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Living Green with Prescott’s Cody Lundin

Primavera School Students Design Their Dream Houses hotel rises from ashes Living with lead Plus Attracting birds to your backyard

To mirror or not mirror

Transform your outdoor area into living space

Give your kitchen a facelift


Let’s all start with Sustainability 101 have said this before “I wish the calendar would start in May” since there is no more exciting time of the year that has such wonderful beginnings. Winter is gone, leaves are turning green, birds are singing, baby quail are chirping, grass is growing and flowers are thriving. Now is the time for all of us to make a new beginning, a pledge to change our lives and become more eco-friendly. Generations have changed. We have gone from hanging clothes outside on the clothesline to now tossing them into dryers that talk to us. We turn our faucets on and can have instant hot water. We have vacuums that roll around furniture and are as light as a feather and we have every cleaning product imaginable. Josephine Cochran is a heroine to me. And you are asking who is she? To everyone that ever stands at a sink, we should say thank you. Josephine designed the first commercially successful dishwasher and this came about because her service staff was always chipping her good china. Our lives have changed and for the better, however we must continue to change because it is our environment footprint and our legacy for future generations and being eco-friendly is one of our areas where we can all make a difference. The home is probably the best place to begin to educate your family about making sustainable choices. And we all

know that at home, the biggest impact we have on the environment is through our use of water and energy. It is OK to start out making small choices, simple choices in our everyday life such as setting your computer to sleep mode, installing CFL bulbs, making sure your doors and windows have weather stripping, replacing your HVAC filters. We do not have to start out by going totally solar and living off the grid. Instead of relying on tap water to water our plants, it is just as easy to collect rainwater in rain barrels and sustain our plants. Make sure your toilets and faucets do not have leaks and never let the water run when not using it.  Sustainability is the ability to provide for our needs without damaging the ability of future generations to provide for themselves. When a process is sustainable, it can be carried out and over and over again without negative environmental effects or impossibly high costs to anyone involved.  Our mission should be to make small choices every day that affect the health of the planet we share. Small choices can have a major positive impact on our environment. Wise sustainable decisions

sustain not only the natural environment, but also the economies and communities that mean so much to us. Remember you can change your life and make it more eco-friendly. We do not have to live in a home the size of a closet and we certainly do not have to use vegetable oil to drive our car. The fact is we can all make environmental choices that can make a difference. So let’s remember that life is exhilarating and we must plunge into it and dive through it with compassion and an open heart. I encourage each of you to reach out and practice being eco-friendly and sustainable. Let’s learn how to meet our resource demands without undermining the ability of our planet to provide for future generations. Let’s all start with Sustainability 101. We can all resolve to make lasting changes in our homes and the way we live to save our precious resources and to help the planet. Saving water, saving energy, recycling and reusing and all it takes is a little commitment and dedication to make a lasting impact.  I hope that you are inspired by our magazine, articles and enterprising advertisers. Thank you all for invariably overloading our phone lines and e-mails, and with friendships and warm and tender sentiments for the help that you received by calling YCCA. Here is to a more beautiful and eco-friendly tomorrow.

Publisher

Cover Photo A local Prescott residence with landscaping design by Creative Outdoors of Prescott using Belgard products. Since 1995 Belgard interlocking pavers, paving stone and garden wall products have been produced by a nationwide network of Oldcastle manufacturing facilities. These products include the traditional and antiqued paver and wall series. Photo provided by Belgard

Design & Layout AHA Creative Ink, Prescott, Arizona 928-717-2412 • www.ahacreativeink.com

Yavapai County Contractors Association 810 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 928-778-0040

Fax: 928-541-9882 ycca@cableone.net www.ycca.org

Building Yavapai received a 2012 Award of Excellence in Publication Design from Graphic Design USA 4

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©2013 Yavapai County Contractors Association. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Every effort has been made to provide dependable data in an everchanging market. As a result, the publisher does not warrant the data herein is complete or accurate.


YCCA Board of Directors President Mike Enders Benttree Custom Homes

1st Vice President Matt Greenlee Greenlee Designer Surface

2nd Vice President Chuck Merritt DeCarol Company

Secretary/Treasurer Chris Welborn Vicente Landscaping

Dave Barrett Barrett Propane

Greg Barstad Granite Basin Roofing

Brian Bombardieri B’s Contracting

Ken Coleman Sir Speedy

Tom Haley Haley Construction

John Heisley Fann Contracting

Robert Kozak Robert C. Kozak, PLLC

Wyatt Orr Earth Resources Corp.

Ty Scott Builder’s Wholesale

Ty Smith Yavapai Block & Precast

The mission of the Yavapai County Contractors Association is to properly manage a construction industry association that transfers and promotes education, safety, political action, services and networking for the benefit of its members and the communities of Yavapai County. avapai County Contractors Association has proudly been serving the communities of Yavapai County for more than 50 years. YCCA Board members, past and present, laid the groundwork and structured a clearly defined mission that not only addresses challenges faced by the licensed and bonded contractor, but also encourages and aggressively provides consumer protections within the same framework. As Yavapai County grows, so does the importance of Yavapai County

Contractors Association (YCCA). “We take our responsibility very seriously and our Building Yavapai magazine, the official YCCA publication, is just one tool that we use to strengthen and build a relationship between government,contractors, suppliers, the consumer and our community,” said

Sandy Griffis, YCCA Executive Director.

We hope that you enjoy the articles and tips within Building Yavapai, and we encourage you to do business with our members. Tuck this issue away it will be a valued resource for years to come!

Remember, Don’t Start Without Us! Use Licensed, Local, Bonded and Insured Contractors 2013 Building Yavapai

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In Arizona, all construction contracts greater than $1,000 must contain at a minimum: The name and business address of the contractor. The contractor’s license number. The name and mailing address of the owner. The jobsite address or legal description. The date the owner and contractor signed the construction contract. Estimated completion date of the work. A description of the work to be performed. Total dollar amount to be paid to the contractor for all the work, including all taxes. The dollar amount of any advance deposit paid or scheduled to be paid to the contractor by the owner. The dollar amount and stage of construction for any progress payments to be made to the contractor. Specific information, prominently displayed, explaining how to file a written complaint with the Registrar of Contractors. Prompt Pay details for owner, occupants. 5


Matt Ackerman Matthew B. Ackerman, LEED-AP AIA is the founding partner at Catalyst Architecture—a full-service, award-winning sustainable design firm located in downtown Prescott. Matt was awarded the US Green Building Council’s LEED professional accreditation in the spring of 2003, making Matt the first LEED accredited architect in Yavapai County. Matt is a co-contributor of the Daily Courier’s Eco_Logic Blog- Your Common Sen$e Guide to Going Green. Karla Clark Karla Clark and her husband John own Red Arrow Real Estate, which was established in 1987. They have offices in Prescott and the Prescott Country Club. It is the largest independent real estate firm in the area. Clark holds degrees in journalism, marketing and business. She is privileged to work with contractors, developers locally, Fortune 500 Companies, NFL, NBA, MLB, Bank One Ball Park, America West Arena, Westcor Malls, International real estate and banking institutions. Sandy Griffis Sandy has been living in Prescott for 16 years and loving every minute of those 5,840 days and nights. As Executive Director of Yavapai

County Contractors Association, she feels privileged to have the best job ever! Sandy has a BA in Journalism and an MBA in Business from San Diego State. She loves golf, enjoys hiking, is an able violinist and seriously embraces, hugs and takes on life with a smile. Ann Haver-Allen Ann has more than 25 years’ experience as a writer, editor and graphic designer. During her career, she has received more than 50 professional awards recognizing her achievements in writing, editing, photography and graphic design. She is listed in Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who of American Women, and Who’s Who in the World, among other biographical listings. She enjoys hiking, photography and gardening. Bob Kozak Bob Kozak is a Prescott attorney who has been in practice for more than 30 years. He is also a professional mediator and arbitrator. He sits on the Boy Scouts of America Grand Canyon Council Executive Board and has two Eagle Scout sons. In his spare time, he is an active backpacker, scuba diver and triathlete.

Lauren Millette Lauren Millette has worked as a journalist for more than 20 years. She’s reported for The Arizona Republic, Phoenix Gazette, Scottsdale Progress, The Verde Independent, The Daily Courier, KYCA Radio, Prescott ENews and Prescott Woman’s Magazine, among others. She graduated from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Telecommunications at Arizona State University. She loves the outdoors, gardening, cooking and spending time with family. She works part time at Trader Joe’s and is helping launch Blue Rose Heritage and Culture Center in Prescott Valley. Sandy Moss For 10 years, Sandy Moss has been a broadcaster with Arizona’s Hometown Radio Group: KPPV, KQNA, KDDL, KUGO and KPKR. She hosts a live interview show, “Q&A with Sandy Moss,” on KQNA at 3 p.m. Monday through Thursday; as well as doing movie reviews, social calendars, newscasts and more. She came to radio after a decade as a reporter and columnist with The Daily Courier. This past year, Sandy published her first book, “The Terrible Loyalty.”

When hiring a contractor:

Be wary of individuals who: Solicit work door-to-door Offer “special deals” for jobs using “leftover” materials Solicit by telephone

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Make sure your contractor is licensed. Ask for references. Plan your project carefully and make detailed plans if necessary. Get at least three detailed bids. Ask what problems may come up during the project. Get a written contract. Make sure you understand the terms of the contract before signing. Be cautious about advancing monies for work not yet completed. Put all changes into writing. Make frequent inspections.


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Features Primavera School Students design their dream houses

Pay Attention to Your Mother

Prescott’s own Cody Lundin on sustainable design and paying attention to Mother Nature

Hotel rises from ashes

The May 2012 devastating fire in downtown Prescott forever changed the face of Whiskey Row

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8 Attracting

Birds to your yard

16 To Mirror or Not Mirror

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No water hogs among these plants

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Four seasons of home maintenance keeps things operating smoothly

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Yavapai County: Ancient Land—Visionary People

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Improving comfort and efficiency of your home

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Duct tape—America’s favoriate fix-all

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Extend the life of your HVAC system

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Perfect lawn without all the labor

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Why replace windows?

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Fired up to build—Know your local fire sprinkler codes

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Why should we hire an arborist?

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The world of flooring made easy

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Do not close off vents in unused rooms

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Select the right roof for your home

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Home energy audit first step towards efficiency

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3 Reasons to re-evaluate homeowner’s insurance

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Accounting is a year-round activity

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Maintain your septic tank

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Color Trends

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Eco-friendly cleaning products a smarter choice

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Big expense: Heating water efficiently saves money

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When going ‘green’ know what it means

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Enhance your home and office with feng shui

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Top 5 Reasons for Window Replacement

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Transform your outdoor area into living space

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Never again spend time doing housework

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Give your kitchen a facelift

Meet your YCCA team 2 3 4 93 95

Message from Sandy Griffis, Executive Director YCCA Board of Directors Meet the Writers YCCA Service Index Membership Directory 2013 Building Yavapai

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Not all wildflowers welcome in Arizona 9


Attracting birds to your backyard o you want to relax to the sounds and color that come with birds visiting your backyard, and would you enjoy identifying the native birds which visit us throughout the seasons? How do you invite native birds into your yard? The better question is “What is the best way to invite myself into the birds’ own yard? Birds need water, food, shelter and a safe place to raise their young. Keep in mind that the native species have been passing through, feeding and raising their young in the same habitat for thousands of years. You are actually visiting their territory. The most important attraction for native birds is native vegetation because it provides safe shelter. Landscaping with native vegetation not only decreases the need for water and care of the plants, it also increases visits from native birds and other wildlife. Eric Moore of Jay’s Bird Barn encourages customers to change their human perspective by considering, “If someone bulldozed down his home, would he still want to live on that property?” If all of the native vegetation has been removed, few of the native birds will want to remain there. Native vegetation provides the native bugs and seeds for food. You can supplement their natural foods with suet, nyjer seed or nectar. But, you can’t attract native birds with the wrong food, so be wary of “natural bird” seed sold at big box stores. The same seed is sold to residents of Fort Lauderdale, Portland, Cincinnati, Schenectady and 10

By Robert Kozak

Prescott. The birds in Fort Lauderdale are different from those in Prescott, and species native to those unique habitats have different dietary needs. Even within a specific city’s limits within Yavapai County, there are many different habitats attracting different bird species: higher elevations attract nuthatches, chickadees, titmice and woodpeckers, while lower elevations attract quail, dove, finches and roadrunners. Buying the nutritionally appropriate food for your specific habitat will bring the widest variety of natural birds. Even though central Arizona has its share of mountain 2013 Building Yavapai

terrain, it is still considered a desert. Many birds obtain their water directly from drinking. Many birds enjoy taking baths. Consider installing a birdbath, bird water source or hummingbird feeder. You may choose to have your yard certified by the National Wildlife Federation as a bird habitat. These certified habitats require specific compliance requirements for shelter, food, water and raising of young. Now that you have attracted that pretty red bird with the green speckled head that only appears in the autumn, you will probably want to know what it is. Bird field guides on the www.ycca.org

market today are more userfriendly. Many are indexed by bird color to help identify the species more easily. Intermediate and advanced field guides have illustrations of more bird species and more information on each species. Seeing the birds up close— without scaring them away— requires “optics,” the birders’ term for binoculars and spotting scopes. Better viewing requires better light gathering (larger objective lenses), accurate color (various lens coatings) and higher detail (precision manufacturing). As with many things, you get what you pay for: good quality birding binoculars and spotting scopes may cost you $200 or more. Contact your local birding store and landscape contractor for more information.


avapai County boasts four distinct seasons of splendor: Leaves and flowers burst forth in the spring. Summer monsoons crescendo with intense thunderstorms and downpours, often accompanied by damaging hail. Fall ushers in cooler temperatures and colorful foliage, while winter can bring snow and ice storms. Each season requires a maintenance regime for homeowners wishing to keep their homes in top shape. Savvy homeowners take advantage of the sunny, mild days of spring and fall to prepare for seasonal extremes.

Spring Maintenance

Spring is the time to check and service HVAC systems. r Filters in your HVAC system should be changed monthly, especially during hot summer months. Filters should be changed at least every three months to avoid clogging. r Make sure the coils on your system are clean and the unit is clear of all branches and tree

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limbs to maintain adequate airflow. r Clean registers and air vents at least every other month. r Lawn irrigation systems also should be examined and serviced this time of year. Check sprinkler heads and irrigation lines for leaks. r Have your roof inspected to make sure it is strong, stable and sound.

Fall Maintenance

r As temperatures cool, it’s time to prepare for the coming winter. r Select and stow wood. All wood contains water, and freshly cut wood can contain more than 45-percent water. Well-seasoned wood is in the range of 15 percent to 20-percent water. Well-seasoned and properly dried wood is easier to start, has a higher heat content and burns cleaner. It takes about one year for wood to become well-seasoned; appearing gray, relatively lightweight and cracked on the ends. Unseasoned wood tends to produce a

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steam effect, causing creosote build-up and preventing it from burning hot enough to keep chimneys clean. r Clean and inspect chimneys and fireplaces. Creosote, created by smoke, soot and other particles clinging to chimney walls is highly flammable. Cleaning logs are not recommended to clean chimneys. More than 50,000 fires occur each year in U.S. homes, with 87 percent of those classified as “confined fires” in fireplaces, chimneys/flues, pots on stoves, or other noncombustible containers. Of this 87 percent, 56 percent are chimney/fireplace or flue fires. Even if you do not use your fireplace often, an annual checkup is recommended to protect against obstructions such as bird nests or debris and leaves. An inspection may also uncover other types of deterioration resulting in unsafe chimneys. r Change filters in your heating system. Cover your swamp coolers. r When insulating pipes, be proactive to avoid the expense and inconvenience of frozen pipes. Make sure pipes and faucets in unheated areas, such as attics, basements, or those close to exterior walls are insulated. If you have a fire sprinkler, make sure those lines are properly insulated. r Irrigation systems, garden hoses and

decorative fountains should be drained, covered and insulated for the winter. Licensed landscapers can help you winterize your landscaping. r Additionally, rooftop gutters should be cleaned to allow for proper drainage. After a snowfall, warmer daytime temperatures will melt rooftop snow. If the gutters are clean, the melted snow drains away. Gutters clogged with debris can prevent melting ice and snow from draining properly. When refreezing occurs overnight, ice dams are created at the gutter’s edge. Ice dams can force water to enter your home through inside walls and cause major damage. r This is another good time of the year to contact a roofer to inspect your roof and check for flashing missing around the fireplace or other roof projections. Snow can buildup in these areas and cause roof leaks. r Proper sealing and insulating attic accesses also is important. Bottom line, preventative home maintenance ensures a safer and more economically efficient household throughout the year.

If you need help or advice, contact the YCCA at 928-778-0040

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Yavapai County

Ancient Land — Visionary People

Yavapai County is a region of breathtaking natural beauty dotted with quaint, mountain communities. It is small-town living with a Wild-West flavor amid the most stunning scenic wonders nature has to offer. Universities, airports, shopping, golf and world-class medical facilities are all conveniently located. And Arizona’s majestic Grand Canyon is only a two-hour drive away. Yavapai County offers something for everyone with its mix of business and casual environments with the resources and expertise to manage growth and at the same time, live in a comfortable and relaxed lifestyle. For information about building in Central Arizona, call the Yavapai County Contractors Association at 928-778-0040, or visit the website at www.ycca.org.

Location

Yavapai County—outlined in blue on the state map below, is the largest county in Arizona. Prescott and Prescott Valley are the largest cities in Yavapai County. Neighboring towns include Chino Valley, DeweyHumboldt and Mayer. Also in Yavapai County are the towns of Camp Verde, Clarksdale, Cottonwood, Paulden, Jerome, Spring Valley, Cordes Lakes, Congress, Bagdad and Williamson Valley. Sedona straddles two counties: Yavapai and Coconino. Blessed with clean air, a mild year-round climate, endless blue skies and majestic views,

residents of Yavapai County enjoy an enviable quality of life. This place has an allure all its own; people come to visit and decide to stay. Wide expanses of open space and sky, miles of hiking trails, stunning natural beauty, superb recreational activities, thriving economies and all the amenities associated with a larger urban area make north central Arizona one of the most desirable, livable areas in the United States.

Education and Medical Educational opportunities abound in Yavapai County, which is home to Yavapai College, a multi-campus

community college system. Additionally, three four-year colleges are in the county: Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Prescott College and Northcentral University. Yavapai Regional Medical Center is a state-of-the-art hospital with campuses in Prescott and Prescott Valley. The Bob Stump Veteran’s Administration Medical Center is located in Prescott.

Outdoors and History Yavapai County is a paradise for nature lovers and outdoor enthusiasts with limitless opportunities for golf, jogging, hiking, backpacking, camping, fishing, biking, bird watching, star gazing, horseback riding, rock climbing, boating and picnicking. History buffs will be interested in the passed-down folklore and historical sagas of the towns and cities that make up Yavapai County. The county is home to the ancient Native American dwellings of Montezuma

Castle and Montezuma Well and the ghost towns of Jerome and Cleator, among many scattered throughout the county. Visitors can explore old mines, visit Indian ruins, participate in archaeological digs, stroll around the grounds of Prescott’s Sharlot Hall Museum or comb through the museum’s exhaustive archives of documents and photographs.

Transportation

Prescott can be reached via Arizona Highways 69, 89, 89A and 169. Interstate 17, which runs between Phoenix and Flagstaff, cuts through the southeast edge of Yavapai County. Interstate 40 crosses the northern edge of Yavapai County and is accessible via Highway 89. Commercial flights are available through Prescott’s municipal airport, Ernest A. Love Field. Flights to Los Angeles and Denver arrive and leave daily. The airport is also used as the flight-training center for Embry-Riddle.

Distance to Prescott from: (in miles) Albuquerque......................................................................400 Denver................................................................................780 Flagstaff................................................................................73 Las Vegas............................................................................268 Los Angeles........................................................................347 Phoenix.................................................................................95 Salt Lake City......................................................................610 San Diego............................................................................410 Sedona...................................................................................53 Tucson.................................................................................212 14

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Prescott Valley, incorporated in the 1970s, is home to the Arizona Sundogs hockey team. A bustling entertainment center , pedestrian-friendly downtown and 10 public parks beckon vistors to come play and stay. Glassford Hill, an extinct volcano, is the town’s most notable landmark. Hikers who make it to the top are rewarded with amazing panaromic views.

Chino Valley is a land of 40 wide-open space, populated by pronghorn antelope, breathtaking mountain views and the most amazing sunsets to be seen anywhere. This sleepy ranching and farming community has larger home lots and ranches, where horses and livestock of all kinds are welcome. Chino Valley has many Bagdad amenities geared toward family enjoyment, outdoor recreation and education. A 37-acre community center includes an aquatic park, picnic areas, lighted ball fields, an 93 amphitheater and miles of trails.

Sedona, located at the base of Oak Creek Canyon and surrounded by the Coconino National Forest, is most well known for its striking red rock formations. Despite being one of the state’s top tourist dentinations attracting 3 million visitors a year, Sedona remains a quiet, residential municipality.

Yavapai County Paulden

Sedona

Chino Valley

Clarkdale Jerome

Williamson Prescott Valley Valley

Cottonwood

Prescott

Camp Verde Dewey-Humboldt Mayer Spring Valley Cordes Lakes

Congress

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Prescott (pronounced “Preskit”) has a population nearing 40,000. With its historic downtown, famed Whiskey Row and picturesque Courthouse Square, this small city exemplifies the Old West. Surrounded by the Prescott National Forest and tucked into the pines, Prescott is routinely included among the top places to live in the United States. Known as “Everybody’s Hometown,” Prescott continues to be a picture-postcard community of neighborhoods with tiny streets secluded in the pines. Residents and tourists alike spend hours strolling through art galleries, combing the many antique stores and shopping in boutiques that line the charming downtown streets.

Cottonwood was named for the majestic cottonwood trees that dot the landscape. The city, with a population of more than 11,000, is surrounded on three sides by mountains and bounded to the north by buttes and mesas. It is home to the Verde Canyon Railway and features the Historic Old Town. Camp Verde is home to many tourist attractions, including the historic Fort Verde, built in 1865, and Montezuma’s Castle, one of the most well-preserved cliff dwelling sites in North America, which attracts more than 1 million visitors annually.

Dewey-Humboldt is characterized by rolling hills folded into the foothills of the picturesque Bradshaw Mountains in the Agua Fria Valley. Dewey-Humboldt, which incorporated in 2004, is predominantly a rural, residential community.

Downtown Prescott

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Explore the arts & outdoors of Prescott -beauty inside & out

For a complete list of festivals, events and attractions go to

visit-prescott.com

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by Sandy Griffis

y home is filled with 10 mirrors of all shapes and sizes and besides my shoes, they are one of my favorite accessories. Mirrors can change the look of a room just by making it seem larger and much brighter. I have a mirror strategically placed in my laundry room that bounces sunlight from the window and reflects beautiful light into the room. There are other mirrors placed throughout the home that make the dining area look larger and a mirror

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that makes the hallway seem longer. How do you know which mirror is the best size, shape and how is the best spot determined to hang a mirror? A lot of these decisions are personal choice however a rule of thumb is that a mirror should be hung 60 inches from the floor to the center of the mirror if possible. This feature allows people to see themselves in the mirror. Mirror material does not have to match other home pieces and that is the fun of decorating with mirrors. A general rule of thumb is to stay with the same general color of the overall room. The width of the mirror according to interior designers should always be smaller than the piece of furniture that is below it. The rule of thumb for the size proportions is that the mirror should be roughly two thirds the size of the furniture piece. Decorating with mirrors is certainly a way to add panache, flair and stylishness to any room. Besides the brightness and light coming into a room with mirrors, strategically placed mirrors will make a room seem larger, they can be used as a focal point and of course can make a declaration about ones personal style. Mirrors are a quick way to change a room. If you are wanting a focal point, want a room to appear larger, add more light and brightness, or want to be stylish, a mirror or mirrors can do the trick. Mirror mirror on the wall….. www.ycca.org


Advertorial

Improving comfort, efficiency of your home

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dvantage Home Performance (AHP) is a full-service heating and air conditioning company that specializes in resolving high utility bills, uncomfortable rooms, uneven temperatures, heavy dust accumulation, moisture issues, indoor air quality problems and more. The company’s services include: energy audits, heating and air conditioning, insulation and shade screens. Mike Uniacke, owner of AHP, has taught building science at Yavapai College as an adjunct faculty member since the early 1990s. He has been featured on Dateline NBC as a consumer advocate and insulation expert. Uniacke founded AHP in

Prescott in 1997 as Advanced Insulation. As the company’s scope of services evolved, the company changed its name to Advantage Home Performance to reflect its much broader range of services. To solve energy problems in homes, AHP’s trained auditors perform state-ofthe-art energy audits, using more than $10,000 worth of diagnostic tools to perform the evaluation. The cost of an audit is currently being subsidized by local utility companies. According to Uniacke, auditors routinely find a combination of building/ energy issues that cause concerns with a home’s energy performance. These types of problems can cause uncomfortable rooms

(too warm or too cold), high utility bills and indoor-air quality issues such as excessive household dust. “You may not be able to see these problems, however, they are certainly issues that you will feel living in your home,” Uniacke said.

Making changes in some cases can immediately start to reduce utility bills and improve the comfort and indoor air quality of a home. For more information visit AHP’s website at www. advantagehomeperformance. com.

Did you know? 1. 2. 3.

Americans consume 26% of the world’s energy Our demand for energy grows by about 3% per year Heating and cooling account for about 56% of the energy use in a typical home 4. About 25% of all the energy we use to heat our homes escapes through single-glazed windows 5. At any one time in most households an average of eight appliances are left on stand-by. (Stand-by is an appliance’s “off” setting, but the appliance continues to use about 85% of the energy it uses while on—often so that it can listen for signals from remote controls.) 6. Our homes produce even more CO2 emissions than our cars 7. Operating our homes accounts for 18% of total emissions 8. We spend 10% of our electricity bills on lighting 9. 90% of the energy used by traditional bulbs is wasted in producing heat. 10. Energy-efficient light bulbs last about 12 times longer than ordinary bulbs, and consume about 1/5 of the energy This list was excerpted from Energy: Use Less—Save More by Jon Clift and Amanda Cuthbert, which is available from Chelsea Green Publishing at www.chelseagreen.com/bookstore/item/ energy:paperback

2013 Building Yavapai

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BY SANDY MOSS

oberta Benjamin directed the art lesson for Primavera School kindergartners through fifth graders, who were given the challenge:

de

st Gra elia, Fir

Am

“If you were to design the outside of a house that you would like to build or live in when you are grown up, what would it look like? “What angles, shapes and materials would you use? What environment would you live in…mountains, beach, city or farm. What

Savannah, Fourth Grade

might houses look like in the future?” The fourth and fifth grade classes explored a local architect’s home and had a small lesson on design, angles and structure as they sketched out their ideas on site. Jenni McClearn Beaver

Claire, Fifth Grade

provided additional art instruction for 1st graders and Pam and Tony Brown assisted fourth and fifth graders. All grade levels used several types of mediums to complete their “House” art. see Houses, page 22

Kia N., Thir

d Grade

Amy, Fourth Grade

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Justin, Fir

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Ellie, Second Grade

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Anna, First Grade

Avery, Second Grade

Matthew, Kindergarten

Ben, First Grade

Josh, Fourth

Gianna, Fir

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st Grade

, Teacher

Roberta

Katie, Fifth Grad

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Asher, Fourth Grade

Edo, Secon

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Alex, Fifth Grade

Nathan, First Grade

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Jenni, Teacher

dergarten

Kaidee, Kin

Ananise, Third Grade

Lilly S., Third

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George, Fifth Gr

Annan, Kinde

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Lilly G., Third Grade

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Ethan, Kindergarten

Maddie, First

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AnnaMarie, Firs

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Van, Second Grade

Riley, Third Grade

Wyatt, First Grade

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Meleya, Fourth Grade

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Houses

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18 They used watercolor, pastel, color pencil, art markers, fabrics and collage in a variety of ways to bring out the details. The results were wildly varied. One house resembled a pastel-beaded rollercoaster atop a beach ball; two looked rather like missiles, and one was similar to a hang glider perched atop a vertical snake. The children’s drawings also included a castle, a teepee, a house with polka dot siding, and one looked like a painting by Matisse. “Their stories came alive when they drew their homes,” Benjamin said. “The small children’s drawings were about shapes and lace curtains, the older children’s were more sophisticated with rock faces, elevators and underground garages.” As part of designing their ideal house, the older children toured the innovative and energy efficient home of Ecosa builder Tony Brown and his wife Pam. That’s where at least one student found his inspiration: Fourth grader Asher’s twostory house is energy smart, built partially underground, sports an elevator, big windows (to be able to see the stars), a water fountain and trap doors. “I wanted it be efficient,” Asher said, “so it’s not feeding off energy. I just learned that and started drawing it.” Sided with a newsprint pattern, first grader Justin’s house has two stories as well.

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Lily S., Third Grad

Griffin, First Grade

Maria, Teacher

Kaden, Second Grade

Madison, Third Grade

Max, Fourth Grade

Chloe, Fifth Grade

Andrew James, Kindergarten

e

Ben S., Third Grad

see Houses, page 24

Shelby, Kind

ergarten

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Ivan, Second Gr www.ycca.org

Quinn, Fourth Grade


Lantana Development Inc.

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Building Quality Custom Homes for 30 Years Owners, Keith and Linda Hughes, established their custom home building company in Prescott in 1994. Keith brings 30 years of extensive development and building experience with a total build of approximately 600 custom homes and commercial projects. Linda is a 3rd generation builder with over 20 years of custom home and interior space design experience. Together they provide a seamless process in the home building experience. Lantana offers a free design consultation and site evaluation. We understand and appreciate this endeavor is all about you, your vision, your dream and we are here to make it happen for you.

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Call for a tour of our model home, see our website or visit us at our design center in downtown Prescott located at 155 East Goodwin Street.

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Photos by Andersoncreativeproductions.com


Houses

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22 “They’re cool and fun,” he said, “with a lot of room for toys.” Justin wants his house big so he has space for his Lego jets and vehicles. Kindergartner Violet’s daisy-patterned house has a plaid-covered studio beside it. “I’m an artist,” she said. Violet’s dream house would also have a pool, a playground like the one her grandpa built at her real house, a big tree, and windows so she could see if there were chickens outside. Fifth grader Claire’s dad and grandpa are builders and she wants to be an architect when she grows up, so Claire’s house looks like it’s ready to be occupied. Her realistic house has a rock face and copper-colored shingles. “I love seeing house plans and how they work,” Claire see Houses, page 26

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Elijah, Second Grade

Jasmine, Third Grade

Wyatt, First Grade

Kai M., Kindergarten

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Ariana, First Grade

Makayla, Fourth Gr

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Saree, Third Grade

Anya, First Gr

Roberta, Teacher

Claire, Kindergart

ade

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Nick, Fourth Grade

Ava, Second Grade

Brendan, First Grade

Bryce, Third Grade

dCourier.com 928.445.3333

Local News • Sports • Entertainment Real Estate • Business • Weather Classifieds • Events • Coupons & Savings The area’s leading and most comprehensive source for local news and information. 2013 Building Yavapai

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Houses

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 24 says. The children used watercolors, pastels, colored pencils, art markers, fabrics and collages, but no matter the medium, each house’s visage was unique. One house that none of the children drew, however, was an igloo—where Primavera School’s mascot penguin could live. “Penguins are dedicated and diligent,” explains Primavera’s Principal Carol Darrow. “They are independent, great survivors, and care for each other, too. I like to think that’s what our students exemplify.” So, no matter where the children live now or in their dreams, Darrow believes that most importantly they shine with those qualities.

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Azra, Fourth Grad


Duct tape—America’s favorite fix-all rom classic gray industrial strength to hip and groovy and up-beat designs and colors, duct tape has come a long way since it first came into our lives back in 1902. This first material was originally used to make shoes stronger and it was used to wrap steel cables. In 1942 Gimbel’s department store used duct tape to hold together their venetian blinds. This original tape did not have any adhesive backing—it was tied or sewn in place. It was not until World War II when the tape made its real debut. The military needed

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By Ann Haver-Allen

Duck Tape® is instrumental in this doom room’s design.

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a strong, flexible, durable, waterproof tape to keep ammunition cases dry and a major criteria was the tape had to tear by hand without any cutting tool. A subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson stepped up to meet the challenge and the soldiers called the resulting product “Duck Tape” because of its ability to repel water, its adhesive backing and its ability to rip easily into strips for fast, convenient use. Duct Tape is one of the most enduring products of our time. It has been aboard every NASA mission since early in the Gemini days. On Apollo 13, duct tape was used


to modify the carbon dioxide filters, which saved the lives of three astronauts. On Apollo 17, duct tape was used to repair a damaged fender on the lunar rover. Duct tape was even used heavily during the Vietnam War to repair and balance helicopter rotor blades. Today, duct tape is an institution and is an extremely popular item more than likely found in all homes, garages and toolboxes. It comes in a wide variety of colors and designs, featuring sports team and college logos, special holiday prints, patterns from geometrics to stripes and bubbles and there is even duct tape that glows in the dark. Duct tape now is used

for purposes from decorating to making clothing, covering switch plates, making pop art and decorating chair seats and jazzing up ceiling fans and of course it is still a construction favorite due to its strength, long-lasting adhesive qualities, waterresistant qualities, easy to cut and tear properties. Duct tape is even used in motor racing to repair fiberglass bodywork. There has definitely been a mission makeover in duct tape from its original intended use many years ago Duck Tape®, the

Lara and Cole are the winners of the 2012 Stuck at Prom Scholarship Contest sponsored annually by Duck Tape®.

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most popular brand of duct tape, sponsors several contests each year for creative uses of Duck Tape®, including a scholarship contest for the best-designed prom outfit. Winners receive $5,000 each. The 2012 winners are pictured at left. Duck Tape® has an entire crafting section on its website with directions for creating Duck Tape® clothing, decorations, fashion accessories, jewelry and much more. Duck Tape® was even featured on Lifetime Television’s “Project Runway” in the Unconventional Materials Challenge this season. Take the Duck Tape® challenge. What can you make? See http://duckbrand. com/ for tons of ideas.

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Extending the life of your HVAC system

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xtending the life of heating and cooling systems through routine maintenance can protect one of the most vital investments you’ll ever make in your home. Maintenance not only protects your equipment, it can lower utility expenses, reduce equipment replacement costs and provide healthier living conditions. Improper damper operation is one of the most common problems in HVAC equipment; reducing indoor air quality and increasing utility use. Dampers keep the compressor from running when the outside air temperature drops below 60-degrees F. When not

cleaned and lubricated annually, dampers may stick and hamper the system’s cooling potential and overload the cooling coil. Clean evaporator and condenser coils at least once or twice a year. Dirt buildup rapidly deteriorates condenser coils and molds thrive in constant dampness created by evaporator coils. Depending on the degree of cleaning required, proper cleaning may require an expert. Examine the fan, bearings and belts biannually. Fan blades should be cleaned, motors should be inspected to ensure they are running properly and bearings should be checked for excessive noise, vibrations or heat. Belts need to be properly aligned with correct tension.

Evergreen Homes Has Been Building Quality Constructed, Energy Efficient, Affordable Homes in Prescott Since 1986

This type of work should be performed by a licensed qualified HVAC contractor. Inspecting and changing air filters is a major key to achieving longevity. Dirty filters impede airflow and HVAC-system efficiency, wasting energy and money. A clean filter prevents dust and dirt from clogging your system, leading to costly repairs or early system failure. Air filters should generally be checked monthly, especially during the heavy use months of winter and summer. Filters should be changed at least every three months, but if it looks dirty after a month, change it. Air filters come in a wide variety of material and styles, so selecting the most appropriate filter to suit your needs may require some research. Washable filters, wholehouse filters, pleated filters, electronic filters, spun fiberglass filters and other options are available. No need to spend $15-$20 for a pleated air filter, as those costing $5 or less can do the job. In fact, more expensive filters provide more resistance than necessary catching bad air and may lead to other problems. However, pet owners and

928.445.0006 homes@evergreen-homes.com www.evergreen-homes.com “Our goal is to make the design-building process an easy, enjoyable and satisfying experience.” Licensed & Bonded

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ROC 107230

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families with allergies might want to weigh efficiency ratings of various filters available before selecting which filter is best for their homes. Generally, name brand filters cost more and generic brands can have the same rating but cost less. HEPA filters remove more dust and allergens because they block even the tiniest particles but may clog quicker and lead to other issues without constant changing. Beware of filters labeled “HEPA-like,” as they may not perform as efficiently. More costly alternatives include electrostatic filters and air-filter systems. Although they are considered lifetime filters, they must be maintained monthly to operate properly. Routine inspections of your HVAC system can save you money and promote greater health. If you don’t feel comfortable doing the work yourself, you can always contact a reputable HVACsystem specialist. Many will inspect your system for free or charge a nominal fee. For help in locating a qualified HVAC specialist, contact YCCA at 928-778-0040.


Now Is The Time for

Grass

Synthetic grass can help you maintain a beautiful, green yard year round. Real grass requires a lot of maintenance to keep it looking it’s best: weekly mowing, edging, fertilizing, weeding and watering. Artificial turf, on the other hand, is virtually maintenance free.

Add Value with Professional Curbing Curbing is an attractive, permanent landscaping accent which adds value to your property. It is great for lawn edging and flower beds. There are multiple color design options, including flowing curbs. Most jobs completed same day. Call to schedule. Whatever the size of your yard or your budget, we can help you achieve the look you desire.

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8333 E. Pecos Dr., Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 713-6333 • HaciendaLandscaping.com ROC#166690 Landscaping • Stonework • Articial Turf • Patios 34

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By Robert Kozak

H

ave you ever dreamed of having a lawn that is on par with a wellmaintained putting green? Or are your dreams a little less extravagant: Would you settle for a lawn without weeds, yellow spots and without need for watering, mowing, weeding and fertilizing? You can have both. And, at an affordable price. Today’s artificial or synthetic turf has evolved well beyond the “Astroturf” installed in the Houston Astrodome in 1964. Today’s manufacturers produce artificial turf offering a wide range of synthetic grass products. In the arid southwest and in central Arizona’s below-freezing winter temperatures, synthetic turf is the ideal way to showcase the perfect lawn year round. The most important reason synthetic turf is installed is to minimize watering, according to Chris Welborn, owner of the Vicente Landscaping. Almost as important is the ability to enjoy the lawn year-round. For those who suffer from grass related allergies, symptoms may be reduced. Improvements in the past decade have been astounding: Turf available for purchase even a decade ago is no longer available because of the many improvements. It is virtually visually identical to real grass. You no longer need to water your lawn or repair irrigation systems. Weekly mowing and weeding, and annual fertilizing and thatching will become a distant memory as you sit back and enjoy your iced tea while admiring your perfect lawn. Children and grandchildren no longer have mud to track into your home. Pets will no longer be able to create yellow spots in your stain-proof turf. Like the carpeting inside your home, synthetic turf comes in different grades, colors (to imitate different grass varieties), and length and width of the grass blades. There are different types of turf available for different needs: visual


lawn without all the labor

needs, pet yards, lawn sports such as bocce ball and croquet, and children friendly play areas. Synthetic turf is even made for backyard golfers to chip and putt. Cost is dependent upon these various factors. Depending upon the type of artificial grass installed, as a rule of thumb a homeowner might expect to recover the turf’s initial cost within three years, compared to maintaining a live grass lawn. All artificial turf warranties are different. Ask your landscape contractor or turf supplier for the details. It is recommended that a licensed landscape contractor install your turf. Preparation of the ground for a smooth lawn is essential, as is sloping of the ground away from the home to prevent water damage to the home. For do-it-yourselfers, artificial turf is available at home-improvement centers and other suppliers. But, be aware that this product is extremely heavy. Improperly joining seams can result

in a visually poor lawn. And, do-ityourselfers are limited in their choice of available products, while a contractor has access to virtually all available turf products. Before you completely doze off dreaming of an idyllic lifestyle in your new yard, be aware that synthetic turf is not entirely maintenance-free. Dog urine needs to be occasionally rinsed off and feces picked up. Autumn leaves will need to be raked, blown or vacuumed. Every few years “lofting” of the turf with a “power broom” may be necessary. Depending upon the product, a contractor may need to replace the rubber crumbs that are used in some turf to help loft the blades. If you like the feel of real grass between your toes, real grass is generally cooler to the touch in full sun than synthetic grass. Sell your lawnmower at the garage sale. Put extra ice cubes in your iced tea, sit back and let your yard be the envy of your neighbors.

Vicente Landscaping installed the artificial turf for this homeowner.

Synthetic turf comes in different grades, colors (to imitate different grass varieties), and length and width of the grass blades. There are different types of turf available for different needs: visual needs, pet yards, lawn sports such as bocce ball and croquet, and children friendly play areas.

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No water hogs among these plants S ave water and reduce maintenance by growing droughttolerant plants. This list includes xeric options that require little-toperiodic deep watering after three years. It is important to research plant characteristics and mature size when planning a landscape. All plants are listed by their common name. TREES Deodar Cedar Oklahoma Redbud Chitalpa Arizona Cypress Arizona Ash Thornless Honeylocust One-seed Juniper Rocky Mountain Juniper

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Butterfly Bush

Desert Marigold

Mexican Evening Primrose

Austrian Black Pine Chinese Pistache London Plane Sycamore Locust

Apache Plume New Mexican Privet Red Yucca Juniper Oregon Grape Fremont Barberry Bear Grass Russian Sage Mugho Pine Shrubby Cinquefoil Firethorn Sumac New Mexico Locust Pendulous Yucca

PERENNIALS Yarrow Desert Marigold Coreopsis Grandiflora California Poppy Daylily Red Hot Pepper English Lavender Blue Flax Blackfoot Daisy Mexican Evening Primrose Beardtongue Russian Sage Sandpaper Verbena

SHRUBS Sagebrush/Wormwood Butterfly Bush Blue Mist Mountain Mahognay Gray Rabbit Brush Purple Smokebush Cotoneaster Desert Spoon

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GROUNDCOVERS Lowfast Cotoneaster Emerald Gaiety Blue Carpet Juniper Buffalo Juniper Hall’s Honeysuckle Creeping Oregon Grape Virginia Creeper Boston Ivy Germander Creeping Thyme GRASSES Sidwoats Grama Blue Grama Buffalograss Feather Reedgrass Blue Fescue Blue Oat Grass Pink Deergrass Deergrass Mexican Feathergrass Plains Switchgrass Little Bluestem


WHY REPLACE WINDOWS?

Choose energy efficient windows—save on energy costs that are constantly rising

R

eplacing the old poor windows with high-performance windows adds comfort to the home, helps reduce overall maintenance and can at its best add much for curb appeal. Today’s windows have gone far with high energy efficiency, modern designs, with cost-saving, aesthetic and functional advantages. Not to mention the resale value that new windows generate! Window and door selection is one of the most important aspects of creating an energy efficient home. Most heat gain and loss comes from windows, which makes your AC and heating systems run longer, raising your electric bill. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates savings of $125 to $450 a year on heating and cooling bills with ENERGY STAR windows. Also, using energy efficient windows helps the temperature in your home become more consistent all year long. Consider these factors when shopping for new windows and a window replacement contractor:

different approaches and the approach can change for each local climate. For example, windows with southern exposure should use a Low-E coating to permit passive solar, which will help heat the home in cold months. For windows facing east and west, choosing windows with a lower solar heat gain coefficient will prevent heat gain during warm months. North-facing windows should have maximum insulation value to keep heat from moving in or out of the building. A sales consultant can help determine the best windows based on location. Using window treatments can also add to the benefits of windows features. Closing blinds during direct sunlight will help prevent heat gain in warm months. During the colder months, keeping the blinds and curtains open during the day would help use the sun’s heat. Keep them closed during the night to retain heat inside building.

INSTALLATION If not installed correctly, even the most expensive windows will not perform effectively. Properly installed flashing around doors and windows, along with pre-installation water management will reduce the risk of water leaks. The gap between the window and doorjambs and framed opening should be filled with minimally expanding urethane foam to eliminate air infiltration. Even a small air leak can have a huge effect on heat loss over the life of the building. The cheapest materials of window installation are flashing and sealants, but if they are not applied with an eye to detail, the water and air leaks will cause many problems to surface that could have been easily prevented. Don’t overlook the importance of proper installation; choose a contractor who will install per the manufacturer’s specifications!

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

For energy efficiency, get the facts about some key factors when comparing windows, like U-values, Low-E and Solar heat gain coefficient. The R-value indicates the resistance of heat to flow through a window—the higher the value, the better the insulation. U-value is the inverse to R-value and a lower value indicates the window does a better job keeping out heat and cold. A window with a lower solar heat gain coefficient (SGHC) is important to decrease the amount of heat that is transferred through sunlight. Also, Low-Emissivity (Low-E) glass reflects heat back to its source, keeping UV rays from heating and fading interior furnishings. Comparing efficiency ratings before you purchase will help lower heating and cooling costs and make the most of your investment. Look for the ENERGY STAR label.

LOCATION

Another good thing to keep in mind is that the different sides of the house will need 2013 Building Yavapai

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Pay attention to your Mother Survival guru, founder of the Aboriginal Living Skills School, and co-star of Discovery Channel’s Dual Survival—Prescott’s own Cody Lundin—on sustainable design and paying attention to Mother Nature By Matthew Ackerman

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n case you haven’t heard of Cody Lundin by now, Cody is the founder of Prescott’s Aboriginal Living Skills School (1991), and is an instructor in outdoor survival skills at Yavapai College as well as an adjunct faculty member of the Ecosa Institute. He has provided training to numerous private, educational, corporate, and governmental agencies, and has appeared in dozens of national and international media venues sharing his outdoor survival and urban preparedness skills. Cody has authored several books including 98.6 Degrees: The Art of Keeping Your Ass Alive, and When All Hell Breaks Loose: Stuff You Need to Survive When Disaster Strikes. I had the pleasure of meeting Cody for the first time a few weeks ago, and was impressed by his commitment to selfreliance, and how that translated into the architectural design of his own home. Throughout the course of our conversation, I was struck by how the notion of paying attention to nature (as a means to conserve energy, financial, and material resources) had served a critical starting point for each of us—for myself through my work as a sustainable architect, and for Cody through his decades-long devotion to self-reliant living—from both surviving out in the wild, to kicking back within the walls of his surprisingly comfortable home. Walking the Talk, Barefoot Since 2010, Cody has been a co-star of Discovery Channels hit series “Dual Survival.” Lundin is no stranger to television, however, having worked in the medium for over a decade. Cody impressed TV producer Steve Hoggard after Lundin’s 2004 appearance on “Lost in the Wild.”

The guts of the photovoltaic electrical system. Ten photovoltaic panels provide power for a refrigerator, microwave, clothes washer and a stereo,

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2013 Building Yavapai

The early days of construction. Through a course at Yavapai College, Cody learned of optimal building orientation, the proper ratio of window area per square foot of floor area, as well as how to size and place sun-controlling roof overhangs.

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Cody used xeriscaping for the plantings surrounding his home. Xeriscaping is landscaping or gardening in ways that reduces or eliminates the need for supplemental water.

“Cody is the real deal,” said Hoggard. “He’s a guy who not only practices what he preaches, he lives it.” Walking the talk ...that’s Cody all right. Keenly aware of the risks that our “disposable, plug-in society” has created for so many of us, Cody has devoted his life to living more lightly on the earth, and to doing more with less. It’s no surprise then that when it came to building his own home—the wilderness survivor known for his conspicuous lack of shoes—would naturally seek to express his commitment and passion to these values through the design and construction of his residence.

Education is key

Cody credits a class he took at Yavapai College for giving him the practical knowledge he needed to design a net-

zero energy home. He also learned that when it comes to sustainable design and construction (just as it is for self-reliant living) it’s all about making the “right” choices for the bio-environment that you’re in. “Eco-design is based on nature,” Cody explains. “You need to know your climate by taking into consideration where the sun is, where it comes up and where it sets, where the water runs, how the weather patterns move, etc.” Cody learned the basics of passive solar planning through a sustainable design course at Yavapai College. This course included such information as optimal building orientation, the proper ratio of window area per square foot of floor area, as well as how to size and place suncontrolling roof overhangs. “Pay attention to mother nature,” 2013 Building Yavapai

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Lundin said in a 2008 Earth Current interview. “Notice what she does first, how she interacts with the landscape and then adapt your design to that.”

Creature Comfort and Zero Utility Cost

Lundin’s residence is a 700-square-foot off-grid, earth-sheltered, passive solar structure that stores thermal energy, collects rainwater and basically heats and cools itself. The home is constructed of reinforced concrete (gunite) and is built into a hill on his Yavapai County property. It’s essentially a south-facing cave, flooded with natural daylight through the use of correctly sized and placed windows, as well as homemade sun-tubes that Cody lined with shards of mirrored glass. Approximately 2’ to 4’ of earth tops the roof, which acts as a super-insulating 39


barrier between the interior and exterior environments of the home. Cody pays nothing for utilities. The intention for the home was not to recreate the spartan living conditions of many of Cody’s outdoor adventures, but, in fact, was to be as comfortable as possible, “...without being bound to the electricity gods.” Ten photovoltaic panels located on an adjacent roof (used for rainwater collection), provide power for such typical creature comforts as a stereo, refrigerator, microwave and a clothes washer. Cody makes use of our region’s typically low humidity levels for good ole’ fashioned outdoor clothes drying. Domestic hot water is provided courtesy of the sun, as well as providing the energy for a solar oven.

‘Thermal Flywheel’ Design

Because of the super-insulating qualities of the earthen roof, optimized building orientation and adequate thermal mass in the floors and walls of the home, Cody doesn’t need to burn wood in the winter to keep warm. The sun provides all the heating energy that’s needed—for free. In the summertime, the same super-insulating building envelope works very well to keep the heat out. No air conditioning or evaporative cooling is needed either—Cody simply opens his windows at night, charging the structure’s mass with the colder temperatures of the nighttime air, which then keeps the home cool and comfortable all through the next day. Natural ventilation also helps keep the interior cool. Cody made sure to place openings in the structure in order to capture the site’s natural airflows from the southwest. Operable windows strategically placed up high in the structure help vent any buildup of hot air back outdoors—where it belongs. The thoughtful integration of thermal mass into a well-insulated home or commercial building is a concept known as “thermal flywheel.” Both heat and cold energy are stored in the floors and walls of a structure during one part of the day, which is then released throughout the structure as needed during the other part of the day. Cody went with an open floor plan layout, which effectively distributes this free energy throughout the home. 40

2013 Building Yavapai

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Landscaping and Water Conservation

Water collection is achieved by directing rain water harvested from the roofs into three 3,000 gallon tanks located on the property. The water is then used for drinking, bathing, sanitation and landscape irrigation. Cody makes use of this water outdoors for his organic gardening and deciduous fruit trees, which in turn provide shade on the property during the hot months of the year, allowing desired solar gain to pass on through during the colder months of the year. Cody utilized xeriscaping for the plantings surrounding his home. Xeriscaping is landscaping or gardening in ways that reduces or eliminates the need for supplemental water. Cody constructed earthen swales that function to slow stormwater runoff and maximize ground water absorption. The earthen swales in Cody’s lot literally capture hundreds of gallons of “free” rainwater, which provides supplementary irrigation for Lundin’s fruit trees. The earthen swales also serve to protect against erosion. Native flagstone, dry-set into finished grade without mortar, makes for a natural, enduring walkway to the front door.

A ‘True Conservative’

While attempting to avoid any particular political association, Lundin considers himself a “true conservative,” as in someone who strives to “conserve” resources wherever possible—material, energy and financial. A large part of Cody’s motivations come from his intense love of freedom— especially the freedom that comes with living off-grid, and an inherent distaste for bureaucracy, bills and stupidity. “I’m not against growth,” explained Lundin in a recent interview, “I’m against stupid growth.” Similarly, Cody tends to dislike regulation in general, though he does support intelligent regulation. “I think ‘smart’ regulation—those that incentivize people to build and live more sustainably—is a good thing,” Cody explained.

Self Reliant Values, Sustainable Design

Cody knows from experience that thermal regulation is critical to survival in the wild.

Both heat and cold energy are stored in the floors and walls of a structure during one part of the day, which is then released throughout the structure as needed during the other part of the day.

Failure to do so is the number one cause of death in the wilderness. It follows then, that should our nation’s vital power network go down, disabling our home’s heating and cooling systems and interrupting access to clean water, food and fuel, that maintaining a home that can heat and cool itself, provide drinkable water and even grow some food—could be a vitally important resource to have. Cody is firm in his belief that through sustainable design “paying for heating and cooling is really optional.” “It’s just good common sense,” he says. People want to save money by building in the same old ways, “but it’s really a matter of weighing short-term costs versus longterm goals.”  “To not pay attention to nature in the design of anything on this planet, I think is a mistake,” Cody says. “Ultimately, you will use more energy, burn more calories, and it won’t be as efficient as if you just follow her (Mother Nature’s) design.”

Earthen swales capture hundreds of gallons of “free” rainwater, which provides supplementary irrigation for Lundin’s fruit trees. The earthen swales also serve to protect against erosion.

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“I think that’s what it’s all about,” says Cody.

Bringing it Home

While learning to disinfect water, catch a rabbit and make a fire (without a lighter) may be important to know, living more lightly on the planet doesn’t require that you reside in a cave or go shoeless 24/7. Sustainable, self-reliant living is truly available to all of us. We can all make choices that make a difference. We can resolve to make changes to our homes, our businesses, and even our lifestyle that can help conserve our bio-environment’s precious resources, rather than deplete them. Just as it is for wilderness survival, the notion of using the sun for warmth, collecting rainwater for cooking, and paying little to nothing for energy isn’t rocket science. The key it seems, is simply becoming better educated about the choices we do have, and of course—learning to pay attention to our mother—Mother Nature that is. 41


pat i o s

walkways & driveways

outdoor kitchens


FIRED UP TO BUILD

Know your local fire sprinker codes “I live in Nevada and recently purchased a lot in Timber Ridge. Inasmuch as we are going to be new community citizens, I have been staying in touch with happenings in the area via the paper, radio, TV and heard rumblings and rumors that fire sprinklers are going to be mandatory in every home. Is this accurate?” Bob and Pam W

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You are correct in that you may have to install a fire sprinkler if you decided to build a home in Prescott. Prescott is a community built within a national forest, which is one of the reasons people enjoy living here. But, it also means the community is vulnerable to forest fires. Because of this, two fire codes may apply to construction: the 2012 International Fire and Wildland/Urban Interface Code (WUI) and International Fire Code (IFC). Since you plan to build in the Timber

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Ridge subdivision, both codes will apply and you may have to install a fire sprinkler system in your home. The WUI code applies to areas in our community that have been designated as being heavily affected by surrounding vegetation, topography, and proximity to our neighboring forest, such as the Timber Ridge subdivision. The following criteria determines if your new home will be required to have a residential fire sprinkler system installed: r Is the home more than 5,000 square feet—including the garage and storage spaces, but not including decks and patios? r Is a fire hydrant located within 500 feet of your property? r Is the street you are building your home on a dead end greater than 1,300 feet in length? r Is the grade of your street greater than 12 percent? r Is the distance from the street to the most distant point on your house greater than 150 feet? r Is your home only accessible through a low-water crossing and there is no other way to access your house if the low-water crossing is impassable? r Are there more than 10 people living in your home? r Will the home be greater than two stories tall? While most of the above requirements make sense when you consider the ability to get fire trucks and fireman to your home, with water, in all weather conditions, it’s the “150 foot” rule that stands out as the one that most people do not understand. I have talked with the fire marshal to help clarify this requirement. After reviewing plans looking at home layouts and placement on lots this requirement is really a pretty simple process and makes a lot of sense. Firefighters fight fires with water from the hoses that are attached to their trucks. In Prescott and the surrounding area—as well as a vast majority of other fire departments I am told—the length of the fire hoses that are pre-connected and


Prescott is a community built within a national forest, which is one of the reasons people enjoy living here. But, it also means the community is vulnerable to forest fires. pulled off the truck to attack a fire, are 200 feet long. So, using the 150 foot measurement, the fire department knows that their hoses will reach to the most distant point on the home so they can put water on a fire that is burning inside, and go inside from there if needed. If the home is situated on the lot (beyond the 150 feet) the fire hoses cannot reach the most distant point on the home, and the fire is impossible to contain and control. Those are the basic parameters when

a standard home in Prescott would be required to have a fire sprinkler system installed. As I said though, the fact that your property in also in the Wildland/Urban interface, there are some additional criteria and requirements that come into play. They are: If your driveway is longer than 150 feet long (a driveway is anything less than 20 feet wide, can support a fire truck, and has 13 feet 6 inches of height clearance). In this case, not only will you have to install fire sprinklers, you will also have to install an “operational platform” next to the home, measuring 20X30 feet. Our fire department has told me that they will be happy to meet with anyone that would like to hear more about these requirements, either at their station, at your property and with your builder at any time. 1102 Willow Creek Rd. • Prescott, Az 86301

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Why should we hire an arborist? By Sandy Griffis

A

n arborist is an individual trained in the art and science of planting, caring for and maintaining individual trees. Arborists are extremely knowledgeable about the needs of trees and are trained and equipped to provide proper tree care. In other words, arborists are certified tree doctors and we are extremely fortunate to have two of the best right here in Yavapai County: Rick Cober with Carescape and Richard Roy of The Joshua Tree and Landscape Company. Both of these gentlemen have achieved their knowledge through experience and by passing a comprehensive examination developed by some of the nation’s leading experts on tree care. Certified Arborists must also continue their education to maintain their certification and adhere to a Code of Ethics. Hiring an arborist is a decision that

TAlthough REE REMOVAL tree removal is a last resort,

should not be taken lightly. Proper tree care is an investment that can lead to substantial returns as well cared-for trees are attractive and can add considerable value to your property. On the other hand, poorly maintained trees can be a significant liability. Services that arborists can provide to maintain tree health are:

there are circumstances when it is necessary and an arborist can help decide whether a tree should be removed or not. Tree removal is determined if a tree is dead or drying, considered an unacceptable risk, causing an obstruction that is impossible to correct through pruning, crowding and causing harm to other more desirable trees and located in an area where new construction requires removal.

PAnRUNING arborist can determine the type of

pruning necessary to maintain or improve the health, appearance and safety of trees. Pruning techniques include removing limbs that interfere with utility lines or structures, obstruct streets, are dead, weak or decayed, are diseased or insect-infested, damaged by storms, increasing light penetration and reducing wind resistance within the canopy.

PAnLANTING arborist can recommend what species

are appropriate for a particular location. The wrong tree in the wrong location will lead to further problems as a result of limited growing space, insects, diseases

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or poor growth. It is important to remember “the right tree for the right space.” Tree function, form and size, site conditions, soil conditions, drainage, space constraints, human and pet activity, pest problems are all things that should be considered when planting a tree—not just plopping the tree into the ground and/or selecting a tree just because it has nice foliage.

TAnREE HEALTH arborist will offer tree health care and/ or preventative maintenance to keep trees in good health while reducing insect, disease or site problems. Fertilization and soil recommendations are offered for improved tree health. Soil aeration to improve root growth and applications to manage certain insect and disease problems are services offered by an arborist.

SIn OIL CONDITIONS dense urban areas and new

subdivisions, soil is often disturbed, shallow, compacted and subject to drought. Most trees will suffer in these

conditions without additional care. An arborist can take soil samples from your yard and test for texture, fertility, salinity and pH and from the results of these tests you can determine which trees are suited for your property. Whether you already have existing trees on your property, or you are considering planting trees, an arborist can assist you with tree selection. Taking into consideration the factors above, you can ensure the trees in your yard and the new ones you plant will grow and function as desired.

To help your trees reach their full potential, give our local arborists a call. Rick can be reached at (928) 777-8519 and Richard can be reached at (928) 567-4064. Both of these guys love talking about trees and are the best tree huggers we could have.

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Transform your outdoor area into living space By Ann Haver-Allen

avapai County residents are fortunate to live in an area where the climate is conducive to enjoying the outdoors—and especially one’s own backyard. The backyard is a favorite gathering space for today’s families and it only makes sense to bring all the comforts of indoor rooms to the outside living spaces. Creating an outdoor living space can bring hours of enjoyment with friends and relatives while spending more time in the sunshine and fresh air. Consider turning your yard, patio or porch into a new, functional living space. Here’s a few tips to help you get started. Determine the style or theme that you would like for your outdoor living space. The options vary widely from a desert, drought-tolerant setting to a lush environment with water features. To create a desert xeriscape, Susie Burgin, owner of Earth Works in Chino Valley, suggests starting with river rock to make a dry streambed or placing boulders for texture and dimension. “Use drought-tolerant grasses and perennials, along 48

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with fun rustic iron garden art to create an inviting space,” she said. Few things can calm a stressful, tension-filled day like relaxing in your outdoor living space and listening to the trickle of water. Water features come in many sizes and shapes—from the simple store-bought fountains to custom-designed cascading waterfalls. “To create a lush environment, incorporate water features such as a fountain or pond with water plants,” Burgin said. “Use lots of flowery accents and brightly colored Talavera pottery or animals to create fantasy and fun.” Of course, your water feature could be as large as a pool or a spa and rather than the sound of water alone calming the senses, you can immerse yourself in relaxation at the end of a hectic day. Soaking in a hot tub can reduce stress and headaches, relieve insomnia, reduce pain associated with arthritis, reduce back pain, help control diabetes and aid in weight loss. When planning your outdoor living space, select an area that can be “contained”—a patio, a deck, or a section of yard. If you See Living Space, page 84


Hotel rises from the ashes

The May 2012 devastating fire in downtown Prescott forever changed the face of Whiskey Row n May 2012 a devastating fire wrecked havoc on downtown Prescott. After fighting the fire all night, one historic building on Whiskey Row was damaged beyond repair and neighboring buildings had suffered extensive smoke and water damage. “The decision was made to keep the fire from spreading, so ladder trucks … sprayed water from above to surround and drown the fire,” Prescott Fire Capt. Jeff Knotek said at the time. Since the fire, the most extensively damaged building—which housed Pearl’s Place Café, the Prescott Food Store and The Bird Cage Saloon—was torn down. Smoke and water damage required extensive restoration and renovations in the adjacent building, where Jenny Longhorn’s, Moctezuma’s, Prescott Museum and Trading Company and the Highland Hotel were located. Although occupied by various merchants, the buildings belong to Howard and Nancy Hinson. When life gives you lemons… “After the fire, we decided to make lemonade,” Nancy said. “We gutted the

building…took it down to the bricks and sticks. We have a 2013 building in a 1900 shell—all new plumbing and wiring, but we are trying to maintain the historical heritage wherever possible.” In addition to new plumbing, heat and air conditioning systems, smart thermostats, dual-flush toilets and a fire sprinkling system, you can find original exposed brick walls and restored doors and hardware. The original bay windows in the front two rooms that overlook Whiskey Row were also salvaged and incorporated into the design of the new hotel. “We kept the original shaft that was used as a chamber pot disposal,” Nancy said. That particular architectural element is preserved behind Plexiglas®. Originally, the establishment was the Grand Hotel and Saloon. Constructed in 1903 after the historic 1900 fire that swept Whiskey Row, the hotel and saloon were the first businesses to rebuild and open.

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Smoke and water damage required extensive restoration and renovations.The Daily Courier/ Les Stukenberg/Reprinted with permission.

This photo and the one at right were taken looking down the central hallway of the Grand Hotel.

The saloon was downstairs in what is currently Jenny Longhorn, a western boutique store. Upstairs was the Grand Hotel. Change came in the 1950s when the building was purchased by Hinson’s father. The hotel name was changed to the Highland and the former saloon was transformed into a general mercantile, the Holiday Shop. The May 2012 fire presented an opportunity for the Hinsons to fulfill a long-time dream. They plan to open a boutique hotel in place of the old Highland row hotel, which had 17 rooms—15 of which shared three bathrooms. The boutique hotel has 12 themed rooms, each with a private bath, a claw-footed tub and shower. The new hotel will also have a reception area, a kitchen and laundry room. “The boutique hotel is something that we always wanted to do,” Nancy said. “My husband’s dad bought the building in the 1950s and ran it as the Highland Hotel. We bought it from my husband’s siblings upon his dad’s death and we have wanted to do this for some time.” The new hotel will be the Grand Highland Hotel—a combination of the previous names.

Melanie Link, of Interior Artistry by Melanie Link, is the project’s interior designer, as well as being the daughter of Nancy and Howard. Melanie has used faux painting techniques to create the wall finishes in each of the 12 rooms. Additionally, she rescued many furniture pieces from the fire and hand-painted each piece. The custom furniture pieces will be used to furnish the new hotel rooms. “I went to school in Texas for faux painting,” Melanie said. “I had a business for 10 years in the Dallas area. Then, I decided to come home.” Faux painting is a term used to describe a wide range of decorative painting techniques. Faux painting was first started as a way to replicate materials such as marble and wood with paint. The style grew to encompass many other decorative finishes for walls and furniture simulating recognizable textures and surfaces. In her designs, Melanie has replicated plaster, leather, wood and lace, among other textures. She has included designs from various art periods, including Art Deco, Art Nouveau, Western and MidCentury Modern. Each room in the new boutique hotel has a theme that represents an historical period in Prescott. Melanie said it took about a week to do the wall designs in each room. “I juggled about five rooms at a time,” she said. “That allowed each

Photos at left, Prescott firefighters sprayed water from above and below to surround and drown the May 2012 fire on Whiskey Row in downtown Prescott. The Daily Courier/Matt Hinshaw/Reprinted with permission.

See Hotel, page 50

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After a year of construction and renovations, the new Grand Highland Hotel nears completion.

The Trails Room features a tree design on the walls that was created with layers of plaster and then painted.

The Rodeo Room uses burlap on the walls that is encased in plaster. 51


This dresser will reside in the Sharlot Hall Room.

This dresser will reside in the Capitol Suite.

This dresser, which can be found in the Rodeo Room, was refinished to resemble embossed leather.

layer of plaster and paint to dry before proceeding.” Melanie used Pure Earth Paint, which is an all-natural paint made from minerals, clay, chalk and earth pigments.

for improving living conditions for the Prescott Yavapai, her work with the Presbyterian Church and her basketry. At the new Grand Highland Hotel, the Singing Cricket Room is done in browns and blues.

The Rooms

4. Big Nose Kate Room is a saloonthemed room that uses red and black. This room pays homage to Mary K. Cummings, also known as Big Nose Kate, who was a long-time companion and common-law wife of Doc Holliday. She was one of the first female residents of the Arizona Pioneers’ Home and is buried in the Arizona Pioneer Home Cemetery.

8. The Sharlot Hall Room is Venetian Plaster with a lace pattern. “The lace is applied with plaster, then trawled over and the lace is removed,” Melanie said. “It leaves a raised lace pattern.” Sharlot Hall was the first woman to hold an office in the Arizona Territorial government. She acquired the cabin that had served as the Governor’s mansion for Arizona Territory’s first governors, where she lived and amassed her collection of artifacts related to Arizona pioneers and prehistoric Yavapai County. In 1928 she founded the Prescott Historical Society and opened the Old Governor’s Mansion Museum, now knows as the Sharlot Hall Museum.

HOTEL

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 49

The 12 rooms in the new Grand Highland Hotel are: 1. The Speakeasy Room has an Art Deco theme and is the hotel’s American with Disabilities (ADA) compliant room. The faux painting is soft matte plaster with a silver leaf in the design. Art Deco was popular during the 1920s to 1940s. It combined traditional craft motifs while embracing technology at the same time. Art Deco emphasizes geometric forms and uses modern materials, such as stainless steel, chrome and plastics.

5. The Trails Room at the new Grand Highland Hotel pays homage to Prescott’s abundant outdoor life and uses trees in the wall design. “We found an old map and old photos and decoupaged them onto an old dresser,” Melanie said. 6. The Capitol Suite is a very traditional room from the 1800s with a tin ceiling. Prescott served as capital of Arizona Territory 1864-1867 and again 18771889. The first Territorial Capital and Governor’s Mansion are now part of Sharlot Hall Museum.

9. The Prospector Room is done in turquoise and copper. Prescott began as a mining town when the Walker Party (Captain Joseph Walker) discovered gold in the Hassayampa River, about six miles south of Prescott, in 1863. The discovery of gold brought a flood of miners to Prescott with dreams of striking it rich. By 1864, Prescott was a booming town and when Arizona was named a territory, Prescott was named the capital.

3. The Singing Cricket Room pays respect to the Yavapai Tribe. The tribe’s first chieftess was Viola Jimulla. One of her native names was Who-wah, or singing cricket. Chieftess Jimulla is known

7. The Holidays Room is a tribute to Judge Hinson’s father. “Granddad had a store downstairs that was called the Holiday Shop,” Melanie said. “The design theme is midcentury modern…funky patterns with stencling.”

10. The Rough Rider Room is rough plaster with a bronze ceiling. The Rough Riders were a volunteer regiment of cowboy cavalry from Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Indian Territory, who served in the Spanish American War. The Arizona regiment was led by Prescott

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2. The Art Nouveau Room features metallic plasters applied in several layers with stenciling on the final layer. “It gives the room a very rich look that glows,” Melanie said. Art Nouveau was popular in 1890 to 1910 and was inspired by natural forms and structures. The style features natural forms, flowers, plants and curved lines.

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A copper patina dresser, along with the nightstand at right, will furnish the Prospector Room.

refinished to resemble embossed leather,” Melanie said.

Melanie Link practices faux painting techniques in art class.

Mayor “Bucky” O’Neill, who died at the battle of San Juan Hill in Cuba. 11. The Rodeo Room uses burlap on the walls that is encased with plaster over the top. Prescott is home to the World’s Oldest Rodeo. Its beginnings date to 1888. Melanie’s creations for this room also include a customized dresser. “I used a waterfall dresser that I

12. Victorian Room uses grey and silver Venetian plaster with purple accents. Furnishings include Victorian dresser and purple velvet drapes. Prescott has 809 buildings on the National Register of Historic Places. Many of those buildings date from the Victorian era (1837–1901). The Grand Highland Hotel is located at 152 S. Montezuma St. Phone numbers are (toll-free) 855-438-9963, and local, 928-776-9963. For reservations or more information, visit The Grand Highland Hotel on Facebook.

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Detail of the front door finish.

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The world of flooring made easy

N

ot all wood floors are alike. Wood flooring is made from many species of hardwoods and softwoods; solid wood or engineered wood; unfinished or prefinished; stained or unstained; top-grade or lower-grade; and in thin strips, wide planks or parquet tiles. Each kind of wood comes in a number of grades that reflect specific quality assessments. Do not let the many options in wood floors confuse you when desiring wood floors in your home. There are three basic patterns and three basic styles when contemplating wood floors:

STRIP AND PLANK FLOORS

These are the traditional wood floors found in older homes and usually this type of wood flooring is of uniform width and random length. Planks are generally wider than wood strips and usually constructed with tongue-and-groove edges and ends. Strip and plank wood flooring is not recommended for basements or rooms

with high water usage or moisture levels, such as full bathrooms or kitchens or for basements or rooms below ground level. Installing wood in these places voids most manufacturers’ warranties for solid wood flooring. Strip and plank wood flooring comes in many grades and is available in solid or engineered wood, also available in unfinished or pre-finished. When installing, this wood must be acclimated in home for five days before installation.

RANDOM-WIDTH FLOORS

Contemporary random-width floors mimic much older wood floors at a lower price. The random-width look is created by installing a repeated pattern of three rows of different width planks. This flooring is nearly always constructed with tongue-and-groove edges and ends. This type of flooring is unfinished and comes in many grades and species of wood. It is available in solid or engineered wood. This type of wood flooring must also be acclimated in home

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for five days before installation.

PARQUET FLOORS

Parquet flooring is composed of short strips of wood that form a pattern or a variety of mosaic patterns. This flooring is a specific kind of engineered wood that is designed to be a repeating pattern. Parquet floors are on the high end of cost and difficult to install because each strip of wood is laid separately. Parquet comes in many patterns and is usually sold in 12” square tiles. Parquet msut be acclimated in home for five days before installation.

HARDWOOD OR SOFTWOOD

Each kind of wood comes in several grades, indicating its general quality. The top grade is FAS (First and Seconds), which indicates clear, knot-free wood. Lower grades include common #1, #2 and #3. In these grades you may find a less uniform color and some small knots. Even low grades of wood can make an attractive and durable floor and are less expensive. Hardwood has its own advantage. With the rich look of real wood


flooring to the subfloor. Interlocking pieces join together to create a large covering over a thin layer of foam called the underlayment. Laminate flooring can be installed directly over most existing surfaces, including wood, vinyl, tile and more. Laminate flooring offers a high level of comfort. This type of flooring can be walked on immediately after installation.

TIPS

Here are some tips to ensure your wood flooring choice and install is smoothsailing. Check your invoice for the wood, style and color of your flooring order. Check the invoice for the order and

delivery date and install. Make sure all of the flooring arrives at the same time. If your flooring arrives at two different dates, do not accept it. It will not match. Check the credentials of your installer. Make sure your installer is up-to- date on the latest install methods, as they change with the product. Make sure your installer delivers your product to acclimate in your house for at least five days. Do not allow your flooring to be delivered to your garage or inside of your garage or on your front step. It must be inside your house, spread around, kept in boxes for five days or more to prevent warping or serious problems in the future.

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ENGINEERED WOOD

Engineered wood is beautiful and costs less than hardwood. If engineered, the wood is made up of several layers. A solid species top layer is attached to a multilayer solid wood core, plus layers of multi-ply solid wood. Multi-ply layers increase durability and stability and decreases cost. Engineered wood has milled tongue-andgroove edges and ends that require snap together planks.

LAMINATE FLOORING

Laminate flooring has many advantages. It comes in a wide range of styles to suit any dĂŠcor. It can be embossed for realistic wood, stone and tile textures. Laminate flooring is made from sturdy, lasting materials and offers easy care and maintenance. This flooring creates a perfect addition to high-traffic areas and has a simple floating method that is not fastened to the subfloor but is held in place by the molding installed around the perimeter of the room. It requires no nails or glue to secure the laminate 2013 Building Yavapai

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Be sure to read our YCCA Ask the Contractor Column in the Real Estate Section Every Friday at www.dcourier.com

Do not close off vents in unused rooms

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Q: We have several bedrooms that, as empty-nesters, we do not use. It seems logical to close the AC/heating vent in each of the unused rooms and then close the door to each of those rooms so that we are not heating rooms that we do not use. I have been told that this is not a good idea. Can you explain why? A: Closing off registers and closing doors to unused rooms may create a pressure imbalance in the heating system for the rest of your home. You are forcing the remaining return air ducts to take in more air, which may throw your system into negative pressure. A forced-air heating system is expected to be a “closed” system, which means that whatever air goes through the return air grill is the same air that flows out of the supply grills. If you restrict the air supply, the return still will attempt to move the same amount of air and will find the air from somewhere else. Supply diffusers are not made to be closed off. If you do not want air coming out of those registers, the easiest and most affordable fix would be to remove the register, cover it with a piece of sheet metal and seal the hole. It is recommended, however, that if you do this, you should contact an HVAC contractor to ensure your system will continue to operate efficiently and safely.


P

urchasing a new roof can be a monumental investment requiring some basic consumer knowledge about products available and a dependable licensed contractor to get the job done right. In fact, the National Roofing Contractors Association recommends homeowners be more concerned with selecting the most suitable roofing material for a specified project and installing the roof properly by a qualified roofing contractor than a warranty. “A long-term warranty may be of little value to a consumer if the roof system does not perform satisfactorily and leaks,” the NRCA states. “Conversely, if a roof system is designed, constructed and manufactured well, the expense of purchasing a warranty may not be necessary.” The NRCA advises that long-term roofing warranties are not all-inclusive insurance policies and typically do not warrant the roof system will not leak or is suitable for the project where it is installed. “Long-term warranties largely are reactive (rather than proactive) solutions to roof problems,” the NRCA states. “In general, they tend to undermine a prudent owner’s initial concern for proper roofing specifications and application, as well as an owner’s subsequent responsibility for periodic roof maintenance.” Roofing products fall into six basic types: tile, metal, wood shingles and shakes, synthetic products, slate and asphalt shingles. Shingles have three fire resistance ratings: Class A, B or C. Class A signifies the most fire-resistant and Class C is the least fire-resistant. Generally, most fiberglass shingles have Class A fire ratings and most organic shingles have Class C ratings. Asphalt shingles are the most common roofing product. They are reinforced with organic felts or fiberglass. Organic shingles are made of cellulose fiber and saturated with asphalt, then coated with colored mineral granules. Fiberglass shingles consist of a fiberglass matt with top and bottom layers of asphalt, topped with mineral granules. Whereas, wood shingles and shakes are made of cedar, redwood, southern pine and other woods and are not used as much any more since local building codes

By Ann Haver-Allen limit the use of wood shingles and shakes due to fire-resistance concerns. Tile shingles come in clay or concrete and are highly durable. Mission and Spanish-style round-topped tiles are used widely in the Southwest and Florida, and flat styles also are available to create French and English looks. Tile is available in a variety of colors and finishes. But tile is heavy, so if you are replacing another type of roof system with tile, you will need to verify the structure can support the load. Although slate shingles are considered virtually indestructible, they are made from natural rock quarried in Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania and Virginia and not used much in the Southwest. They are more costly than other roofing materials and application requires special skill and experience. Metal roofing and asphalt shingles are more common in Yavapai County. Metal roofing products come as panels or shingles in a variety of shapes and sizes. Metal shingles typically are intended to

simulate traditional roof coverings, such as wood shakes, shingles and tile. Apart from metal roofing’s longevity, metal shingles are relatively lightweight, have a greater resistance to adverse weather and can be aesthetically pleasing. Some have Class A fire ratings. Synthetic roofing products are manmade products simulating various traditional roof coverings, such as slate and wood shingles and shakes. These products can include rubbers, plastics, and modified asphalts and tend to have a higher price tag attached. Before purchasing synthetic roofing products, scrutinize the manufacturers’ brochures and look at full-size samples of the proposed product. Ideally, it is a good idea to visit a building that is roofed with a particular product you may be considering. Regardless of the roofing materials you determine will best fit your needs, definitely hire a qualified, licensed contractor to install the roof so the job is done right and will not continue to drain your finances.

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Repair & Maintenance Programs Available 331 N. Arizona Ave. Prescott, 86301 ROC072030 | ROC056519

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With so many choices in Real Estate Companies, your only real choice is Realty Executives.

Each town in Northern Arizona is home to the Realty Executives Sign and our more than 125 Real Estate Professionals are the top producers in the area! In fact, they’re five times more productive than the National average. We know the Northern Arizona market and we have the right marketing tools to sell or find your next dream home. So why look any further than Realty Executives of Northern Arizona?

Where the Experts are with Real Results in Real Estate! “I’m proud to offer the best real estate executives in the business through our offices. Our professionals are consistently winning awards for top in sales and are committed to your real estate needs. You really do pick winners when you chose Realty Executives of Northern Arizona. Come see why.” Don Bonnell. Broker/Owner

Commerce Center Office 1955 Commerce Center Circle Satellite, Suite C Prescott, AZ 86301 Office Phone: 928-778-9726 Toll Free: 866-778-4492 Office Fax: 928-443-1247

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Cottonwood Office 2825 E. State Route 89A Cottonwood, AZ 86326 Office Phone: 928-204-9300 Office Fax: 928-204-0692 Admin Phone: 928-204-9300

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Downtown Prescott Office 110 E. Gurley Street , Suite 200A Prescott, AZ 86301 Office Phone: 928-443-9800 Toll Free: 800-778-7891 Office Fax: 928-443-1635

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Payson Office 408 S. Beeline Highway Payson, AZ 85541 Office Phone: 928-474-4401 Toll Free 800-778-7891


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Home energy audit first step toward We all know that saving energy, detecting energy waste and managing your energy wisely can reduce household utility bills as well as conserve our precious natural resources. This can be done while still maintaining the quality of your environment with heating and cooling, and without having to walk around in the dark. A home energy audit is often the first step in making your home more efficient. Q: Exactly what is an energy audit, how much does it cost and what can a homeowner expect? A: A home energy audit is a systems approach—used by our local utility companies APS and UniSource Energy Services— to analyzing your home’s energy performance. Using the latest innovations in building science, energy experts will perform a comprehensive in-home energy analysis that will help you prioritize the improvement projects that will deliver the most energy savings at the best value. Both APS and UniSource Energy Services are offering their customers an energy analysis for only $99. This is a value of approximately $400. In the Quad City area, because so many customers have both utility services in their homes, UniSource and APS have partnered and combined their audits. As a UniSource customer, if you call UniSource for an audit, APS-approved participating contractors will be performing the audit and not UniSource. You will receive a comprehensive assessment of how your home uses energy. Areas of energy waste will be identified, and you will receive a detailed report of recommended energy efficiency improvements that are tailored specifically for your home. It is important to remember that audits alone do not save energy. You will need to implement some or all of the recommended improvements.

Be sure to read our YCCA Ask the Contractor Column in the Real Estate Section Every Friday at www.dcourier.com

thermal comfort, lower your energy bill and create a more affordable home. Q: Is there a difference with the UniSource Energy Audit vs. the APS energy Audit? If you are a customer of both utilities, does it make a difference which one to use?

A: After evaluating your home, you could save up to 35% annually by selecting the improvements that will improve your

A: Both the APS Home Performance Energy Audit and the Bright Save UniSource Energy Services’ Energy Audit offer comprehensive in-home energy analysis that identify where and how you can improve your home’s energy performance. Again, for clarification, if you reside in the Quad City area, UniSource and APS have combined their energy audits. Iif you call UniSource for an audit, an APS approved participating contractor will perform the audit. The glory of this combined partnership is that you, as the customer, will receive all of the prevailing rebates based on whether you have a gas furnace or an electric furnace.

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Q: Is there a guaranteed percentage a homeowner can expect to receive on heating and cooling costs if the energy audit recommendations are followed?

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In addition, if the energy audit finds that your HVAC unit and furnace are old, outdated and should be replaced, you are also eligible for both the electric and gas incentives from both utility companies. APS uses qualified contractors and conducts diagnostic tests that identify ways to increase your home’s efficiency. The APS energy audit looks at the AC system, ductwork and insulation inspections. A blower-door test is also performed. A blower door test uses a powerful fan placed in the frame of an open front door while all other windows are closed. When the fan is turned on, it forcefully draws outside air into your home. As that is taking place, the audit professional walks through the home identifying where air is leaking into the home through any holes, cracks and gaps in the walls and attic and indicates where you will need to seal leaks. As these holes and leaks are sealed, you will then prevent expensive cooling and heating from escaping your home, thus saving money and energy. Q: Is it beneficial to have an energy audit performed on a home that is two years old? A: Homes built after 2005 are typically more energy efficient due to improved code requirements and construction practices. In most cases the older the home is, the greater the potential savings. As homes age, they offer an increasing number of opportunities for energy savings. If homes built before 2000 used as little energy per square foot as newer homes, residential energy consumption would drop by more than 22%. It is possible you might require duct sealing, and in a typical home nearly 20% of the air that moves through the duct system is lost due to leaks, holes and


poorly connected ducts. It has always been difficult to detect the energy waste that is hiding in our homes, but not anymore with an energy audit. After you receive your completed analysis, you can decide which customized upgrades you want to incorporate into your home. Your contractor will also assist you in gaining access to any offered APS and UniSource rebates and incentives. Go to aps.com or uesaz.com for a complete list of rebates and program guidelines.

Preparing for your audit

Professional energy assessments generally go into great detail to assess your home’s energy use. The energy auditor will do a room-by-room examination of the residence, as well as a thorough examination of past utility bills. Many professional energy assessments will include a blower door test. Most will also include a thermographic scan. There’s also another type of test—the PFT air infiltration measurement technique—but it is rarely offered. Before the energy auditor visits your house, make a list of any existing problems such as condensation and uncomfortable or drafty rooms. Have copies or a summary of the home’s yearly energy bills. Auditors use this information to establish what to look for during the audit. The auditor first examines the outside of the home to determine the size of the house and its features (i.e., wall area, number and size of windows). The auditor then will analyze the residents’ behavior: r Is anyone home during working hours? r What is the average thermostat setting for summer and winter? r How many people live here? r Is every room in use? Your answers may help uncover some simple ways to reduce your household’s energy consumption. Walk through your home with the auditors as they work, and ask questions. They may use equipment to detect sources of energy loss, such as blower doors, infrared cameras, furnace efficiency meters, and surface thermometers. 2013 Building Yavapai

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Renovate your homeowners policy. Great insurance. Low rates. Remodeling your home can increase its value. Protect it by taking a new look at your homeowners insurance policy. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.® CONTACT AN AGENT TODAY.

Cathy Trent, Agent

Penny Hubble, Agent

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Heidi Rae Fowler, Agent

Eric Strobel, Agent

150 S Highway 69 Ste 9E Dewey, AZ 86327 Bus: 928-775-4080 www.heidifowlerinsurance.com

2485 N Great Western Drive Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Bus: 928-772-8338 www.estrobel.net

1: NEW PROPERTY

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State Farm Fire and Casualty Company, State Farm General Insurance Company, Bloomington, IL

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aybe you purchased homeowner’s insurance and then never thought about it again. After all, once taken care of, it’s not something we have to think about again, right? Wrong. Your home insurance should be an accurate reflection of your needs at all times. What most people do not realize, however, is that your needs change over time. Your insurance needs can change from year-to-year as you expand or remodel your home, or if it experiences the general wear and tear all homes do. It’s important to re-evaluate your homeowner’s insurance policy every year to make sure that your home is fully covered. If you don’t re-evaluate your policy once a year, you could find yourself paying more for less home insurance coverage. Here are three reasons why you should update your policy every year.

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One of the main reasons to take stock of your homeowner’s policy every year is to see if you can save money. Many valuable items covered under itemized home insurance policies, such as stereo equipment, can depreciate over time. If you re-evaluate your policy on an annual basis, you can make sure that your new policy reflects the lower monetary value of these items. The savings from individual items can really add up each year. Re-evaluating your itemized list of possessions can reduce the overall cost of your home insurance policy due to depreciation. Look at your possessions once a year to see how much you can save. The same rule applies for the property you purchase. If, since you updated your policy, you’ve purchased a new television, exercise equipment, or any other property of value, then you’ll want to update your policy to make sure you’re covered. This is particularly true if you have replacement cost coverage, which reimburses you for the price you paid for the item without factoring in depreciation. With that in mind, it’s a


to re-evaluate homeowner’s insurance good idea to hold on to the receipts of all high-value items you purchase so that you can help expedite the reimbursement process if you experience a loss.

2: HOME IMPROVEMENTS

Another good reason to reevaluate your homeowner policy on an annual basis is to make sure that any changes that you have made to your home have the appropriate coverage. Whenever you expand or remodel your home, you need to make sure that your home insurance policy reflects the increased property value. Major changes often cause property values to shoot through the roof. The home you own is simply worth more after a few

simple changes. You need to make sure that your new, more valuable, home is well covered. You can also often save money on your policy if you add a home security system to your house. These systems reduce the chances of a burglary, often meaning that insurance companies can offer you the same coverage with less risk. Most insurance companies will pass the savings on to you in the form of lower rates. Insurance companies will often only allow you to make major adjustments like this once a year. If you miss your chance to re-evaluate your policy limits, you may find yourself paying a premium that does not reflect your circumstances. Don’t let this happen to you.

2013 Building Yavapai

3: ADJUST FOR INFLATION

This could be the most important reason to update your policy every year. The value of your property, and the cost to rebuild it, can increase over time due to inflation. That doesn’t mean, however, that the amount of coverage you have will increase with inflation, which could leave you drastically underinsured if you experience a total loss of your home. Fortunately, many insurance policies come with inflation guard coverage, which automatically increases your coverage by a certain percentage every year. Inflation guard coverage is typically available for homeowners who cover 100% of the value of their home. If you cover 80% or less

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It’s important to re-evaluate your homeowner’s insurance policy every year to make sure that your home is fully covered.

your insurance company may not be obligated to cover all of the cost of rebuilding your home. By revisiting your policy once a year, you can be sure that every inch of your home has appropriate coverage. If you just take a few minutes every year to look around and take note of changes, you can save a lot of money, and ensure you have adequate coverage, in the long run.

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Advertorial

magine never having to dust, vacuum, clean the shower or wash those windows. Are those tasks that you would like to get rid of? We all imagine of getting away from cleaning and that dream can come true. Leave the cleaning to Prescott Maid To Order LLC and spend more time with the people you love most and spend time on your favorite activities. Lucy Leyva, owner of Prescott Maid To Order, recognized the need for quality time when she saw cleaning stresses that were prevalent in so many of their lives. Eight years ago she did something about it. Lucy established Prescott Maid to Order LLC, a high-quality, trustworthy residential cleaning service in Northern Arizona. Prescott Maid To Order LLC offers personalized, flexible household cleaning for people who want to simplify their lives or for those families who do not have the time. Other clients are those who need cleaning services due to health issues or

Two Quality Companies.. One Committed Owner!

disabilities or are moving into a new home or space. When you meet Lucy and her team you understand why she says, “Maid to Order exists to improve the quality of our client’s lives.” What makes Prescott Maid to Order unique is that, as the owner of the company, Lucy is not satisfied until you are! She trains her own cleaners and even employs the help of a Quality Assurance Specialist who performs routine and surprise inspections every day. Now, after successfully caring for more

than 3,800 satisfied customers, she has opened MTO Janitorial LLC to change the standards of commercial cleaning in Northern Arizona. “With MTO Janitorial we focus on reliable, quality commercial cleaning,” says Lucy. “We know that the appearance and cleanliness of facilities translates into improved productivity and customer satisfaction, so we’re here to keep you on track.” Visit their web site for residential and janitorial cleaning tips, or call Lucy if you have a cleaning situation that seems overwhelming to tackle. In the meantime here is a tip to get you started on your Spring Cleaning: A professional spring cleaning twice a year preserves the life of your home, says Lucy. Baseboards, ceiling fans, window sills and tracks, door inlays, doorknobs and light switches all get close attention when we come in for a thorough cleaning. “We get to areas no one cleans during the year, that can get out of control,” Lucy says. Call Prescott Maid to Order at: 928-899-8518 or MTO Janitorial at: 928-772-0004 or visit our web sites: www.PrescottMaidtoOrder.com and www.MTOJanitorial.com.

CLEANING TIPS Remove scuff marks and crayon marks off walls Use 3 tbsp. of TSP (Trisodium Phosphate) to a gallon of water. Wear gloves and do not use on semi-gloss or gloss paint or wood.

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Remove Smoke Odor Place a bowl of vinegar in the room to absorb the smoke odor. Slow Running Drain Put two Alka-Seltzer tabs down the drain with a cup of vinegar. Let sit for 3 minutes and then flush with hot water. Garbage Disposal If your dishwasher drains through your garbage disposal, switch on the disposal when the hot soapy water is running through and it will get a good cleaning.

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Remove marks from stainless steel Rub the area with a soft cloth dampened with white vinegar then immediately wipe dry. Remove baked-on food from the microwave Fill a microwave-safe container with water microwave it until the water boils and let it sit for a few minutes more while the steam loosens the particles. Wipe clean. 2013 Building Yavapai

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Accounting is a year-round activity eing a certified public accountant involves more than preparing tax returns for individuals and business clients, according to CPA Richard Joliet. Joliet said tax returns account for only 30 percent of his business. Business consulting accounts for more than 50 percent of his workload. “I tend to be more of a business consultant,” Joliet said. “Taxes are irrelevant if you are not making money.” Ninety percent of businesses fail because they are not financially viable, Joliet said. “I encourage people to come talk to me if they are considering going into business.” Joliet recently decided to strike out on his own after working for five years and three months for Helfinstine & Associates, a CPA firm with offices in Prescott and Prescott Valley. He set up shop in Suite 202 in a business center at 1129 Iron Springs Road in Prescott. “I feel that there is a niche unserved by the current CPA industry,” he said. Joliet, a native of Canton, Ohio, brings 26 years of experience in public and industry accounting to his one-man office. He earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration with an emphasis in accounting from St. Louis (Mo.) University and a master’s degree in business administration from Southern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville. “I was in pre-med,” Joliet said. “Chemistry and I did not get along. I like business, and my older brother Jay said, ‘No matter what you did in business, you had to understand where the money

“I tend to be more of a business consultant. Taxes are irrelevant if you are not making money.” Richard Joliet, CPA came from.’” Joliet gained business know-how during the 1980s as a comptroller for the distribution industry and manufacturing in Albuquerque and St. Louis, respectively. He is trying to build up his base of small-business clients. Some of his clients spoke highly of him in prepared statements. “As a small-business owner, it is invaluable to me that Rich has operated his own company,” said Beth Staub, owner of Adventure Auto Glass in Prescott Valley. “It gives him a unique understanding of the needs and challenges small businesses face. Rich always takes a personalized approach and is able to deliver customized solutions for us.” Joliet said he works well with other CPAs and bookkeepers. CPAs and bookkeepers who encounter problems in an audit can refer clients to him to prevent conflicts of interest, he said. “I can help the company out in the procedure or the proper documentation to correct the problem,” he said. Besides operating a CPA firm, Joliet serves as president 2013 Building Yavapai

of the North Central Chapter of the Arizona Society of Certified Public Accountants, and heads the Rotary Club of Prescott Valley. Joliet said his short-term goal is to build up business for himself, and a long-term goal

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is to hire another CPA. He maintains office hours of 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays, and by appointment Saturdays. For more information, call 777-2386. Story by Ken Hedler. Reprinted with permission of The Daily Courier.

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Maintain septic tank

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y husband is a civil engineer. One of his specialities is designing septic systems and he knows the importance of having our septic tank pumped reguarly. Recently, when JT’s came out to pump our tank, our neighbor came over to ask if we were having problems. My husband said no, that regular pumping is part of preventative maintenance. Our neighbor said he had not had his tank pumped in 20 years and asked the truck driver for a card. Within a week, JT’s was at our neighbor’s house facing a rather challenging situation. Although our neighbor had not experienced any problems with his septic system, he had paved over the access portals. JT’s was undaunted and saw the job through completion. How often should I pump my septic tank? See our website jtseptic.com and click on “Pump the Tank” for an estimated septic tank pumping frequency chart. • Do I need a septic inspection if I am selling my home? As of July 2006, ADEQ mandated that all septic systems, regardless of age, will be inspected by a certified inspector and a transfer of ownership will be filed with ADEQ. • Do I have a filter in my septic tank? If your system is newer than 2001, you should have an effluent filter to service every six months to one year. See jtseptic.com for further instructions on how to maintain your filter to prevent a sewage back up. • Every homeowner should educate themselves as to how a septic system works and how often to maintain their system. Education and maintenance is the key to preventing a costly repair bill or even replacement of a system.

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JT’s

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here is one thing in common with color trends, they are all about individual expression and you do not have to paint your room Sunflower Yellow just because trending says it is the “in” color for the year. Color palettes change, hues become softer, bolder and earthy terracotta shades are always around. Mellow colors, neutrals and ostentatious wow colors are always around. According to Century Painting, Emerald Forest Painting and Certa Pro Painters, trendy interior colors are leaning more towards relaxing and soothing colors such as light blue, pale beige and light greys. Also rich browns and dark blues are a trendy color for 2013. These painters are also seeing more earth tones and more homeowners are using greens and browns as well. Do not ever be afraid to try something new in the terms of non-traditional shades. Selecting interior paint colors can be fun, and you do not have to paint your walls using drab and dull colors. Have fun,

think out of the box and remember your rooms do not have to be painted the same color. The use of accent walls is a great way to add color. Paint colors are individual preferences and you can create a subtle contract or make a bold statement. So have fun, and whatever paint shade you choose, remember you are expressing your own unique design. Break the monotony of a single-color white space and be trendy.

When Quality and Price Matters… … Count on Us Excellence in Painting Serving Quad Cities Since 1994

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By Ann Haver-Allen ankind has had a toxic love affair with lead from the moment the metal was first discovered thousands of years ago. Alanah Fitch, chemistry professor at Loyola University Chicago, says that because lead is buried deep within the Earth’s crust, humans essentially evolved in a lead-free environment. “Most of the lead present was buried in subsurface deposits composed of a relatively inert (insoluble) form,” Professor Fitch in wrote History of Lead and Humanity: An Environmental Case Study of a 5,000-Year Toxic Marriage. “As a consequence humans (and other living species), have no protection against lead. There is currently no known biological function for lead, making it toxic.” Lead exists as a complex of ores and minerals, with Galena being the ore from which lead is most often extracted. Prehistoric metallurgists crushed and smelted ore to produce lead, which was called the oldest metal by alchemists. Lead is one of six metals mentioned in the Bible. The others are gold, silver, copper, iron and tin. The oldest known lead artifact was a statue excavated in Turkey and dated to about 6500 B.C. Lead’s properties are almost miraculous: It is easily melted and easily formed into bullets, shot and pipes. It is poor conductor of electricity and is noncorrosive. Lead absorbs vibrations and serves as an electrical insulator. And it can join other metals together. Over the centuries, lead has been one of the most widely used materials for the manufacture of a number of important commodities, including pigments, paint bases, varnishes, dyestuffs, ceramic glazes, crystal, batteries, food cans and liners, plumbing fixtures and gasoline additives. Lead reigned as the supreme metal until copper and bronze were mastered. “Once metallurgy of copper and bronze was mastered, pure lead apparently was relegated to use as a cheap, disposable material—rather like plastic today,” Professor Fitch wrote. 68

And, like plastic, lead started appearing everywhere with ever-widening uses. “In the rigidly hierarchical world of the ancients, lead was the plebeian metal deemed suitable for a vast variety of everyday uses,” wrote Jack Lewis, former assistant editor of the EPA Journal. “Lead products were, to a certain degree, accessible even to the poorest proletarian.”

According to Lewis, lead was a key component in face powders, rouges, and mascaras; the pigment in many paints; a spermicide for informal birth control; the ideal “cold” metal for use in the manufacture of chastity belts; a sweet and sour condiment popular for seasoning and adulterating food; a wine preservative perfect for stopping fermentation or

Lead and water—not perfect together The Romans used lead pipes throughout their Empire. These pipes had a small diameter and were easier to produce than the bigger ones. Commonly, a series of pipes were applied in siphons with lead pipes. A headertank and ramp of the Yzeron siphon in the Gier aqueduct of Lyon, France

Lead pipe in Roman bath in Bath, Somerset, England.

An original lead pipe used to deliver water to the population of Pompeii.

Ruins of the Gier aqueduct of Lyon, France

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Lead pipes were still in use in the 20th century. Many older homes in the United States may still have lead pipes.


disguising inferior vintages; the malleable and inexpensive ingredient in pewter cups, plates, pitchers, pots and pans and other household artifacts; the basic component of lead coins; and a partial ingredient in debased bronze or brass coins and counterfeit silver and gold coins. “Most important of all was lead’s suitability as inexpensive and reliable piping for the vast network of plumbing that kept Rome and the provincial cities of the Roman Empire supplied with water,” Lewis wrote. “Indeed, the very word ‘plumbing’ comes from the Latin word for lead, plumbum. The lead pipes that were the vital arteries of ancient Rome were forged by smithies whose patron saint, Vulcan, exhibited several of the symptoms of advanced lead poisoning: lameness, pallor and wizened expression.” Lewis said that while the Romans—like Americans today—were aware that lead caused serious health problems, even madness or death, they were so fond of its heterogeneity that they turned a blind eye to the health hazards. While Roman aristocrats consciously avoided anything related to lead mining or production, and eventually forced the lead

smelters to move outside the city, they thought nothing of “seasoning” their wine and food with lead. “The first century A.D. was a time of unbridled gluttony and drunkenness among the ruling oligarchs of Rome,” Lewis wrote. “The lead concealed in the food and wine they devoured undoubtedly had a great deal to do with the outbreak of unprecedented epidemics of saturnine gout and sterility among aristocratic males and the alarming rate of infertility and stillbirths among aristocratic women. “Still more alarming was the conspicuous pattern of mental incompetence that came to be synonymous with the Roman elite. This creeping cretinism manifested itself most frighteningly in such clearly degenerate emperors as Caligula, Nero and Commodus. It is said that Nero wore a breastplate of lead, ostensibly to strengthen his voice, as he fiddled and sang while Rome burned. Domitian, the last of the Flavian emperors, actually had a fountain installed in his palace from which he could drink a never-ending stream of leaded wine.” During the Middle Ages, alchemists tried to produce gold from lead.

2013 Building Yavapai

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Galena is the ore from which lead is most often extracted. Galena deposits often contain significant amounts of silver.

And lead was crucial in Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press, which led to social changes that pulled Europe into the Reformation and the Age of Enlightenment. When Europeans came to the New World, they brought lead with them. Records indicate that by 1621, lead was being mined and forged in Virginia.

Batteries

Today, America’s dependence on lead and lead-containing products is nearly See Lead, page 68

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LEAD

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10 times greater than that of the ancient Romans. Professor Fitch said that in the United States, only two sources of lead consumption have increased during the last 40 years: lead-acid batteries and munitions. In 2011—the most recent statistics available—global lead consumption increased about 6% over 2010 to 10.1 million tons. The manufacture of lead-acid batteries is one of the major reasons for the increasing demand for lead. By the early 2000s, the total demand for lead in all types of lead-acid storage batteries represented 88% of apparent U.S. lead consumption. Other significant uses included ammunition (3%), oxides in glass and ceramics (3%), casting metals (2%), and sheet lead (1%). The remainder was consumed in solders, bearing metals, brass and bronze billets, covering for cable, caulking lead, and extruded products. During the first 9 months of 2011, 90.1 million lead-acid automotive batteries

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Photo by Chris Parish/ The Peregrine Fund via Cronkite News Service A California condor soars over the Grand Canyon in this undated photograph. At least 15 condors have died of lead poisoning since 2000. Although there may be other sources of lead, a scientific study funded by the Arizona Game and Fish Department has identified lead from spent ammunition as the major source of lead in condors.

were shipped in North America, a 3% increase from those shipped in the same period of 2010.

Munitions

Lead has been a popular choice for projectiles for thousands of years. Lead is a good choice because of its dense

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properties and it is easily molded. Archeologists have found thousands of sling bullets, or glandes, which sometimes had names, symbols and messages cast onto them. The Greeks were the primary users of lead shot. They discovered that a lead projectile could be thrown up to two times


farther than a stone projectile. Slings could out-range bows and arrows and could cause quite a bit of damage. The Romans even developed a special pair tongs for extracting sling bullets. Later, lead was used in the mass production of pistols, rifles and cannons— and the ammunition used by these firearms. Lead remains a popular choice for munitions and today is used in bullets and shot, such as that used in shotgun shells or those made for pellet guns. Much of that lead shot ends up in the environment. “Frequently used upland hunting fields may have as much as 400,000 shot per acre,” states the new scientific report Sources and Implications of Lead-Based Ammunition and Fishing Tackle on Natural Resources. “Individual shooting ranges may receive as much as 1.5 to 23 tons of lead shot and bullets annually, and outdoor shooting ranges overall may use more than 80,000 tons of lead shot and bullets each year,” according to the report, which was commissioned by The Wildlife Society and the American Fisheries Society. Ingestion of lead ammunition and fishing tackle is one of the greatest hazards facing wildlife—especially birds—the new study reports (see www.enn.com/press_ releases/2562 for more information). Other popular uses of lead in the 20th century include glass manufacture, semiconductors, paint and gasoline.

glass a brilliant, crystalline look. But lead also gives advantages in working with molten glass, such as requiring lower temperatures and making fewer bubbles. Leaded glass technology has been known since prehistoric times. Glassmaking techniques were first developed in China, and thanks to their pyrotechnic expertise, the Chinese soon started incorporating lead into their glassware, probably between the sixth and fourth centuries B.C. Lead has always lent an air of superiority to a product. Leaded crystal is still considered to be the finest glass available. The fluxing and refractive properties of leaded glass also make lead an important additive to glazes on pottery.

Semiconductors Lead oxide produces a higher refractive index, which gives glass a brilliant, crystalline look.

A natural semiconductor, lead was a vital component in the crystal sets used to make a single-station radio. “Galena is a natural semiconductor See lead, page 72

Glass manufacture

Certain glasses, such as “crystal,” contain lead oxide that produces a higher refractive index giving the

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and so the forerunner, the enabler, of all the electronic gadgets we have today, from telephones to TVs to GPS navigating systems as well as all sorts of medical equipment—in short, modern life as we know it,” said Electrical Engineer Allen Wollscheidt.

Van Gogh cut off the lobe of his left ear during a seizure on Dec. 24, 1888. Mental problems afflicted him, particularly in the last few years of his life. There has been much debate over the years as to the source of Van Gogh’s mental illness and its effect on his work. More than 150 psychiatrists have attempted to label his illness, and some 30 different diagnoses have been suggested. A recently proposed illness is lead poisoning. The paints he used were lead-based, and one of the symptoms of lead poisoning results in a swelling of the

Lead paint

Lead makes good pigments and was the preferred paint for years. The paints used by Van Gogh (and all artists of his day) were lead-based paints. Recently, Van Gogh’s mental struggles have been attributed to lead poisoning, which results in a swelling of the retina and may have led to the halo effect seen in many of Van Gogh’s later works. But lead-based paints were not just used by artists centuries ago. All houses

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retina, which may have led to the halo effect seen in many of Van Gogh’s later works. built before 1978 are likely to contain some lead-based paint. Leaded paint in older houses is the major source of environmental lead for children. The blood levels of children living in older houses have not decreased at the rate of the general population. In 1992, the Department

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of Housing and Urban Development was directed to reduce lead paint hazards in the nation’s older houses, but as of 2001, more than 24 million homes still had lead paint on the inside walls.

Leaded gasoline

In 1921, a mechanical engineer at General Motors found that lead—in the form of tetraethyl lead (TEL)— would increase the octane rating of gasoline to reduce knocking, increase energy and improve long-term storage. America was sold. In 1965, geochemist C.C. Patterson published “Contaminated and Natural Lead Environments of Man,” through which he tried to draw public attention to the problem of increased lead levels in the environment and the food chain. Patterson had discovered the growing lead contamination while researching his uraniumlead dating method for determining the Earth’s age. Because uranium and thorium decompose or transmute at a constant rate over eons into lead, measuring that decomposition is an atomic clock of sorts. Patterson discovered that atmospheric lead pollution was so plentiful www.ycca.org

that it interfered with his measurements. He created an ultra clean, lead-free laboratory, and in the process, he realized that lead levels were so high our health was in danger. He began campaigning to reduce lead in our environment. As a result of Patterson’s efforts, in 1973, the Environmental Protection Agency announced a lead reduction in gasoline of 60 percent to 65 percent in phased steps. Lead was supposed to be removed from all gasoline in the United States by 1986. Beginning Jan. 1, 1996, the Clean Air Act banned the sale of leaded fuel in the United States for use in on-road vehicles. Possession and use of leaded gasoline in a regular on-road vehicle now carries a maximum $10,000 fine. Fuel containing lead, however, may still be sold for off-road uses, including aircraft, racing cars, farm equipment and marine engines. Lead levels within the blood of Americans are reported to have dropped by up to 80 percent by the late 1990s. The legacy of TEL was massive lead pollution of the air and ground. At its peak, 160 million metric tons of lead was being released into the air per year, 90


percent of which came from the combustion of leaded gasoline. After years of using leaded gasoline, roadside dirt now can contain up to 10,000 parts per million (PPM) of lead—one pound per 100 pounds of dirt. Roadside lead—no matter how deep it is buried—is bioavailable and can enter the food chain. In 1979, a Scottish investigator found that wild blackberries along suburban roadsides contained 0.79 mg per Kg (or 0.79 PPM) of lead—five times higher than blackberries in nonroadside environments. Washing the fruit removed only 0.1 mg/ kg, suggesting that the soil contained the lead, which was taken up by the berry plants.

Health effects

For a long time, doctors thought that lead was toxic only at high levels. But they were wrong. Lead is highly poisonous, whether inhaled or swallowed and it affects almost every organ and system in the body. The health problems caused by lead include anemia, premature babies, low birth weight, reduced rate of nerve conduction, blood pressure, kidney damage, manual dexterity, eye-hand coordination and even death. Medical data from people working in lead smelters and those who deliberately inhaled leaded gasoline fumes have been reported the above symptoms. In addition to affecting various target organs and tissues, such as the heart, kidney, brain nerves, etc., lead also negatively influences the metabolism of essential minerals, such as iron, zinc and copper in the liver and other tissues. Higher doses are lethal, at least in controlled animal studies. The lethal dose for humans has not yet been

established. Recognizing the seriousness of lead poisoning, in May 2012, the Center for Disease Control lowered the recommended limit for lead exposure in young children to 5 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood, from 10 micrograms per deciliter. High lead levels in young children have been found to affect cognitive development and may lead to a lower I.Q. Christopher Portier, director of the CDS’s National Center for Environmental Health, said that no lead level is considered safe in young children and that sometimes the effects could be so subtle as to be unnoticeable.

Prevention

Lead poisoning is entirely preventable. The key is stopping children from coming into contact with lead and treating children who have been poisoned by lead. In 2011, EPA established accreditation, training, certification and recordkeeping requirements, as well as work practice standards, for persons performing renovations for compensation in most pre-1978 housing and child-occupied facilities. (See box on page 73.) To minimize exposure to lead: • Test your home for lead paint and dust. • Test your water for lead content. Since you cannot see, taste or smell lead dissolved in water, testing is the only sure way of telling whether there are harmful quantities of lead in your drinking water. • Make sure children do not have access to peeling paint or chewable surfaces. • Pregnant women and children should not be present in housing built before 1978 that is undergoing renovation. They should not participate

See lead, page 74

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in activities that disturb old paint or in cleaning up paint debris after work is completed. • Create barriers between living/play areas and lead sources. • Regularly wash children’s hands and toys, which can become contaminated from household dust or exterior soil. • Regularly wet-mop floors and wet-wipe window components. • Prevent children from playing in bare soil; if possible, provide sandboxes. Plant grass on areas of bare soil or cover the soil with mulch or wood chips. To further reduce a child’s exposure from nonresidential paint sources: • Avoid using traditional home remedies and cosmetics that may contain

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lead; • Avoid eating candies imported from Mexico; • Avoid using containers, cookware, or tableware to store or cook foods or liquids that are not shown to be lead free; • Remove recalled toys and toy jewelry immediately from children. Check Lead Recall lists at www.cpsc. gov/. You can sign up to have recalls emailed to you. • Use only cold water from the tap for drinking, cooking and for making baby formula. Hot water is more likely to contain higher levels of lead. • Shower and change clothes after finishing a task that involves working with lead-based products, such as stain glasswork, bullet making or using a firing range.

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Product recalls due to excessive lead content

P

roduct recalls have dropped drastically since 2007 when massive and constant recalls shattered consumer confidence. Product recalls due to excessive lead content peaked in 2007 at more than 100 that year. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission adopted rules in 2011 that require independent, third-party testing of toys and other children’s products before they reach consumers. But an occasional product with high lead content does still make its way to children—and the lead can be in unsuspected locations. In October 2012, the Consumer Product Safety Commission found that the surface coating on the zipper of the fleece hoodie and t-shirt sets contain excessive levels of lead, violating the federal lead paint standard. In September 2012, the Consumer Product Safety Commission found the surface paints on the pirate toy pistols contain excessive levels of lead, a violation of the federal lead paint standard. Both products were recalled.

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Remediation criteria for lead-based paints

I

f you are concerned that lead-based paint may be in your environment, hire a certified professional to conduct an assessment. For help finding a certified risk assessor or inspector, call YCCA or look in the Yavapai’s County Contractor’s Association magazine. When lead remediation is done, the EPA requires cleaning verification. Make sure all cleanup is done and verified. Have a lead-dust test done. These are wipe samples sent to a laboratory for analysis for final results after a remediation job is completed. The EPA has strict work practices that a contractor must follow:

For every mile that you walk, bike or carpool, you will save one pound of carbon dioxide. A typical 1,700-square-foot, wood-framed home requires the equivalent of clear-cutting one acre of forest. Junk mail uses 100 million trees annually. Contact the Direct Marketing Assoc. at www.dmaconsumers.org/cgi/offmailinglist to be removed from mass mailing lists.

r Contain the Work Area r Ask what lead safe methods the contractor will use to set up and perform your job. Projects that disturb painted surfaces can create dust and endanger you and your family. r When lead paint is disturbed via sanding, scraping, burning, brushing or blasting, make sure the contaminated area is blocked off and sealed with plastic sheeting. Have a separate pathway for the contractor and supplies that is not the same entrance the business or family uses. r Avoid renovation methods that generate large amounts of lead-contaminated dust. Turn off forced heating and air conditioning systems while work is being done. Consider how this might affect business and living conditions. r Clean up thoroughly. The work area should be cleaned up daily. Use a HEPA vacuum to clean up dust and debris on all surfaces followed by wet wiping and wet mopping with plenty of water. If any debris, dust, paint-chips in the area, it must be re-cleaned. You can verify that a contractor is certified by checking EPA’s website at epa.gov/getleadsafe or by calling 1-800424-5323. Always ask to see a copy of the contractor’s firm certification. If you are concerned about your exposure to lead from lead-based paint, call your doctor or local health department and arrange for a blood test. A blood test is the only way to determine if someone has lead poisoning. *Footnote on concentrations: Concentrations of compounds, such as lead, in the blood are given as micrograms (ug) per deciliter (dL). Concentrations in bone or teeth are given as ug/g of bone (or teeth). Environmental levels of lead are usually reported as parts per million (PPM) or parts per billion (PPB). This means that 1.0 ug of lead per million ug of water is given as one part per million, or 1.0 PPM. A PPM calculator can be found at: cleavebooks.co.uk/scol/ccconc.htm. 2013 Building Yavapai

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urchasing ecofriendly cleaning products can be confusing at best. Cleaning products are necessary for maintaining attractive and healthy conditions in the home and workplace. In addition to the obvious aesthetic benefits of cleaning, the removal of dust, allergens and infectious agents is crucial to maintaining a healthful indoor environment. Eco-friendly products are free of toxins and hazardous materials, making them safe for use in the home, workplace, or around children and small pets. They do not release harmful fumes into the air, thereby eliminating the risk of respiratory symptoms associated with airborne chemicals. Most are mild on the hands, eliminating the danger of burns or injury from harsh chemicals. Look on your store shelves for all-purpose cleaners, laundry detergents and other cleaning products that carry labels signifying that the ingredients are safe for the environment. The environmental label, sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, indicates that every ingredient in that product was assessed and deemed minimally toxic to humans and animals, and less harmful to the environment than other chemicals of the same type. Cleaning products with positive environmental attributes, such as biodegradability, low toxicity, low VOC (volatile organic compound) content, reduced packaging and low lifecycle energy can improve indoor

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air quality and reduce water and ambient air pollution while also providing effective cleaning. In addition look for products that are low flammability, designed for use in cold water and products using citrus, seed, vegetable and pine oils. Many household products make effective eco-friendly cleaning products. The products listed are safe but must be used according to directions on the containers: Baking soda removes stains and can be used as a mild abrasive to clean counter tops, cooking pans, household appliances, and bathroom fixtures. White vinegar and lemon juice cut through greasy or waxy buildup, leaving the home smelling fresh and clean. Both borax and castile soap remove laundry stains and can be used as cleaning solutions. When you need to hire a professional cleaning crew to steam your carpets or provide periodic thorough cleaning, patronize companies that use environmentally friendly products. Before you hire a service that claims to be eco-friendly, ask to see the labels of the cleaning products it uses. If the products require hazardous waste disposal, they are not environmentally friendly. Look for cleaning solutions that thoroughly clean your carpets, upholstery, and tile and grout with absolutely no health risks to you or your family. Cleaning agents that are 100% hypoallergenic, 100% child safe, 100% baby Safe, 100% nontoxic, 100% nonhazardous, 100% colorless, and 100% biodegradable are available. Water consumption is drastically reduced, with no wastewater. Commercial spot removers


products are a smarter choice

for carpets and rugs usually contain caustic substances, not to mention chlorine and/ or petroleum–based solvents. Although more and more spot removers are becoming available that claim to be easy on both the environment and your health, there is really no need for you to buy them. Luckily, you can tackle many of the common carpet and rug stains you may encounter with a vinegar and

water solution, and sometimes with just undiluted vinegar alone or baking soda mixed with water. To get that coveted foaming action that many products feature, place the vinegar solution into a well-rinsed foaming soap bottle. In many homes, carpets cover nearly every area of the house. Because of its prevalence, carpeting should be cleaned with eco-friendly nontoxic solutions to prevent potential health problems and environmental contamination from chemical-based products. Nontoxic carpet cleaners effectively attack dirt in the carpets without introducing noxious chemicals into your home. Before you choose your professional cleaning crew there are many non-toxic

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options for both spot removal and full-carpet cleaning. A dry nontoxic carpet cleaner can be as simple as sprinkling corn meal or baking soda with an optional 20 to 30 drops of your favorite essential oil over your carpet and vacuuming it up after a few minutes to deodorize and quickly clean. Nontoxic full carpet liquid cleaning solutions are best kept waterbased with a softener like borax or baking soda for a gentle cleaning. Steam cleaning with a vinegar-water solution is also effective for deodorizing while still gently lifting stains. The traditional commercial carpet-cleaning solutions can contain a cocktail of noxious synthetic chemicals. One, perchloroethylene, commonly called “perc” in the

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industry, is a notorious dry cleaning additive known to cause dizziness, fatigue, and nausea if ingested or inhaled. Another chemical, naphthalene, a solvent manufactured from coal tar, is considered toxic to the human central nervous system and a possible carcinogen by the EPA. Carpet cleaning chemicals get into the air of a room when applied during cleaning, and can also be ingested by kids who play on the floor soon afterwards. Besides such on-site health threats, carpet cleaning chemicals can pollute local groundwater if disposed of improperly (such as down your drain). Wastewater from carpet cleaning requires treatment and/or filtration in order to neutralize contaminants.

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hen it comes to a kitchen makeover, cabinetry is one of the biggest decisions—and expenses—to consider. New cabinets can consume nearly 50 percent of a kitchen renovation budget. Functional cabinets can make the difference between a workable space and one that doesn’t work at all. But what options do you have if you can’t afford to buy all new cabinets with the latest bells and whistles? Actually, you have some attractive options.

Refacing

Refacing your cabinetry can be done at a fraction of the

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cost of new cabinets. Refacing involves installing new cabinet door and drawer fronts and covering the exposed cabinet frames with a product that matches the veneer of the doors and drawers. Lastly, new hardware is installed. Before opting to reface your cabinets, you must make certain that your cabinet structure is solid and worth retaining. Older cabinets are often more solidly constructed than the modular, prebuilt cabinets of today. If you consider refacing, three finish options are available: plastic laminates, rigid thermofoils and wood veneer. Laminates come in a variety of solid colors and wood-grain looks. Laminates are limited to plain door styles because they are not malleable.

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Rigid thermofoils, on the other hand, are malleable and can be shaped and molded in a range of styles. The range of available colors is less than plastic laminates, but the wood grain is quite realistic from a distance. If you are in search of an authentic wood look, then wood veneer is your option. Refacing cabinets with wood veneer can cost up to 25 percent more than plastic laminates or rigid thermofoils.

Refinishing

If your current cabinets are made of wood or laminate and you like their style and configuration, refinishing may be your best option. Most older cabinetry is well built, so preserving it is usually


worthwhile. Examine the cabinet construction to make sure they are built of wood. Wood cabinets can be sanded and stained or painted to achieve a new look. If your cabinets are veneers, painting will be your only option since veneers can’t be sanded or stained. Whether painting or staining, choose an oil-based finish, which is far more durable and forgiving of everyday kitchen grime than latex finish.

Replacing

Replacing your kitchen cabinets is recommended if your current cabinets and countertops are worn out. If you replace your cabinets, you can opt for stock or modular cabinets, or custom-made

cabinets. Stock or modular cabinets are the less expensive option. They come in standard sizes and are offered in three-inch increments and finishes. On the low-end are cabinets covered with melamine. Mid-grade cabinets have paint-grade plywood or solid wood doors. The thicker the plywood, the better the quality. On the high end are hardwood veneers and stain-grade solid wood doors. Remember, when buying stock cabinets be aware of construction quality because you get what you pay for. Custom-made cabinets are the way to go if you have a unique design or require special size cabinets, but this is the most expensive of all cabinet alternatives.

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Reface your current cabinets if: 1. Your cabinet structure is sound. 2. Your kitchen layout is functional. 3. Cabinets are even and in alignment. 4. You want an updated look.

Refinish your current cabinets if: 1. You like their style. 2. You like your kitchen’s configuration. 3. Your cabinets are solid and well built. 4. You want an updated look.

Replace your cabinets if: 1. You want a new footprint. 2. You want additional storage. 3. Your existing cabinets lack strong “bones.”

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Big expense

Heating water efficiently saves money eating water accounts for up to 30 percent of the average home’s energy budget. Older hot water heating systems are less efficient than newer, Energy Star rated products. When it’s time to consider a new water heater for your home, choose a waterheating system that will not only provide enough hot water, but also that will do so energy efficiently and save money. Hot water heaters come in five basic models: • Conventional storage water heaters, which offer a ready reservoir (storage tank) of hot water. • Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters, which heat water directly without the use of a storage tank. • Heat pump water heaters that move heat from one place to another instead of generating heat directly for providing hot water.

• Solar water heaters, which use the sun’s heat to provide hot water. • Tankless coil and indirect water heaters, which use a home’s space heating system to heat water. Specific selection criteria you should consider when purchasing a new hot water heater includes fuel type (availabiltiy and cost), size, energy efficiency and operating costs. The fuel type or energy source you use for water heating will not only affect the water heater’s annual operation costs but also its size and energy efficiency. Electric heaters are typically more energy efficient, last longer and are usually less expensive to purchase. But electric heaters may not be the best option when considering the cost of electricity. Natural gas heaters usually cost less to operate because natural gas costs less than electricity, but natural gas heaters produce fumes that must be vented, and

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that could add to the cost. Selecting the right size hot water heater is important. Make sure to purchase a unit that will provide your household with enough hot water to accommodate your lifestyle. Energy efficiency is another important consideration when purchasing a hot water heater. Be sure to check and compare energy ratings. Energy Star models sometimes offer rebates that reduce the overall purchase costs. Operating cost is the final factor that should go into your purchasing decision. Compare annual operating costs between the less or more energy-efficient models to determine what option is best for your lifestyle. Consider installing a timer on your hot water unit to help reduce operating costs. Before purchasing a new hot water heating system, do your research, including talking to professionals.


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When going ‘green’ know what it means My wife and I have recently retired to Prescott and looking forward to purchasing a home. We have three homes that we are considering. One is rated as an Energy Star home and the other two are not, but they have “green” features. We read your column weekly and want to know the thoughts from your builders.

T

he construction industry has experienced a lot of “green washing” in recent years. Bob Norman of Sun Pine Homes, Ed Stahl of R.E.S Contracting and Kurt Holmes of Prescott Green Builders all agree that merely claiming a home is green because it has bamboo flooring, natural paint or the latest slick green components despite a leaky duct system can be misleading. “The most important principle of green design and construction is producing a home that is highly energy efficient and then having it independently tested to prove its performance,” Norman said. “It starts with energy efficiency verified to Energy Star.”

Be sure to read our YCCA Ask the Contractor Column in the Real Estate Section Every Friday at www.dcourier.com

Holmes builds all of his homes to meet or exceed Energy Star standards. “Anyone can say they build an energy efficient home, but having the home certified Energy Star ensures that it is,” Holmes said. “An Energy Star home

goes far beyond energy efficiency. The certification standards use the building science system approach to ensure the home is energy efficient, but also ensures that the home has good indoor air quality, is safe from radon buildup, has proper weatherization barriers, window flashing, foundation drainage, ventilation, comfort and is safe and durable.” Green building should be correlated not with just sustainability, but also with quality. It is quite difficult to build an energy efficient home that is poor quality. An Energy Star builder must have a firm grasp on building science. Stahl started building energy efficient homes in the Prescott area in 1987 and recognized that a well built home was not only energy efficient but also much more comfortable. Since 2008, R.E.S. Contracting has built 10 Energy Star Certified homes. Prescott Green Builders has been building in the area for 10 years and has seven Energy Star homes, including one net zero home.

R.E.S. Contracting has been building custom homes in the Prescott area for over 26 years. Large or small, complex or simple, we work with you through every step to ensure you get the home you’ve been dreaming about at a price you can afford.

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Sun Pine Homes has been building since 1995 and understands the importance of energy efficiency, a low environmental footprint and the value of health, comfort, home safety and durability. Norman has built six Energy Star homes over the past couple of years and is well versed in the Energy Star building process. The Energy Star process guarantees that a home will meet approved standards. “With Energy Star, the builder and homeowner get the added benefit of third party inspections and certification by a certified energy rater,” Norman said. The house plans are sent to the energy rater for review and analysis. The rater provides independent, third party verification and looks for key information on the plans to help the builder select the best combination of energy-efficient features to ensure that the home will earn the Energy Star label when constructed. These raters personally follow the progress of the build with multiple site visits to verify compliance at key intervals. “Throughout the construction process, the rater performs a number of on-site inspections and diagnostic tests to verify the proper installation of the selected energy-efficient features and overall energy performance of our homes,” Stahl said. “Good construction will pay back for decades, and as the cost of energy increases, the savings become more and more significant for us and our planet.” Stahl said that a recent study of homes sold between 2007 and 2012 documented an average increase of 9 percent in selling price when the home had a green certification label such as the Energy Star Certification. Norman agrees. “Many energy efficient options are good investments and are an asset for resale,” he said. All three of these Energy Star builders agree that the costs to build are 1.0% to 1.5% more than current built homes and the payback time is approximately three to five years. Energy Star and other performance upgrades are adding about $6,000 to the construction price, but are saving the customer about 30 percent minimum in annual energy costs of $2,000 to $3,000. “Sustainable materials and conservation are important parts of a green home, but the most important aspect of building green is the energy efficiency of the thermal enclosure,” Stahl said.

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Enhance home, office with feng shui

F

eng shui is a complicated philosophical Chinese system of placement that was developed more than 3,500 years ago to help improve life by receiving positive energy and chi, or life force. Feng shui was designed to harness the most beneficial chi in palaces and temples in ancient China. Feng shui means “wind and water” and the concept takes into consideration location, building shape, neighboring structures, use of rooms, furniture, colors, landscaping and decorative items. The feng shui philosophy enables an individual to position themselves within an environment to their best advantage. Put simply, incorporating feng shui design principles can make rooms, homes and offices exude ease and harmony. Getting started with feng shui can be easy when one starts with the basics. Then, you can move on to the more complex and multifaceted components of finetuning the chi in your home and life. How does one start with feng shui? Clear out your clutter. Remove everything that you do not love. It is said that this first step is essential because removing stagnant energy is the start of harmonious

house chi. Next, make sure that your home or office or space has good air quality and good light. Open your blinds and windows and allow for as much natural light as possible to enter your space. Natural materials, lots of light and color, a variety of shapes and textures and pleasant views can bring high energy levels into rooms. Make sure your home or office has the five basic feng shui elements: wood, fire, earth, metal and water. Each element is represented by a specific color, and color is one of the easiest ways to bring good chi and harmony into a home or office. Wood is represented by green and blue, and this element will enhance the energy of heath, vitality and growth in your life. Fire is red, a color of power and vibrancy, which is associated with fame and recognition. Earth is pinks, tans and golds and will support stability and nourishment for your relationships. Metal is white and gray and gives us clarity, efficiency, sharpness, precision and will keep us balanced.

LIVING SPACE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 46 want your outdoor living space in the yard, consider a “floor” of stone or brick to define your living space from the rest of the yard. Low walls can provide a sense of enclosure without making people feel trapped. Pergolas also provide a sense of enclosure, but still feel open and airy. Planting climbing vines, such as grapes or wisteria, will add to the sense of privacy when mature. Think color. All those bright colors that may overwhelm the inside of your house are perfect for your outdoor living space. Outside the complement nature’s green and brown pallet and add a splash of fun. Paint your chairs and benches bright colors. Hang colorful Chinese paper lanterns or build a bottle tree. “I’m a big fan of adding color wherever I can,” Burgin said. “Paint furniture, or incorporate old doors that are painted a bright color and distressed to add color. Place painted and distressed benches

throughout for seating. Wind chimes or bells are also a favorite that creates a very nonformal garden that is pleasing to the eyes and ears.” Lighting adds another layer to your design. Soft lighting such as lantern or torches can create a romantic retreat, while stronger light from electric bulbs is functional. “Consider fairy lights in the trees and on fences to add to the overall appeal of your outdoor space at night,” Burgin said. As a general rule, lighting around the outside of a house that is pointed upward can dramatically accent the architecture of the structure, while light pointed downward will create a softer, cozier glow. The well-equipped outdoor living space has more than just a grill…it is an outdoor kitchen complete with a mini fridge, sink, food prep areas and a wood-fired oven. Some outdoor kitchens feature bars with working beer taps. Adequate seating should be planned, whether an informal

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Water is black and dark blue and gives us a calmness and an ease of communication. Knowing how to use colors can strengthen and improve energy and harmony in any room in your home. The next feng shui tool is the bagua. This is a symbolic map of life issues that is overlaid on your home or office as well as individual rooms. The bagua includes areas for wealth, fame and reputation, partnership, creativity, travel, career, higher knowledge and family. For example, the far left-hand corner at the rear of your home is the wealth area of your home. So if that area of your home is full of clutter and dimly lit or is an area that you do not like, money and abundance issues may manifest in your life. There is so much more to feng shui— how a room affects our attitudes and personality, how a color affects our mood, where to place mirrors, what walls to put a fireplace on, and what earth energies may be under our home. Simple changes can get life moving, and by using feng shui we can bring positive changes into our home, office and spaces. picnic table or a more elaborate outdoor dining set. Adding a fire feature to your outdoor living space creates another area for congregating and socializing. People have long loved to gather round the fire to share stories and song. Fire pits can be as simple as a hole in the ground or as elaborate as an outdoor gas-fueled fireplace. Portable firepits are a viable option for smaller spaces and chimineas are an attractive and affordable option. Remember when planning your outdoor living space that whatever furnishings or decorations you use, consider the weather. Weatherproof furniture and waterproofed wood or metal will provide more years of enjoyment. Look for products that can tolerate direct sunlight without fading and those that can withstand rain, snow and wind without rotting or falling apart. For additional help or advise in constructing your outdoor living space, contact the Yavapai County Countractors Association at 928-778-0040.


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Not all welcome in

D

id you know that many of the pretty, colorful flowers that grow throughout Yavapai County are actually noxious weeds? While a weed is generally defined as any plant growing where it is not wanted, a noxious weed is an undesirable, nonnative plant species. Any plant that is deemed an economic threat, an environmental threat or a threat to public health may be defined as noxious. In fact, Arizona has a State Noxious Weed List (see Noxious Weed List). These exotic species have been introduced from other biotic communities either: intentionally for their edible, medicinal, ornamental or forage properties; accidentally in ballast, or cargo; or as contaminants in seed, hay or straw. Because of the lack of competition or natural control mechanisms of predator or pathogen, the exotic species thrives and the native plant and animal communities suffer. Invasive species compete for space, moisture and nutrients. They alter the fire regime, interrupt cycling of nutrients, disrupt stream flow and native plant regeneration patterns. This may contribute to habitat destruction and lead to a reduction in species diversity and species richness. Exotic invaders displace local species or cause their extinction. Some species can alter or disrupt flood regimes in desert washes and streams, causing loss of life and severe economic and environmental harm. A licensed landscaper can help you make sure that you are not harboring any of these invasive aliens in your yard. How you can minimize the spread of noxious weeds: r Drive only on established roads and trails away from weed infested areas. r When using pack animals, carry only feed that is certified weed free. r Removed weed seeds from pack animals. r Don’t pick the flowers of noxious weeds and take them home.

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YAVAPAI BLOCK Largest Selection of Landscaping Materials for your Spring Home Improvement Projects

Retaining Wall Systems Pavers • Stepping Stones

Centaurea solstitialis L.—Yellow starthistle (St. Barnaby’s thistle)

445-4340

www.yblock.com 1389 Masonry Way • Prescott Monday-Friday 7am-4pm Saturdays 8am-12pm

Remodeling •

Custom Homes • Steel Buildings Photo: Stephen R. Brubaker

Residential • Commercial

Ipomoea triloba L.—Three-lobed morning glory

Don’t pick and transport wild flowers that you can’t identify. r Don’t camp or drive in weed infested areas. r

To remove an invasive weed: r If no flowers or seeds are present, pull the weed and leave it on the area. r If flowers or seed are present, r Pull the weed. Be careful the seed does not fall from the weed. Place the weed in a plastic bag or similar container. r Dispose of sealed bag or container properly.

we have been committed to working with families and local businesses to bring their dreams to life with quality and integrity. We use only the best building materials to achieve a blend of craftsmanship and exceptional value.

HARPER & SON DEVELOPMENT, INC.

Chuck Harper, President Debbie Harper, Executive Vice President Josh Harper, Vice President of Production

See Invaders, page 88

2013 Building Yavapai

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ROC182916 ROC182917 ROC182918

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INVADERS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 87

Restricted The following noxious weeds are restricted (includes plants, stolons, rhizomes,

cuttings and seed) and if found within the state shall be quarantined to prevent further infestation or contamination. r Acroptilon repens (L.) DC.—Russian knapweed r Aegilops cylindrica Host.—Jointed goatgrass r Alhagi pseudalhagi Bieb. Desv.— Camelthorn r Cardaria draba (L.) Desv.—Globedpodded hoary cress (Whitetop) r Centaurea diffusa L.—Diffuse knapweed r Centaurea maculosa L.—Spotted knapweed r Centaurea solstitialis L.—Yellow starthistle (St. Barnaby’s thistle) r Cuscuta spp.—Dodder r Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms— Floating water hyacinth r Elytrigia repens (L.) Nevski— Quackgrass r Euryops sunbcarnosus subsp. vulgaris—Sweet resinbush r Halogeton glomeratus (M. Bieb.) C.A. Mey—Halogeton r Helianthus ciliaris DC.—Texas blueweed r Ipomoea triloba L.—Three-lobed morning glory

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Printed here is a partial list of Arizona’s Noxious Weeds. Regulated The following noxious weeds are regulated (includes plants, stolons, rhizomes, cuttings and seed) and if found within the state may be controlled or quarantined to prevent further infestation or contamination. r Cenchrus echinatus L.—Southern sandbur r Cenchrus incertus M.A. Curtis—Field sandbur r Convolvulus arvensis L.—Field bindweed r Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms— Floating water hyacinth r Medicago polymorpha L.—Burclover r Pennisetum ciliare (L.) Link— buffelgrass r Portulaca oleracea L.—Common purslane r Salvinia molesta—Giant Salvinia r Tribulus terrestris L.—Puncturevine

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Linaria genistifolia var. dalmatica—Dalmation toadflax

Onopordum acanthium L.—Scotch thistle

Linaria genistifolia var. dalmatica— Dalmation toadflax r Onopordum acanthium L.—Scotch thistle For the complete list, see http://www. azda.gov/psd/quarantine5.htm. r


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Top 5 Reasons for Window Replacement

O

ne of the smartest ways to make your home more beautiful, comfortable and energy efficient is to replace your old, drafty windows with high performance, thermally efficient replacement windows. Replacing your home windows may seem like a large expense, but think of it as an investment. New energy-efficient windows will reduce heating and cooling costs, reduce outside noises and increase the exterior appeal of your home. Additionally, new windows require virtually no maintenance, will improve home security and are easy to handle and clean. The Top 5 reasons to replace your old windows with new energy efficient windows are:

1

Energy consumption Energy efficient windows require less WINDOW & DOOR

R EXPERTS YOU WILL

INSTALLATION EPLACEMENT

energy to heat or cool the home. That is a double benefit: reduced consumption of natural resources and lower utility bills.

2

Safety

Many old windows were made with lead…both in the glass and in the paint surrounding the window. Upgrading your windows will remove this potential health hazard.

3

Leaking

Leaking windows allow water to come into the home, both in front and behind the walls. Old sealing around the windows is also vulnerable to moisture. Mold is a dangerous by product of moisture entering the home, and it can be detrimental to your family’s health and the resale value of your home.

5

Aesthetics

Efficiency

Old windows are commonly single paned. They have a tendency to freeze open or shut, and they feel icy to the touch. In addition, they are known to develop frost on the inside of the window, increasing the chances of breakage, which causes damage to the home.

New windows boost curb appeal by perking up the appearance of your home. If you are simply looking to enhance the safety, security and overall health of your home, new windows offer countless benefits. New windows will increase the value of the home and assist in obtaining a higher resale value, which is critical in today’s real estate market.

WINDOWS

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WINDOWS & DOORS

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NO INTEREST | NO PAYMENTS for 12 Months or LOW MONTHLY PAYMENTS On approved credit

Call today for a FREE In-Home Consultation

Visit our Prescott Valley showroom

2485 N. Great Western Dr. RenewalByAndersen.com

Home Resort Living of Arizona Inc. (fn) ROC260542

94

4

At Four Season Sunrooms we offer styles that can be customized to your needs Home Resort Living of Arizona Inc. (fn) ROC260542 and budget.

928-717-5455 prescott.fourseasonssunrooms.com

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2013 YCCA Service Membership Directory Directory Index Category

Page

Accounting/Payroll/Tax Preparation...................................................... 95 Acoustical Ceilings..................................................................................... 95 Advertising/Graphic Design..................................................................... 95 Apparel Logo Wear.................................................................................... 95 Alarms/Home & Fire (See Home Security Systems) ........................... 102 Appliances................................................................................................... 95 Architectural Design Services .................................................................. 95 Asphalt Maintenance/Paving & Seal Coating........................................ 95 Associations................................................................................................ 95 Attorney/Legal............................................................................................ 95 Banking/Lending & Financing Services.................................................. 95 Bath Conversions (See Tub/Shower Conversion)................................ 111 Blueprint Copying...................................................................................... 95 Building Materials & Builders Hardware................................................ 95 Cabinet Refacing........................................................................................ 96 Cabinet Refinishing.................................................................................... 96 Cabinets....................................................................................................... 96 Cabinets/Garage & Storage....................................................................... 96 Cable TV...................................................................................................... 96 Carpentry/Finish Carpentry..................................................................... 96 Carpet & Tile Cleaning (See Floor Cleaning)........................................ 100 Ceramic, Stone & Tile................................................................................ 96 Certified Public Accountants.................................................................... 97 Chambers of Commerce........................................................................... 97 Chimney Sweep.......................................................................................... 97 Civil Engineering & Land Surveying....................................................... 97 Cleaning/Commercial Janitorial.............................................................. 97 Cleaning/Residential.................................................................................. 97 Commercial Contractors........................................................................... 97 Communications/Low Voltage................................................................ 97 Concrete Contractors & Suppliers........................................................... 97 Construction Accounting/Payroll Services/Tax Preparation.............. 97 Construction Clean-up.............................................................................. 97 Countertops................................................................................................ 97 Coupons/Savings........................................................................................ 98 Deck Coating.............................................................................................. 98 Decorative Concrete.................................................................................. 98 Developers................................................................................................... 98 Direct Mail Marketing............................................................................... 98 Doors/Screens (See Screens).................................................................... 109 Doors & Windows..................................................................................... 98 Drainage Systems & Supplies................................................................... 99 Drywall & Plastering.................................................................................. 99 Duct & Dryer Vent Cleaning.................................................................... 99 Duct Sealing................................................................................................ 99 Education.................................................................................................... 99 Electrical Contractors................................................................................ 99 Employment Services................................................................................ 99 Energy Building Consultants.................................................................... 99 Engineering/Testing/Structural/Special Insepctions/Foundations............99 Environmental Testing (Mold, Asbestos, Radon, Water Quality).............99 Equipment Rentals & Dealers.................................................................. 99 Escrow & Title Services............................................................................ 100 Fencing—Chain Link/Vinyl/Welded Rail/Wood................................. 100 Fencing—Ornamental Iron..................................................................... 100 Finish Carpentry....................................................................................... 100 Fireplaces, Woodstoves & BBQ’s............................................................ 100 Fire Spirnklers............................................................................................ 100

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Category

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Flagstone, Sandstone, Decorative Stone & Rock Supplies................... 100 Floor Cleaning........................................................................................... 100 Floor Covering (Tile, Natural Stone, Wood & Carpet)....................... 100 Fuel Companies......................................................................................... 101 Garage Doors............................................................................................. 101 Garage Floor Coating............................................................................... 101 Garden Center........................................................................................... 101 Gates—Chain Link/Vinyl/Welded Rail/Wood..................................... 101 Gates—Ornamental Iron......................................................................... 101 General Contractors—Engineering/Excavation/Grading & Paving........101 Glass & Mirrors (See Shower Doors/Mirror/Glass)............................. 101 Grass—Artificial/Synthetic Turf............................................................. 101 Green Building.......................................................................................... 101 Gutters........................................................................................................ 102 Handyman/Home Repair........................................................................ 102 Health Care Services................................................................................. 102 Highway Construction Safety Guardrail Signs..................................... 102 Historic Restoration.................................................................................. 102 Home Furnishings.................................................................................... 102 Home Security Systems............................................................................ 102 Hotel—Extended Stay/Conference......................................................... 102 HVAC......................................................................................................... 102 HVAC Supplies & Fixtures...................................................................... 103 Hydroseeding............................................................................................. 103 Insulation................................................................................................... 103 Insurance.................................................................................................... 103 Interior Design.......................................................................................... 103 Irrigation Materials................................................................................... 103 Irrigation Systems..................................................................................... 103 Kitchen & Bath Design............................................................................. 103 Kitchen & Bath Remodeling.................................................................... 103 Land Development/Lots & Acreage....................................................... 103 Landscaping & Construction Materials................................................. 103 Landscaping—Erosion Control/Xeriscape/Water Features and Defensible Space................................................................................. 103 Lighting....................................................................................................... 104 Locks........................................................................................................... 104 Log Homes................................................................................................. 104 Log Home Chinking................................................................................. 104 Marble—Countertops, Shower Surrounds............................................ 104 Masonry Block Supplies........................................................................... 104 Mediation................................................................................................... 104 Membership Warehouse.......................................................................... 104 Metal/Steel Buildings................................................................................ 104 Metal Stud Framing.................................................................................. 104 Millwork..................................................................................................... 104 Mold Abatement....................................................................................... 104 Mold Inspection........................................................................................ 104 Mold Testing.............................................................................................. 104 Municipality............................................................................................... 104 Nursery/Garden Supplies......................................................................... 104 Outdoor Living.......................................................................................... 104 Paint & Supplies........................................................................................ 105 Painting....................................................................................................... 105 Painting—Decorative/Faux/Murals....................................................... 105 Pavers.......................................................................................................... 105 Pest Control............................................................................................... 105 Plan Rooms................................................................................................ 105

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Service Directory Category

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Planting Soil .............................................................................................. 105 Plumbing Contractors ............................................................................. 106 Plumbing Fixtures/Supplies.................................................................... 106 Printing/Copying (See Blueprint Copying) ........................................... 95 Promotional Products ............................................................................. 106 Propane ...................................................................................................... 106 Radio Partners .......................................................................................... 106 Rainwater Harvesting .............................................................................. 107 Real Estate/Residential & Commerical ................................................. 107 Recycling.................................................................................................... 107 Remodeling/Restoration Contractors ................................................... 107 Residential/Custom Builders .................................................................. 107 Retaining Walls—Masonry ..................................................................... 108 Retaining Walls—Stone........................................................................... 109 Retirement Plans/401K/IRA/Roith........................................................ 109 Road/Driveway Chip Sealing .................................................................. 109 Rock (See Flagstone, Sandstone, Decorative Stone, Rock Supplies)....... 100 Roofing....................................................................................................... 109 Saw, Tool, Small Engine Repair ............................................................. 109 Screens (Doors & Windows) .................................................................. 109 Security Doors & Screens ........................................................................ 109 Septic System Design & Installation ...................................................... 110 Septic Tank Cleaning ............................................................................... 110 Septic Tank Inspections .......................................................................... 110 Septic & Water Tank Manufacturer ...................................................... 110 Sewer & Drain Cleaning .......................................................................... 110 Shower Doors/Mirrors/Glass ................................................................. 110 Shredding Services ................................................................................... 110

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Page

Siding ......................................................................................................... 110 Signs/Banners ........................................................................................... 110 Snow Removal .......................................................................................... 110 Solar Energy .............................................................................................. 110 Solar Plumbing ......................................................................................... 110 Solar Tubes & Skylights ........................................................................... 110 Spas/Saunas/Hot Tubs............................................................................. 110 Stone (See Flagstone, Sandstone, Decorative Stone, Rock Supplies) .........100 Stucco/Plastering ...................................................................................... 111 Sun Rooms/Pergola Shade & Patio Covers........................................... 111 Telephone & Internet .............................................................................. 111 Tree Removal/Trimming ........................................................................ 111 Tub Shower Conversion.......................................................................... 111 Utilities....................................................................................................... 111 Waste Hauling .......................................................................................... 111 Water/Waster Water Piping Supplies ................................................... 111 Water & Fire Damage Restoration ........................................................ 111 Water Proofing ......................................................................................... 111 Water Purification.................................................................................... 111 Weed Control ........................................................................................... 112 Welding ..................................................................................................... 112 Wells/Pump Installation & Servicing .................................................... 112 Window Coverings, Screens, Shutters, Tinting ................................... 112 Windows (See Doors & Windows)......................................................... 98 Windows—Replacement......................................................................... 112 Windows/Sliding Door Repairs ............................................................. 112 Woodworking (See Carpentry/Finish Carpentry)............................... 100

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2013 YCCA Membership Directory

ACCOUNTING/PAYROLL/TAX PREPARATION MPM, Inc. 3207 Montana Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 273-0820 Richard L. Joliet, CPA See Our Ad Page 63 1129 Iron Springs Road, Suite 202 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-2386 www.RichardJolietCPA.com

ACOUSTICAL CEILINGS

Quality Maytag See Our Ad Page 79 1097 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-8460 www.qualitymaytagaz.com

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN SERVICES Blue Line Designs 730 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-2901 www.bluelinedesignsaz.com

Chartier Drywall, Inc. See Our Ad Page 99 655 Brannen Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1191

Catalyst Architecture See Our Ad This Page 123 E. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-3508 www.catalystarchitecture.com

Jebco Construction Companies 140 North Hwy 89, Suite B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com

Living Systems Building Group 129 Apollo Heights Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-2413 www.michaelfrerking.com

ADVERTISING/GRAPHIC DESIGN

Michael Taylor Architects, Inc. 118 S. Pleasant St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-0626 www.mtai.net

Morgan Sign Company 704 E. Moeller St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6336 www.morgansign.com Sir Speedy 1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

APPAREL LOGO WEAR Sir Speedy 1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

ALARMS/HOME & FIRE (See Home Security Systems)

APPLIANCES Arizona Wholesale Supply Company 6640 Inter-Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (480) 510-9279 www.arizonawholesalesupply. com Home Depot Prescott Location 1941 E. State Route 69 (928) 771-8467 www.homedepot.com Prescott Valley Location 5500 E. State Route 69 (928) 777-2400 www.homedepot.com Lowes 2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com MCK Woodworks See Our Ad Page 96 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

Renovations Your Complete Remodel Resource See Our Ad Page 68 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8506 www.renovationsaz.com

ASPHALT MAINTENANCE PAVING /SEAL COATING Cactus Asphalt & Paving 8211 W. Sherman St. Tolleson, AZ 85353 (623) 907-2800 www.cactusasphalt.com Eyemark, LLC 6947 E. 1st Street #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 928-237-0404 Specialty Paving & Grading 503 E. E-Z Street Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8411

ASSOCIATIONS Central Arizona Partnership P.O. Box 3185 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 458-5361 www.centralazpartnership.org Prescott Lakes Architectural Review Committee 3205 Lakeside Village Prescott, AZ 86301 www.prescottlakescommunity.org

ATTORNEY/LEGAL

BANKING / LENDING & FINANCING SERVICES BBVA Compass Bank 923 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3311 www.bbvacompass.com Country Bank See Our Ad Page 5 107 E. Willis St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-9595 www.countrybankaz.com National Bank of Arizona 201 N. Montezuma St., Suite 100 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 771-8100 www.nbarizona.com

BATH CONVERSIONS (See Tub/Shower Conversion)

BLUEPRINT COPYING A & E Reprographics www.a-erepro.com

Gammage & Burnham Kevin J. Blakley 2 No. Central Avenue 15th Floor Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 256-4467 www.gblaw.com

Prescott Locations 1030 Sandretto Dr., Suite F (928) 442-9116

Robert Kozak, PLLC Bob Kozak 3619 B Crossings Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7140

Prescott Valley Location 8101 Hwy. 69 (928) 772-0054

2013 Building Yavapai

222 S. Montezuma St. (928) 445-3815

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Sir Speedy 1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

BUILDING MATERIALS & BUILDERS HARDWARE Foxworth Galbraith Lumber See Our Ad Page 27 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com Home Depot Prescott Location 1941 E. State Route 69 (928) 771-8467 www.homedepot.com Prescott Valley Location 5500 E. State Route 69 (928) 777-2400 www.homedepot.com Lowes 2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com ProBuild See Our Ad Page 73 6601 E. 2nd St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-1221 www.probuild.com

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2013 YCCA Membership Directory The Door & Window Store 487 EZ St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6400 www.prescottdoors.com

CABINET REFACING Granite Transformations 2205 W. Lone Cactus Dr. #23 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (928) 227-3090 www.granitetransformations.com Reliant Capitol, LLC 725 N 73rd Ave., Suite 124 Phoenix, AZ 85043 (623) 388-8899 www.reliantcapitolllc.com MCK Woodworks See Our Ad This Page 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com Northern Arizona Woodworking 8875 E. Laredo Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3779

CABINET REFINISHING Northern Arizona Woodworking 8875 E. Laredo Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3779

The Arizona Woodworking Co. 8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworking company.com

Heritage Carpets & Interiors See Our Ad Page 98 9101 E. Florentine Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

The Arizona Woodworking Co. 8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworking company.com

CABINETS

Home Depot Prescott Location 1941 E. State Route 69 (928) 771-8467 www.homedepot.com

Timberline Woodworks 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

Prescott Valley Location 5500 E. State Route 69 (928) 777-2400 www.homedepot.com

CABLE TV

Able & Ready PaintingRemodeling, LLC See Our Ad Page 54 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com B2 Custom Cabinets P.O. Box 3842 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 420-9339 Engrained Cabinetry and Countertops See Our Ad Page 1 www.engrained.com Prescott Location 550 N. 6th St. (928) 776-4568 Prescott Valley Location 7129 E. 1st St., Ste. 101 (928) 772-8149 Foxworth Galbraith Lumber See Our Ad Page 27 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Lowes 2300 E. State. Rt. 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com MCK Woodworks, LLC See Our Ad This Page 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com Northern Arizona Woodworking 8875 E. Laredo Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3779

ML Sims Frame To Finish 1896 N. Lapis Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-0142 Timberline Woodworks 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net Triple E Construction See Our Ad Page 35 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Prescott Floors 1239–1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86306 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

CARPET & TILE CLEANING (see Floor Cleaning)

The Arizona Woodworking Co. 8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworking company.com

Arizona Stone & Architectural Products See Our Ad Inside Front Cover 2601 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0828 www.arizonastone.com

CABINETS/GARAGE & STORAGE Engrained Cabinetry and Countertops See Our Ad Page 1 www.engrained.com Prescott Location 550 N. 6th St. (928) 776-4568 Prescott Valley Location 7129 E. 1st St., Ste. 101 (928) 772-8149 MCK Woodworks See Our Ad This Page 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com ML Sims Frame To Finish 1896 N. Lapis Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-0142

2013 Building Yavapai

CARPENTRY/FINISH CARPENTRY

Prescott Design Center See Our Ad Page 70-71 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com

Timberline Woodworks Inc. 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

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Cable One See Our Ad Back Cover 3201 Tower Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-4511 www.cableone.net

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CERAMIC, STONE &TILE

Arizona Tile See Our Ad Page 44 625 Holiday Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-1070 www.arizonatile.com B & L Flooring America 2710 N. Glassford Hill Rd. #G Prescott Valley AZ 86314 (928) 772-2222 www.bandlflooringamerica.com Greenlee Designer Surfaces See Our Ad Page 71 Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com Heritage Carpets & Interiors See Our Ad Page 98 9101 E. Florentine Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com Home Depot Prescott Location 1941 E. State Route 69 (928) 771-8467 www.homedepot.com


2013 YCCA Membership Directory Home Depot Prescott Valley Location 5500 E. State Route 69 (928) 777-2400 www.homedepot.com Lowes 2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com Precision Marble & Granite See Our Ad Page 43 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com Prescott Floors 1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928)771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com Primera Carpet One Floor & Home See Our Ad Page 24 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTS (CPAS) Pittman & Murdough, CPAs 745 E. Maryland Ave. #114 Phoenix, AZ 85014 (602) 265-6590 www.pittmanandmurdough.com Richard L. Joliet, CPA See Our Ad Page 63 1129 Iron Springs Road, Suite 202 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-2386 www.RichardJolietCPA.com

CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE Chino Valley 175 E. Road 2 South Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2493 www.chinovalley.org Prescott 117 Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2000 www.prescott.org Prescott Valley 7120 Pav Way, Ste. 201 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8857 www.pvchamber.org

CHIMNEY SWEEP Builders Wholesale 400 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com

CIVIL ENGINEERING & LAND SURVEYING Shephard-Wesnitzer, Inc. 221 N. Marina St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 282-1061 www.swiaz.com

CLEANING/COMMERCIAL JANITORIAL MTO Janitorial, LLC See Our Ad Page 62 Serving the Quad City Area (928) 772-0004 www.MTOjanitorial.com

CLEANING/RESIDENTIAL Prescott Maid to Order, LLC See Our Ad Page 62 Serving the Quad City Area (928) 899-8518 www.prescottmaidtoorder.com

COMMERCIAL CONTRACTORS Acklin Brothers Construction 1965 Coyote Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-4007 Aspen Valley Development See Our Ad Page 107 697 6th Street, Suite 503 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-9877 www.aspenvalleyhomesaz.com B’s Contractors Serving Yavapai County (928) 771-9240 Circle C Construction See Our Ad Page 87 P.O. Box 960 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com Circle D Builders Serving Yavapai County (928) 443-0208 www.circledbuilders.com Concord General Contracting See Our Ad Page 26 4215 E. McDowell Road #201 Mesa, AZ 85215 (480) 962-8080 www.concordinc.com

Kenson Construction Co. 6135 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5192 KNA Construction, Inc. P.O. Box 12467 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 778-6932 knams@commspeed Laipple Construction 1947 Victoria Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-6865 Luvco Construction P.O. Box 661 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 778-9181 www.luvcoconstruction.com Malouff and Company, Inc. 325 W. Gurley St., Ste. 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1657 NJ Builders, Inc. See Our Ad Page 25 P.O. Box 13051 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com Prescor Builders 3200 Lakeside Village Dr. #201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com Prescott Builders of AZ, LLC See Our Ad Page 29 2600 Gentle Breeze Way Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 717-0147 www.PrescottBuildersofAZ.com Ravencrest Homes 518 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-1677 www.ravencresthomes.com

DeCarol Company See Our Ad Page 42 P.O. Box 11348 Prescott, AZ 86304 Phone: (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com

Renovations Your Complete Remodel Resource See Our Ad Page 68 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8506 www.rennovationsaz.com

Don Savage Building Contractors 1753 S. Blooming Hills Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1307 www.donsavagebuilders.com

TLC Construction 1940 W. Buena Vista Trail Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 925-1342 www.tlcconstructionofprescott.com

COMMUNICATIONS – LOW VOLTAGE Aspen Communications 7 Kiji-Dava Circle, Suite A Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 774-0992 www.aspentelco.com

CONCRETE CONTRACTORS & SUPPLIERS Asphalt Paving & Supply 2425 N. Glassford Hill Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6363 www.ashpaltpavingsupply.com CEMEX See Our Ad Page 33 13531 E. Hwy. 89A Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 772-3733 www.cemexusa.com Diversified Concrete Crafters P.O. Box 26400 Prescott, Valley, AZ 86312 Cell (928) 237-0085 www.diversifiedconcretecrafters. com Drake Cement 5001 E. Drake Rd. Paulden, AZ 86334 (928) 636-4825 www.drakecement.com Hanson Aggregates 5899 Wilkinson Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-3571 www.heidelbergcement.com Laipple Construction 1947 Victoria Drive Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-6865

CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNTING/ PAYROLL SERVICES/TAX PREPARATION MPM, Inc. 3207 Montana Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 273-0820 Richard L. Joliet, CPA See Our Ad Page 63 1129 Iron Springs Road, Suite 202 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-2386 www.RichardJolietCPA.com

CONSTRUCTION CLEAN UP MTO Janitorial, LLC See Our Ad Page 62 Serving the Quad City Area (928) 772-0004 www.MTOjanitorial.com

Greseth Builders P.O. Box 1228 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 445-9572 www.gresethbuilders.com

TL Garrett Construction See Our Ad Page 61 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928)445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com

Haley Construction Company See Our Ad Page 5 P.O. Box 831 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

Triple E Construction See Our Ad Page 35 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Arizona Tile See Our Ad Page 44 625 Holiday Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-1070 www.arizonatile.com

Jebco Construction Companies 140 North Hwy 89, Suite B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com

Womack Enterprises 425 W. Delano Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6094 www.womack-brothers.com

Engrained Cabinetry & Countertops See Our Ad Page 1 www.engrained.com Prescott Location 550 N. 6th St. (928) 776-4568 Prescott Valley Location 7129 E. 1st St. (928) 772-8149

2013 Building Yavapai

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COUNTERTOPS

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2013 YCCA Membership Directory Foxworth Galbraith Lumber See Our Ad Page 27 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

Heritage Carpets & Interiors See Our Ad This Page 9101 E. Florentine Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com

Granite Kitchen Concepts 303 N. Summit Avenue Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8811 www.granitekitchenconcepts.com

Lowes 2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

Granite Transformations 2205 W. Lone Cactus Dr. #23 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (928) 227-3090 www.granitetransformations.com

MCK Woodworks, LLC See Our Ad Page 96 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com

Greenlee Designer Surfaces See Our Ad Page 71 Prescott Design Center See our ad page 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.com Home Depot Prescott Location 1941 E. State Route 69 (928) 771-8467 www.homedepot.com Prescott Valley Location 5500 E. State Route 69 (928) 777-2400 www.homedepot.com

Northern Arizona Woodworking 8875 E. Laredo Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3779 Precision Marble & Granite See Our Ad Page 43 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com Prescott Design Center See Our Ad Page 70-71 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com Prescott Floors 1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home See Our Ad Page 24 7785 E. Hwy 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com Silver Creek Stone (Granite Only) 1464 Masonry Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-0307 www.silvercreekstone.com

COUPONS/SAVINGS Money In The Mail See Our Ad Page 89 Willie Lass, Publisher Serving Yavapai County (928) 830-5208 www.NAZMoneyInTheMail.com

DECK COATING Arizona Vinyl Waterproofing See Our Ad Page 65 7000 Williamson Valley Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-1406 www.duradek.com Badger Roofing See Our Ad Page 109 8800 E. Long Mesa Dr., Ste. A Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 771-8770 www.badgerroofing.net Central Basin Roofing, Inc. See Our Ad Page 55 331 N. Arizona Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 Phone: (928) 778-5819 www.centralbasinroofing.com Granite Basin Roofing P.O. Box 10756 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 772-9222 www.granitebasinroofing.com Western Sealant PO Box 549 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 778-3112 www.westernsealantaz.com

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2013 Building Yavapai

DIRECT MAIL MARKETING Money In The Mail See Our Ad Page 89 Willie Lass, Publisher Serving Yavapai County (928) 830-5208 www.NAZMoneyInTheMail.com

DOORS/SCREENS (See Screens)

DOORS & WINDOWS Able & Ready PaintingRemodeling, LLC See Our Ad Page 54 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com Arizona Window Wizard Installation & Service 8600 E. Turtle Rock Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 710-3081 Bennett Glass & Mirror See Our Ad Page 16 722 E. Sheldon St. Prescott AZ 86301 (928) 445-1180 www.bennettglassaz.com Builders Wholesale, LLC 400 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com Foxworth Galbraith Lumber See Our Ad Page 27 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com ML Sims Frame to Finish 1896 N. Lapis Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-0142

DECORATIVE CONCRETE

Pella Windows & Doors Mountain West 15507 N. Scottsdale Road #120 Scottsdale, AZ 85254 (928) 710-4253 www.pella.com

Circle C Construction See Our Ad Page 87 P.O. Box 960 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com

ProBuild See Our Ad Page 73 6601 E. 2nd St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-1221 www.probuild.com

Diversified Concrete Crafters P.O. Box 26400 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 Cell: (928) 237-0085 diversifiedconcretecrafters.com

Reliant Capitol 725 N. 73rd Ave., Ste. 124 Phoenix, AZ 85043 (623) 388-8899 www.reliantcapitolllc.com

DEVELOPERS Dorn Homes, Inc. 730 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-9427 www.dornhomes.com

Renewal by Andersen of Northern Arizona See Our Ad Page 92 2485 N. Great Western Dr. #D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3159 www.renewalbyandersen.com

The Fain Signature Group 3001 N. Main Street Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8844 www.fainsignaturegroup.com

The Door & Window Store 487 EZ St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6401 www.prescottdoors.com

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2013 YCCA Membership Directory Triple E Construction Pella Certified Contractor See Our Ad Page 35 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

DRAINAGE SYSTEMS & SUPPLIES Earth Resources Corporation 8120 Poland Road Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 775-2795 HD Supply 3100 N. Hwy. 89 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-8032 www.hdsupply.com

DRYWALL & PLASTERING Able & Ready PaintingRemodeling, LLC See Our Ad Page 54 7245 E. 2nd St. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com Chartier Drywall, Inc. See Our Ad This Page 655 Brannen Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1191 Taylor Plastering 5798 Foxglove Place Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 772-7522

DUCT & DRYER VENT CLEANING Builders Wholesale 400 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com Energy Savings Heating & Cooling 360 Henry St. Suite A Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-8402 www.energysavingshc.com Moyer’s Heating & Cooling See Our Ad Page 102 8146 E. Ashley Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 2822659 www.moyershvac.com

DUCT SEALING

ENERGY BUILDING CONSULTANTS

Advantage Home Performance See Our Ad Page 17 1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-3828 www.advantagehome performance.com

Advantage Home Performance See Our Ad Page 17 1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-3828 www.advantagehome performance.com

ArrowSeal See Our Ad Page 94 Serving Yavapai County (928) 925-5353 www.aeroseal.com

Arizona Public Service See Our Ad Page 59 120 N. Marina St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-3636 www.aps.com

Moyer’s Heating & Cooling See Our Ad Page 102 8146 E. Ashley Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 2822659 www.moyershvac.com

EDUCATION Yavapai College Foundation 1100 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-2063 www.yc.edu

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS Boxer M Construction, LLC 11971 E. Mingus Vista Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 925-4967

TDK Comfort Systems, Inc. 1940 S. Hwy. 89, Ste. D Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-0846 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com UniSource Energy Services See Our Ad Page 59 6405 Wilkinson Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (866) 467-1229 www.uesaz.com

Delta Diversified Enterprises See Our Ad Page 43 2606 Centerforce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-0066 www.deltadiv.com

Ponderosa Electric See Our Ad Page 11 418 N. Washington Ave. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1790 www.ponderosaelectric.net S & M Electric See Our Ad Page 45 P.O. Box 10006 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 778-1871 www.sandmelectricinc.net Thomas Electrical Contractors (Commercial Contractor) 4636 S. 35th St., Ste. 1 Phoenix, AZ 85040 (602) 268-8620 www.teci.us

TDK Comfort Systems 1940 S. Hwy 89, #D Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-0846 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES Labor Systems Temporary Services 701 Miller Valley Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-0010 www.laborsystems.com

2013 Building Yavapai

Core Structure Group 621 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 899-8696 www.corestructuregroup.com Western Technologies 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING (MOLD, ASBESTOS, RADON, WATER QUALITY) Western Technologies 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86305 Phone: (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

EQUIPMENT RENTALS & DEALERS Bingham Equipment Company 2694 Union Dr. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 646-5388 www.binghamequipment.com Chino Rentals See Our Ad Page 24 1181 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2026 www.chinorentalsonline.com

Drywall can be finished using a number of techniques and textures. Homeowners can choose from smooth or textured drywall finishes. Some common drywall textures are: • Knockdown • Venetian Plaster • Trowelled • Mud Swirl • Brush Textures • Skim Coating Some drywall finishes are better for walls that are not as flat or smooth and other finishes can help soften the angels of a room and create a great new look.

Mar Dez Electrical, Inc. PO Box 709 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 642-8073

Pitzers One-Hour Air Conditioning & Heating 63363 Cooper Hill Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 777-8899 www.pitzersonehour.com

Yavapai Plumbing & Heating See Our Ad Page 10 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

Moyer’s Heating & Cooling See Our Ad Page 102 8146 E. Ashley Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Quad Cities (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 2822659 www.moyershvac.com

ENGINEERING/TESTING/STRUCTURAL SPECIAL INSPECTIONS/FOUNDATIONS

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2013 YCCA Membership Directory Sunstate Equipment Co., LLC 9351 E. Lorna Lane Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-7350 www.sunstateequip.com

ESCROW & TITLE SERVICES Yavapai Title Agency 123 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2528 www.yavapaititle.com

FINISH CARPENTRY MCK Woodworks See Our Ad Page 96 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com ML Sims Frame To Finish 1896 N. Lapis Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-0142

FENCING—CHAIN LINK/VINYL/ WELDED RAIL/WOOD Prescott Fence 6576 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4211 www.prescottfence.com

FENCING/ORNAMENTAL IRON A. Action Welding See Our Ad This Page 1514 Shoup St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-2579 www.a-actionwelding.com Arc-Tech Welding 8252 E. Long Mesa Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-7050 www.arctechwelding.com Prescott Fence 6576 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4211 www.prescottfence.com

Moloney Construction, LLC 234 Whitney Street Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 533-3376 The Arizona Woodworking Co. 8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworking company.com Timberline Woodworks 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

FIREPLACES, WOODSTOVES & BBQS Banker Insulation of No. AZ 5790 Fulton Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2544 www.bankerinsulation.com

Builders Wholesale, LLC 400 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com Eric & Sons See Our Ad Page 70 6640 Inter-Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 775-2880 www.ericandsons.net Foxworth Galbraith Lumber See Our Ad Page 27 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

FIRE SPRINKLERS B & W Fire Security Systems See Our Ad Page 28 8737 E. Florentine Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8008 www.bwfiresecurity.com Western States Fire Protection 3001 Main St #2D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (623) 640-6554 www.wsfp.com Phoenix Office 4346 E. Elwood Street #100 Phoenix, AZ 85040 602-272-2200

FLAGSTONE, SANDSTONE, DECORATIVE STONE & ROCK SUPPLIES Arizona Stone & Architectural Products See Our Ad Inside Front Cover 2601 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0828 www.arizonastone.com Asphalt Paving & Supply 2425 N. Glassford Hill Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6363 www.asphaltpavingsupply.com Dunbar Stone Company, Inc. 1041 Commerce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-7880 www.dunbarstoneinc.com Earthworks Landscape & Supply 2531 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksrocksupply.com G&S Gravel 11500 E. Finley St. Mayer, AZ 86333 (928) 632-9359 Prescott Dirt, LLC Serving Yavapai County (928) 636-5844 Silver Creek Stone 1464 Masonry Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-0307 www.silvercreekstone.com

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FLOOR CLEANING Clean-N-Bright Carpet & Tile Specialists P.O. Box 11178 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 778-2343 www.clean-n-bright.com Greenlee Designer Surfaces See Our Ad Page 71 Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (982) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.net MTO Janitorial, LLC See Our Ad Page 62 Serving the Quad City Area (928) 772-0004 www.MTOjanitorial.com Prescott Maid to Order, LLC See Our Ad Page 62 Serving the Quad City Area (928) 899-8518 www.prescottmaidtoorder.com Primera Carpet One Floor & Home See Our Ad Page 24 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com Service Master of Prescott 8330 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Phone: (928) 445-9205 www.ServiceMasterofprescott. com

FLOOR COVERING (TILE, NATURAL STONE, WOOD & CARPET) Able & Ready PaintingRemodeling, LLC See Our Ad Page 54 7245 E. 2nd St. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com Arizona Tile See Our Ad Page 44 625 Holiday Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-1070 www.arizonatile.com B & L Flooring America 2710 N. Glassford Hill Road #G Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2222 www.bandlflooringamerica.com Dunbar Stone Company, Inc. 1041 Commerce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-7880 www.dunbarstoneinc.com Greenlee Designer Surfaces See Our Ad Page 71 Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-1814 www.greenleesurfaces.net Heritage Carpets & Interiors See Our Ad Page 98 9101 E. Florentine Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com


2013 YCCA Membership Directory Home Depot Prescott Location 1941 E. State Route 69 (928) 771-8467 www.homedepot.com

Yavapai Bottle Gas 2170 Concord Dr. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 776-9007 www.yavapaigas.com

Prescott Valley Location 5500 E. State Route 69 (928) 777-2400 www.homedepot.com

GARAGE DOORS

Interior Logic See Our Ad Page 21 710 N. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-0900 www.interior-logic.com Lowes 2300 E. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com Mingus Tile 2225 E. State Hwy 69, Suite A Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-5875 www.mingusflooring.com Prescott Design Center See Our Ad Page 70-71 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com Prescott Flooring Brokers See Our Ad Page 52 401 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-2544 www.prescottflooringbrokers.com Prescott Floors, Inc. 1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com The Picture Window, Inc. See Our Ad Page 71 www.thepicturewindowinc.com Prescott Location Prescott Design Center 6640 Inter-Cal Way (928) 772-0122 Cottonwood Location 634 E. State Route 89A (928) 634-8442 Primera Carpet One Floor & Home See Our Ad Page 24 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

FUEL COMPANIES Barrett Propane See Our Ad Page 74 1555 W. Iron Springs Road #5 Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 636-1600 www.barrettpropane.com Bennett Oil 810 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1181 www.Bennettoil.com

Neumann High Country Doors See Our Ad Page 53 8920 E. Valley Rd. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-9738

GARAGE FLOOR COATING Able & Ready PaintingRemodeling, LLC See Our Ad Page 54 7245 E. 2nd St. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com Classic Garage, Inc. P.O. Box 2331 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928)308-9477 www.classicgarageinc.com Garage Floors and More 303 E. Gurley St. #195 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 308-7337 www.garagefloorsandmore.net

GARDEN CENTER Earthworks Landscape & Supply 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksrocksupply.com Home Depot Prescott Location 1941 E. State Route 69 (928) 771-8467 www.homedepot.com Prescott Valley Location 5500 E. State Route 69 (928) 777-2400 www.homedepot.com Lowes 2300 W. State Rt. 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

GATES/CHAIN LINK/VINYL/RAIL/ WELDED RAIL/WOOD Prescott Fence 6576 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4211 www.prescottfence.com

GATES/ORNAMENTAL IRON A. Action Welding See Our Ad Page 100 1514 Shoup St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-2579 www.a-actionwelding.com Arc-Tech Welding 8252 E. Long Mesa Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-7050 www.arctechwelding.com

2013 Building Yavapai

Prestige Security Doors 600 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-7900 (928) 204-1222 Sedona www.prestgesecuritydoors.com

GENERAL CONTRACTORS: ENGINEERING, EXCAVATION, GRADING & PAVING Asphalt Paving & Supply 2425 N. Glassford Hill Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6363 www.asphaltpavingsupply.com CLM Earthmovers P.O. Box 12002 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 445-1918 Earth Resources Corporation 8120 Poland Road Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 775-2795 Fann Contracting, Inc. 1403 Industrial Way Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 778-0170 www.fanncontracting.com FNF Construction, Inc. 115 South 48th St. Tempe, AZ 85281 (480) 784-2910 www.fnfinc.com Headwaters Construction 6789 Mandan Lane Paulden, AZ 86334 (928) 636-6976 Ringler Excavating P.O. Box 2004 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 899-0012 T&H Construction P.O. Box 961 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 445-4700 Technology Construction 5430 Side Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-0099 Vastco, Inc. 425 Industrial Dr. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3880 www.vastco.com

GLASS & MIRRORS (See Shower Doors/Mirror/Glass)

GRASS (ARTIFICIAL/SYNTHETIC TURF) Arizona Stone & Architectural Products See Our Ad Inside Front Cover 2601 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0828 www.arizonastone.com CareScape See Our Ad Inside Back Cover See our ad page Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

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Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping See Our Ad Page 32 Serving Yavapai County (928) 713-6333 www.haciendalandscaping.com Landscape Now, Inc. P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com Vicente Landscaping See Our Ad Page 70 P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

GREEN BUILDING Benttree Custom Homes See Our Ad Page 20 1575 Plaza West Dr. #B Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 443-5484 www.benttreecustomhomes.net Board by Board Builder See Our Ad Page 78 950 W. Rosser St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com Evergreen Homes See Our Ad Page 30 1377 Coyote Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-0006 www.evergreen-homes.com Haley Construction Company See Our Ad Page 5 P.O. Box 831 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com Living Systems Building Group 129 Apollo Heights Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-2413 www.michaelfrerking.com Prescott Green Builders Serving Yavapai County (928) 925-8674 www.prescottgreenbuilders.com R.E.S. Contracting. Inc. See Our Ad Page 82 P.O. Box 4198 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 776-0301 www.prescottbuilder.com Renovations Your Complete Remodel Resource See Our Ad Page 68 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8502 www.renovationsaz.com Sun Pine Homes See Our Ad Page 72 4605 N. Twisted Trail Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6600 www.sunpinehomes.com Triple E Construction See Our Ad Page 35 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com 103


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GUTTERS Arizona Seamless Gutters See Our Ad Page 68 703 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1818 www.arizonaseamlessgutters.com Willbuilt Seamless Gutters Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-0904

HANDYMAN/HOME REPAIR A&D Branch Construction 750 Gail Gardner Way Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 771-0139 DeCarol Company See Our Ad Page 42 P.O. Box 11348 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com Discount Home Service See Our Ad Page 87 7640 E. Long Look Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 713-8209 www.dhs-discounthomeservicesprescott.com Handyman & Construction Services See Our Ad Page 83 Serving Yavapai County (928) 771-0405

JAGR Custom Homes See Our Ad Page 88 2866 N. Eldred Road Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 227-6705 www.jagraz.com ML Sims Frame To Finish 1896 N. Lapis Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-0142 Moloney Construction 234 Whitney St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 533-3376 Thompson’s Remodeling Specialists See Our Ad Page 53 936 Buck Hill Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6407 www.thompsonsprescottaz.com

HEALTH CARE SERVICES Precision Spinal Care 3733 Karicio Lane Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 442-0202 www.precisionspinalcare.net Prescott Valley Chiropractic 3088 Robert Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-0522 www.prescottvalleychiropractic. com

HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION GUARDRAIL SIGNS

HOTEL/EXTENDED STAY/CONFERENCE

Arizona Highway Safety Specialists P.O. Box 3690 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-8934

Residence Inn By Marriott See Our Ad Page 31 3599 Lee Circle Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 775-2232

HISTORIC RESTORATION

Spring Hill Suites In Historic Downtown Prescott See Our Ad Page 31 200 E. Sheldon St. (928) 776-0998 www.marriott.com

Haley Construction Company See Our Ad Page 5 P.O. Box 831 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com Renovations Your Complete Remodel Resource See Our Ad Page 68 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8502 www.renovationsaz.com

HOME FURNISHINGS Prescott Spas See Our Ad Page 46 6947 E. 1st St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9884 www.prescottspas.com Relaxed Fitness (702) 629-1800 www.relaxedfitness.com The Lite Company Prescott Location Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.thelitecompany.com The Lite Company Flagstaff Location 2109 N. 4th St. Flagstaff, AZ 86004 (928) 774-6257

HOME SECURITY SYSTEMS B&W Fire Security Systems See Our Ad Page 28 8737 E. Florentine Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8008 Safeguard Security & Communication P.O. Box 3923 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 772-0155 www.safeguard.us The Alarm Connection 1038 Commerce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-1609 Western States Fire Protection 3001 Main St. #2D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (623) 640-6554 www.wsfp.com Phoenix Office 4346 E. Elwood Street #100 Phoenix, AZ 85040 602-272-2200

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HVAC Advantage Home Performance See Our Ad Page 17 1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-3828 www.advancedinsulationinc.com Arizona Heating & Cooling 700 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-9378 Balanced Heating & Air Conditioning 1985 N. Rancho Santa Maria Rd Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-4623 www.balancedheating.com Chino Heating & Cooling, Inc. See Our Ad Page 53 550 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2955 www.chinoheating.com Energy Savings Heating & Cooling 360 Henry St. Suite A Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-8402 www.energysavingshc.com Goettl’s High Desert Mechanical See Our Ad Page 90-91 4650 Old Highway 279, #A Campe Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-2200 www.goettlshdm.com Moyer’s Heating and Cooling See Our Ad This Page 8146 E. Ashley Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-4346 Sedona/Verde Valley (928) 282-2659 www.moyershvac.com Pitzer’s One-Hour Air Conditioning & Heating 6363 Copper Hill Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 777-8899 www.pitzersonehour.com TDK Comfort Systems, Inc. 1940 S. Hwy 89, Ste. D Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-0846 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com Verde Sol-Air 724 N. Industrial Dr. Bldg 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 Toll Free: (866) 700-5757 www.verdesolair.com


2013 YCCA Membership Directory Yavapai Plumbing & Heating See Our Ad Page 10 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

State Farm-Penny Hubble See Our Ad Page 60 360 N. Hwy 89 #B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3377 www.pennyhubble.com

HVAC SUPPLIES & FIXTURES

State Farm-Heidi Fowler See Our Ad Page 60 150 S. Hwy 69 #9 Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 775-4080 www.heidifowlerinsurance.com

HD Supply 3100 N. Hwy. 89 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-8032 www.hdsupply.com Yavapai Plumbing & Heating See Our Ad Page 10 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

HYDROSEEDING CareScape See Our Ad Inside Back Cover 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com Manzanita Landscaping See Our Ad Page 9 PO Box 26546 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandcapinginc. com Vicente Landscaping See Our Ad Page 70 P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

INSULATION Advantage Home Performance See Our Ad Page 17 1021 Commerce Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-3828 www.advantagehome performance.com Arizona State Insulation P.O. Box 27375 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 775-2403 Banker Insulation of No. AZ 5790 Fulton Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2544 www.bankerinsulation.com Gale Insulation 11610 E. Santa Fe Loop Road #B Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 778-0222 www.masco.com

INSURANCE Brown & Brown of Prescott 915 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-3540 www.bbprescott.com Prudential Financial 301 Whipple St. Suite D Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 583-0944 www.prudential.com/us/harry. weber

State Farm-Cathy Trent See Our Ad Page 60 233 N. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2061 www.cathytrent.com State Farm-Eric Strobel See Our Ad Page 60 2485 N. Great Western Dr. #G1 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8338 www.estrobel.net The Mahoney Group Clyde Marshall 3636 Crossings Dr. #B Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-1900 www.mahoneygroup.com

INTERIOR DESIGN Heritage Carpets & Interiors See Our Ad Page 98 9101 E. Florentine Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com Prescott Design Center See Our Ad Page 70-71 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com Prescott Floors, Inc. 1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 775-9121 www.prescott.abbycarpet.com The Picture Window, Inc. See Our Ad Page 71 www.thepicturewindowinc.com Prescott Location 6640 Inter-Cal Way (928) 772-0122 Cottonwood Location 634 E. State Route 89A (928) 634-8442 Primera Carpet One Floor & Home See Our Ad Page 24 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

IRRIGATION MATERIALS Ewing Irrigation 8267 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9803 www.ewing1.com

2013 Building Yavapai

IRRIGATION SYSTEMS CareScape See Our Ad Inside Back Cover 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com Rickett’s Landscaping Serving Yavapai County 928-300-1850 Creative Outdoors See Our Ad Page 47 P.O. Box 10095 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com Landscape Now, Inc. P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com Little’s Landscape & Design 1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670 Manzanita Landscaping See Our Ad Page 9 P.O. Box 26546 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc.com RRS Landscape & Maintenance See Our Ad Page 74 Serving Yavapai County (928) 848-2058 www.rrslandscapeservices.com TK Haley Yard Care 2661 W. Noble Vista Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 830-4061 www.tkhaley.com The Joshua Tree Landscape Company P.O. Box 4462 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com Vicente Landscaping See Our Ad Page 70 P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

KITCHEN & BATH DESIGN Board by Board Design See Our Ad Page 78 950 W. Rosser St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com

KITCHEN & BATH REMODELING Board by Board Builder See Our Ad Page 78 950 W. Rosser St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com DeCarol Company See Our Ad Page 42 P.O. Box 11348 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com

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Moloney Construction LLC 234 Whitney St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 533-3376

LAND DEVELOPMENT / LOTS & ACREAGE HomeSmart Fine Homes & Land Brian Howell 140 N. Montezuma St., Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 442-2121 www.homesmartfranchise.com Realty Executives See Our Ad Page 56-57 1-800-778-7891 Red Arrow Real Estate See Our Ad Page 67 Corporate Office 1107 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-2525

LANDSCAPING & CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS Earthworks Landscape & Supply 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksrocksupply.com Prescott Dirt, LLC Serving Yavapai County (928) 636-5844

LANDSCAPING/EROSION CONTROL/ XERISCAPE/WATER FEATURES/DEFENSIBLE SPACE COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL Autumn Blaze Construction See Our Ad Page 105 3071 Pedregal Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-4210 www.autumnblazeconstruction.com CareScape See Our Ad Inside Back Cover 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com Creative Outdoors See Our Ad Page 47 P.O. Box 10095 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping See Our Ad Page 32 Serving Yavapai County (928) 713-6333 www.haciendalandscaping.com Landscape Now, Inc. P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com Little’s Landscape & Design 1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670 Manzanita Landscaping See Our Ad Page 9 PO Box 26546 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandcapinginc.com

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2013 YCCA Membership Directory Rickett’s Landscaping Serving Yavapai County 928-300-1850 Rock ‘N’ Earth Landscaping See Our Ad Page 86 Serving Yavapai County (928) 710-6795 www.rocknearth.com RRS Landscape & Maintenance See Our Ad Page 74 Serving Yavapai County (928) 848-2058 www.rrslandscapeservices.com TK Haley Yard Care 2661 W. Noble Vista Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 830-4061 www.tkhaley.com The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. P.O. Box 4462 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com Vicente Landscaping See Our Ad Page 70 P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

LIGHTING K’s Lighting, LLC 735 Sixth St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1623 www.kslightinginc.com Prescott Floors 1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbycarpet.com The Lite Company Prescott Location Prescott Design Center 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.thelitecompany.com The Lite Company Flagstaff Location 2109 N. 4th St. Flagstaff, AZ 86004 (928) 774-6257

LOCKS Builders Wholesale 400 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com Foxworth Galbraith Lumber See Our Ad Page 27 430 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2525 www.foxgal.com

LOG HOMES Stoney Creek Builders See Our Ad Page 108 1965 Bumblebee Dr. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (602) 885-3932 www.stoneycreekbuildersinc.com

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LOG HOME CHINKING Western Sealant PO Box 549 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 778-3112 www.westernsealantaz.com

MARBLE (COUNTERTOPS, SHOWER SURROUNDS) Arizona Tile See Our Ad Page 44 625 Holiday Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 776-1070 www.arizonatile.com Precision Marble & Granite, Inc. See Our Ad Page 43 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www. precisionmarbleinc.com Primera Carpet One Floor & Home See Our Ad Page 24 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com

MASONRY BLOCK/SUPPLIES Yavapai Block & Precast Co. See Our Ad Page 87 1389 Masonry Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4340 www.yblock.com

MEDIATION Robert C. Kozak, PLLC Bob Kozak 3619 Crossings Dr. #B Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-7140

MEMBERSHIP WAREHOUSE Costco Wholesale 3911 E. Hwy 69 Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 541-2204 www.costco.com

METAL/STEEL BUILDINGS Chartier Drywall, Inc. See Our Ad Page 99 655 Brannen Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1191 Circle C Construction See Our Ad Page 87 P.O. Box 960 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com JAGR Custom Homes See Our Ad Page 88 2866 N. Eldred Road Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 227-6705 www.jagraz.com Jebco Construction Companies 140 North Hwy 89, Suite B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com

2013 Building Yavapai

Kenson Construction Co. 6135 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5192 Prescor Builders 3200 Lakeside Village Dr. #201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com Stanley Steel Structures 1537 S. Bates Road Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-6703 www.stanleysteelstructures.com

METAL STUD FRAMING Jebco Construction Companies 140 North Hwy 89, Suite B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com

MILLWORK MCK Woodworks, LLC See Our Ad Page 96 725 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-0177 www.mckwoodworks.com ML Sims Frame To Finish 1896 N. Lapis Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 710-0142 The Arizona Woodworking Co. 8484 E. Laredo Dr. #B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 237-0747 www.thearizonawoodworking company.com Timberline Woodworks Inc. 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-8589 www.timberlinewoodworks.net

MOLD ABATEMENT Able & Ready PaintingRemodeling, LLC See Our Ad Page 54 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com Service Master of Prescott 8330 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Phone: (928) 445-9205 www.ServiceMasterofprescott. com

MOLD INSPECTION Able & Ready PaintingRemodeling, LLC See Our Ad Page 54 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com Service Master of Prescott 8330 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Phone: (928) 445-9205 www.ServiceMasterofprescott. com

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Western Technologies 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86305 Phone: (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

MOLD TESTING Western Technologies 1040 Sandretto Dr., Ste. C Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 443-5010 www.wt-us.com

MUNICIPALITY City of Prescott See Our Ad Page 14 201 S. Cortez St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-1100 www.cityofprescott.net

NURSERY/GARDEN SUPPLIES Earthworks Landscape & Supply 2531 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksrocksupply.com Home Depot Prescott 1941 E. St. Rt. 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 771-8467 Prescott Valley 5500 E. St. Rt. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 777-2400 Lowes 2300 W. State Route 69 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-8640 www.lowes.com

OUTDOOR LIVING CareScape See Our Ad Inside Back Cover 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com Eric & Sons See Our Ad Page 70 6640 Inter-Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 775-2880 www.ericandsons.net Landscape Now, Inc. P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com Manzanita Landscaping See Our Ad Page 9 PO Box 26546 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandcapinginc. com Prescott Spas See Our Ad Page 46 6947 E. 1st. St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9884 www.prescottspas.com Relaxed Fitness Serving Yavapai County (702) 629-1800 www.relaxedfitness.com


2013 YCCA Membership Directory Tuff Spas 7112 W. Frier Drive Glendale, AZ 85303 (623)939-0851 www.tuffspas.com

Emerald Forest Painting Serving Yavapai County (928) 708-0388

Vicente Landscaping See Our Ad Page 70 P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

Interior Artistry By Melanie Link The Painted House 230 S. Montezuma Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 515-9599 www.melanielink.com

PAINT & SUPPLIES Dunn-Edwards 6572 E. 2nd St. #A-B Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-7748 www.dunnedwards.com

PAINTING Able & Ready PaintingRemodeling, LLC See Our Ad Page 54 7245 E. 2nd St., Ste. C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com Century Painting See Our Ad Page 65 697 N. 6th St., Ste. 304 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-2374 www.centurypainting.com Certa Pro Painters 1042 Willow Creek Road, Ste. A Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 499-2571 www.certapro.com

ROC#216048 B-

PAINTING/DECORATIVE/FAUX/MURALS

Landscape Now, Inc. P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com Little’s Landscape & Design 1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

PAVERS Autumn Blaze Construction See Our Ad This Page 3071 Pedregal Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-4210 www.autumnblazeconstruction. com CareScape See Our Ad Inside Back Cover Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com Creative Outdoors See Our Ad Page 47 P.O. Box 10095 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping See Our Ad Page 32 Serving Yavapai County (928) 713-6333 www.haciendalandscaping.com

Manzanita Landscaping See Our Ad Page 9 PO box 26546 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc. com Rock ‘N’ Earth Landscaping See Our Ad Page 86 Serving Yavapai County (928) 720-6795 www.rocknearth.com The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. PO Box 4462 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com Vicente Landscaping See Our Ad Page 70 PO Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

PEST CONTROL Orkin Pest Control 8230 Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-5457 www.getorkin.com Truly Nolen of America 6594 E. 2nd St. Suite D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-4261 www.trulynolen.com

PLAN ROOMS A & E Reprographics Prescott Locations 1030 Sandretto Dr., Ste. F Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-9116 www.a-erepro.com 222 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3815 Prescott Valley Location 8010 E. Hwy. 69, Ste. D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-0054

PLANTING SOIL Earthworks Landscape & Supply 2531 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-3972 www.earthworksrocksupply.com

ROC#253282 B-02

LAZE B ACUTUMN ONSTRUCTION, LLC

2013 Building Yavapai

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2013 YCCA Membership Directory Prescott Dirt. LLC Serving Yavapai County (928) 636-5844

PLUMBING CONTRACTORS Arizona Green Plumber See Our Ad Page 83 P.O. Box 27971 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 925-6809 www.arizonagreenplumber.com Benjamin Franklin Plumbing 6363 Copper Hill Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 777-8899 benjaminfranklinplumbing.com Brewer Plumbing, Inc. P.O. Box 2301 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2351 Luna Plumbing Serving Yavapai County (928) 277-0127 Paragon Plumbing, Inc. See Our Ad Page 61 P.O. Box 25844 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 775-2343 Perfection Plumbing P.O. Box 5055 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 301-7702

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R.E.D. Plumbing See Our Ad Page 80 8133 E. Pecos Circle Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-9296 www.redplumbinginc.com The Plumbing Store See Our Ad Page 86 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com Yavapai Plumbing & Heating See Our Ad Page 10 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

PLUMBING FIXTURES/SUPPLIES HD Supply 3100 N. Hwy. 89 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-8032 www.hdsupply.com The Plumbing Store See Our Ad Page 86 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com Yavapai Plumbing & Heating See Our Ad Page 10 5860 N. Fulton Dr. (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

2013 Building Yavapai

PRINTING/COPYING (See Blueprint Copying)

PROMOTIONAL PRODUCTS Sir Speedy 1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

PROPANE Barrett Propane See Our Ad Page 74 1555 W. Iron Springs Road #5 Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 636-1600 www.barrettpropane.com Yavapai Bottle Gas 2170 Concord Dr. Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 776-9007 www.yavapaigas.com

RADIO PARTNERS Arizona’s Hometown Radio Group See Our Ad This Page 3755 Karico Lane Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-9289 www.azhometownradio.com KDDL–“Cattle Country” 94.3 FM www.cattlecountryradio.com

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KPPV–“The Mix” 106.7 FM www.kppv.com KQNA–“Talk of the Quad Cities” 1130 AM & 99.9 FM www.kqna.com Great Circle Radio See Our Ad Page 64 116 S. Alto Street Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6880 www.gcmaz.com KAFF – “Flagstaff Country” 93.5 FM & 930 AM www.country935.gcmaz.com KNOT – “Fun Oldies” 100.9 FM & 1450 AM www.hits106.gcmaz.com KAFF – “Kaff Country” 92.9 FM www.kaff.gcmaz.com KFSZ – “Hits 106” 106 FM www.hits106.gcmaz.com KTMG – “Magic” 99.1 FM www.magic991.gcmaz.com KMGN – “The Mountain” 93.9 FM www.939themountain.gcmaz.com


2013 YCCA Membership Directory

RAINWATER HARVESTING

REMODELING/RESTORATION CONTRACTORS

Arizona Seamless Gutters See Our Ad Page 68 703 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1818 www.arizonaseamlessgutters.com

A&D Branch Construction 750 Gail Gardner Way Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 771-0139

CareScape See Our Ad Inside Back Cover 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com Ewing Irrigation 8267 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9804 www.ewing1.com Landscape Now, Inc. P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com Vicente Landscaping See Our Ad Page 70 PO Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscpaing.com Yavapai Plumbing & Heating See Our Ad Page 10 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

REAL ESTATE/ RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL Evergreen Homes See Our Ad Page 30 1377 Coyote Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-0006 www.evergreen-homes.com HomeSmart Fine Homes & Land Brian Howell 140 N. Montezuma St., Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 442-2121 www.homesmartfranchise.com Realty Executives See Our Ad Page 56-57 1-800-778-7891 Red Arrow Real Estate See Our Ad Page 67 Corporate Office 1107 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-2525

RECYCLING Iron Man Recyclers 11710 Santa Fe Loop Road Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 775-6894 www.ironmanrecyclers.com Mattera Enterprises Recycling 685 S. Coldwater Lane Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 775-6894 www.merecycling.net Patriot Disposal 9434 E. Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9000 www.patriotdisposal.com

Able & Ready PaintingRemodeling, LLC See Our Ad Page 54 7245 E. 2nd St. #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com Acklin Brothers Construction 1965 Coyote Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-4007 Aspen Valley Homes See Our Ad This Page 697 6th Street, Suite 503 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-9877 www.aspenvalleyhomesaz.com Benttree Custom Homes See Our Ad Page 20 1575 Plaza West Dr. #B Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 443-5484 www.benttreecustomhomes.net Board by Board Builder See Our Ad Page 78 950 W. Rosser St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com Circle C Construction See Our Ad Page 87 P.O. Box 960 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com

NJ Builders, Inc. See Our Ad Page 25 P.O. Box 13051 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com

TLC Construction 1940 W. Buena Vista Trail Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 925-1342 www.tlcconstructionofprescott. com

Prescott Builders of AZ, LLC See Our Ad Page 29 2600 Gentle Breeze Way Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 717-0147 www.prescottbuildersofaz.com

Triple E Construction See Our Ad Page 35 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Prescott Green Builders Serving Yavapai County (928) 925-8674 www.prescottgreenbuilders.com

Womack Enterprises, Inc. 425 W. Delano Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6094 www.womack-brothers.com

Renovations Your Complete Remodel Resource See Our Ad Page 68 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8502 www.renovationsaz.com

RESIDENTIAL/CUSTOM BUILDERS A&D Branch Construction 750 Gail Gardner Way Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 771-0139

Stoddard Lifestyle Homes Serving the Prescott Area (928) 778-3981 www.stoddardlifestylehomes.com

Acklin Brothers Construction 1965 Coyote Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-4007

Stoney Creek Builders See Our Ad Page 108 1960 Bumblebee Dr. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (602) 885-3932 www.stoneycreekbuildersinc.com

Aspen Valley Homes See Our Ad This Page 697 6th Street, Suite 503 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 708-9877 www.aspenvalleyhomesaz.com

Thompson’s Remodeling Specialists See Our Ad Page 53 936 Buck Hill Rd. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928)778-6407 www.thompsonsprescottaz.com

Benttree Custom Homes See Our Ad Page 20 1575 Plaza West Dr. B Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 443-5484 www.benttreecustomhomes.net

Circle D Builders Prescott, AZ (928) 443-0208 www.circledbuilders.com DeCarol Company See Our Ad Page 42 P.O. Box 11348 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com Handyman & Construction Services See Our Ad Page 83 Serving Yavapai County (928) 771-0405 JAGR Custom Homes See Our Ad Page 88 2866 N. Eldred Road Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 227-6705 www.jagraz.com Kenson Construction Co. 6135 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5192 LUVCO Construction P.O. Box 661 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 778-9181 Moloney Construction LLC 234 Whitney St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 533-3376

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2013 YCCA Membership Directory Board by Board Builder See Our Ad Page 78 950 W. Rosser St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com

Designer Homes By Szabo 516 Shadow Mountain Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 717-9326 www.designerhomesbyszabo.com

Carrington Homes P.O. Box 2335 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 443-7300 www.carringtonhomesaz.com

Don Savage Building Contractors 1753 S. Blooming Hills Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1307 www.donsavagebuilders.com

Circle C Construction See Our Ad Page 87 P.O. Box 960 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4660 www.circle-c-const.com

Evergreen Homes See Our Ad Page 30 1377 Coyote Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-0006 www.evergreen-homes.com

Circle D Builders Prescott, AZ (928) 443-0208 www.circledbuilders.com

Granite Mountain Builders of Prescott, LLC 2025 W. Seven Oaks Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-1802 www.gmbuilders.com

Crystal Creek Homes built by TL Garrett Construction See Our Ad Page 61 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928)445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com DeCarol Company See Our Ad Page 42 P.O. Box 11348 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 541-7912 www.decarolcompany.com

Greseth Builders P.O. Box 1228 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 445-9572 www.gresethbuilders.com Haley Construction Company See Our Ad Page 5 P.O. Box 831 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 445-1281 www.haleyconst.com

Headwaters Construction 6789 Mandan Lane Paulden, AZ 86334 (928) 636-6976

Prescott Green Builders Serving Yavapai County (928) 925-8674 prescottgreenbuilders.com

JAGR Custom Homes See Our Ad Page 88 2866 N. Eldred Road Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 227-6705 www.jagraz.com

R.E.S. Contracting, Inc. See Our Ad Page 82 P.O. Box 4198 Prescott, AZ 86302 Phone: (928) 776-0301 www.prescottbuilder.com

Jebco Construction Companies 140 North Hwy 89, Suite B Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 778-7976 www.jebcocc.com

Ravencrest Homes 518 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-1677 www.ravencresthomes.com

John Nanke Signature Group P.O. Box 10158 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 899-7259

Renovations Your Complete Remodel Resource See Our Ad Page 68 142 S. Alarcon St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-8506 www.renovationsaz.com

Kenson Construction Co. 6135 Corsair Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5192 KNA Construction, Inc. P.O. Box 12467 Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6932 knams@commspeed Laipple Construction 1947 Victoria Dr Prescott, AZ 886305 (928) 445-6865 Lantana Development, Inc. See Our Ad Page 23 115 E. Goodwin St., Suite I Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 717-0033 www.lantanacustomhomes.com Living Systems Building Group 129 Apollo Heights Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-2413 www.michaelfrerking.com LUVCO Construction P.O. Box 661 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 778-9181 Malouff and Company, Inc. 325 W. Gurley St., Ste. 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-1657 NJ Builders, Inc. See Our Ad Page 25 P.O. Box 13051 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 708-0292 www.njbuildersinc.com Premier Development AZ, LLC 7760 E. State Hwy 69, #C5-400 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 899-9150 www.premierdevelopmentaz.com Prescor Builders 3200 Lakeside Village Dr. #201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7043 www.prescoraz.com Prescott Builders of AZ, LLC See Our Ad Page 29 2600 Gentle Breeze Way Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 717-0147 www.PrescottBuildersofaz.com

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Ridge West Homes 772 Meadlowlark Lane Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-5955 www.RidgeWestHomes.com Stoddard Lifestyle Homes Serving the Prescott Area (928) 778-3981 www.stoddardlifestylehomes.com Stoney Creek Builders See Our Ad This Page 1960 Bumblebee Dr. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (602) 885-3932 www.stoneycreekbuildersinc.com Sun Pine Homes See Our Ad Page 72 4605 N. Twisted Trail Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6600 www.sunpinehomes.com TL Garrett Construction See Our Ad Page 61 700 S. Montezuma St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-3200 www.crystalcreekhomes.com TLC Construction 1940 W. Buena Vista Trail Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 925-1342 www.tlcconstructionofprescott. com Triple E Construction See Our Ad Page 35 540 N. 6th Street #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com Womack Enterprises, Inc. 425 W. Delano Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6094 www.womack-brothers.com

RETAINING WALLS/MASONRY Autumn Blaze Construction See Our Ad Page 105 3071 Pedregal Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-4210 www.autumnblazeconstruction. com


2013 YCCA Membership Directory CareScape See Our Ad Inside Back Cover 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com Creative Outdoors See Our Ad Page 47 P.O. Box 10095 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com Laipple Construction 1947 Victoria Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-6865 Landscape Now, Inc. P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com Little’s Landscape & Design 1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670 Rickett’s Landscaping Serving Yavapai County 928-300-1850 Vicente Landscaping See Our Ad Page 70 PO Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601

RETAINING WALLS/STONE Autumn Blaze Construction See Our Ad Page 105 3071 Pedregal Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-4210 www.autumnblazeconstruction. com CareScape See Our Ad Inside Back Cover 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com Creative Outdoors See Our Ad Page 47 P.O. Box 10095 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 445-1096 www.creative-outdoors.com Dunbar Stone 1041 Commerce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 445-7880 www.dunbarstoneinc.com Hacienda Del Ray Landscaping See Our Ad Page 32 Serving Yavapai County (928) 713-6333 www.haciendalandscaping.com Landscape Now, Inc. PO Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com Little’s Landscape & Design 1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670

Manzanita Landscaping See Our Ad Page 9 P.O. Box 26546 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandscapinginc. com Rickett’s Landscaping Serving Yavapai County 928-300-1850 Rock ‘N’ Earth Landscaping See Our Ad Page 86 Serving Yavapai County (928) 710-6795 www.rocknearth.com

Central Basin Roofing, Inc. See Our Ad Page 55 331 N. Arizona Ave. Prescott, AZ 86301 Phone: (928) 778-5819 www.centralbasinroofing.com

Prestige Security Doors 600 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-7900 (928) 204-1222 Sedona, AZ www.prestigesecuritydoors.com

Granite Basin Roofing, Inc. P.O. Box 10756 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 772-9222 www.granitebasinroofing.com

Triple E Construction See Our Ad Page 35 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Roofing Systems of Prescott PO Box 687 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 778-5017

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. P.O. Box 4462 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

Superior Roofing of No. AZ P.O. Box 27444 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 775-0060 www.superiorroofingofaz.com

Vicente Landscaping See Our Ad Page 70 PO Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601

SAW/TOOL/SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

RETIREMENT PLANS/401K/IRA/ROTH Prudential Financial 301 Whipple St. Suite D Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 583-0944 www.prudential.com/us/harry. weber

ROAD/DRIVEWAY CHIP SEALING

Able Saw & Small Engine See Our Ad Page 83 625 Miller Valley Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6371 www.ablesaw.com

SCREENS (DOORS & WINDOWS) All Seasons Retractable Screens 2535 Copper Basin Road Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 533-3336 www.allseasonsretractable.com

SECURITY DOORS & SCREENS First Impression Security Doors 1415 N. Mondel Dr. Gilbert, AZ 85233 (480) 924-1104 www.firstimpressionsecurity doors.com Prestige Security Doors 600 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-7900 (928) 204-1222 Sedona, AZ www.prestigesecuritydoors.com Triple E Construction See Our Ad Page 35 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

Earth Resources Corporation 8120 Poland Road Dewey, AZ 86327 (928) 775-2795

ROCK (See Flagstone, Sandstone, Decorative Stone & Rock Supplies)

ROOFING/RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL Arizona Vinyl Waterproofing See Our Ad Page 65 7000 Williamson Valley Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-1406 www.duradek.com Badger Roofing See Our Ad This Page 8800 E. Long Mesa Dr., Ste. A Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 771-8770 www.badgerroofing.net Bradshaw Mountain Roofing See Our Ad Page 77 8734 E. Long Mesa Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-1145 BradshawMountainRoofing.com Byrd Roofing 8824 E. Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6767 BZ Roof’N See Our Ad Page 83 1715 S. Reed Road Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 237-0788 www.bzroofnprescott.com

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SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN & INSTALLATION Ringler Excavating P.O. Box 2004 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 899-0012

SEPTIC TANK CLEANING JT’s Septic, LLC See Our Ad Page 64 3026 S. 3rd Street Humboldt, AZ 86329 (928) 632-7077 www.jtseptic.com

SEPTIC TANK INSPECTIONS JT’s Septic, LLC See Our Ad Page 64 3026 S. 3rd Street Humboldt, AZ 86329 (928) 632-7077 www.jtseptic.com

SEPTIC & WATER TANK MANUFACTURER Yavapai Block & Precast Co. See Our Ad Page 87 1389 Masonry Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-4340 www.yblock.com

SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING Arizona Green Plumber See Our Ad Page 83 P.O. Box 27971 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 925-6809 www.arizonagreenplumber.com Brewer Plumbing P.O. Box 2301 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-2351 Luna Plumbing Serving Yavapai County (928) 277-0127 Paragon Plumbing See Our Ad Page 61 P.O. Box 25844 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 775-2343 R.E.D. Plumbing See Our Ad Page 80 8133 E. Pecos Circle Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-9296 www.redplumbinginc.com The Plumbing Store See Our Ad Page 86 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com Yavapai Plumbing & Heating See Our Ad Page 10 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

SHOWER DOORS/MIRRORS/GLASS

Bennett Glass & Mirror See Our Ad Page 16 722 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-1180 www.Bennettglassaz.com Precision Marble & Granite See Our Ad Page 43 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com Prescott Valley Glass 8810 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-7171 www.prescottvalleyglass.com

SHREDDING SERVICES Sir Speedy 1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

SIDING Early Bird Siding Serving Yavapai County 928-301-1607 Reliant Capitol, LLC 725 N. 73rd Ave., Suite 124 Phoenix, AZ 85043 (623) 388-8899 www.reliantcapitolllc.com

SIGNS/BANNERS A & B Sign Company 691 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-6995 www.absignco.com A & E Reprographics www.a-erepro.com Prescott Locations 1030 Sandretto Dr., Suite F (928) 442-9116 222 S. Montezuma St. (928) 445-3815 Prescott Valley Location 8101 Hwy. 69 (928) 772-0054 Morgan Sign Company 704 E. Moeller St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6336 www.morgansign.com Sir Speedy 1961 Commerce Center Circle Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-4332 www.sirspeedyprescott.com

SIGNS HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION GUARDRAIL Arizona Highway Safety Specialists P.O. Box 3690 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-8934

Arizona Window Wizard Installation & Service 8600 E. Turtle Rock Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 710-3081

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SNOW REMOVAL CareScape See Our Ad Inside Back Cover 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com Landscape Now, Inc. P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com Little’s Landscape & Design 1650 E. Center St. Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 308-7670 Manzanita Landscaping See Our Ad Page 9 PO Box 26546 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 848-8025 www.manzanitalandcapinginc. com Rickett’s Landscaping Serving Yavapai County 928-300-1850 Vicente Landscaping See Our Ad Page 70 P.O. Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

SOLAR ENERGY EV Solar Products, Inc. See Our Ad Page 33 2655 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2201 www.evsolar.com Pur Solar 1505 E. Cochise St. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 639-1267 www.pursolaraz.com SolarWorks See Our Ad Page 51 142 S. Main St. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-5781 www.solarworksaz.com

TDK Comfort Systems 1940 S. Hwy 89, Suite D Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-0846 www.tdkcomfortsystems.com Verde Sol-Air 724 N. Industrial Dr., Bldg. 1 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-5315 Toll Free: (866) 700-5757 www.verdesolair.com Yavapai Plumbing & Heating See Our Ad Page 10 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

SOLAR TUBES & SKYLIGHTS Arizona Window Wizard Installation & Service 8600 E. Turtle Rock Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 710-3081 Badger Roofing See Our Ad Page 109 8800 E. Long Mesa Dr., Ste. A Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 771-8770 www.badgerroofing.net Builders Wholesale 400 W. Goodwin St. Prescott, AZ 86303 (928) 778-6655 www.buildersprescott.com Eric & Sons See Our Ad Page 70 6640 Inter-Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 775-2880 www.ericandsons.net Granite Basin Roofing P.O. Box 10756 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 772-9222 www.granitebasinroofing.com

Southface Solar Electric 2122 W. Lone Cactus Dr. #2 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (480) 636-1800 www.southfacese.com

The Door & Window Store 487 EZ St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-6402 www.prescottdoors.com

SOLAR PLUMBING

SPAS/SAUNAS/HOT TUBS

Arizona Green Plumber See Our Ad Page 83 P.O. Box 27971 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 925-6809 www.arizonagreenplumber.com

Prescott Spas See Our Ad Page 46 6947 E. 1st St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9884 www.prescottspas.com

EV Solar Products, Inc. See Our Ad Page 33 2655 N. Hwy 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2201 www.evsolar.com

Relaxed Fitness Servicing Yavapai County (702) 629-1800 www.relaxedfitness.com

R.E.D. Plumbing See Our Ad Page 80 8133 E. Pecos Circle Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-9296 www.redplumbinginc.com

2013 Building Yavapai

SolarWorks See Our Ad Page 51 142 S. Main St. Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-5781 www.solarworksaz.com

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Tuff Spas 7112 W. Frier Drive Glendale, AZ 85303 (623)939-0851 www.tuffspas.com


2013 YCCA Membership Directory

STONE (See Flagstone, Sandstone, Decorative Stone & Rock Supplies)

STUCCO/PLASTERING Sanders Plastering Systems See Our Ad This Page Serving Yavapai County (928) 632-5008 www.sandersplastering.com Taylor Plastering 5798 Foxglove Place Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 772-7522

SUN ROOMS/PERGOLA SHADE & PATIO COVERS Stanley Steel Structures 1537 S. Bates Road Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-6703 www.stanleysteelstructures.com Sunburst Patios 6263 Copper Hill Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-8229

Communications Center See Our Ad Page 45 1038 Commerce Dr. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 778-0750 www.communicationscenter online.com

TUB/SHOWER CONVERSION

TREE REMOVAL/TRIMMING

Able & Ready PaintingRemodeling, LLC See Our Ad Page 54 7245 E. 2nd St., #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com

CareScape See Our Ad Inside Back Cover 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928)777-8519 www.carescape.com

Arizona Green Plumber See Our Ad Page 83 PO Box 27971 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 925-6809 www.arizonagreenplumber.com

Landscape Now, Inc. P.O. Box 28052 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 458-0425 www.landscapenowinc.com

Board by Board Design See Our Ad Page 78 950 W. Rosser St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 442-1387 www.boardbyboard.com

The Joshua Tree Landscape Co. P.O. Box 4462 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-4064 www.joshuatreescape.com

TELEPHONE & INTERNET

TK Haley Yard Care 2661 W. Noble Vista Dr. Prescott, AZ 85605 (928)830-4061 www.tkhaley.com

Cable One See Our Ad Back Cover 3201 Tower Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-4511 www.cableone.net

Vicente Landscaping See Our Ad Page 70 PO Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

SP S

anders lastering ystems

Granite Transformations 2205 W. Lone Cactus Dr., #23 Phoenix, AZ 85027 (928) 227-3090 www.granitetransformations.com Precision Marble & Granite See Our Ad Page 43 1102 Willow Creek Road Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-7642 www.precisionmarbleinc.com The Plumbing Store See Our Ad Page 86 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com Yavapai Plumbing & Heating See Our Ad Page 10 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

UTILITIES Arizona Public Service See Our Ad Page 59 120 N. Marina St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 776-3636 www.aps.com UniSource Energy Services See Our Ad Page 59 6405 Wilkinson Dr. Prescott, AZ 86301 (866) 467-1229 www.uesaz.com

WATER/WASTE WATER PIPING SUPPLIES HD Supply 3100 N. Hwy. 89 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-8032 www.hdsupply.com The Plumbing Store See Our Ad Page 86 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com

WATER & FIRE DAMAGE RESTORATION Able & Ready PaintingRemodeling, LLC See Our Ad Page 54 7245 E. 2nd St., #C Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-6178 www.ablereadyllc.com Service Master of Prescott 8330 E. Pecos Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-9205 www.ServiceMasterofprescott. com Triple E Construction See Our Ad Page 35 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

WATER PROOFING Arizona Vinyl Waterproofing See Our Ad Page 65 7000 Williamson Valley Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 710-1406 www.duradek.com Western Sealant Company Inc. PO Box 549 Prescott, AZ 86302 (928) 778-3112 www.westernsealantaz.com

WATER PURIFICATION

WASTE HAULING

Arizona Green Plumber See Our Ad Page 83 PO Box 27971 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (928) 925-6809 www.arizonagreenplumber.com

Patriot Disposal 9434 E. Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 775-9000 www.patriotdisposal.com

HD Supply 3100 N. Hwy. 89 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 445-8032 www.hdsupply.com

Prescott Valley C&D Landfill 2640 S. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 759-9400

Kinetico Quality Water 7485 E. 1st St. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-5020 AND 2697 W. Hwy. 89A Sedona, AZ 86336 (928) 282-2115 (800) 280-2010 www.kineticonaz.com

Southwest Waste Services, Inc. See Our Ad Page 69 2671 N. Lake Valley Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 445-8446 www.azsws.com

2013 Building Yavapai

Waste Management 23355 E. Hwy. 169/Mile Post 11 Dewey, AZ 86327 Phone: (928) 771-1102 www.wm.com

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2013 YCCA Membership Directory Perfection Plumbing P.O. Box 5055 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 301-7702 R.E.D. Plumbing See Our Ad Page 80 8133 E. Pecos Circle Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-9296 www.redplumbinginc.com The Plumbing Store See Our Ad Page 86 537 N. 6th St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-7120 www.theplumbingstoreaz.com Yavapai Plumbing & Heating See Our Ad Page 10 5860 N. Fulton Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 Phone: (928) 776-7025 www.ypeinc.com

WEED CONTROL

RRS Landscape & Maintenance See Our Ad Page 74 Serving Yavapai County (928) 848-2058 www.rrslandscapeservices.com Vicente Landscaping See Our Ad Page 70 PO Box 12798 Prescott, AZ 86304 (928) 636-1601 www.vicentelandscaping.com

WELDING A. Action Welding See Our Ad Page 100 8252 Shoup St. Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 445-2579 www.a-actionwelding.com Arc-Tech Welding 8252 Long Mesa Dr. Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-7050 www.arctechwelding.com

CareScape See Our Ad Inside Back Cover 6752 Intercal Way, Suite 201 Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

WELLS/PUMP INSTALLATION & SERVICING

Rickett’s Landscaping Serving Yavapai County 928-300-1850

R.W. Turner and Sons 3471 N. Hwy. 89 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-2771

Dan McGe Drilling & Pump P.O. Box 2939 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 (928) 636-4576

WINDOW COVERINGS, SCREENS, SHUTTERS, TINTING Blind Brothers of Prescott See Our Ad This Page Serving Yavapai County (928) 710-1962 www.hunterdouglas.com Heritage Carpets & Interiors See Our Ad Page 98 9101 E. Florentine Road Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-2580 www.heritageinteriors.com Prescott Design Center See Our Ad Page 70-71 6640 Intercal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 443-3212 www.prescottdesigncenter.com Prescott Floors 1239-1241 Iron Springs Road Prescott, AZ 86305 (928) 771-9121 www.prescott.abbeycarpet.com Prestige Security Doors 600 E. Sheldon St. Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 541-7900 (928) 204-1222 – Sedona, AZ www.prestigesecuritydoors.com

Primera Carpet One Floor & Home See Our Ad Page 24 7785 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-6310 www.carpetone.com Protint, LLC See Our Ad Page 77 6264 E. Hwy. 69 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-5971 www.enerlogicfilm.com The Blind Brothers dba Blinds Shutters & Shades 437 S. Main St., Ste. 3 Cottonwood, AZ 86326 (928) 634-2423 (928) 445-4670 Prescott, AZ www.theblindbrothers.com The Picture Window, Inc. See Our Ad Page 71 www.thepicturewindowinc.com Prescott Design Center 6640 Inter-Cal Way Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 772-0122 Cottonwood Location 634 E. State Route 89A (928) 634-8442

WINDOWS (see Doors & Windows)

WINDOWS - REPLACEMENT Bennett Glass & Mirror See Our Ad Page 16 722 E. Sheldon St. Prescott AZ 86301 (928) 445-1180 www.bennettglassaz.com Renewal by Andersen of Northern Arizona See Our Ad Page 92 2485 N. Great Western Dr. #D Prescott Valley, AZ 86314 (928) 772-3159 www.renewalbyandersen.com Triple E Construction See Our Ad Page 35 540 N. 6th St. #F Prescott, AZ 86301 (928) 778-3056 www.tripleeaz.com

WINDOWS/SLIDING DOOR REPAIRS Arizona Window Wizard Installation & Service 8600 E. Turtle Rock Prescott Valley, AZ 86315 (928) 710-3081

WOODWORKING (See Carpentry/Finish Carpentry)

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2013 Building Yavapai

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COMMITTED TO LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT AND ALL THE DETAILS.

From landscape design, construction, maintenance and arbor care, to fire wise clearing, pest control and snow removal, at CareScape our business is taking care of your environment. (928) 777-8519 www.carescape.com

 Master Planned & HOA Residential Communities  Commercial Properties  Residential Properties Golf Courses  Municipal Properties  Roadway Medians  Shopping Centers  Apartment Complexes  Sports Venues /Parks Schools  Certified Arborists & Certified Pest Applicators on Staff License ROC 168268, ROC 193649, ISA Certified Arborists WE3474A Š 2012 CareScape



YCCA 2013