (70 percent) report that they are not getting the recommended amount of sleep needed each night (7.5 hours or more) to perform at their best each day. “Sleep deprivation impacts us physically, which can negatively affect our coordination, agility, mood and energy,” says Dr. Bert Jacobson, professor and head of the School of Educational Studies at ­Oklahoma State University (OSU) and the lead author of the new study Grouped Comparisons of Sleep Quality for New and Personal Bedding Systems. “Research shows that sleep and athletics performance

“... a survey found that 81 percent of Americans report waking up with back, neck or shoulder pain.

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are related as sleeping better and longer leads to improvements in athletic performance, including faster sprint time, better endurance, lower heart rate, and even improved mood and higher levels of energy during a workout.” One out of three survey respondents agrees, stating that the best thing about getting a good night’s sleep is improved physical performance.

A New Mattress Does a Body Good The survey also reveals that respondents who report getting seven to eight hours of sleep each night (7.5 is optimal) are more likely to be sleeping on a newer mattress (one to four years old). Survey results also show that those sleeping on a newer mattress are significantly more likely to engage

in physical activities than those who sleep on older mattresses. What’s more, the survey found that 81 percent of Americans report waking up with back, neck or shoulder pain in the past year, with nearly half (46 percent) of respondents reporting that they frequently (at least a few times a month) wake up with these types of pain that limit their physical performance. But there’s good news for the majority of people suffering with limited mobility due to back and neck pain. According to Dr. Jacobson’s study, published in the Journal of Applied Ergonomics, sleeping on a new mattress can significantly improve sleep quality during the night and reduce physical pain during the day.


What is Paving & Grading? What is Asphalt Removal and Replacement? What is Asphalt Maintenance and Repair? Once the condition of your asphalt area has been recognized, the appropriately licensed contractor can establish a solution tailored to what meets the needs of correction for the asphalted area. New paving is the application of hot asphalt applied to a rock base material. Thickness of the asphalt and rock base is determined by how much weight and traffic the surface will be subject to. With new paving, base material or rock base is necessary and must attain a high rate of compaction. The use of base material provides a strong foundation for the new asphalt that is being placed. Grading of the base material is required in order to level the base to achieve the specified elevations before paving takes place. Grading is also necessary to obtain a smooth and compact base that will be ready to receive the asphalt material. As asphalt pavement ages through its lifecycle, its appearance diminishes over time. Without regular maintenance fine hairline cracks can spread and deepen within the asphalt and water may enter through the cracks, holes may form which will undermine the base. In this case, the existing asphalt may need to be removed and replaced. This process includes removing and hauling off the substandard asphalt, repairing the base and paving with new asphalt. If your current asphalt area looks rough and uneven but the base seems to be in good shape, it is possible that resurfacing or an overlay is all that is needed. You should protect your investment by having your asphalt regularly maintained. Applying a seal coat to the asphalt will protect it from environmental influences. Asphalt is extremely durable and keeping it protected will ensure that it will last years and years. Although we are a relatively small area, we have experienced prob­lems with dishonest Paving Contractors. Watch out for: ›› Contractors who find you, rather than you finding them. ›› Contractors who say they have leftover asphalt from another job and will cut you a good deal. ›› Contractors who seem to be moving through the area, rather than local, permanent contractors. ›› Contractors who say they will “pave” your driveway, only to spread out driveway sealant. ›› Contractors that have business cards without an address and only a phone number and/or Contractors that have an out of area address. Our area is blessed to have several local asphalt contractors with stellar reputations for asphalt maintenance, paving and seal coating and they are: Eyemark, LLC and Specialty Paving & Grading. Earth Resources Corporation can handle road/driveway chip sealing. 122

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The “Garage Room” There are many improvements to driveways by using such m ­ aterials as interlocking pavers and decorative concrete. But, after driving across that beautiful driveway surface do you pull onto a drab, oilstained, boring, gray garage floor? Let us offer a way to help you beautify that garage floor, and any other concrete surface at your home such as walkways, steps, patios, and yes, even driveways themselves. Epoxy coating. Besides beautifying your garage floor, you may wish to consider the other benefits offered by epoxy coating your floor. Epoxy coating brings to an end the concrete dust which is constantly brought into your home. This surfacing provides a virtually impermeable coating to fend off stains not only from oil, gasoline, transmission fluid, antifreeze, grease, but also from the dirt, sand, salt and cinders brought in with ice and snow. Install new shelving and lighting and your garage becomes one more usable room. Just a few of these will add value to your home. Epoxy coatings come in several basic colors and colors can be custom mixed. Textured surfaces and multicolored chips are the most requested surfaces. Surface colors range from plain gray to black, to chrome, red-white-and-blue, and even glow-in-thedark. The cost for epoxy coating generally ranges from $1.85 to $3.60 per square foot. Before epoxy coating is applied an expert installer should test the moisture content and water pressure within the concrete surface. This not only tests the water actually within the concrete at that moment, but also tests to determine whether water seeping upward through the concrete may prevent the application of this type of impermeable coating. Application of an epoxy coating first requires surface preparation. According to John Schaefer with Garage Floors and More preparation is the key step to obtaining the 15 year to 20 year lifespan from your epoxy surface. While some chemicals are available to prepare the surface, John Schaefer recommends machine sanding the floors to not only remove existing stains but also to prepare the surface to better bind to the epoxy coating.

accomplished with the use of different chemical hardeners, and costs a little more. Put that garage clutter into new overhead storage racks, new c­ abinets and additional lighting and show off that beautiful new room of your house, your garage.

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The second step involves the application of a water-based epoxy primer. The third step is the final coating containing the texture and colors. Normal curing time permits driving and parking on this new service within 5 to 7 days. A faster curing time can be

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Garden Art By Christine James The ultimate perennial: Garden art is always in full blossom “Bloom where you are planted,” the saying goes. That can sometimes be tricky in a mountain-desert climate. And there are months when most foliage is dormant, which can mean a drab view from your window. But there’s an easy solution: For visual interest in every season, enliven your landscape with garden art. Garden art includes decorative accents like statues, fountains, found objects, unique furniture, gazing balls, sundials, and other unexpected surprises that enhance your patio, deck or yard. It can be functional or aesthetic or both. Make a major impact with water features, solar-powered illuminations, or kinetic windpowered sculptures. Create wonder and delight with tucked-away treasures. “Garden art provides people an opportunity to beautify their property. It gives them a sense of fulfillment, purpose and meaning,” says Eric Moore, owner of Jay’s Bird Barn in Prescott and Sedona. “People need something to look forward to when they wake up in the morning.” Anything that appeals to an individual – and is weatherproof – can become garden art. “Garden art is in the eye of the beholder,” muses Sue Burgin, owner of Earthworks Garden Supply in Chino Valley. “It can be simple, formal, rustic, meaningful, spiritual or

pretty. Everyone has a different idea about it. For me, the perfect accent to my yard and garden area is an eclectic mix of old rusty things like washtubs, wheelbarrows, screen doors, painted pallets, garden tools and implements, with flowers and perennials growing in and around the pieces.” Earthworks offers fountains, birdbaths, birdfeeders, pottery, metal sculptures, statues, ceramic pieces, southwestern and cowboy décor, benches, tables and chairs to transform outdoor spaces into sanctuaries 12 months a year. The store’s most popular items are recycled metal animal sculptures and brightly painted Talavera pottery. “My customers are usually buying a one-of-a-kind item,” Burgin says. “I like for people to feel they are buying something no one else has, so I don’t buy mass quantities of the same thing. “The pieces have a personality of their own and can really add fun and whimsy to a yard or patio.” Another benefit to garden art? You don’t have to fertilize, prune or weed it. And you’ve heard of low-water-use landscaping? Try ­no-water-use – which is ideal for our drought-conscious, conservation-minded community. “In our quad-city area, a lot of my customers are into xeriscaping or desert landscaping,” Burgin notes, explaining that garden art can be a water-free, no-maintenance way to beautify your surroundings. Burgin also recommends using decorative rock or flagstone in different sizes and colors to form walkways, pathways and rock stream beds to add dimension to a yard. Jay’s Bird Barn, which caters to fans of our feathered friends, carries birdbaths, houses and feeders from the simple to the ornate. “We sell a variety of beautiful birdbaths that are sculptured metalwork with fired-clay bowls. We sell decorative and functional birdhouses. Birdhouses are often used as décor inside and outside people’s homes. Similarly, with hummingbird feeders, some of them are pretty, but they’re not necessarily practical. They’re more yard art than they are functional as far as the birds using them. We tell people, if you only have one hummingbird feeder, you want one that’s functional. “If you like (the decorative feeder), enjoy it, but don’t expect a lot of hummingbirds,” he adds with a laugh.

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“My customers are usually buying a oneof-a-kind item,” Burgin says.

CONCRETE AND CONSTRUCTION SUPPLIES Jay’s Bird Barn recently unveiled a line of products that are part of the newest trend in landscape accessorizing: fairy gardens. “It’s miniatures,” he explains. “Little fairy houses and stepping stones and toadstools and little chairs and fences and moss and all the accompanying products. It’s the latest craze. They’re whimsical, they’re artsy, they’re purely yard art. It’s nothing anybody needs, but it’s what people want. It’s really fun, because you can make it and arrange it in any way you want. The sky’s the limit. “Be creative. Have fun with it. Think outside the box. Change it over time. Nothing is too little or too much,” says Burgin. “There aren’t any do’s and don’ts. It’s what you love and what makes you happy.”

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Bird House Do’s & Don’ts Homeowners living in areas where there are few trees will quickly discover that there are not very many cavity-nesting birds on their property. Bird houses will either have a perpetual ‘vacancy’ sign or they will be inhabited by non-native bird species such as house sparrows and European starlings.

However, none of these species has the right beak structure to excavate their own nesting cavity, so they rely on flickers, woodpeckers and nuthatches to create cavities suitable for nesting. Mother Nature also creates naturally occurring cavities such as when a tree limbs breaks, leaving a cavity where it was attached to a tree.

How successful you will be in a­ttracting birds to bird houses largely depends upon where you live. Cavity-nesting birds typically occur in forested environments. Cavity-nesting bird species such as woodpeckers and nuthatches prefer trees that have sufficient girth to support creating a hollow in the trunk of the tree.

Most of the bird species that occur in this area do not use nesting boxes. Instead, species such as lesser goldfinches, western scrub-jays, house finches, orioles and grosbeaks build a neatly woven cupshaped nest either in a tree or shrub. Even if you provide a bird house, these birds will ignore it and build their nests in trees and shrubs.

Interestingly, most cavity-nesting species rely on the work of other birds to create cavities in the trunks of trees. Examples of cavity-nesters in the Central Highlands area include violet-green swallows, western bluebirds, bridled and juniper titmouse, mountain chickadee, Lucy’s warbler, Bewick’s wren, ash-throated flycatchers, American kestrel and western-screech owl.

Assuming your habitat is conducive to cavity-nesting birds, here are some guidelines for placing your bird houses. First, it is recommended that the bird house faces the opposite direction from our prevailing winds. This means, as much as practical, bird houses should face a north-easterly direction.

The height where you place bird boxes should be at least five feet off the ground. However, you can mount them at any height you can reach safely. Do not put bird houses near bird feeders or water sources that are designed to attract birds. With few exceptions, birds like their privacy when rearing young – to protect their nest from predators. Of course, there are always exceptions to the rules. Swallows, bluebirds and flycatchers prefer to nest in bird houses that are out in an open, exposed location. Shade is not a requirement, but if you can provide some protection from the hot, late afternoon sun, I would try to accommodate that. The benefit that foliage provides is concealing the location of the bird house, more than protecting it from the sun. Good quality bird houses should be vented adequately to provide ventilation for the adults sitting on eggs and for the babies after hatching. Bird houses should be easy to clean so you can remove the previous year’s nests.

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With the onset of unseasonably warm t­emperatures, you may consider cleaning out your old bird houses right now and possibly replacing your old, falling apart bird houses. In March, start providing nesting material such as ‘cottontail’ nesting balls, pet hair, dryer lint or small strands of thread or yarn. Nesting material can be placed near your feeding stations, but don’t place it near your bird houses as you might end up drawing attention to the location of an active nest. Eric M. Moore is the owner of Jay’s Bird Barn, with two locations in northern Arizona – 1046 Willow Creek Road in Prescott, and 2360 State Highway 89A in Sedona. Eric has been an avid birder for 50 years. If you have questions about wild birds that you would like discussed in future articles, email him at eric@jaysbirdbarn.com.


Termites By Christine James Don’t let termites eat you out of house and home – Learn to recognize signs of an infestation That’s strange. You’ve found a small pile of what looks like ground pepper on your windowsill. Above the pile is a tiny hole in the frame. Or perhaps you spotted unusual vein-like dirt tubes around your foundation. Maybe it’s nothing. Best to wait and see if anything else happens, right? WRONG ... This is an article about termite damage and how to prevent it, after all. As with every problem, early detection is key to a swift recovery. Ignore the warning signs and the complications grow exponentially. And termites – wood-boring insects that work largely unseen – can cause devastating damage if left unchecked. “Many years ago, I got a call from a grade school, and they had a 10-by-10-foot section of their ceiling on the floor in the lunchroom,” recalls Tim Goeringer, coowner of Orkin Pest Control in Northern Arizona. “Thankfully it happened at night and not at lunchtime. They had a ladder set up and I looked up there … it was riddled. The termites had destroyed all the rafters.” That was an extreme situation due to “at least a decade of neglect,” Goeringer stresses, adding that most homeowners call in the professionals in time to avert disaster. However, he cautions, “You don’t have to have structural damage for it to

Mud tubes are about as big around as a pipecleaner, made out of dirt

be a fairly significant cost. If they eat up a doorframe and you have to replace it, you’re probably well north of $1,000 to repair that.” Arizona has a moderate to heavy termite population, according to the U.S. Forest Service, which estimates that the pests cause $5 billion in damage nationwide each year. Preventive treatments include baiting systems and liquid pesticides. But “that’s usually not something you need to consider until your home is at least 10 years old,” says Goeringer. In Arizona, per state law, every new home is required to get a termite pre-treatment with a threeyear guarantee. “The first 10 years, if the pre-treat is done well, it’s pretty unlikely you’ll get termites. We get calls, ‘Hey, my termite guarantee just expired.’ We can treat it and give you a guarantee, but quite honestly, it’s probably not necessary. But some people just want that peace of mind.” Use of professional services to kill t­ ermites is advisable for the layperson. “Many termiticides are highly toxic, making it ­ critical to follow label directions with ­ added care,” states an Environmental ­Protection Agency report. “Pest management professionals have the knowledge,

expertise, and equipment as required by the label, which minimizes risks and maximizes effectiveness.” Goeringer’s business partner, Matt Golleher, notes, “There are two types of termites that we’re dealing with in Yavapai County: subterranean termites and drywood termites. Subterranean termites come out of the ground and build shelter mud tubes. So the telltale signs are mud tubes or mud in the wood itself.” Mud tubes are “about as big around as a pipecleaner, made out of dirt,” Goeringer clarifies. With drywood termites, the tip-off is the aforementioned “pile of pepper,” which is actually comprised of wood-colored droppings, or frass, that’s hexagonal in shape. Above the frass is a pushpin-sized “kickout hole,” so named because the termites are “kicking out their fecal pellets,” according to Golleher. “Most of the time we find drywood termites, they’re going to be in a window frame, a doorframe, or a crawlspace, because those are the easiest entry points,” Golleher explains. Drywood termites “are looking to burrow into your wood, and if you have a crack, that makes it very easy for them,” says Goeringer. “Caulk the cracks, use wood putty, seal it.” Being proactive is key to preventing termites. Many pest control companies perform free termite inspections, says Golleher. “It’s a good idea to get some professional eyes on the house, pointing out some conducive conditions that the homeowner can fix.” The main culprit is moisture up against the foundation, continues Golleher, who cites faulty grading, overwatering, flower beds up against a home, leaky pipes or spigots,

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Signs you may have termites

HOME REMODELING SPECIALISTS

Mud tubes near foundation Mud-specked pinholes Piles of wood-colored droppings under tiny kickout holes Sagging, buckling or swollen sections of floors, walls or ceilings Visible maze-like tunnels Discarded wings and dripping air conditioning condenser units, among other things. Another termite magnet is wood-toground contact, as with wood joists, a wood fence directly attached to the house, or a DIY patio. “One problem we see is stucco or siding that goes below the grade into the soil,” says Goeringer. “Any time you put any kind of wood product in contact with the soil, you’re rolling out the red carpet for termites.”

928-775-6178

ABLE & READY PAINTING REMODELING, LLC

Design Center: 7245 E 2nd St, #C, Prescott Valley www.AbleReadyllc.com • ROC 286905

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Photos courtesy of OakCraft

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Accounting/Payroll/Tax Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Drywall & Plastering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

Acoustical Ceilings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Duct & Dryer Vent Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

Advertising/Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Duct Sealing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

Apparel Logo Wear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Electrical Contractors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Alarms/Home & Fire (See Home Security Systems) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Electrical Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Appliances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Employment Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Architectural Services/Architects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Energy Building Consultants/Home Energy Audit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Architectural Services/Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Engineering/Testing/Structural/Special Inspections/Foundations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Arizona 811 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Environmental Testing (Mold, Asbestos, Radon, Water Quality) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Asphalt Maintenance/Paving/Seal Coating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Equipment Rentals & Dealers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Associations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Escrow & Title Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Attorney/Legal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Excavation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Auto Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Fencing – Chain Link/Vinyl/Welded Rail/Wood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Banking/Lending & Financing Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Fencing – Ornamental Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Bath Conversions (See Tub/Shower Conversion) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Finish Carpentry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Blueprint Copying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Fire Sprinklers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Bookkeeping (See Construction Accounting/Tax Preparation) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Fireplaces, Woodstoves & BBQ’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Building Inspector (See Commercial Building Inspection/See Home Inspectors) . . . . 132

Flagstone/Rock Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Building Materials & Builders Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Floor Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Cabinet Re-facing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

Floor Covering (Tile, Natural Stone, Wood & Carpet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

Cabinet Refinishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

Fuel Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

Garage Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

Cabinets/Garage & Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

Garage/Horse Stalls/Barns/Sheds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

Cable TV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

Garage Floor Coating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

Camera Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

Garden Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

Carpentry/Finish Carpentry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

Gates – Chain Link/Vinyl/Welded Rail/Wood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

Carpet & Tile Cleaning (See Floor Cleaning) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

Gates – Ornamental Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

Ceramic, Stone & Tile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

General Contractors: Commercial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

General Contractors: Engineering, Excavation, Grading & Paving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138

Chambers of Commerce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

General Contractors: Green Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138

Chimney Sweep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134

General Contractors: Historic Restoration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138

Civil Engineering & Land Surveying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134

General Contractors: Multi-Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138

Commercial Building Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134

General Contractors: Residential/Custom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138

Commercial Contractors (See General Contractors: Commercial) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134

Glass & Mirrors (See Shower Doors/Mirror/Glass) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

Concrete Contractors & Suppliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134

Grass (Artificial/Synthetic Turf) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

Construction Accounting /Tax Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134

Grid/Tile Ceiling Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

Countertops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134

Gutters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

Coupons/Savings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134

Habitat for Humanity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

Deck Coating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134

Handyman/Home Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

Decks/Deck Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134

Health Care Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

Decorative Concrete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134

Highway Construction Safety Guardrail Signs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

Developers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134

Home Builders (See General Contractors: Residential/Custom) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

Direct Mail Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

Home Furnishings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

Directional Boring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

Home Improvements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

Disaster Restoration Clean-Up – Fire, Flood, Odor, Personal Property, Trauma, and Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

Home Inspectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

Doors/Screens (See Screens) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

Hotel – Extended Stay/Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

HVAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

Drainage Systems & Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

HVAC Supplies & Fixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

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Hydroseeding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

Residential Contractors (See General Contractors: Residential/Custom) . . . . . . . . . . 146

Insulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

Retaining Walls – Masonry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146

Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

Retaining Walls – Stone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Interior Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

Road/Driveway Chip Sealing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Irrigation Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

Rock (See Flagstone/Rock Supplies) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Irrigation Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

Roofing – Residential & Commercial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Kitchen & Bath Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Saw/Tool/Small Engine Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Kitchen & Bath Remodeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Screens (Doors & Windows) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Land Development/Lots & Acreage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Security Doors & Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Landscaping & Construction Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Septic & Water Tank Manufacturer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Landscaping – Erosion Control/Xeriscape/Water Features/Defensible Space Commercial & Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Septic Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Septic Tank Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Septic System Design & Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Locks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Septic Tank Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Log Home Chinking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Sewer & Drain Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Log Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Shower Doors/Mirrors/Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Marble (Countertops, Shower Surrounds) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Shredding Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Masonry Block/Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Siding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Mediation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Signs/Banners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Membership Warehouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Signs – Highway Construction Guardrail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Metal/Steel Buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

Snow Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Metal Stud Framing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

Solar Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Millwork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

Solar Panel Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Mold Abatement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

Solar Plumbing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Mold Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

Solar Tubes & Skylights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Mold Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

Spas/Saunas/Hot Tubs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Municipalities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

Stain Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

Murphy Beds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

Stone (See Flagstone/Rock Supplies) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

Nursery/Garden Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

Stucco/Plastering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

Outdoor Living . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

Sun Rooms/Pergola Shade & Patio Covers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

Paint & Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144

Telephone & Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

Painting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144

Tree Removal/Trimming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

Patio Furnishings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144

Tub Shower Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

Pavers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144

Underground Utilities: Excavation/Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

Payroll Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144

Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

Pest Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144

Waste Hauling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

Plan Rooms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144

Water/Waste Water Piping Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

Planting Soil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144

Water & Fire Damage Restoration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

Plumbing Contractors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144

Water Purification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150

Plumbing Fixtures/Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145

Waterproofing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150

Printing/Copying (See Blueprint Copying) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145

Weed Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150

Promotional Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145

Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150

Propane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145

Wells/Pump Installation & Servicing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150

Quickbooks Consulting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145

Window Coverings, & Shutters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150

Radio Partners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145

Window Tinting (Auto, Building, and Home) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150

Rainwater Harvesting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146

Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150

Real Estate/Residential & Commercial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146

Windows/Sliding Door Repairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151

Recycling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146

Windows – Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151

Remodeling/Restoration Contractors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146

Woodworking (See Carpentry/Finish Carpentry) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151

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Accounting/Tax Preparation

Appliances

Holdsworth & Co. CPAs

Lowes

3031 Dollar Mark Way Ste C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8633 www.holdsworthcpa.com

2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

Richard L. Joliet, CPA

MCK Woodworks, LLC

1129 Iron Springs Road, Suite 202 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-2386 www.richardjolietcpa.com

(See our ad on page 107) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

Acoustical Ceilings Chartier Drywall, Inc.

Quality Maytag

(See our ad on page 135) 655 Brannen Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1191

(See our ad on page 77) 1097 Iron Springs Rd. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-8460 www.qualitymaytagaz.com

Jebco Construction Companies

Westar Kitchen & Bath

(928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

Advertising/Graphic Design A & E Reprographics www.a-erepro.com Prescott Location 1030 Sandretto Dr., Ste. F Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-9116 Prescott (Downtown) Location 222 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3815 Prescott Valley Location 8010 E. Hwy. 69, Ste. D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0054

Morgan Sign Company 704 E. Moeller St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6336 www.morgansign.com

Sir Speedy 1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

Apparel Logo Wear Sir Speedy 1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

Alarms/Home & Fire (See Home Security Systems)

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15500 N. Greenway-Hayden Loop, Suite 103 Scottsdale, AZ 85260 (480) 991-6200 www.westar-sw.com

Architectural Services/Architects Catalyst Architecture (See our ad on page 51) 123 E. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-3508 www.catalystarchitecture.com

Crystal Creek Builders, LLC 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

Desert Development & Design, Corp. (928) 777-0022 www.desertdevelopmentaz.com

Michael Taylor Architects, Inc. 118 S. Pleasant St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-0626 www.mtai.net

Renovations, Your Complete Remodel Resource (See our ad on page 115) 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8506 www.renovationsaz.com

Architectural Services/ Design Blue Line Designs 730 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-2901 www.bluelinedesignsaz.com

Crystal Creek Builders, LLC 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

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Sterling Design Group

National Bank of Arizona

1678 Oaklawn Dr., Ste #B Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 499-5718 www.sterlinghomedesign.com

201 N. Montezuma St., Suite 100 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-6900 www.nbarizona.com

Arizona 811

Bath Conversions

“Call Before You Dig” 811

(See Tub/Shower Conversion)

www.arizona811.com

Asphalt Maintenance/Paving/ Seal Coating Eyemark, LLC 6947 E. 1st Street, Ste. B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928)237-0404

Specialty Paving & Grading (See our ad on page 122) (928) 777-8411

Associations Central Arizona Partnership (928) 458-5361 www.centralazpartnership.org

Prescott Lakes Architectural Review Committee www.prescottlakescommunity.org

Attorney/Legal

Blueprint Copying A & E Reprographics www.a-erepro.com Prescott Location 1030 Sandretto Dr., Ste. F Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-9116 Prescott (Downtown) Location 222 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3815 Prescott Valley Location 8010 E. Hwy. 69, Ste. D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0054

Sir Speedy 1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

Gammage & Burnham

Bookkeeping

Kevin J. Blakley 2 N. Central Avenue, 15th Floor Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 256-4467 www.gblaw.com

(See Construction Accounting/ Tax Preparation)

Robert C. Kozak, PLLC Bob Kozak 3619 Crossings Dr. Suite B Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7140

Auto Glass Bennett Glass & Mirror (See our ad on page 150) 722 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1180 www.bennettglassaz.com

Banking / Lending & Financing Services BBVA Compass Bank 923 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3311 www.bbvacompass.com

Country Bank (See our ad on page 8) 107 E. Willis St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-9595 www.countrybankaz.com

Building Inspector (See Commercial Building Inspection) (See Home Inspectors)

Building Materials & Builders Hardware DuPont Tyvek Weather Barriers (800) 288-9835 www.weatherizationpartners.com

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber (See our ad on page 5) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Lowes 2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

ProBuild (See our ad on page 49) 6601 E. 2nd St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-1221 www.probuild.com

The Door & Window Store 487 E Z St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6400 www.prescottdoors.com


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Cabinet Re-facing Granite Transformations 2205 W. Lone Cactus Dr. #23 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (623) 581-5056 www.granitetransformations.com

Reliant Capitol, LLC 725 N. 73rd Ave., Suite 124 Phoenix, AZ 85043 (623) 388-8899 www.reliantcapitolllc.com

MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 107) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

Northern Arizona Woodworking 8875 E. Laredo Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3779

Cabinet Refinishing Northern Arizona Woodworking 8875 E. Laredo Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3779

The Arizona Woodworking Co. 8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworkingcompany.com

Cabinets Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC (See our ad on page 129) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

Engrained Cabinetry & Countertops www.engrained.com Prescott Location 550 N. 6th St. (928) 776-4568 Prescott Valley Location 7129 E. 1st St., Ste. 101 (928) 772-8149

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber (See our ad on page 5) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC 9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

Lowes

Timberline Woodworks

2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

MCK Woodworks, LLC

We Organize-U

(See our ad on page 107) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

2675 N. State Rt. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 458-7323 www.weorganize-u.net

Northern Arizona Woodworking 8875 E. Laredo Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3779

Prescott Design Center (See our ad on page 10 and 111) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com

The Arizona Woodworking Co. 8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworkingcompany.com

Timberline Woodworks Inc. 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

USA Cabinets Direct 303 E Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 771-1122

We Organize-U 2675 N. State Rt. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 458-7323 www.weorganize-u.net

Cabinets/Garage & Storage Engrained Cabinetry & Countertops www.engrained.com Prescott Location 550 N. 6th St. (928) 776-4568 Prescott Valley Location 7129 E. 1st St., Ste. 101 (928) 772-8149

MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 107) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

The Arizona Woodworking Co. 8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworkingcompany.com

Greenlee Designer Surfaces Prescott Design Center (See our ad on page 10 and 111) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC

Cable TV

9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

Cable One

Lowes

(See our ad on page 54) 3201 Tower Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-4511 www.cableone.net

2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

Precision Marble & Granite (See our ad on page 53) 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com

Camera Systems B&W Fire Security Systems (See our ad on page 85) 8544 E. Eastridge Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8008 www.bwfiresecurity.com

Prescott Floors

Carpentry/Finish Carpentry Timberline Woodworks

1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life

1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

Triple E Construction (See our ad on page 75) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Certified Public Accounts (CPAs) Holdsworth & Co. CPAs 3031 Dollar Mark Way Ste C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8633 www.holdsworthcpa.com

We Organize-U 2675 N. State Rt. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 458-7323 www.weorganize-u.net

Richard L. Joliet, CPA

(See Floor Cleaning)

1129 Iron Springs Road, Suite 202 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-2386 www.richardjolietcpa.com

Ceramic, Stone &Tile

Chambers of Commerce

Arizona Stone & Architectural Products

Chino Valley

Carpet & Tile Cleaning

175 E. Road 2 South Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2493 www.chinovalley.org

(See our ad page 1) 2601 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0828 www.arizonastone.com

Prescott 117 Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2000 www.prescott.org

Arizona Tile (See our ad on page 57) (Stone and Tile Supplier) 625 Holiday Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-1070 www.arizonatile.com

Prescott Valley 7120 Pav Way, Ste. 102 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8857 www.pvchamber.org

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Chimney Sweep Builders Wholesale, LLC 400 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com

Civil Engineering & Land Surveying Shephard-Wesnitzer, Inc. 221 N. Marina St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 282-1061 www.swiaz.com

Commercial Building Inspection

Construction Accounting/ Tax Preparation Holdsworth & Co. CPAs 3031 Dollar Mark Way Ste C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8633 www.holdsworthcpa.com

Richard L. Joliet, CPA 1129 Iron Springs Road, Suite 202 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-2386 www.richardjolietcpa.com

Construction Clean-Up MTO Janitorial, LLC

Beneficial Home Inspection

Serving the Quad City Area (928) 772-0004 www.mtojanitorial.com

(928) 710-7061 www.beneficialhomeinspection.com

Countertops

Commercial Contractors

Arizona Tile

(See General Contractors: Commercial)

Concrete Contractors & Suppliers Asphalt Paving & Supply 2425 N. Glassford Hill Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6363 www.ashpaltpavingsupply.com

Az Decks Appeal 331 N. Arizona Avenue Prescott, AZ 896301 (928) 778-5819 www.azdecksappeal.com

(See our ad on page 57) (Stone & Tile Supplier) 625 Holiday Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-1070 www.arizonatile.com

Artisan Stone Surfaces, LLC Prescott Design Center Solid Surface Tops Only (See our ad on page 10 and 111) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.artisanstonesurfaces.com

Engrained Cabinetry & Countertops www.engrained.com

CEMEX (See our ad on page 101) 13531 E. Hwy. 89A Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 772-3733 www.cemexusa.com

Diversified Concrete Crafters (See our ad on page 14) (928) 237-0085 www.diversifiedconcretecrafters.com

Hanson Aggregates 5899 Wilkinson Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7305 www.heidelbergcement.com

Laipple Construction 1947 Victoria Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-6865

Interior Logic (See our ad on page 19) 710 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0900 www.interior-logic.com Prescott Location 550 N. 6th St. (928) 776-4568 Prescott Valley Location 7129 E. 1st St., Ste. 101 (928) 772-8149

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber (See our ad on page 5) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Granite Kitchen Concepts

USA Cabinets Direct

(Natural Stone Products Only) (See our ad on page 59) 303 N. Summit Avenue Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8811 www.granitekitchenconcepts.com

303 E Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301

Granite Transformations (Granite Only) 2205 W. Lone Cactus Dr. #23 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (623) 581-5056 www.granitetransformations.com

Greenlee Designer Surfaces Prescott Design Center (See our ad on page 10 and 111) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC 9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

Lowes 2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 107) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

www.ycca.org

(See our ad on page 127) Willie Lass, Publisher (928) 830-5208 www.nazmoneyinthemail.com

Deck Coating Central Basin Roofing, Inc. (See our ad on page 103) 331 N. Arizona Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-5819 www.centralbasinroofing.com

Granite Basin Roofing 1011 E. Commerce Dr., Suite #E Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 772-9222 www.granitebasinroofing.com

Western Sealant Company Inc. (See our ad on page 64) (928) 778-3112 www.westernsealantaz.com

Decorative Concrete Az Decks Appeal 331 N. Arizona Avenue Prescott, AZ 896301 (928) 778-5819 www.azdecksappeal.com

Circle C Construction

8875 E. Laredo Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3779

Precision Marble & Granite

Classic Garage, Inc.

(See our ad on page 53) 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com

Prescott Design Center (See our ad on page 10 and 111) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com

Prescott Floors 1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

2015 Building Yavapai

Money In The Mail

(See our ad on page 15) 1190 W. Rd. 1 North Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com

Northern Arizona Woodworking

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life

134

Coupons/Savings

(928) 308-9477 www.classicgarageinc.com

Diversified Concrete Crafters (See our ad on page 14) (928) 237-0085 www.diversifiedconcretecrafters.com

Decks/Deck Repair Az Decks Appeal 331 N. Arizona Avenue Prescott, AZ 896301 (928) 778-5819 www.azdecksappeal.com

Branson Custom Homes & Remodeling (See our ad on page 31) Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-4212 www.bransoncustomhomesaz.com


2015 YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Developers Carrington Homes Triple E Lane Construction 394 Isabelle Pella Certified Prescott, AZ 86301 Contractor See Our Ad Page 35 (928) 540445-9711 N. 6th St. #F www.carringtonhomesaz.com Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com Desert Development & Design, Corp. (928) 777-0022 Drainage SyStemS & SupplieS www.desertdevelopmentaz.com

Earth Resources Corporation Dorn 8120Homes, PolandInc. Road 600 W. Gurley #200 Dewey, AZSt.86327 (928) 775-2795 Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-9427 HD Supply www.dornhomes.com 3100 N. Hwy. 89

Prescott, AZ 86301 The Fain Signature Group (928) 445-8032 www.hdsupply.com 3001 N. Main Street Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Drywall & plaStering (928) 772-8844 www.fainsignaturegroup.com Able & Ready Painting-

Remodeling, LLC Prescor See OurBuilders Ad Page 54 7245ourE.ad2nd St.front #C cover) (See inside Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 3200 Lakeside Village Dr. (928) 775-6178 #201 Prescott, AZ 86301 www.ablereadyllc.com (928) 778-7043 Chartier Drywall, Inc. www.prescoraz.com

See Our Ad This Page 655 Brannen Ave. Direct Mail Prescott, AZMarketing 86301 (928) 778-1191 Sir Speedy Taylor Plastering 1961 Commerce Center Circle 5798 Foxglove Place Prescott, AZ 86301 Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 776-4332 (928) 772-7522

www.sirspeedyprescott.com Duct & Dryer Vent cleaning

Directional Boring Builders Wholesale

400 W. Goodwin St. Savage Development, Prescott, AZ 86303 Inc. (See our778-6655 ad on page 105) (928) www.buildersprescott.com (928) 717-0024 Energy Savings Heating &

Disaster Cooling Restoration Clean-Up – 360 Henry Suite A Fire, Flood, St. Odor, Personal Prescott, Trauma AZ 86301 Property, and Vandalism (928) 445-8402 www.energysavingshc.com Service Master of Prescott 8330 E. PecosHeating Dr. Moyer’s & Cooling See Our AdAZPage Prescott Valley, 86314102 8146 E. Ashley Dr. (928) 445-9205 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 www.servicemasterofprescott.com Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 2822659 Doors/Screens www.moyershvac.com (See Screens)

Pitzers One-Hour Air Conditioning & Heating

Doors 63363 Cooper Hill Dr.

Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Able Ready (928)& 777-8899 www.pitzersonehour.com Painting-Remodeling, LLC (See ourComfort ad on pageSystems 129) TDK 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C#D 1940 S. Hwy 89, ChinoValley, Valley, AZ 86323 Prescott AZ 86314 (928) 636-0846 (928) 775-6178 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com www.ablereadyllc.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating Bennett & Mirror See OurGlass Ad Page 10 5860ourN.adFulton (See on pageDr. 150) Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 722 E. Sheldon St. (928) 776-7025 Prescott, AZ 86301 www.ypeinc.com (928) 445-1180 www.bennettglassaz.com

Builders Wholesale, LLC Builders Wholesale, LLC 400 W. Goodwin St. 2013 YCCA Membership 400 W. Directory Goodwin St.

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating

Prescott, AZ 86303 Duct778-6655 Sealing (928) www.buildersprescott.com Advantage Home Performance

Prescott, AZ 86303 energy BuilDing conSultantS (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com Advantage Home Performance

(928) 445-2525 ArrowSeal www.foxgal.com

www.energysavingshc.com

See Our Ad Page 17 Foxworth GalbraithDr., Lumber 1021 Commerce Ste. A (See our ad AZ on page 5) Prescott, 86305 (928) 445-3828 430 N. 6th St. www.advantagehome Prescott, AZ 86301 performance.com See Our Ad Page 94 Serving Yavapai Pella Windows & County (928) 925-5353 Doors Mountain West www.aeroseal.com

120 E. Corporate Place Suite 16 Moyer’s & Cooling Chandler, AZHeating 85225 See 710-4253 Our Ad Page 102 (928) 8146 E. Ashley Dr. www.pella.com Prescott Valley, AZ 86314

Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 ProBuild Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 2822659our ad on page 49) (See www.moyershvac.com 6601 E. 2nd St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 eDucation (928) 772-1221 Yavapai College Foundation www.probuild.com

1100 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, 86301Store The Door &AZ Window (928) 776-2063 487 E Z St. www.yc.edu Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6400 electrical contractorS www.prescottdoors.com

Boxer M Construction, LLC 11971EE. Mingus Vista Dr. Triple Construction Prescott (See our adValley, on page AZ 75) 86315 (928) 925-4967

Pella Certified Contractor Delta Enterprises 540 N. 6thDiversified St. #F See Our Page 43 Prescott, AZAd 86301 2606 Centerforce Dr. (928) 778-3056 Prescott, AZ 86301 www.tripleeaz.com (928) 708-0066

See Our Ad Page 17 Energy Savings Heating & Cooling 1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A 360 Henry St.AZ Suite86305 A Prescott, (928) 445-3828 Prescott, AZ 86301 www.advantagehome (928) 445-8402 performance.com Arizona Public Service Moyer’s Cooling See OurHeating Ad Page& 59 120 our N. ad Marina (See on pageSt.141) Prescott, AZ 8146 E. Ashley Dr. 86301 (928) 776-3636 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 www.aps.com

Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 Moyer’s Heating &282-2659 Cooling Sedona/Verde Valley (928) See Our Ad Page 102 www.moyershvac.com 8146 E. Ashley Dr.

Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Pitzer’s One-Hour Air772-4346 Quad Cities (928) Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282Conditioning & Heating 2659Cooper Hill Dr. 6363 www.moyershvac.com Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 777-8899 TDK Comfort Systems, Inc. 1940 S. Hwy. 89, Ste. D www.pitzersonehour.com

Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928)Comfort 636-0846 TDK Systems, Inc. www.tdkcomfortsystems.com (928) 636-0846 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com UniSource Energy Services

See Our Ad Page 59 6405 Wilkinson Dr. Verde Sol-Air Prescott, AZDr. 86301 724 N. Industrial Bldg 1 (866) 467-1229 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 www.uesaz.com (928) 567-5315 www.verdesolair.com

Core Structure Group 621 E. Gurley St. Duct Sealing Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 899-8696 Advantage Home Performance www.corestructuregroup.com 1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A

Western Technologies Prescott,Sandretto AZ 86305 Dr., Ste. C 1040 (928) 445-3828 Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.advantagehomeperformance.com www.wt-us.com ArrowSeal

e(See nVironmental teSting our ad on page 119)(molD, 925-5353 SBeStoS , raDon, water Quality) a(928) www.aeroseal.net

Western Technologies 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. C Moyer’s Heating & Cooling Prescott, AZ 86305 (See our ad on page 141) Phone: (928) 443-5010 8146 E. Ashley Dr. www.wt-us.com Prescott Valley, AZ 86314

eQuad Quipment rentalS & DealerS Cities (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282-2659 Bingham Equipment Company www.moyershvac.com 2694 Union Dr. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 Verde 646-5388 Sol-Air (928) www.binghamequipment.com 724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 Chino Rentals (928) Our 567-5315 See Ad Page 24 1181 N. Hwy. 89 www.verdesolair.com Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2026 www.chinorentalsonline.com

Drywall can be finished using a number of techniques and textures. Homeowners can choose from smooth or textured drywall finishes. Some common drywall textures are: • Knockdown • Venetian Plaster • Trowelled • Mud Swirl • Brush Textures • Skim Coating Some drywall finishes are better for walls that are not as flat or smooth and other finishes can help soften the angels of a room and create a great new look.

www.deltadiv.com

Drainage Systems & Inc. Supplies Mar Dez Electrical, PO Box 709 Earth Resources Corporation Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 775-2795 (928) 642-8073 Ponderosa Electric Drywall & Plastering See Our Ad Page 11

418 N. Washington Ave. #F Able & Ready Prescott, AZ 86301 Painting-Remodeling, LLC (928) 717-1790 www.ponderosaelectric.net (See our ad page 129) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C S & M Electric Prescott Valley, 8631445 See Our AdAZ Page P.O.775-6178 Box 10006 (928) Prescott, AZ 86304 www.ablereadyllc.com

(928) 778-1871 www.sandmelectricinc.net Chartier Drywall, Inc. (See our adElectrical on this page)Contractors Thomas (Commercial 655 Brannen Ave. Contractor) 4636 S.AZ35th Prescott, 86301St., Ste. 1 Phoenix, AZ 85040 (928) 778-1191 (602) 268-8620 www.teci.us Taylor Plastering, Inc. 5798 Foxglove Place employment SerViceS Prescott, AZ 86305 Labor Systems Temporary (928) 772-7522

Services 701 Miller Valley Road

Duct & Dryer Vent Cleaning Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-0010 ArrowSeal www.laborsystems.com (See our ad on page 119) (928) 925-5353 www.aeroseal.net

2013 Building Yavapai

(See our ad on page 83) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. ePrescott ngineering /tAZeSting /Structural Valley, 86314 S(928) pecial inSpectionS/FounDationS 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

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www.ycca.org

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Electrical Contractors Boxer M Construction, LLC 11971 E. Mingus Vista Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 925-4967

Elan Electric 7760 E. State Rt. 69 Suite C5 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 925-7937 www.elanelectricinc.com

Mar Dez Electrical, Inc. (928) 642-8073 www.mardezelectrical.com

Ponderosa Electric (See our ad on page 112) 418 N. Washington Ave. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1790 www.ponderosaelectric.net

P.S. Electric 6301 Baja Circle Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 759-2151

S & M Electric (See our ad on page 81) (928) 778-1871 www.sandmelectricinc.net

Thomas Electrical Contractors (Commercial Contractor) 4636 S. 35th St., Ste. #1 Phoenix, AZ 85040 (602) 268-8620 www.teci.us

Electrical Design Savage Development, Inc. (See our ad on page 105) (928) 717-0024

Employment Services Labor Systems Temporary Services 701 Miller Valley Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-0010 www.laborsystems.com

Energy Building Consultants/ Home Energy Audits Advantage Home Performance 1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-3828 www.advantagehomeperformance.com

ArrowSeal (See our ad on page 119) (928) 925-5353 www.aeroseal.net

Moyer’s Heating & Cooling (See our ad on page 141) 8146 E. Ashley Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282-2659 www.moyershvac.com

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2015 Building Yavapai

TDK Comfort Systems, Inc. (928) 636-0846 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com

Verde Sol-Air 724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 www.verdesolair.com

Engineering/Testing/Structural/ Special Inspections/Foundations Core Structure Group 621 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 899-8696 www.corestructuregroup.com

Western Technologies, Inc. 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

Environmental Testing (Mold, Asbestos, Radon, Water Quality) Western Technologies, Inc. 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

Equipment Rentals & Dealers Bingham Equipment Company

Fencing – Chain Link/Vinyl/ Welded Rail/Wood Prescott Fence 6576 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928)-445-4211 www.prescottfence.com

Fencing – Ornamental Iron A-Action Welding 1514 Shoup St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-2579 www.a-actionwelding.com

Prescott Fence 6576 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4211 www.prescottfence.com

Finish Carpentry MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 107) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

Moloney Construction, LLC 234 Whitney Street Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 533-3376

The Arizona Woodworking Co.

Builders Wholesale, LLC 400 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com

Eric & Sons (See our ad on page 10 and 111) 6640 Inter Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 775-2880 www.ericandsons.net

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber (See our ad on page 5) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Flagstone/Rock Supplies Arizona Stone & Architectural Products (See our ad on page 1) 2601 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0828 www.arizonastone.com

Asphalt Paving & Supply 2425 N. Glassford Hill Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6363 www.asphaltpavingsupply.com

Dunbar Stone Company, Inc. 1041 Commerce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7880 www.dunbarstoneinc.com

2694 S. Union Dr. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 646-5388 www.binghamequipment.com

8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworkingcompany.com

Chino Rentals

Timberline Woodworks

(See our ad on page 125) 1181 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2026 www.chinorentalsonline.com

1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

(See our ad on page 124) 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

We Organize-U

Sunstate Equipment Co., LLC

2675 N. State Rt. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 458-7323 www.weorganize-u.net

G&S Gravel

9351 E. Lorna Lane Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-7350 www.sunstateequip.com

Fire Sprinklers

Escrow & Title Services

B&W Fire Security Systems

Yavapai Title Agency 123 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2528 www.yavapaititle.com

(See our ad on page 85) 8544 E. Eastridge Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8008 www.bwfiresecurity.com

Excavation

Fireplaces, Woodstoves & BBQs

Savage Development, Inc.

Banker Insulation of Northern AZ

(See our ad on page 105) (928) 717-0024

www.ycca.org

5790 Fulton Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2544 www.bankerinsulation.com

Earthworks Garden Supply

11500 E. Finley St. Mayer, AZ 86333 (928) 632-9359

Prescott Dirt, LLC (See our ad on page 107) (928) 636-5844 www.prescottdirt.com

Floor Cleaning Clean-N-Bright Carpet & Tile Specialists 312 White Spar Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-2343 www.clean-n-bright.com


2015 YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Greenlee Designer Surfaces Prescott Design Center (See our ad on page 10 and 111) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

Service Master of Prescott 8330 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-9205 www.servicemasterofprescott.com

Interior Logic (See our ad on page 19) 710 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0900 www.interior-logic.com

Lowes 2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

Mile High Tile (Tile Only) 7680 E. Cocopah Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-2924 www.milehightile.com

Prescott Design Center

Floor Covering (Tile, Natural Stone, Wood & Carpet)

(See our ad on page 10 and 111) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com

Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC

Prescott Flooring Brokers

(See our ad on page 129) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

Arizona Tile (See our ad on page 57) (Stone & Tile Supplier) 625 Holiday Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-1070 www.arizonatile.com

Desert Hardwood Flooring (Install Hardwood Flooring Only) 450 W. Gina Marie Blv. Paulden, AZ 86334 (928) 713-6785 www.deserthardwoodflooring.com

Delta Plus Floors Wood Floors Only (928) 445-3926

Dunbar Stone Company, Inc. (Stone & Tile Only) 1041 Commerce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7880 www.dunbarstoneinc.com

Greenlee Designer Surfaces Prescott Design Center (See our ad on page 10 and 111) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC 9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

(See our ad on page 53) 401 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-2544 www.prescottflooringbrokers.com

Prescott Floors 1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

The Flooring Shack

Garages/Horse Stalls/ Barns/Sheds

General Contractors: Commercial

JAGR Shed & Garage

1965 Coyote Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-4007 www.acklinbrothersconstruction.com

Acklin Brothers Construction

(See our ad on page 125) 2866 N. Eldred Road Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 227-6705 www.jagraz.com

Aspen Valley Development

Garage Doors Neumann High Country Doors (See our ad on page 93) 8920 E. Valley Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-9738

(See our ad on page 139) 697 6th Street, Suite 503 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-9877 www.aspenvalleyhomesaz.com

B’s Contractors, LLC 1601 Louis Trail Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 771-9240 www.bscontractorsllc.com

Garage Floor Coating Classic Garage, Inc.

Beshers Builders, LLC

(928) 308-9477 www.classicgarageinc.com

700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

Garage Floors and More (See our ad on page 123) 303 E. Gurley St. #195 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 308-7337 www.garagefloorsandmore.net

Circle C Construction (See our ad on page 15) 1190 W. Rd. 1 North Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com

Garden Center Earthworks Garden Supply

Circle D Builders

(See our ad on page 124) 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

1035 Vantage Point Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0208 www.circledbuilders.com

Concord General Contracting

Lowes

4215 E. McDowell Road, Ste. #201 Mesa, AZ 85215 (480) 962-8080 www.concordinc.com

2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

Gates – Chain Link/Vinyl/Rail/ Welded Rail/Wood

DeCarol Company (See our ad on page 45 and 95) (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com

(See our ad on page 73) 9234 E Valley Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 515-2450 www.theflooringshack.com

Prescott Fence

Fuel Companies

Gates – Ornamental Iron

1753 S. Blooming Hills Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1307 www.donsavagebuilders.com

Barrett Propane

A-Action Welding

(See our ad on page 82) 1555 W. Iron Springs Road, #5 Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 636-1600 www.barrettpropane.com

1514 Shoup St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-2579 www.a-actionwelding.com

Greseth Builders

Bennett Oil

600 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-7900 – Prescott (928) 204-1222 – Sedona www.prestigesecuritydoors.com

810 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1181 www.bennettoil.com

Don Savage Building Contractors, Inc.

6576 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928)-445-4211 www.prescottfence.com

(928) 445-9572 www.gresethbuilders.com

Haley Construction Company (See our ad on page 9) (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

Prestige Security Doors

Jebco Construction Companies (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

Yavapai Bottle Gas 2170 Concord Dr. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 776-9007 www.yavapaigas.com www.ycca.org

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John T. Barenz Construction

TLC Construction

1300 Covery Trail Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3343

1940 W. Buena Vista Trail Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 925-1342 www.tlcconstructionofprescott.com

Kenson Construction Co. 6135 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5192 www.kensonconstructionco.com

KNA Construction, Inc. (928) 778-6932

Laipple Construction 1947 Victoria Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-6865

Lantana Development, Inc. (See our ad on page 24) 115 E. Goodwin Street Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 717-0033 www.lantanacustomhomes.com

Triple E Construction (See our ad on page 75) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Womack Enterprises 425 W. Delano Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6094 www.womack-brothers.com

General Contractors: Engineering, Excavation, Grading & Paving

General Contractors: Green Building Benttree Custom Homes (See our ad on page 67) 1575 Plaza West Dr. #B Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 443-5484 www.benttreecustomhomes.net

Carrington Homes

General Contractors: Residential/Custom

Crystal Creek Builders, LLC 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

(See our ad on page 59) 128 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 458-6044 www.abilityprescott.com

Evergreen Homes

Acklin Brothers Construction

2425 N. Glassford Hill Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6363 www.asphaltpavingsupply.com

325 W. Gurley St., Ste. 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1657

CLM Earthmovers

Haley Construction Company

NJ Builders, Inc.

(928) 775-2795

(See our ad on page 87) (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com

Fann Contracting, Inc.

Lovdahl Contracting, Inc. (928) 277-5247

Malouff and Company, Inc.

Prescor Builders (See our ad inside front cover) 3200 Lakeside Village Dr. #201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com

Prescott Builders of AZ, LLC (See our ad on page 83) (928) 717-0147 www.prescottbuildersofaz.com

Ravencrest Builders LLC 518 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-1677 www.ravencrestbuilders.com

Renovations, Your Complete Remodel Resource (See our ad on page 115) 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8506 www.renovationsaz.com

Ridgeline Builders, LLC

(928) 445-1918

Earth Resources Corporation

1403 Industrial Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-0170 www.fanncontracting.com

FNF Construction, Inc. 115 S. 48th St. Tempe, AZ 85281 (480) 784-2910 www.fnfinc.com

Headwaters Construction 6789 Mandan Lane Paulden, AZ 86334 (928) 636-6976

Prescor Builders (See our ad inside front cover) 3200 Lakeside Village Dr. #201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com

Ringler Excavating (928) 899-0012

Savage Development, Inc. (See our ad on page 105) (928) 717-0024

6640 Intercal Way, Ste. B Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-7194 www.ridgelinebuilders.com

Technology Construction

Savage Development, Inc.

Vastco, Inc.

(See our ad on page 105) (928) 717-0024

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5430 Side Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-0099 425 Industrial Dr. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3880 www.vastco.com www.ycca.org

(928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

394 Isabelle Lane Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-9711 www.carringtonhomesaz.com

(See our ad on page 90) 2008 Forest Hills Rd. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-0006 www.evergreen-homes.com

Asphalt Paving & Supply

Jebco Construction Companies

(See our ad on page 9) (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

R.E.S. Contracting. Inc. (928) 776-0301 www.prescottbuilder.com

Sun Pine Homes (See our ad on page 113) 2480 E. Boulder Creek Ln. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6600 Ext. 7 www.sunpinehomes.com

Triple E Construction (See our ad on page 75) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

General Contractors: Historic Restoration Haley Construction Company (See our ad on page 9) (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

General Contractors: Multi-Family Carrington Homes 394 Isabelle Lane Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-9711 www.carringtonhomesaz.com

Haley Construction Company (See our ad on page 9) (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

Ability Remodeling & Home Services, LLC

1965 Coyote Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-4007 www.acklinbrothersconstruction.com

Aspen Valley Development (See our ad on page 139) 697 6th Street, Suite 503 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-9877 www.aspenvalleyhomesaz.com

Benttree Custom Homes (See our ad on page 67) 1575 Plaza West Dr. #B Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 443-5484 www.benttreecustomhomes.net

Board by Board, Inc. (See our ad on page 57) 2053 Douglas Ln. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com

Branson Custom Homes & Remodeling (See our ad on page 31) Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-4212 www.bransoncustomhomesaz.com

Carrington Homes 394 Isabelle Lane Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-9711 www.carringtonhomesaz.com

Circle C Construction (See our ad on page 15) 1190 W. Rd. 1 North Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com


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Circle D Builders

Jebco Construction Companies

PVO Construction, LLC

Stoney Creek Builders

1035 Vantage Point Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0208 www.circledbuilders.com

(928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

(928) 710-5873 www.pvoconstruction.com

(See our ad on page 143) (602) 885-3932 www.stoneycreekbuildersinc.com

Crystal Creek Builders, LLC 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

John Nanke Signature Group

Culhane Contracting, LLC

(928) 899-7259

7300 Saddle Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 713-8199 www.culhanecontractingllc.com

John T. Barenz Construction

DeCarol Company

Kenson Construction Co.

(See our ad on page 45 and 95) (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com

Desert Development & Design, Corp. (928) 777-0022 www.desertdevelopmentaz.com

Designer Homes By Szabo, LLC (See our ad on page 71) 516 Shadow Mountain Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-9326 www.designerhomesbyszabo.com

Don Savage Building Contractors, Inc. 1753 S. Blooming Hills Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1307 www.donsavagebuilders.com

1300 Covery Trail Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3343 6135 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5192 www.kensonconstructionco.com

KNA Construction, Inc. (928) 778-6932

Laipple Construction 1947 Victoria Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-6865

Lantana Development, Inc.

Ravencrest Builders LLC 518 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-1677 www.ravencrestbuilders.com

TLC Construction

Renovations, Your Complete Remodel Resource (See our ad on page 115) 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8506 www.renovationsaz.com

1940 W. Buena Vista Trail Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 925-1342 www.tlcconstructionofprescott.com

Triple E Construction (See our ad on page 75) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Ridgeline Builders, LLC 6640 Intercal Way, Ste. B Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-7194 www.ridgelinebuilders.com

Womack Enterprises, Inc. 425 W. Delano Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6094 www.womack-brothers.com

Ridge West Homes 772 Meadlowlark Lane Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5955 www.ridgewesthomes.com

(928) 277-5247

Malouff and Company, Inc. 325 W. Gurley St., Ste. 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1657

Mandalay Homes 1955 E. Commerce Center Cir. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 277-4817 www.mandalayhomes.com

NJ Builders, Inc.

Greseth Builders

(See our ad on page 87) (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com

(928) 445-9572 www.gresethbuilders.com

Premier Development AZ, LLC

(See our ad on page 9) (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

(See our ad on page 68) 1305 Westridge Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 227-2043 www.premierdevelopmentaz.com

Headwaters Construction

Prescor Builders

6789 Mandan Lane Paulden, AZ 86334 (928) 636-6976

(See our ad inside front cover) 3200 Lakeside Village Dr. #201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com

Haley Construction Company

(See our ad on page 113) 2480 E. Boulder Creek Ln. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6600 Ext. 7 www.sunpinehomes.com

Lovdahl Contracting, Inc.

(See our ad on page 90) 2008 Forest Hills Rd. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-0006 www.evergreen-homes.com

2025 W. Seven Oaks Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-1802 www.gmbuilders.com

Sun Pine Homes

(928) 776-0301 www.prescottbuilder.com

(See our ad on page 24) 115 E. Goodwin Street Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 717-0033 www.lantanacustomhomes.com

Evergreen Homes

Granite Mountain Builders of Prescott, LLC

R.E.S. Contracting. Inc.

Prescott Builders of AZ, LLC (See our ad on page 83) (928) 717-0147 www.prescottbuildersofaz.com

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Glass & Mirrors (See Shower Doors/Mirror/Glass)

Grass (Artificial/Synthetic Turf)

Jeff’s Landscaping Yard Service 1720 Kaibab Loop Prescott Valley, AZ 86303 (928) 708-0863 www.prescottlandscaping.net

Willbuilt Seamless Gutters Prescott Design Center

The Picture Window, Inc.

6640 Inter-Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-0904 www.willbuilt.net

(See our ad on page 10 and 111) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-0122 www.thepicturewindowinc.com

Arizona Stone & Architectural Products

Landscape Now, Inc.

(See our ad page 1) 2601 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0828 www.arizonastone.com

(928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Habitat For Humanity

Home Improvement

Vicente Landscaping

Prescott Area Habitat for Humanity (See our ad on page 84) 1230 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8003 www.prescotthabitat.org

Early Bird Siding

CareScape (See our ad on page 66) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Forever Lawn of Northern Arizona 6110 N. Pinon Road Flagstaff, AZ 86003 (928) 606-3416 www.foreverlawn.com

Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping (See our ad on inside back cover) 8333 E. Pecos Dr. #5 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-6333 www.haciendalandscaping.com

(See our ad on page 3) 2600 Stearman Rd., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Grid/Tile Ceiling Systems Chartier Drywall, Inc. (See our ad on page 135) 655 Brannen Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1191

Gutters Arizona Seamless Gutters (See our ad this page) 703 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1818 www.arizonaseamlessgutters.com

Handyman/Home Repair Ability Remodeling & Home Services, LLC (See our ad on page 59) 128 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 458-6044 www.abilityprescott.com

Handyman & Construction Services (See our ad on page 74) (928) 771-0405

Lovdahl Contracting, Inc. (928) 277-5247

Moloney Construction, LLC 234 Whitney Street Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 533-3376

Thompson’s Remodeling Specialists, LLC (See our ad on page 77) 936 Buck Hill Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6407 www.thompsonsprescottaz.com

Health Care Services Precision Spinal Care 3733 Karicio Lane Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 442-0202 www.precisionspinalcare.net

Prescott Valley Chiropractic 3088 Robert Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-0522 www.prescottvalleychiropractic.com

Highway Construction Safety Guardrail Signs Arizona Highway Safety Specialists (928) 636-8934

Home Builders (See General Contractors: Residential)

Home Furnishings The Lite Company 2109 N. 4th St. Flagstaff, AZ 86004 (928) 774-6257 www.thelitecompany.com

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(928 )301-1607

Home Inspectors Beneficial Home Inspection (928) 710-7061 www.beneficialhomeinspection.com

Home Security Systems B&W Fire Security Systems (See our ad on page 85) 8544 E. Eastridge Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8008 www.bwfiresecurity.com

Safeguard Security & Communication (928) 772-0155 www.safeguard.us

The Alarm Connection 8816 E State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86314 (928) 445-1609

Hotel – Extended Stay/ Conference Residence Inn By Marriott (See our ad Back Cover) 3599 Lee Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 775-2232 www.marriott.com

SpringHill Suites In Historic Downtown Prescott (See our ad Back Cover) 200 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-0998 www.marriott.com

HVAC Advantage Home Performance 1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-3828 www.advantagehomeperformance.com

Arizona Heating & Cooling 700 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-9378

Balanced Heating & Air Conditioning 389 Road 2 South #B6 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-4623 www.balancedheating.com


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Chino Heating & Cooling, Inc.

Manzanita Landscaping

Prescott Floors

(See our ad on page 77) 550 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2955 www.chinoheating.com

(See our ad on page 63) (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

Desert Valley Aire, INC 8140 E. State Rt. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 778-0784 www.desertvalleyaire.com

Energy Savings Heating & Cooling 360 Henry St. Suite A Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-8402 www.energysavingshc.com

Goettl’s High Desert Mechanical

Vicente Landscaping (See our ad on page 3) 2600 Stearman Rd., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Insulation Advantage Home Performance 1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-3828 www.advantagehomeperformance.com

4650 Old Highway 279, #A Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-2200 www.goettlshdm.com

Arizona State Insulation

Moyer’s Heating & Cooling

Banker Insulation of Northern AZ

(See our ad this page) 8146 E. Ashley Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282-2659 www.moyershvac.com

Pitzer’s One-Hour Air Conditioning & Heating 6363 Cooper Hill Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 777-8899 www.pitzersonehour.com

TDK Comfort Systems, Inc. (928) 636-0846 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com

Verde Sol-Air 724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 www.verdesolair.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 83) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

HVAC Supplies & Fixtures Yavapai Plumbing & Heating

9305 N. Coyote Springs Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 775-2403 5790 Fulton Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2544 www.bankerinsulation.com

Gale Contractor Services 11610 E. Santa Fe Loop Road #B Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 778-0222 www.masco.com

7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

Creative Outdoors (928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com

Landscape Now, Inc.

Irrigation Materials

(928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Earthworks Garden Supply

Little’s Landscape & Design

(See our ad on page 124) 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

Manzanita Landscaping (See our ad on page 63) (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

Ewing Irrigation 8267 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9803 www.ewing1.com

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

Jeff’s Landscaping Yard Service 1720 Kaibab Loop Prescott Valley, AZ 86303 (928) 708-0863 www.prescottlandscaping.net

2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

RRS Landscape & Maintenance (See our ad on page 94) (928) 848-2058 www.rrslandscapeservices.com

915 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-3540 www.bbprescott.com

State Farm-Eric Strobel 2485 N. Great Western Dr. #G1 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8338 www.ericstrobel.com

The Mahoney Group Clyde Marshall 3636 Crossings Dr. #B Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-1900 www.mahoneygroup.com

Interior Design

HydroSeeding

Prescott Design Center

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life

(See our ad on page 66) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Brown & Brown of Prescott

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC

(See our ad on page 66) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

CareScape

Insurance

(See our ad on page 83) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

CareScape

Irrigation Systems

9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com (See our ad on page 10 and 111) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com

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The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. 682 Main Street Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

TLC Sprinkler Repair, Inc. 4707 S. Ponderosa Park Rd Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 541-0061 www.tlclandscapingandsprinklers.com

Vicente Landscaping (See our ad on page 3) 2600 Stearman Rd., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Zebrascapes, LLC 2661 W. Noble Vista Dr. Prescott, AZ 85605 (928)830-4061 www.tkhaley.com

Kitchen & Bath Design Board by Board, Inc. (See our ad on page 57) 2053 Douglas Ln. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com

NJ Builders, Inc. (See our ad on page 87) (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com

Kitchen & Bath Remodeling Ability Remodeling & Home Services, LLC (See our ad on page 59) 128 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 458-6044 www.abilityprescott.com

Board by Board, Inc. (See our ad on page 57) 2053 Douglas Ln. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com

DeCarol Company (See our ad on page 45 and 95) (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com

Moloney Construction, LLC 234 Whitney Street Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 533-3376

NJ Builders, Inc.

Land Development / Lots & Acreage Garden Brook Realty 340 W. Willis St. Ste #2 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-0020 www.gardenbrookrealty.com

Prescor Builders

(See our ad on page 63) (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

Landscaping & Construction Materials

(See our ad on page 94) (928) 848-2058 www.rrslandscapeservices.com

Earthworks Garden Supply (See our ad on page 124) 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

Prescott Dirt, LLC (See our ad on page 107) (928) 636-5844 www.prescottdirt.com

Landscaping – Erosion Control/Xeriscape/Water Features/Defensible Space Commercial & Residential Autumn Blaze Construction (See our ad on page 96) 3071 Pedregal Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-4210 www.autumnblazeconstruction.com

CareScape (See our ad on page 66) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Creative Outdoors (928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com

Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping (See our ad on inside back cover) 8333 E. Pecos Dr. #5 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-6333 www.haciendalandscaping.com

Jeff’s Landscaping Yard Service 1720 Kaibab Loop Prescott Valley, AZ 86303 (928) 708-0863 www.prescottlandscaping.net

PVO Construction, LLC

Landscape Now, Inc.

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Manzanita Landscaping

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

Jonny’s Tree & Landscaping

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1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

(See our ad inside front cover) 3200 Lakeside Village Dr. #201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com

(See our ad on page 87) (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com (928) 710-5873 www.pvoconstruction.com

Little’s Landscape & Design

Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 830-4977 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

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2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

RRS Landscape & Maintenance

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. 682 Main Street Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

TLC Sprinkler Repair, Inc. 4707 S. Ponderosa Park Rd Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 541-0061 www.tlclandscapingandsprinklers.com

Vicente Landscaping (See our ad on page 3) 2600 Stearman Rd., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Zebrascapes, LLC 2661 W. Noble Vista Dr. Prescott, AZ 85605 (928)830-4061 www.tkhaley.com

Lighting K’s Lighting, LLC 735 Sixth St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1623 www.kslightinginc.com

The Lite Company 2109 N. 4th St. Flagstaff, AZ 86004 (928) 774-6257 www.thelitecompany.com

Log Home Chinking Stoney Creek Builders (See our ad on page 143) (602) 885-3932 www.stoneycreekbuildersinc.com

Western Sealant Company Inc. (See our ad on page 64) (928) 778-3112 www.westernsealantaz.com

Log Homes Haley Construction Company (See our ad on page 9) (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

Stoney Creek Builders (See our ad on page 143) (602) 885-3932 www.stoneycreekbuildersinc.com

Marble (Countertops, Shower Surrounds) Arizona Tile (See our ad on page 57) (Stone and Tile Supplier) 625 Holiday Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-1070 www.arizonatile.com

Precision Marble & Granite (See our ad on page 53) 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

Masonry Block/Supplies Yavapai Block & Precast Co. (See our ad on page 119) 1389 Masonry Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4340 www.yavapaiblock.com

Locks

Mediation

Builders Wholesale, LLC

Robert C. Kozak, PLLC

400 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber (See our ad on page 5) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Bob Kozak 3619 Crossings Dr. Suite B Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7140

Membership Warehouse Costco Wholesale (See our ad on page 98) 3911 E. Hwy 69 Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 541-2204 www.costco.com


2015 YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Metal/Steel Buildings Circle C Construction (See our ad on page 15) 1190 W. Rd. 1 North Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com

Jebco Construction Companies (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

Kenson Construction Co. 6135 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5192 www.kensonconstructionco.com

Prescor Builders

Timberline Woodworks Inc.

Town of Prescott Valley

Eric & Sons

1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

2501 E. Civic Circle Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 759-3000 www.pvaz.net

Mold Abatement

Murphy Beds

(See our ad on page 10 and 111) 6640 Inter Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 775-2880 www.ericandsons.net

Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC

We Organize-U

(See our ad on page 129) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

Service Master of Prescott 8330 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-9205 www.servicemasterofprescott.com

Mold Inspection Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC

(See our ad inside front cover) 3200 Lakeside Village Dr. #201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com

(See our ad on page 129) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

Stanley Steel Structures

Service Master of Prescott

1537 S. Bates Road Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-6703 www.stanleysteelstructures.com

Metal Stud Framing Chartier Drywall, Inc. (See our ad on page 135) 655 Brannen Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1191

Jebco Construction Companies (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com Chino Valley Location 140 North Hwy 89, Ste. B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 Prescott Location 222 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

Millwork MCK Woodworks, LLC (See our ad on page 107) 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

The Arizona Woodworking Co. 8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworkingcompany.com

8330 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-9205 www.servicemasterofprescott.com

Jeff’s Landscaping Yard Service 1720 Kaibab Loop Prescott Valley, AZ 86303 (928) 708-0863 www.prescottlandscaping.net

2675 N. State Rt. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 458-7323 www.weorganize-u.net

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. 682 Main Street Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

Nursery/Garden Supplies Earthworks Garden Supply (See our ad on page 124) 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

Landscape Now, Inc. (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Lowes

Manzanita Landscaping

2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

Prescott Spas

(See our ad on page 63) (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com (See our ad on page 21) 6947 E. 1st St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9884 www.prescottspas.com

Outdoor Living CareScape (See our ad on page 66) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Western Technologies, Inc. 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

Mold Testing Western Technologies, Inc. (See our ad on page 95) 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste.95C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

Municipalities City of Prescott (See our ad on page 109) 201 S. Cortez St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-1100 www.cityofprescott.net

Town of Chino Valley 202 N. State Route 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2646 www.chinoaz.net

Town of Dewey-Humboldt 2375 S. Highway 69, Suite 12 Humboldt, AZ 86329 (928) 632-7362 www.dewey-humboldt.net

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Tuff Spas

Century Painting

7600 N. 71st Ave Glendale, AZ 85303 (623) 939-0851 www.tuffspas.com

(See our ad on this page) 697 N. 6th St., Ste. 304 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-2374 www.centurypainting.com

Vicente Landscaping (See our ad on page 3) 2600 Stearman Rd., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Certa Pro Painters

Paint & Supplies

Douglas E. Noble Painting

1801 Jade Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 499-2571 www.certapro.com (928) 772-5434 www.douglasenoblepainting.com

Dunn-Edwards 6572 E. 2nd St. #A-B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-7748 www.dunnedwards.com

Granite Mountain Painting Co. LLC. (928) 515-4374

J & J Painting

Painting Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC (See our ad on page 129) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

2530 W. Copper Basin Rd. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-1575 www.jandjpaintingprescott.com

Pinon Painting 1032 Fair Street Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 778-2902 www.pinonpainting.com

Patio Furnishings

Pest Control

Prescott Spas

Orkin Pest Control

(See our ad on page 21) 6947 E. 1st St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9884 www.prescottspas.com

(See our ad page 129) 8230 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-2419 www.getorkin.com

Pavers

Truly Nolen of America

Autumn Blaze Construction (See our ad on page 96) 3071 Pedregal Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-4210 www.autumnblazeconstruction.com

CareScape (See our ad on page 66) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Creative Outdoors (928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com

Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping (See our ad inside back cover) 8333 E. Pecos Dr. #5 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-6333 www.haciendalandscaping.com

Jeff’s Landscaping Yard Service

Exceptional Service at Affordable Prices!

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Planting Soil Earthworks Garden Supply

Prescott Dirt. LLC (See our ad on page 107) (928) 636-5844 www.prescottdirt.com

1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

Plumbing Contractors

Manzanita Landscaping

(928) 925-6809 www.arizonagreenplumber.com

(See our ad on page 63) (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co.

Vicente Landscaping

778-2374

www.a-erepro.com Prescott Location 1030 Sandretto Dr., Ste. F Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-9116 Prescott (Downtown) Location 222 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3815 Prescott Valley Location 8010 E. Hwy. 69, Ste. D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0054

Landscape Now, Inc.

682 Main Street Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

• All work under warranty • Interior & exterior painting & staining • Skilled, Drug-free crews • High quality painting including low VOC “Green” paint • Renovation of parapets & stucco flat roof shield coat system • “Painting for a Day” Program • 12 months same as cash (OAC)

A & E Reprographics

(See our ad on page 124) 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksgardensupply.com

Little’s Landscape & Design

DOING BUSINESS SINCE 1972

Plan Rooms

1720 Kaibab Loop Prescott Valley, AZ 86303 (928) 708-0863 www.prescottlandscaping.net (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

“We will do everything in our power to make sure you’re satisfied with our painting”

6594 E. 2nd St., Ste #D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-4261 www.trulynolen.com

(See our ad on page 3) 2600 Stearman Rd., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Payroll Services Holdsworth & Co. CPAs 3031 Dollar Mark Way Ste C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8633 www.holdsworthcpa.com

Arizona All Service Plumbing

Benjamin Franklin Plumbing 6363 Copper Hill Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 777-8899 www.benjaminfranklinplumbing.com

Brewer Plumbing, Inc. (928) 445-2351

Dan D Plumbing, LLC. (928) 775-5739

Paragon Plumbing, Inc. (See our ad on page 99) (928) 775-2343

Perfection Plumbing (928) 301-7702

R.E.D. Plumbing 11800 E. Berry Dr. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 772-9296 www.redplumbinginc.com


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The Plumbing Store (See our ad on page 81) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

Verde Sol-Air 724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 www.verdesolair.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 83) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Plumbing Fixtures/Supplies The Plumbing Store (See our ad on page 81) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 83) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Printing/Copying

Propane

A & E Reprographics

Barrett Propane

www.a-erepro.com Prescott Location 1030 Sandretto Dr., Ste. F Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-9116 Prescott (Downtown) Location 222 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3815 Prescott Valley Location 8010 E. Hwy. 69, Ste. D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0054

(See our ad on page 82) 1555 W. Iron Springs Road, #5 Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 636-1600 www.barrettpropane.com

Sir Speedy

3031 Dollar Mark Way Ste C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8633 www.holdsworthcpa.com

1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

Promotional Products Sir Speedy 1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

KPPV – “The Mix” 106.7 FM & 100.7 (Flagstaff) www.kppv.com

KQNA – “Talk of the Quad Cities” 1130 AM & 99.9 FM www.kqna.com

JACK – “Cottonwood & Quad Cities”

Yavapai Bottle Gas

94.7 FM www.jackfmarizona.com

2170 Concord Dr. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 776-9007 www.yavapaigas.com

KUGO – “Travelradio at the Grand Canyon” 102.5 FM www.travelradioUSA.com

Quickbooks Consulting

Great Circle Radio

Holdsworth & Co. CPAs

116 S. Alto Street Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6880 www.gcmaz.com

KAFF – “Flagstaff Country”

Radio Partners

93.5 FM & 930 AM www.country935.gcmaz.com

Arizona’s Hometown Radio Group

KAFF – “Kaff Country”

(See our ad on this page) 3755 Karicio Lane Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8289 www.azhometownradio.com

92.9 FM www.kaff.gcmaz.com

KNOT – “Fun Oldies” 100.9 FM & 1450 AM www.hits106.gcmaz.com

KDDL – “Cattle Country”

KFSZ – “Hits 106”

94.3 FM & 103.1 FM www.cattlecountryradio.com

106 FM www.hits106.gcmaz.com

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KTMG – “Magic” 99.1 FM www.magic991.gcmaz.com

Recycling Iron Man Recyclers

93.9 FM www.939themountain.gcmaz.com

11710 Santa Fe Loop Road Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 775-6894 www.ironmanrecyclers.com

Rainwater Harvesting

Mattera Enterprises Recycling

KMGN – “The Mountain”

CareScape (See our ad on page 66) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Arizona Seamless Gutters (See our ad on page 140) 703 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1818 www.arizonaseamlessgutters.com

Ewing Irrigation

685 S. Coldwater Lane Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 541-9345 www.ironmanrecylcers.com

Patriot Disposal 9434 E. Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9000 www.patriotdisposal.com

Remodeling/Restoration Contractors Ability Remodeling & Home Services, LLC

Circle C Construction

Stoney Creek Builders

(See our ad on page 15) 1190 W. Rd. 1 North Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com

(See our ad on page 143) (602) 885-3932 www.stoneycreekbuildersinc.com

Circle D Builders 1035 Vantage Point Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0208 www.circledbuilders.com

(See our ad on page 77) 936 Buck Hill Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6407 www.thompsonsprescottaz.com

Crystal Creek Builders, LLC

TLC Construction

700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

1940 W. Buena Vista Trail Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 925-1342 www.tlcconstructionofprescott.com

Culhane Contracting, LLC

Triple E Construction

7300 Saddle Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 713-8199 www.culhanecontractingllc.com

(See our ad on page 75) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

(See our ad on page 59) 128 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 458-6044 www.abilityprescott.com

DeCarol Company

(928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC

Vicente Landscaping

(See our ad on page 129) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

(See our ad on page 9) (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

8267 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9803 www.ewing1.com

Landscape Now, Inc.

(See our ad on page 3) 2600 Stearman Rd., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 83) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Real Estate/ Residential & Commercial Ashlin Enterprises, Inc. 11250 E. State Route 69 #2167 Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 710-4487

Garden Brook Realty 340 W. Willis St. Ste #2 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-0020 www.gardenbrookrealty.com

Prescor Builders (See our ad inside front cover) 3200 Lakeside Village Dr. #201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com

Acklin Brothers Construction 1965 Coyote Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-4007 www.acklinbrothersconstruction.com

Aspen Valley Development (See our ad on page 139) 697 6th Street, Suite 503 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-9877 www.aspenvalleyhomesaz.com

Benttree Custom Homes (See our ad on page 67) 1575 Plaza West Dr. #B Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 443-5484 www.benttreecustomhomes.net

Board by Board, Inc. (See our ad on page 57) 2053 Douglas Ln. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com

Branson Custom Homes & Remodeling (See our ad on page 31) Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-4212 www.bransoncustomhomesaz.com

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(See our ad on page 45 and 95) (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com

Haley Construction Company

Handyman & Construction Services (See our ad on page 74) (928) 771-0405

Kenson Construction Co. 6135 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5192 www.kensonconstructionco.com

Thompson’s Remodeling Specialists, LLC

Womack Enterprises, Inc. 425 W. Delano Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6094 www.womack-brothers.com

Yavapai Design Build (See our ad on page 60) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-4953 www.ypeinc.com

Residential Contractors (See General Contractors: Residential/Custom)

Lovdahl Contracting, Inc.

Retaining Walls – Masonry

(928) 277-5247

Autumn Blaze Construction

Moloney Construction, LLC

(See our ad on page 96) 3071 Pedregal Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-4210 www.autumnblazeconstruction.com

234 Whitney Street Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 533-3376

NJ Builders, Inc. (See our ad on page 87) (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com

Prescott Builders of AZ, LLC (See our ad on page 83) (928) 717-0147 www.prescottbuildersofaz.com

PVO Construction, LLC (928) 710-5873 www.pvoconstruction.com

Renovations, Your Complete Remodel Resource (See our ad on page 115) 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8506 www.renovationsaz.com

CareScape (See our ad on page 66) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Creative Outdoors (928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com

Laipple Construction 1947 Victoria Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-6865

Landscape Now, Inc. (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com


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Little’s Landscape & Design

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co.

2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

682 Main Street Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

Thomas W. Kincaid Masonry, Inc. 7450 E. Acre Way Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 772-8520 www.twkmasonry.com

Vicente Landscaping (See our ad on page 3) 2600 Stearman Rd., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Vicente Landscaping (See our ad on page 3) 2600 Stearman Rd., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Road/Driveway Chip Sealing Earth Resources Corporation (928) 775-2795

Retaining Walls – Stone

Rock

Autumn Blaze Construction

(See Flagstone/Rock Supplies)

(See our ad on page 96) 3071 Pedregal Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-4210 www.autumnblazeconstruction.com

CareScape (See our ad on page 66) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Roofing – Residential & Commercial Badger Roofing

Dunbar Stone Company, Inc.

BZ Roof’N

Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping (See our ad inside back cover) 8333 E. Pecos Dr. #5 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-6333 www.haciendalandscaping.com

Landscape Now, Inc. (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Little’s Landscape & Design 1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

Manzanita Landscaping (See our ad on page 63) (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

Able Saw & Small Engine

A-Action Welding

(See our ad on page 104) 625 Miller Valley Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6371 www.ablesaw.com

1514 Shoup St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-2579 www.a-actionwelding.com

Screens (Doors & Windows)

1415 N. Mondel Dr. Gilbert, AZ 85233 (480) 588-4811 www.firstimpressionsecuritydoors.com

First Impression Security Doors

All Seasons Retractable Screens 2535 Copper Basin Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 533-3336 www.allseasonsretractable.com

Prescott Screen Mobile (928) 713-8684 www.screenmobile.com

Prestige Security Doors

Prestige Security Doors

600 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-7900 – Prescott (928) 204-1222 – Sedona www.prestigesecuritydoors.com

600 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-7900 – Prescott (928) 204-1222 – Sedona www.prestigesecuritydoors.com

Triple E Construction

Septic & Water Tank Manufacturer

(See our ad on page 75) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Yavapai Block & Precast Co. (See our ad on page 119) 1389 Masonry Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4340 www.yavapaiblock.com

Bradshaw Mountain Roofing

(928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com 1041 Commerce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7880 www.dunbarstoneinc.com

Security Doors & Screens

(See our ad on this page) 8800 E. Long Mesa Dr., Ste. A Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 771-8770 www.badgerroofing.net (See our ad on page 101) 8734 E. Long Mesa Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-1145

Creative Outdoors

Saw/Tool/Small Engine Repair

(See our ad on page 27) 1715 S. Reed Road Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 237-0788 www.bzroofnprescott.com

Central Basin Roofing, Inc. (See our ad on page 103) 331 N. Arizona Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-5819 www.centralbasinroofing.com

Granite Basin Roofing 1011 E. Commerce Dr., Suite #E Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 772-9222 www.granitebasinroofing.com

Roofing Systems of Prescott (928) 778-5017

Superior Roofing of Northern AZ (928) 775-0060 www.superiorroofingofaz.com

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Septic Repair

Shredding Services

JT’s Septic

Sir Speedy

(928) 632-7077

Septic System Design & Installation

1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

Ringler Excavating (928) 899-0012

Savage Development, Inc. (See our ad on page 105) (928) 717-0024

Septic Tank Cleaning JT’s Septic (928) 632-7077 www.jtseptic.com

Septic Tank Inspections

Early Bird Siding

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

Verde Sol-Air

(928)301-1607

2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 www.verdesolair.com

Reliant Capitol, LLC 725 N. 73rd Ave., Suite 124 Phoenix, AZ 85043 (623) 388-8899 www.reliantcapitolllc.com

Signs/Banners A & B Sign Company

A & E Reprographics

Brewer Plumbing, Inc. (928) 445-2351

Paragon Plumbing, Inc. (See our ad on page 99) (928) 775-2343

R.E.D. Plumbing 11800 E. Berry Dr. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 772-9296 www.redplumbinginc.com

The Plumbing Store (See our ad on page 81) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 83) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Shower Doors/Mirrors/Glass Bennett Glass & Mirror (See our ad on page 150) 722 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1180 www.bennettglassaz.com

Precision Marble & Granite (See our ad on page 53) 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com

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Manzanita Landscaping

Siding

Sewer & Drain Cleaning (928) 925-6809 www.arizonagreenplumber.com

11800 E. Berry Dr. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 772-9296 www.redplumbinginc.com

TDK Comfort Systems, Inc.

(928) 632-7077 www.jtseptic.com

Arizona All Service Plumbing

R.E.D. Plumbing

1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670 (See our ad on page 63) (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com

691 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6995 www.absignco.com

JT’s Septic

Little’s Landscape & Design

www.a-erepro.com Prescott Location 1030 Sandretto Dr., Ste. F Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-9116 Prescott (Downtown) Location 222 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3815 Prescott Valley Location 8010 E. Hwy. 69, Ste. D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0054

Morgan Sign Company 704 E. Moeller St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6336 www.morgansign.com

Sir Speedy 1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

Signs – Highway Construction Guardrail Arizona Highway Safety Specialists (928) 636-8934

Snow Removal CareScape (See our ad on page 66) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Landscape Now, Inc. (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

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Vicente Landscaping (See our ad on page 3) 2600 Stearman Rd., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Solar Energy Blazing Sky Energy Group

(928) 636-0846 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 83) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Solar Tubes & Skylights

(See our ad on page 20) 128 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 277-8460 www.blazingsky.com

Arizona Window Wizard

EV Solar Products, Inc.

Badger Roofing

Installation & Service 8600 E. Turtle Rock Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 775-8964

(See our ad on page 25) 2655 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2201 www.evsolar.com

(See our ad on page 147) 8800 E. Long Mesa Dr., Ste. A Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 771-8770 www.badgerroofing.net

Pur Solar & Electrical

Builders Wholesale, LLC

www.pursolaraz.com

Cottonwood Location 1505 E. Cochise St. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 639-1267

400 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com

Eric & Sons

7433 E. Addis Ave Prescott Valley, 86314 (928) 788-0285

(See our ad on page 10 and 111) 6640 Inter Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 775-2880 www.ericandsons.net

Southface Solar Electric

Granite Basin Roofing

Prescott Valley Location

2122 W. Lone Cactus Dr. St. #2 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (480) 636-1800 www.southfacese.com

Solar Panel Cleaning The Solar Scrubber Serving the Great State of Arizona (928) 308-4970 www.thesolarscrubber.com

Solar Plumbing Arizona All Service Plumbing (928) 925-6809 www.arizonagreenplumber.com

EV Solar Products, Inc. (See our ad on page 25) 2655 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2201 www.evsolar.com

1011 E. Commerce Dr., Suite #E Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 772-9222 www.granitebasinroofing.com

The Door & Window Store 487 E Z St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6400 www.prescottdoors.com

Spas/Saunas/Hot tubs Prescott Spas (See our ad on page 21) 6947 E. 1st St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9884 www.prescottspas.com

Tuff Spas 7600 N. 71st Ave Glendale, AZ 85303 (623)939-0851 www.tuffspas.com


2015 YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Stained Glass

Telephone & Internet

SGO Designer Glass

Cable One

(928) 771-9896

(See our ad on page 54) 3201 Tower Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-4511 www.cableone.net

Stone (See Flagstone/Rock Supplies)

Stucco/Plastering

Tree Removal/Trimming

Sanders Plastering Systems

Big Bear Tree Care

(See our ad this page) (928) 632-5008 www.sandersplastering.com

(928) 925-5786

CareScape (See our ad on page 66) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

Taylor Plastering, Inc. 5798 Foxglove Place Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 772-7522

Sun Rooms/Pergola Shade & Patio Covers Stanley Steel Structures 1537 S. Bates Road Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-6703 www.stanleysteelstructures.com

Sunburst Patios 6263 Copper Hill Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8229

Jeff’s Landscaping Yard Service 1720 Kaibab Loop Prescott Valley, AZ 86303 (928) 708-0863 www.prescottlandscaping.net

(928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

Utilities

Vicente Landscaping

(See our ad on page 97) 120 N. Marina St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-3636 www.aps.com

(See our ad on page 3) 2600 Stearman Rd., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Tub/Shower Conversion

SP S SP the finest Stucco Restoration and new Stucco you will find! SPanders romise:

Stucco Restoration anders lastering New Stucco Systems ystems LLC imply ut...  

We will do what we say! We will create an expectation… then exceed it!

Patriot Disposal 9434 E. Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9000 www.patriotdisposal.com

(See our ad on page 129) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

Prescott Valley C&D Landfill

Arizona All Service Plumbing

Granite Transformations

682 Main Street Camp Verde, AZ 86322

Waste Hauling

Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC

Landscape Now, Inc.

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co.

(See our ad on page 113) 6405 N. Wilkinson Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 771-7298 www.uesaz.com

2661 W. Noble Vista Dr. Prescott, AZ 85605 (928)830-4061 www.tkhaley.com

(928) 830-4977 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

UniSource Energy Services

Zebrascapes, LLC

(928) 925-6809 www.arizonagreenplumber.com

Jonny’s Tree & Landscaping

Arizona Public Service

Southwest Waste Services, Inc. (See our ad on page 107) 2671 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-8446 www.azsws.com

2205 W. Lone Cactus Dr., #23 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (623)-581-5056 www.granitetransformations.com

Precision Marble & Granite

Water & Fire Damage Restoration

(See our ad on page 53) 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com

Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC (See our ad on page 129) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

Reliant Capitol, LLC 725 N. 73rd Ave., Suite 124 Phoenix, AZ 85043 (623) 388-8899 www.reliantcapitolllc.com

Service Master of Prescott 8330 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-9205 www.servicemasterofprescott.com

The Plumbing Store (See our ad on page 81) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

Triple E Construction (See our ad on page 75) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Thompson’s Remodeling Specialists, LLC (See our ad on page 77) 936 Buck Hill Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6407 www.thompsonsprescottaz.com

Water Purification Arizona All Service Plumbing

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating

www.sandersplastering.com

• Conventional Stucco • Stucco Restoration Systems • Residential/Commercial

Call for a FREE inspection and consultation

928-632-5008 ROC 291273

ROC 291272

SINCE 1993

2640 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 759-9400

(See our ad on page 83) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

(928) 925-6809 www.arizonagreenplumber.com

Kinetico Quality Water www.kineticonaz.com Prescott Valley Location 7485 E. 1st St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-5020 Sedona Location 2697 W. St. Rt. 89A Sedona, AZ 86336 (928) 282-2115

Underground Utilities: Excavation & Installation Savage Development, Inc. (See our ad on page 105) (928) 717-0024 www.ycca.org

2015 Building Yavapai

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2015 YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Perfection Plumbing (928) 301-7702

R.E.D. Plumbing 11800 E. Berry Dr. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 772-9296 www.redplumbinginc.com

The Plumbing Store (See our ad on page 81) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating (See our ad on page 83) 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Waterproofing Az Decks Appeal 331 N. Arizona Avenue Prescott, AZ 896301 (928) 778-5819 www.azdecksappeal.com

Western Sealant Company Inc. (See our ad on page 64) (928) 778-3112 www.westernsealantaz.com

(See our ad on page 81) 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

(928) 636-4576

R.W. Turner and Sons 3471 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2771

Window Coverings & Shutters

2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

Blind Brothers Arizona

RRS Landscape & Maintenance (See our ad on page 94) (928) 848-2058 www.rrslandscapeservices.com

9101 E. Florentine Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

ROC279238

Best Full Service Glass Shop in the Tri City Area Best Price • Best Service • Best Warranty CUSTOM SHOWER DOORS - MIRRORS TABLE TOPS - INSULATED GLASS - STOREFRONTS

ior REPLACEMENT WINDOWS in EstFREE Senzen & You ima i y Cit ilitar ts! AUTOMOTIVE, RESIDENTIAL r H tes n om M cou & COMMERCIAL WINDOW TINT e Dis

3M Window Film before after

Replacement Windows

722 E. Sheldon St., Prescott • 928.445.1180 2015 Building Yavapai

Interior Logic (See our ad on page 19) 710 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0900 www.interior-logic.com

Prescott Design Center (See our ad on page 10 and 111) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com

Prescott Floors

www.ycca.org

Bennett Glass & Mirror (See our ad on this page) 722 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1180 www.bennettglassaz.com

Protint, LLC 6264 E. Highway 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-5971 www.protintaz.com

Windows Able & Ready Painting-Remodeling, LLC (See our ad on page 129) 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

Arizona Window Wizard Installation & Service 8600 E. Turtle Rock Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 775-8964

Bennett Glass & Mirror (See our ad on this page) 722 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1180 www.bennettglassaz.com

Builders Wholesale, LLC 400 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com

Foxworth Galbraith Lumber

1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

(See our ad on page 5) 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home Bringing Home Interiors to Life

Pella Windows & Doors Mountain West

7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

(See our ad on page 75) 120 E. Corporate Place Suite 16 Chandler, AZ 85225 (928) 710-4253 www.pella.com

The Blind Brothers (DBA) Blinds Shutters & Shades

ProBuild

437 S. Main St., Ste. 3 Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-2423 www.theblindbrothers.com

Custom Showers

150

(See our ad on page 93) (928) 710-1962 www.hunterdouglas.com

Heritage Interiors ISI LLC

BENNETT GLASS & MIRROR Full Service Glass Shop Since 1975 www.bennettglassaz.com

Window Tinting (Auto, Building, and Home)

Dan McGee Drilling & Pump

Landscape Now, Inc.

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

Welding

Wells/Pump Installation & Servicing

(See our ad on page 66) 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

The Plumbing Store

(See our ad on page 10 and 111) 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-0122 www.thepicturewindowinc.com

1514 Shoup St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-2579 www.a-actionwelding.com

CareScape

(928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

The Picture Window, Inc.

(See our ad on page 3) 2600 Stearman Rd., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

A-Action Welding

Weed Control

Water/Waste Water Piping Supplies

Vicente Landscaping

(See our ad on page 49) 6601 E. 2nd St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-1221 www.probuild.com


2015 YCCA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY

Reliant Capitol, LLC

Triple E Construction

725 N. 73rd Ave., Ste. 124 Phoenix, AZ 85043 (623) 388-8899 www.reliantcapitolllc.com

(See our ad on page 75) Pella Certified Contractor 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Renewal by Andersen of Northern Arizona 2485 N. Great Western Dr. #D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3159 www.renewalbyandersen.com

Windows N More

The Door & Window Store

Arizona Window Wizard Installation & Service

487 E Z St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6400 www.prescottdoors.com

(928) 505-2555

Windows/Sliding Door Repairs

8600 E. Turtle Rock Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 775-8964

Windows – Replacement

Triple E Construction (See our ad on page 75) 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Bennett Glass & Mirror (See our ad on page 150) 722 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1180 www.bennettglassaz.com

Window World of Northern Arizona

Renewal by Andersen of Northern Arizona

(See our ad on page 46 & 47) 101 Airpark Road #L Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 649-9111 www.windowworldnoaz.com

2485 N. Great Western Dr. #D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3159 www.renewalbyandersen.com

Woodworking

Reliant Capitol, LLC 725 N. 73rd Ave., Suite 124 Phoenix, AZ 85043 (623) 388-8899 www.reliantcapitolllc.com

(See Carpentry/Finish Carpentry)

COTTONWOOD, CAMP VERDE DIRECTORY

Equipment Rentals & Dealers Bingham Equipment Company 2694 S. Union Dr. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 646-5388 www.binghamequipment.com

Home Furnishings The Picture Window, Inc. 634 E. State Route 89A Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-8442

HVAC Goettl’s High Desert Mechanical 4650 Old Highway 279, #A Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-2200 www.goettlshdm.com

Moyers Heating & Cooling (See our ad on page 141) 2400 E. Hwy 89 #A Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 282-2659 www.moyershvac.com

Verde Sol-Air 724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 Toll Free: (866) 700-5757 www.verdesolair.com

Irrigation Systems Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC 2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. P.O. Box 4462 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

Retaining Walls – Stone

Tree Removal/Trimming

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co.

2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

P.O. Box 4462 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

Landscaping – Erosion Control/Xeriscape/ Water Features/Defensible Space Commercial & Residential

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co.

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

Snow Removal

2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

Window Coverings & Shutters

2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. P.O. Box 4462 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

P.O. Box 4462 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

Pur Solar

Solar Plumbing

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co.

Verde Sol-Air

2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

The Picture Window, Inc. (See our ad on page 10 and 111) 634 E. State Route 89A Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-8442 www.thepicturewindowinc.com

1505 E. Cochise St. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 639-1267 www.pursolaraz.com

Pavers

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

437 S. Main St., Ste. 3 Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-2423 www.theblindbrothers.com

Blazing Sky Energy Group

Stanley Steel Structures

Retaining Walls – Masonry

The Blind Brothers (DBA) Blinds Shutters & Shades

Solar Energy (See our ad on page 20) (928) 277-8460

P.O. Box 4462 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

Rickett’s Landscaping, LLC

2320 W. Verde West Dr. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 710-8244

Metal/Steel Buildings 1537 S. Bates Road Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-6703 www.stanleysteelstructures.com

Weed Control

Windows – Replacement Window World of Northern Arizona

724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 Toll Free: (866) 700-5757 www.verdesolair.com

(See our ad on page 46 and 47) 101 Airpark Road #L Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 649-9111 www.windowworldnoaz.com

Sun Rooms/Pergola Shade & Patio Covers Stanley Steel Structures 1537 S. Bates Road Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-6703 www.stanleysteelstructures.com www.ycca.org

2015 Building Yavapai

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Perfect Lawn Without all the Labor Have you ever dreamed of having a lawn that is on par with a well-maintained putting green? Or are your dreams a little less extravagant: Would you settle for a lawn without weeds, yellow spots and without need for watering, mowing, weeding and fertilizing? In the arid southwest and in central ­Arizona’s below-freezing winter temperatures, synthetic turf is the ideal way to showcase the perfect lawn year round. When homeowners want to landscape their yard, there generally is some debating over whether to go with natural grass or artificial grass. Artificial turf by far is much easier to maintain than real grass but that does not mean it is maintenance free and there are pros and cons to both. Today’s artificial or synthetic turf has evolved well beyond the “Astroturf” installed in the Houston Astrodome in 1964. Today’s manufacturers produce artificial turf offering a wide range of synthetic grass products. Real grass is much more affordable up front but in the long run, after the money you spend on water, fertilizer and the time you spend maintaining it, artificial turf will be cheaper. The most important reason synthetic turf is installed is to minimize watering, which almost as important is the ability to enjoy the lawn year-round. For those who suffer from grass related allergies, symptoms may be reduced. Improvements in the past decade have been astounding: Turf available for purchase even a decade ago is no longer available because of the many improvements. It is virtually visually identical to real grass. You no longer need to water your lawn or repair irrigation systems. Weekly mowing and weeding, and annual fertilizing and thatching will become a distant memory as you sit back and enjoy your iced tea while admiring your perfect lawn. Some people love the look and smell of real grass and the cooling effect it has in their yard, where artificial turf will absorb the heat of the sun and will be like a heat island. 152

2015 Building Yavapai

www.ycca.org

Ray Hernandez of Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping sees many benefits to using artificial grass. “The water savings is definitely a plus,” he says. “It doesn’t require any water except an occasional hosing to clean it up and it doesn’t have any insects or pest problems. It is pet friendly and pets will no longer be able to create yellow spots in the stain-proof turf. It is kid friendly and does not harbor bacteria underneath.” Like the carpeting inside your home, synthetic turf comes in different grades, colors (to imitate different grass varieties), and length and width of the grass blades. There are different types of turf available for different needs: visual needs, pet yards, lawn sports such as bocce ball and croquet, and children friendly play areas. Synthetic turf is even made for backyard golfers to chip and putt. Cost is dependent upon these various factors. Depending upon the type of artificial grass installed, as a rule of thumb a homeowner might expect to recover the turf’s initial cost within three years, compared to maintaining a live grass lawn. Hernandez uses a polyethylene turf that is good for the environment and is composed of recyclable material that allows the grass to breathe. It has holes for drainage so water or other liquids can permeate through it. Synthetic grass has a porous backing that allows rainwater to drain into the ground at the rate of 40 gallons per hour per square foot. All artificial turf warranties are different. Ask your landscape contractor or turf supplier for the details. In Yavapai county, real grass is being replaced by synthetic turf for a variety of reasons: a growing number of residents are leaning toward it to avoid allergens associated with natural lawns but water conservation is probably the top reason, Hernandez said. Roughly 50 percent of a home’s water is used for outside irrigation and landscape purposes and synthetic turf cuts down on that usage. No over seeding, thatching, aeration or applying chemicals or fertilizers is necessary.

It is recommended that a licensed landscape contractor install your turf. Preparation of the ground for a smooth lawn is essential, as is sloping of the ground away from the home to prevent water damage to the home. A professional can better help you understand the products and technologies available to suite your needs For do-it-yourselfers, artificial turf is available at home-improvement centers and other suppliers. But, be aware that this product is extremely heavy. Improperly joining seams can result in a visually poor lawn. And, do-it-yourselfers are limited in their choice of available products, while a contractor has access to virtually all available turf products. Before you completely doze off dreaming of an idyllic lifestyle in your new yard, be aware that synthetic turf is not entirely maintenance-free. Dog urine needs to be occasionally rinsed off and feces picked up. Autumn leaves will need to be raked, blown or vacuumed. Every few years “lofting” of the turf with a “power broom” may be necessary. De­pending upon the product, a contractor may need to replace the rubber crumbs that are used in some turf to help loft the blades. If you like the feel of real grass between your toes, real grass is generally cooler to the touch in full sun than synthetic grass. Sell your lawnmower at the garage sale. Put extra ice cubes in your iced tea, sit back and let your yard be the envy of your neighbors.


Now Is The Time for

Grass

Synthetic grass can help you maintain a beautiful, green yard year round. Real grass requires a lot of maintenance to keep it looking it’s best: weekly mowing, edging, fertilizing, weeding and watering. Artificial turf, on the other hand, is virtually maintenance free. Curbing is an attractive, permanent landscaping accent which adds value to your property.

Add Value with Professional Curbing It is great for lawn edging and flower beds. There are multiple color design options, including flowing curbs. Most jobs completed same day. Call to schedule.

Whatever the size of your yard or your budget, we can help you achieve the look you desire.

L.L.C.

8333 E. Pecos Dr., Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 713-6333 • HaciendaLandscaping.com ROC#166690

Landscaping • Stonework • Articial Turf • Patios


Profile for YCCA

YCCA 2015  

Yavapai County Contractors Association Prescott, Prescott Valley, Arizona

YCCA 2015  

Yavapai County Contractors Association Prescott, Prescott Valley, Arizona

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