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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 · VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 118 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

FOGGY CLOUDY

61 54

CROSS CAMPUS Bagel watch. Bagel brunch

was canceled this weekend because, “Which part of the bagel is kosher for passover?!?!! The hole,” according to an email from organizers.

MEN’S LACROSSE BULLDOGS BEAT BROWN BEARS

MENTAL HEALTH

FIRE UNION

Coalition organizes firstever Mental Health and Wellness Weekend

LOCAL 825 FILES SUIT AGAINST MAYOR HARP

PAGE B1 SPORTS

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 5 CITY

CA M P U S L I F E

Yalies welcome spring

pop-up restaurant has been hosting teas in the Davenport Art Gallery. The creators of nom and Fortnight have most recently opened tsp., “pronounced tisp, t.s.p., teaspoon or WTF,” an eatery serving Stumptown pourover coffee and freshly baked goods. On the menu this week: chocolate oatmeal moon pies, chewy ginger cookies, sultan scones with clotted cream, lemon meringue sable tarts and Swiss Miss & Sriracha ice cream.

Pop-up pawn shop. The

Spring festival. The Southeast

Asia Studies Spring Cultural Festival was held this weekend in Luce Hall. The event featured student and faculty performances along with regional food and art. The event is hosted by the SEAS language studies faculty.

Best sleep ever. Professor

Meir Kryger at the Yale School of Medicine has been honored with the 2014 National Sleep Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award. Kryger was recognized for his productivity and leadership in the field of sleep medicine. Kryger established the first clinical lab to study sleep breathing problems in Canada and has published over 200 articles and book chapters. The picture of health. The Yale Global Health Leadership Institute has announced the three winners of its first annual photo contest for Yale students. Entrants could submit original photos that captured “the essence or an aspect of global health.” Lexy Adams SPH ’14 won first place with a photo of a “tippy-tap” being used in Haiti. The runners-up were Damian Weikum ’15 and Adam Beckman ’16.

KATHRYN CRANDALL/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

STUDENTS ENJOY THE RETURN OF WARM WEATHER This weekend saw temperatures top 60 degrees for the first time this year after an unusually long and cold winter. Students celebrated the change in weather by heading outdoors to enjoy clear skies andsoak in the sunshine.

Undergrads join Julia’s Run

PAGE 5 NEWS

Candidates spar in YCC debate The proper role of the Yale College Council was up for discussion Sunday evening, as the candidates in the running to lead Yale’s student government squared off for the sole debate of the campaign season. The four presidential candidates, along with two of the three vice-presidential candidates, offered competing visions of the body responsible for elevating student voice and working with administrators to improve campus life. Speaking to roughly 60 students in Linsly-Chittenden Hall, the candidates said that beyond the specific promises that distinguish their campaign platforms, the YCC should aim to legitimize itself in the eyes of students and administrators alike. The campus-wide election will take place this Thursday and Friday. The current relationship between the undergraduate population and Yale’s highest governing body drew criticism during the presidential portion of the debate. Presidential candidates Ben Ackerman ’16 and Sara Miller ’16, a photography editor for the News, agreed that a student should sit as a full member on the Corporation, which currently includes 16 prominent alumni. Ackerman said including a student voice would shift the “decision-making paradigm” of the University. “What we should be worrying about is whether people are actually able to be the sort of personality who isn’t afraid to sit down with Dean Mary Miller and tell her SEE YCC PAGE 4

A political presidency

BY GAYATRI SABHARWAL CONTRIBUTING REPORTER When a swarm of runners set out from Cross Campus on Sunday morning, they were not just looking for a workout. This weekend, 257 adults and 47 kids runners participated in Julia’s Run — a charity event in memory of Julia Rusinek ’00. Rusinek, who was a student in Jonathan Edwards College, died between her junior and senior year at Yale due to a sudden heart condition. Though roughly the same number of runners participated in the race last year, this year’s event saw a SEE JULIA’S RUN PAGE 4

T

he Yale president is more than just another administrator. As the public face of the University, the president frequently engages on issues that extend far beyond Yale. But is the Yale president a politician? MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS reports.

Professors’ pick. The Brown

Daily Herald ran a post listing ideal Spring Fling lineups according to professors. Computer science professor Andy van Dam requested jazz, folk and classical with names such as Peter Seeger and Itzhak Perlman. Diplo and Chance the Rapper are also part of Brown’s Spring Fling lineup.

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Woolsey Hall was unbearably hot one morning last August. As hundreds of Freshman Assembly attendees fanned themselves with paper programs, University President Peter Salovey stood to speak.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1982 Hillel lectures and workshops are held to ponder the questions of Judaism.

UPCLOSE

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crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE goydn.com/xcampus

World’s largest global health conference comes to New Haven

BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTER

Teaspoon. The latest Yale

Peabody Museum of Natural History hosted an Identification Day this weekend, where experts from the museum attempt to identify objects visitors bring in such as rocks, artifacts, feathers, insects, shells or even living creatures. The special event was called “Skeletons in the Closet.”

MEDICINE

KATHRYN CRANDALL/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Hundreds of people participated in Sunday’s run, held in memoy of Julia Rusinek ’00.

Having only moved into the president’s office in Woodbridge Hall the previous month, Salovey was a freshman in his own right. The speech he was about to deliver would be his first major public address at the helm of the University, and it

would work to set the tone for his presidency. Less than 100 yards from Beinecke Plaza — the longtime site of Yale protests for civil rights and against the Vietnam War, apartheid and, most recently, fossil fuels — Salovey took on the issue of the day: inequality. But he did so through the lens of the University. “This morning I worry about whether the American Dream is still possible and whether education is still the best ‘ticket’ to socioeconomic mobility,” Salovey said. Less than six months later, Salovey filed into the White House

with over 100 other university presidents. They had been called to the White House as part of President Barack Obama’s effort to make higher education more accessible to qualified students, regardless of means. Salovey’s freshman address and visit to the White House reflect two connected facets of the Yale president’s job. In both, he took a stance on the accessibility of higher education, an issue relevant to Yale and to the nation at large. In doing so, he followed a host of Yale presidents SEE SALOVEY PAGE 6


PAGE 2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “The Dutch language is a gateway to classical learning in politics, yaledailynews.com/opinion

Put aside the competition I

went to a very small (some might say tiny) all-girls high school in New York City. Each and every member of our 43-person class made it her business to know all there was to know about the other girls in the grade. Test grades were closely guarded, but in vain — within an hour of getting exams returned, the school was abuzz with the success stories and the embarrassing failures. At no point was this more toxically evident than in the college process. Only one or two impossibly secret girls managed to keep their lists hidden from their peers. I, for one, walked in to school on the morning that Yale’s early admissions decisions were to come out, only to be greeted by classmates of all ages offering me reassurances that the wait was almost over, and how sure they were that I would be just fine. But this constant meddling in other people’s business was not always (or even often) kindspirited. More often, my tiny high school bred an environment of constant competition. Everyone knew and cared about everyone else’s test scores, because how their peers were doing was seen as an implicit reflection on where they stood in the constant power jockeying that defines private high school in Manhattan.

IN SEEKING SUCCESS, WE FORGET TO BE SUPPORTIVE FRIENDS So when I got into Yale, the idea that excited me most about coming here was the hope that at a bigger school — one where everyone was interesting and accomplished and talented enough not to be riddled with personal insecurities — the petty concern with everyone else’s business would fade. It seemed like a safe assumption to think that anyone who had gotten into Yale would have enough going for them, whether academically, extracurricularly or personally, to rest assured in their own worth. But with time I’ve found that this isn’t the case — and it gets worse with every passing year. I don’t need to remind anyone that Yale loves competition. The students themselves, by nature driven and hyper-motivated, come here and find a community quick to institute tiers. No sooner have you gained admission to Yale than you find yourself applying for new and even more selective things — Directed Studies, a cappella, tour guides. Yalies thrive on being visible,

on being too busy to function and, above all, on being “known.” Yale has a few proVICTORIA g r a m s , majors or HALLextracurricular activiPALERM ties that the U n i ve r s i t y The itself treats Notorious as its perVHP sonal darlings. To be part of these elite clubs or circles makes those students, no matter how few, feel wanted. And more importantly, it makes the people who are not part of these small subgroups feel “out” — even if they have absolutely no interest in whatever it is that the group is doing. Freshmen who get into DS are immediately touted as members of a “very selective freshman seminar program.” Even if the thought of reading Plato’s Republic bores you to tears, you can’t help but feel left out. And once Yale sponsors these particular selective programs, the fallout is natural: Everyone else takes great pains to make their own extracurricular selective and exclusive, thus validating their own interests. Joining clubs at Yale is something of a competitive sport; there’s almost nothing you can do here that doesn’t require you to jump through hoops and prove your valor. That makes you all the more special, then, to be part of the club. But there’s an even more insidious result of this constant implicit competition: It deprives us all of the ability to be genuinely happy for our friends for their accomplishments. Every single time someone around us attains something, no matter how irrelevant it is to our interests, most students’ first reaction is anything but excitement. Instead, the response is resentment that there is something out there that we haven’t gotten; it’s a reminder that in some field, we are not the best. And people at Yale, myself included, simply don’t take that well. But long after these insignificant and petty evaluations have faded into the past, after no one remembers what society you were in or whether or not you got into Global Affairs, people will remember their good friends and those who stood by them, not only in the bad times, but also in the good, which can often be even harder. No one is cut out to do everything. But it’s a proof of character to cheer on your friends for their strengths, and not take them as a sign of your own weakness.

ANNELISA LEINBACH/ILLUSTRATIONS EDITOR

L

ast month, Yale admitted just over 6 percent of applicants to the class of 2018. These applicants were evaluated based on their Common Application, standardized test scores, high school transcripts and optional interviews, an application system used by most fouryear colleges. This year, however, Bard College decided to present an alternative admissions process. Applicants were given the option to submit four academic essays in lieu of a traditional application. If, when graded by Bard professors, the essays scored an average of B+ or higher, the applicant was automatically admitted. Following the lead of colleges like Bard that are innovating their process, Yale should consider trying to find alternative admissions methods as well. Bard chose to present the Entrance Examination option in an attempt to level the playing field for applicants “in a process that more closely mirrors actual college work.” Applicants were presented with 21 essay prompts across three categories: social science, history and philosophy; arts and literature; and science and mathematics. Students were asked to choose four prompts that covered all three categories with a suggested essay length of 2,500 words. The essay prompts were simi-

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lar to ones you might find in a typical college course. One philosophy question asked students to analyze ImmanDIANA uel Kant’s “On ROSEN a Supposed Right to Lie.” Looking A mathematics prompt Left asked: “Why is factoring numbers into primes a difficult problem?” Although 400 students logged into the website, only 41 complete applications were submitted. One student was found to have plagiarized and 17 students were admitted, a slightly lower admissions rate. The traditional application system is not the best for everyone. Standardized tests pose problems for second language learners and students with learning disabilities, as well as those who simply do not perform well on multiple-choice tests under pressure. Studies have shown that the SAT and ACT are not particularly good indicators of college performance, especially when compared with high school transcripts. Grades are not a perfect metric either. Some brilliant students

perform poorly in high school because they find the material simple and boring. There is also something to be said for not using a 14-year-old’s grades to determine where he attends college at age 18. The Common Application and interview allow for some amount of subjectivity, but the fact remains that very few students with less than perfect test scores and grades will be admitted to top colleges based on an excellent essay or interview. Exceptions exist, of course, but they are few and far between. This is not to say that the new Bard system is without flaws. It could easily open the door to hiring professionals to write application essays. (This problem arises with the Common Application essay as well.) Bard asks applicants to sign an honor pledge, but that can only go so far. The essay system would also be difficult to implement on a larger scale. Grading 41 sets of essays is much easier than grading hundreds or thousands. In addition, the Bard application advantages those with exposure to the philosophers and literature discussed on the exam, a set of students already advantaged by the traditional system. Finally, I’m not sure that the only goal of a college admissions office should be to find the students who will perform the

best during their first semester. Other important factors should be taken into account when putting together a freshman class, including different backgrounds and varied interests and skills. Still, I like the idea of college applications attempting to actually mirror college coursework. It is possible that many of those admitted under the Bard Entrance Examination would not have been admitted under the traditional system, and clearly they are prepared to take on college-level work. Perhaps a solution is to present an essay examination as an option in addition to the traditional application. Alternatively, the essays could be evaluated alongside either a transcript or standardized test. The only way to figure out what works best will be through experimentation. It’s good to see a wellrespected institution acknowledging that the current college application system is flawed. It may not have found the perfect solution, but proposing an alternative is a good start. Yale should consider taking on a similar endeavor in an attempt to make the college application process as fair and successful as possible. DIANA ROSEN is a sophomore in Pierson College. Her columns run on Mondays. Contact her at diana. rosen@yale.edu .

Our opportunity

VICTORIA HALL-PALERM is a junior in Berkeley College. Contact her at victoria.hall-palerm@ yale.edu .

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'DAVID PROCTOR MCKNIGHT' ON 'YALE CUTS DUTCH LANGUAGE

An admissions experiment

I EDITOR IN CHIEF Julia Zorthian

science, the arts.”

t’s been a rough couple of weeks for the Yale College Council. And that’s not entirely warranted. The YCC has accomplished a lot this year, most notably restructuring itself, implementing a referendum and pushing through several key financial aid reforms. Yet it’s also important to be frank about the mistakes. The YCC should acknowledge its mistake in the condescending and misguided manner in which it selected the hard-won student representative to that committee. We, as Yalies, should also acknowledge our mistake in electing — or, more accurately, allowing to run often uncontested — a YCC that is sometimes so condescending and misguided. Luckily, we have the chance to fix that last mistake. Today, students’ confidence in the YCC is at an all-time low, even as many YCC members’ confidence in themselves has never been higher. The YCC just released a creepy, grating YouTube video and distributed pamphlets across campus touting its own accomplishments. This year’s YCC’s legacy will be its many undemocratic decisions — people have joked about ineffectiveness for years, but the word “dictatorial” never came up before. And when it comes to the most important issues affecting student lives, things may actually be getting worse; the Corpo-

ration just quietly tabled the issue of divestment, the administration delayed yet again a decision on sophomore genSCOTT d e r - n e u t ra l STERN housing, and countless stuA Stern dents may lose Perspective their on-campus jobs. If you want a sense of the immense dissatisfaction with the YCC, just ask the candidates running to be its next president. Today’s YCC, wrote one candidate in the News last week, “has no authority now to foster any real change on campus.” Another commented, “I have recognized an extreme chasm between student perception of Yale and our perceptions of YCC.” Yet another recalled being spurred to run after she was “appalled” by a YCC maneuver. The fourth reflected, “After two years, I have come to realize that YCC is not the organization I want it to be — not yet, at least.” It is time for a change. But who should lead the charge? There are some obvious things we should all seek in a YCC president: someone who is intelligent, informed, passionate and openminded. This bill, of course, could

fit all of the candidates. Yet I’ve recently come to doubt whether we can handle someone who is merely smart, capable and well intentioned. We need someone who is smart, capable, well intentioned and not part of the establishment. The ultimate weakness of student government — especially at Yale — is its lack of bargaining power. Each iteration of the YCC is only around for a year, and it must spend part of that time learning the ropes. The remaining few months are hardly enough time to accomplish any significant changes, especially with an administration that is trenchantly opposed to altering the status quo. And, of course, there is no recourse for the administration’s intransigence. If they wanted to simply stop meeting with the YCC, or to ignore its every demand, they probably could. How can we change this? Well, for the most part, we can’t. As students, we are only here for four years, and that is hardly enough time to change anything structural. They hold all the cards; we do not. Yet they are scared of us. They are terrified. What if a policy of theirs backfires and many students decide not to attend, as has happened at grade-deflating Princeton? What if students decide to stand up, to speak out? I suspect the administration has

decided not to announce a rejection of divestment until over the summer because it wants to avoid vocal student dissent. I suspect the faculty declined to support grade deflation here because of vocal protests, and the administration put a student on the dean’s search advisory committee because of the threat of protest. Loud student voices penetrate even the thickest ivy-coated walls. And the YCC could be the embodiment of our sole power — our ability to vocally demand the changes we know to be necessary. Students are not so young and ignorant that the grownups should completely ignore our opinions. And a student government need not be weak, disconnected and defensive. We have the chance to elect someone who will channel our voices and refuse to be satisfied with half-measures. I am not pushing, here, for a particular presidential candidate. I am asking you to look to the candidate who you believe will best advocate for you, in spite of setbacks — someone who will not be afraid to tell the administration, “This isn’t enough.” It is time for a change. SCOTT STERN is a junior in Branford College. His columns run on Wednesdays. Contact him at scott. stern@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“Mental health is often missing from public health debates even though it’s critical to wellbeing.” DIANE ABBOTT BRITISH POLITICIAN

Coalition hosts mental health weekend

CORRECTIONS FRIDAY, APR. 11

The WEEKEND article “The ‘right’ tenant?” incorrectly stated that the building that houses Panera Bread on Chapel is a UP holding. Furthermore, UP was not responsible for not renewing News Haven’s lease.

More students drawn off campus BY DAVID BLUMENTHAL STAFF REPORTER Despite Yale’s much touted residential college system, more Yalies seem to be making the move off campus. According to students and surrounding businesses, New Haven is becoming a more attractive option for Yalies — and Lynwood Place, Park Street, Dwight Street, Howe Street, High Street and Chapel Street are increasingly popular locations for student housing. Students cited Yale’s improved town-gown relations and the expense of Yale dining as the key factors in this trend. Certain residential colleges, like Ezra Stiles, had increased numbers of students living off campus this year, according to Rachel Yost-Dubrow ’16, a master’s aid in Stiles. Apartment complexes saw more business this year. Arnie Lehrer, who runs Arnold Lehrer Properites, a small firm that rents only to Yale students, said this year has been “a banner year” for his company. Even though he rents to undergraduates less than he used to due to noise complaints, Lehrer said this year has been his company’s most successful to date. The majority of students interviewed gave standard reasons for their off campus move, from the desire to get away from dining halls to increased independence. For Sophie Mendelson ’15, being off Yale’s meal plan is an opportunity to cook on her own; she called not having a kitchen a “huge drawback” of being on campus. Likewise, Grace Steig ’15 said cooking herself allows her to save money. Steig said that, being vegan, cooking on her own is a huge plus, and that she enjoys being free to cook what she pleases. Yalies also said they benefit from separating their school and home lives. Chris Rodelo ’15 said that living off campus allowed him to “have some distance from Yale.”

“It makes the school-home divide a lot more concrete,” he said. “I know I can walk off campus and I can disengage.” New Haven’s revitalization has also played a central role, said Nick Defiesta ’14, who lives on Howe Sreet and is a former city editor for the News, and currently writes a city-focused column for the News. While Defiesta added he could not detect larger trends on whether or not more Yalies were moving off campus, there was no question in his mind that the city’s recent gentrification has played a role in the growth of available neighborhoods.

WILLIAM FREEDBERG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Students and faculty came together to discuss solutions to mental health issues from the perspective of members of the Yale community. mindfulness-based yoga, while events later in the day included a workshop on peer counseling skills with a queer focus, leadership and sexual literacy. “There are techniques that promote wellness that can be taught,” Hendler said. “It was important to have events to teach people practical, concrete skills for resilience.”

BY APARNA NATHAN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER This weekend, students, faculty members and administrators came together to discuss issues of mental health at Yale. Mental Health and Wellness Weekend, organized by the Coalition for Mental Health and Wellbeing at Yale, ran for three days from April 11 to April 13. The initiative featured workshops and panels focused on improving students’ personal well-being and awareness of mental health issues at Yale. The three-day event is the first of its type held by the Coalition. “Conversations all year are culminating in this weekend,” University President Peter Salovey said at a panel on Sunday. “I’m proud to see students take charge of the issue to make progress.” The weekend consisted of a variety of events run by the Coalition, which encompasses 15 campus organizations that are involved with mental health and general wellness from various perspectives. The Coalition grew out of the Yale College Council’s September report on mental health authored by Reuben Hendler ’14, Mira Vale ’13 and John Gerlach ’14, and the trio has taken the lead in planning Mental Health and Wellness Weekend over the last two months. The diversity of perspectives brought by the various organizations sparked the idea for Mental Health and Wellness Weekend, Hendler said. “We had an idea for a series of events that manifest the diverse ways to engage with mental health and well-being as students for students,” Hendler said. The constituent organizations suggested various events and jointly decided which ones would most effectively promote dialogue about wellbeing on campus, Vale said. Many of the events were interactive workshops that taught students skills for different types of personal well-being. Saturday morning began with a class on

As New Haven has gotten better, living off campus has seemed less scary. NICK DEFIESTA ’14 Former city editor, Yale Daily News

“As New Haven has gotten better, living off campus has seemed less scary,” he said. Alexander Co ’15 said that, while New Haven’s revitalization may have had some “unconscious” impact on his decision to live off campus, it was not something he explicitly thought about during the move. However, most Yalies who live off campus do not live far away. Chris Rodelo ’15 said that some off-campus living still feels like it is on Yale’s campus. “I don’t think there’s a big distinction to be made,” he said. Ten of Yale’s 12 residential college deans did not return request for comment. The other two — Morse College Dean Joel Silverman and Saybrook College Dean Christine Muller — declined to comment. Contact DAVID BLUMENTHAL at david.blumenthal@yale.edu .

saying they have that too is really affirming.” The weekend culminated with a panel of administrators speaking about their roles in shaping campus culture. Salovey opened the panel by speaking about the need for a new solution that is not “more of the same.” “There is a need to reach beyond the walls of Yale Health to meet mental health problems exactly where they occur,” Salovey said in his opening remarks. The panel was moderated by University Chaplain Sharon Kugler and featured Yale Secretary and Vice President Kimberly Goff-Crews ’83 LAW ’86, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs Melanie Boyd ’90, Calhoun Master Jonathan Holloway and Assistant Dean of Yale College and Director of the Latino Cultural Center Rosalinda Garcia. The conversation centered on the ways in which Yale’s campus culture plays a role in mental health, and identified overcommitment and fear of failure as contributing factors among college students. The panel emphasized the importance taking time to reflect on and reevaluate your commitments. Students need to remember that they’re human, Kugler said. The Coalition is considering whether to make Mental Health and Wellness Weekend an annual event, Hendler said. “There are a lot of negative feelings about mental health and how people are treated when they go through the system,” said Emily Luepker ’16, president of InspireYale, one of the constituent groups within the Coalition. “It was a good weekend because it brought out the fact that there are problems, but people are trying to fix them, which is the first step to changing how people feel about mental health at Yale.” The Coalition was founded in January.

I’m proud to see students take charge of the issue [of mental health] to make progress. PETER SALOVEY President, Yale University Panels throughout the weekend drew attention to the presence of mental health issues at Yale through the voices of students and administrators. A student panel on Sunday featured four students speaking about their experiences dealing with a variety of mental health issues while facing the pressures of being students at Yale. The panelists all highlighted the various resources available through Yale, but cited the support of their friends as one of the most valuable resources in their recoveries. A panel hosted by the student magazine Vita Bella! provided faculty the opportunity to share their personal stories. “A Meaningful Life” featured Yale Deputy Provost for the Humanities and Initiatives Tamar Gendler ’87, film studies lecturer Ron Gregg and English professor Amy Hungerford speaking about moments of fear and uncertainty in their lives. “We forget that it’s normal to have failures or be anxious,” said Claire Zhang ’15, editor-in-chief of Vita Bella!. “Listening to Yale professors at the top of their game

Contact APARNA NATHAN at aparna.nathan@yale.edu .

YHHAP: a fundraiser, a teaching tool

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On Friday, YHHAP held its second fast of the year to raise money to fight hunger in New Haven. This semester’s events also focused on educating Yale students about homelessness. Approximately 1,600 Yale students donated their Friday meal swipes for the fast, giving YHHAP over $11,000 to donate to Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Programs (HPRP). This year the event also included a series of speakers and discussions aimed towards making the event more than a fundraiser. “The fast has become a tradition and people get used to seeing us tabling outside of dining halls, but I think part of the educational component of what the fast does and who it helps has been lost,” rma said Anne O’Brien ’16, YHHAPC t n board member and co-coordinahap tor of the fast. el S t On Friday, YHHAP instigated conversations about homelessness in the residential colleges. YHHAP assigned board members r g e St to work with the masters of each college to organize master’s teas and study breaks featuring people involved with homelessness prevention projects, O’Brien added. David O’Sullivan, for example, C ons t a was one of the three event speakM otnlec e Bak e r y St ers. He spoke about his experi34 ence as the kitchen coordinator L eg io n A v e for the New Haven Community Soup Kitchen at a Morse study break. The move to provide more information came largely Ave S y lv a n from within the organization,

Event Management Association (YEMA), which arranged for Kumo Hibachi Steakhouse and Sushi Mizu to offer discounts to fasting students, Jennings said. Each year YHHAP donates money raised from the fast to three HPRP organizations — Liberty Community Services, New Haven Home Recovery and Columbus Housing — that receive funds partially from the city and partially from contracts with nonprofits, Jennings said. YHHAP donates $7,000 annu-

to educate them more about what homelessness looks like in New Haven,” Hanna said. Local New Haven restaurants also contributed to the fundraiser by donating a portion of Friday’s profits to YHHAP. Consistent with previous semesters, Tomatillo Taco Joint, Caseus Fromagerie & Bistro, Chipotle Mexican Grill and Yorkside Pizzeria all sponsored the fundraiser, Davey said. YHHAP also garnered newfound support from the Yale

ca de my S t ma H ug he s Pl ooste r P l

$13,000 to $15,000, said Zana Davey ’15, former YHHAP board member and current board advisor. In addition to homelessness education, YHHAP members have also taken this semester’s fast as an opportunity to raise awareness of their other programs, said Ruth Hanna ’17, YHHAP’s Food Rescue coordinator. “Since it’s a big time where we’re talking to a lot of people, we figured this was also a great time

although several students had also expressed interest in a more educational component to the fast, said Shea Jennings ’16, codirector of YHHAP. This semester’s participation numbers and earnings have stayed consistent with those of previous fasts, O’Brien said, adding that each fast is an important opportunity to reach out to freshmen. Usually, approximately 1,300 to 2,000 students choose to fast, which gives YHHAP about

G ill St Dw ig h tS t

BY SARAH BRULEY STAFF REPORTER


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“If one could run without getting tired I don’t think one would want to do anything else.” C.S. LEWIS NOVELIST

Julia’s Run honors past JE student JULIA’S RUN FROM PAGE 1 high level of undergraduate participation. As Helen Fang ’15 was one of only two Yale undergraduates participating in the run last year, she decided to organize a group from JE this year, which included 30 students and administrators from the residential college.

I thought it would be nice to get a JE contingent together in memory of one of our own. HELEN FANG ’15

“I thought it would be nice to get a JE contingent together in memory of one of our own,” Fang said. “Hopefully this becomes a yearly tradition and more undergrads run it.” Fang said the JE group included Master Penelope Laurans, who cheered on the runners, and Dean Joseph Spooner. Laurans said in an email that the run was an “act of community,”

involving members of the JE community coming together to remember and pay tribute to a former JE student. “It was also just plain fun to be together and run for a good cause,” she said. “It made everyone involved feel closer to JE and to one another.” Fang said she got the word out about the race through a residential college-wide email. Though the undergraduates paid for their own registration for the event, the JE College Council helped pay for their T-shirts. Sam Nemiroff ’16, a JE student who ran in the race this year, said he appreciated the good weather and the opportunity to “run alongside fellow JE students for a great cause.” Alec Downie ’16, another runner in JE, said he was surprised by how well attended and well organized the race was. “It was a good course — challenging in parts, but not too stressful,” he said. Though Downie said he was pleased with his time in the race, he added that he would like to do the race again next year to try to improve his time.

Rusinek’s family and friends founded Julia’s Run in 2000, a year after Rusinek passed away. All proceeds from the race go to LEAP (Leadership, Education, Athletics in Partnership), which is an academic and social enrichment program for children and youth from neighborhoods with high poverty rates in New Haven. Andrew Krause ’00, a classmate of Rusinek, said in an email to Fang that the race began as a “family affair,” in which every participant had a direct connection to Rusinek. Over time, the event evolved into an “annual stop for runners on the local road race circuit,” he said. Still, Rusinek’s friends and family have continued to participate enthusiastically in the run each year, Fang said. While the main race was four miles long, kids ages 12 and under could participate in a “Fun Run.” The race was followed by an awards ceremony with refreshments and a raffle. Matthew Lloyd-Thomas contributed reporting. Contact GAYATRI SABHARWAL at gayatri.sabharwal@yale.edu .

KATHRYN CRANDALL/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

People of all ages, from greater New Haven as well as from Yale, participated in the run.

Candidates debate role of YCC YCC FROM PAGE 1 she’s wrong about something,” said Allison Kolberg ’16, who is running against Maia Eliscovich Sigal ’16 and Christopher Moates ’16 for the position of vice president. In reply, Sigal said representatives should have “respect for administrators.” Still, she said, the YCC should push for greater accessibility to the figures wielding influence over major University decisions. Every time the Yale Corporation meets in New Haven, a YCC representative should have a seat at the table, Sigal said. P re s i d e n t i a l c a n d i d a te Michael Herbert ’16 said the YCC has to make sure it properly represents the student body before it demands greater input in decision-making. “When seven out of 12 colleges don’t have contested elections [for college representatives], as happened last fall, there are legitimate concerns about how representative the YCC is,” Herbert said. Presidential candidate Leah Motzkin ’16 said she would like to change the way the YCC relates to students by sending representatives out to student groups, cultural houses and other hubs of student activity. The YCC has historically expected students to bring their interests and concerns to the Council, Motzkin said, adding, “We need to start coming to you.” Candidates disagreed about how the YCC President should relate to the rest of the representatives. Herbert, a first-time YCC hopeful who has identified himself as an outsider candidate, said his efforts to convince other students he knows to run alongside him will enable him to work effectively on his agenda, which includes a plan to index the contribution of students on full financial aid to the Consumer Price Index. This tactic of Herbert’s came under fire, however, as Miller accused Herbert of “creating a body to work with [him]”. Candidates agreed that the YCC has been successful in its restructuring efforts this year, which included expanding the Executive Board and increasing oversight of the Undergrad-

uate Organizations Committee (UOC). Rachel Miller ’15, who attended the debate, said she thought Ackerman — who currently chairs the UOC — emerged victorious from the war of words. Miller was impressed by Ackerman’s overall experience on YCC, she said, pointing particularly to his tenure on the UOC. But she added that Herbert defied her expectations with his articulate performance. Most members of the audience were involved in one of the campaigns. Current YCC President Danny Avraham ’15 declined to name a winner or comment on the substance of the debate, saying only that he thought it was a fruitful discussion. The candidates touted an assortment of specific goals, from allowing students to fulfill distributional requirements on the credit/D/fail grading scale to ending an internal YCC policy that requires presidential candidates to have attended at least three meetings before running. Miller emphasized genderneutral housing and transparent UOC funding as priorities. Herbert criticized the current Council for not speaking out on controversial campus issues such as sexual misconduct and said he would make sure the YCC is attuned to campus culture. The YCC should not take no for answer, said Ackerman, who promised to work to improve Yale Dining services, including allowing more freedom in meal swipe policies. Motzkin said she would seek to increase the offerings of Undergraduate Career Services and better connect victims of sexual misconduct with available resources. Moates, the third vice-presidential candidate, could not attend the debate due to a scheduling conflict. Connor Feeley ’16 is running unopposed for Finance Director, Jaime Halberstam ’16 for Events Director. The debate was moderated by Yale Debate Association President Diana Li ’15 and YCC Vice President Kyle Tramonte ’15. Contact ISAAC STANLEYBECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .

KATHRYN CRANDALL/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Discussion during the debate included the role of the Yale College Council in terms of both the students and the larger Yale community.

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

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NEWS

“Once you have a firefighter in your family, your family and the families from his crew become one big extended family.” DENIS LEARY AMERICAN ACTOR

Fire union files suit against mayor

Health conference sparks dialogue BY JOYCE GUO CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Over the weekend, the world’s largest global health conference descended on New Haven. The Global Health & Innovation Conference, presented by Unite For Sight, provided an opportunity for more than 2,000 academics, students and professionals from around the world to share their work in the health fields. Keynote addresses at the Shubert Theater covered a range of topics, from how advertisements can promote healthy eating to efforts aimed at reducing environmental toxins. “I really love it,” said Greg Yurgham, a senior at the University of Notre Dame. “You just get the feeling here that the conference is at the forefront of modern medicine.”

ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Fire union Local 825 and its president, James Kottage, is attempting to block the transfer of firefighter Michael Briscoe. BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTER The firefighters’ union has filed suit against Mayor Toni Harp in state Superior Court over an appointment that the union claims contravenes the city charter and collective bargaining law. On April 2, Harp appointed firefighter Michael Briscoe to head the city’s Department of Public Safety Communications, which manages emergency 911 calls. The fire union, Local 825, is now seeking to block that transfer, arguing that the mayor lacked legal authority to appoint a rank-and-file firefighter and union member to a management position. The city charter allows the mayor to assign an employee of one department to the temporary performance of “similar duties” in another department, a provision whose language is at the heart of the union’s legal claim. The union said that since Briscoe will remain a rank-and-file firefighter through October 2015, retaining benefits that come from membership in Local 825, he cannot be reassigned to perform managerial duties. “The duties of a line firefighter and the Director of Public Safety are not similar,” said Local 825 President James Kottage. “We’re not going after Michael Briscoe. We’re going after the process.” The legal complaint, prepared by attorney Patricia Cofrancesco and submitted Thursday afternoon, further alleges that Harp violated collective bargaining law by dealing directly with Briscoe, rather than going through union leadership. Kottage said he is the only person with the discretion to change the terms and hours of his members’ employment. Reached Sunday, Briscoe deferred comment on legal matters to his attorney, David Rosen LAW ’69, saying only that he plans to do the best job he can in his new position. “The union is supposed to be sticking up for its members and, instead, they’re suing to try to keep one of their members from getting a good assignment,” Rosen said. Briscoe’s service as a firefighter has been “terrific preparation” for the director position, Rosen added. He is currently

working on a Ph.D. in human services and fire communications. Briscoe’s appointment coincided with his settlement of a long-standing suit of his own against the city. He filed suit in 2009 over the results of a 2003 exam, which denied him promotion to fire lieutenant. The city’s handling of that exam was the subject of the 2009 U.S. Supreme Court case Ricci v. DeStefano, in which 18 firefighters, 17 of whom were white, successfully sued the city for invalidating the exam results after no black firefighters scored high enough to be eligible for promotion. One of the black firefighters not passing was Briscoe, who claimed that the exam was racially discriminatory. His claim went as high as a federal appeals court panel in the Second Circuit, which ruled in his favor. But when the city appealed the ruling, the case was re-tried and subsequently thrown out by a District Court, which had initially dismissed the suit. Briscoe agreed to settle the discrimination lawsuit for $285,000. Rosen said the settlement came after Harp had already offered Briscoe the job. In a March 31 letter addressed to Briscoe, Harp offered him the director’s position on a temporary basis — earning his current base salary of $67,283 plus timeand-a-half for anything over 35 hours a week — until his term with the Fire Department ends in October 2015. At that point, she said, the city would hire him full-time as director of the Department of Public Safety Communications with a salary of $98,000 and other benefits. In the interim time, the letter states, Briscoe will remain a member of Local 825 and be entitled to all the benefits of a Local 825 member, including health care and pension. Kottage said the transfer would only have been lawful if Briscoe had resigned as a firefighter and left the union. “The mayor is trying to say [Briscoe] is still part of the union, but executive management is clearly non-union,” Kottage said. He added that the emergency communications position should have been posted to allow all interested parties to interview for the job. It should also be

civil service tested, he added. Rosen said Harp wanted to appoint Briscoe to the full-time position, but that he needs to remain in the union for another year and a half to remain eligible for his pension. Local 825 endorsed Harp in last year’s mayoral election, and Kottage said he stands by that decision. “I’ll give her the benefit of the doubt, but not for long,” he said. In a Friday statement, City Hall Spokesman Laurence Grotheer suggested that the duties of the two positions are sufficiently similar to justify the appointment, saying that the transfer affirms the skills of the city’s public safety personnel. Grotheer said the city is willing to discuss further labor protections with the union. He did not specifically refute the union’s legal claims and added that any further comment could influence the ensuing legal proceedings. The city’s police union has also filed a complaint over Briscoe’s appointment, but with a state labor board. The police union is arguing that a police officer should head the center, which manages more than 100,000 emergency calls each year. The director oversees a 55-person staff. Cherlyn Poindexter, president of AFSCME Local 3144, the city’s managerial union, said she also has legal concerns about the transfer. Her local represents George Peet, who was heading the center on an acting basis but has reverted to the deputy position since Briscoe’s appointment. Because Briscoe has maintained his responsibilities as a firefighter, Poindexter said, she is worried that the lion’s share of the 911 center work will fall on Peet, who will then not be properly compensated. “If my guy is doing those duties, then we will do everything we need to do to protect his rights,” Poindexter said. Local 825’s suit names Briscoe, Poindexter, New Haven Board of Fire Commissioners Chair Eldron Morrison and Civil Service Commission Chair Daniel Delprete as additional defendants. Contact ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .

You just get the feeling here that the conference is at the forefront of modern medicine. GREG YURGHAM University of Notre Dame ’14 Some speakers also addressed the issue of engaging a broad audience to a cause. One of the conference’s 14 workshops, lead by health care journalist Eve Heyne, focused on teaching how to communicate issues in global health through translating science into language accessible to the general public. Heyne also shared advice for using Twitter and Facebook to attract potential donors to a public health initiative, emphasizing the importance of narrative over statistics. Seth Godin, the founder of Squidoo and one of the seven keynote speakers, talked about the importance of presentation in garnering interest. “Change gets made by telling a story to people who want to hear it, and telling a story that’s true, and telling a story that’s

emotional and [connecting] to them in a way to make them want to change and tell that story to other people,” Godin said. The conference also drew researchers who study different aspects of the health care systems across the globe who shared their work at a poster session on Saturday at the Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School. Dana Van der Heide, an MD/ PhD student at the University of Iowa, displayed her work on the correlation between proximity to roads and child malnutrition rates in Haiti. For her, the talk was a great opportunity to learn more about technological innovations that might help her in her own field such as electronic medical records. Elain Ooi SPH ’81, who works in evaluations at the World Bank, said it was refreshing to visit a conference with so many passionate young activists since the health care industry is so often filled with “pedantic” bureaucracy. Many smaller lectures focused on engaging college students. Emily Conron, the resource development coordinator at Sabin Vaccine Institute, spoke on Saturday about the need for more students to be involved in grass-roots movements. Conron also spoke on Saturday about the need for greater publicity surrounding neglected tropical diseases. The most recent United States federal budget has reduced preventative funding for these diseases abroad, and Conron said this decision places many individuals in those countries at risk. College students in attendance called the conference a valuable networking opportunity. New York University student Mrudula Naidu said she was excited to talk to attendees about innovations in designing solutions to global health problems. Conference attendees hailed from all 50 states and 55 different countries. Contact JOYCE GUO at joyce.guo@yale.edu .

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“We must help our society become what we aspire to be inside our walls — a place where human potential can be fully realized.” RICHARD LEVIN FORMER YALE PRESIDENT, “INAUGURAL ADDRESS, 1993”

Salovey works Yale, Washington WORD FREQUENCY DURING FRESHMAN ADDRESSES OF 2012 AND 2013 LEVIN, 2012 2

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SALOVEY FROM PAGE 1 before him. “Because Yale is one of the world’s great universities, its presidency is naturally a public position,” Morse College Master Amy Hungerford said. In Washington, the president is a representative of Yale and, more broadly, higher education. His constituency: Yale’s faculty and students. At Yale, the president works to set the tone for the University, to lead this diverse constituency to coalesce on a small set of issues and goals. From time to time, these two roles intersect. It is then that Yale presidents have been most remembered for “speaking out” on an issue. For Kingman Brewster, it was the Vietnam War and civil rights. For Richard Levin, it was globalization. “I think being a university president does allow one access to government leaders, to the media, and in that sense can be thought of as a bully pulpit,” Salovey said. In Salovey’s first year, these dual roles have comes together on the question of access to a Yale education and, by extension, socioeconomic inequality and Yale and beyond.

PICKING THE ISSUES CAREFULLY

“Given President Salovey’s commitment to a ‘unified Yale,’ there are constraints on the kind of issues he might speak out on,” English professor Wai Chee Dimock ’82 said. “These constraints would apply to any university president. They are important to keep Yale as a working environment, marginalizing no one, hospitable to all points of view on divisive issues.” Students, faculty and staff are not the only members of the Yale community that span the political spectrum — alumni do too. Charles Johnson ’54, who donated $250 million to Yale in October — the largest gift in the University’s history — is one of the top Republican donors in the country. Other alumni, such as Bill Clinton LAW ’73, have led the Democratic Party to the American presidency. Salovey demurred when asked about his personal political views, emphasizing that he cannot speak as Peter Salovey — psychology professor and New Haven resident — without being heard as the primary representative of Yale University. “I’m always a little reluctant to talk too much about personal politics because it gets coated as the president of Yale says blah, blah, blah,” Salovey said. “It reflects on the institution.” As donating to a political candidate is tantamount to a verbal endorsement, Salovey also does not make political donations of any kind. “It’s less the issue of trying to please people. It’s more the issue of wanting access to anyone I’d like to talk to,” Salovey said. “I need to talk to people on both sides of the aisle … and if I make political contributions they’re

going to be partisan.” While former Yale administrator Henry “Sam” Chauncey ’57, along with dozens of faculty and students interviewed, agreed that the Yale president should avoid partisan issues, he said the president still has a responsibility to occasionally engage on matters of public policy relevant to the University. Thus far, Salovey has expressed his views on three issues: immigration reform for highly skilled workers, federal funding for research and, most of all, access to higher education. In August, he released a statement applauding 68 senators who voted to pass the Border Security, Economic Opportunity and Immigration Modernization Act, a bill Yale had lobbied on. In the same statement, he also threw his support behind the DREAM Act, which provides a path to citizenship for those brought to the United States as children, as well as legislation reforming immigration policies for the highly educated. In January, Salovey spoke out again when he decried the American Studies Association’s boycott of Israel. “As a university president, I believe that the pursuit of knowledge should not be impeded, and therefore a boycott is a strategy I cannot endorse, interfering as it does with academic freedom,” Salovey told the News in a January email. “In this matter I am expressing my own opinion, but one informed by my position as Yale’s president.” Still, there are many issues that Salovey has avoided. After months of nationwide student campaigns to push universities to divest from the fossil fuel industry, administrations at many universities have responded definitively — one way or another — to students’ complaints. In October, Harvard University President Drew Gilpin Faust released a statement saying that Harvard would not divest. Just last week, Faust released another statement announcing new research and sustainability efforts to help fight climate change. Despite several student protests on the Yale campus, Salovey has stayed quiet about the issue of divestment and climate change, though he has stated that he is personally concerned about global warming. When asked what issues he might take public stances on in the future, Salovey was cautious, saying that the Yale community would need to be aligned on any issue.

A FOCUS ON ACCESS

Salovey’s decision to engage on the topic of access to higher education — and by extension, socioeconomic inequality — appears to have been an easy one. First, his interest in the topic is personal, as his own family’s story is a testament to the power of higher education as a vehicle of social mobility. Salovey’s father grew up in

the Bronx, the son of immigrants from Warsaw and Jerusalem. Through education, he was able to overcome the hardships of his childhood. Today, Salovey’s parents live in Palos Verdes, an affluent coastal suburb in California. But Salovey also sees that Yale has a role to play in mitigating socioeconomic inequality by increasingly opening the gates of higher education to more of those who cannot afford it. “A topic like inequality ends up having an important component to do with higher education, because at least historically education was viewed as one of the more effective mechanisms that allowed for social mobility or economic mobility,” Salovey said. “I think it’s important that that not be seen as the only or primary role of education, but it is an important role of education.” Still, increasing access to higher education is not so easy to do. Though they have the same objective, universities and the federal government are currently engaged in a tug-of-war over who should foot the bills for the mounting costs of higher education. At the January White House summit, senior members of the Obama administration — including then-National Economic Council Director Gene Sperling and Obama himself — placed the onus for increasing access and reigning in higher education costs on colleges and universities. Even to attend the conference, university presidents had to arrive with clear commitments in hand. But for their part, institutions of higher education and the associations that unite their Washington-based advocacy have repeatedly sought more help from the federal government. “To make this work you cannot exclusively rely on colleges and universities,” Salovey said after the summit. “Nor can you exclusively rely on government funding.” Salovey said it is important to make clear that ensuring access is a partnership between universities and the federal government. The University must lead by example with the allocation of its resources, notably through an aggressive financial aid policy, he said. But to make the kind of gesture Salovey did during the freshman address, Salovey also needs the monetary backing of the federal government. The Yale president cannot wax poetic about the inherent values of providing a Yale education to all who deserve it if the University does not have the funds to do so. In his freshman address, Salovey made the importance of the federal government plain by mentioning four pieces of legislation: the Morrill Acts — which created land grant colleges — the GI Bill, Title IV and the Federal Pell Grant Program. Together, the acts have helped tens of millions of Americans receive college educations. “These investments are worth making because college graduates develop broad and deep knowl-

edge, sharp critical thinking and communication skills and the ability to work collaboratively,” Salovey said. “And as a result, they are three times as likely as those without a degree to move from the lowest levels of family income to the top level.” Those words could have been delivered to a roomful of policymakers as easily as they could have to the freshmen in Woolsey Hall.

We are not just purveyors of value-neutral information, but should be teachers of moral values. STEVEN SMITH Political science professor, Yale University Salovey said his words on that hot August day were more than an exhortation to Yale’s youngest cohort of students. Rather, they were an act of statesmanship, an address meant to be read as much in the halls of the Capitol as in those of Linsley-Chittenden. “I’m conscious of the fact that a speech like that might be read beyond the walls of Yale, indeed, to be frank, I’m hoping it will be,” Salovey said. “I am hoping that a speech like that will in fact stimulate both a campus discussion but also contribute to a conversation that’s happening off campus as well, including in Washington.”

THE CONVERSATION IN WASHINGTON

Like many other university presidents, Salovey visits Washington, D.C. frequently. Since taking office last July, Salovey has already made his way to the capital no fewer than three times to discuss higher education with members of Congress — 18 of whom attended Yale — senior members of various federal agencies and, at times, groups of other university presidents. Although the meeting agendas differ every time — and are more often than not confidential — administrators interviewed identified two major issues frequently addressed: financial aid and accessibility, and federal grants and contracts. At the most basic level, Salovey’s goal is always the same: to persuade policymakers that what is good for Yale is also good for the country. In particular, University Vice President for Strategic and Global Initiatives Linda Lorimer said Salovey works to advocate for increased federal investment in science and medicine as a way of furthering “the country’s success.” Salovey is just one of the many university presidents who make their way to the capital. William Bonvillian, head of federal relations for MIT, said MIT President Rafael Raif is a frequent visitor to Washington. Kevin Galvin, Harvard’s Senior Director of Pub-

lic Affairs and Communications, said that Harvard’s Washington Office works closely with Harvard’s President Faust to develop strategies for partnerships between Harvard and the federal government. And when university presidents speak, policymakers say they listen. California Congresswoman Lois Capps DIV ’64 said that university presidents have unique perspectives on federal issues, from student financial aid to federal research funding to immigration. Capps was part of a group of Yale alumni in Congress who met with Salovey last July. “In order to advocate on behalf of students and higher education, meeting with campus leaders like President Salovey is important to identify additional ways to best serve the interests of students not only in my Congressional district, but also students at schools and universities across the country,” she said. Elizabeth Esty LAW ’85, who has also met with Salovey, expressed a similar sentiment, adding that presidents such as Salovey have given her insight into how she can support students, faculty, staff and communities around universities. But Salovey cannot be a permanent presence in Washington. Back at Yale, other issues call — searches for new deans, fundraising and a multiplicity of other responsibilities. For this reason and others, Salovey has at his disposal a fulltime office designed to be his eyes, ears and voice in the capital: Yale’s office of federal relations. Richard Jacob, Yale’s associate vice president for federal and state relations, and his deputy, Kara Haas, travel frequently to Washington, though Yale’s office of federal relations is based in New Haven. To effectively articulate how an issue impacts the University, Jacob said the office needs to understand Yale, and the best way to do that is to be on campus. Yale’s federal relations office also keeps a quieter profile than some of its peers. In contrast with New York University’s federal relations office, which maintains an active webpage that encourages alumni to lobby their elected representatives on issues relevant to NYU, the Yale office’s web presence is bare bones. But while Yale may speak softly, it carries a big stick in the capital. In 2013, the University spent $590,000 on lobbying-related expenses. Harvard, by comparison, spent $530,000, while Princeton spent $280,000. Of the 17 pieces of legislation Yale lobbied on in 2013, Harvard and Princeton both lobbied on seven. Another five were lobbied on by either Harvard or Princeton, but not both. An undisclosed portion of Yale’s lobbying spending also goes toward membership dues for a variety of higher-education organizations, such as the Association of American Universities (AAU), the Association of American Colleges and Universities

(AACU) and the Science Coalition, among others. These organizations partner with a variety of other groups — some of which University spokesman Tom Conroy said directly employ lobbying firms — to create a sprawling network of Washington-based advocacy. “These play a key role in collecting university concerns and speaking for overall university interests and concerns,” Bonvillian said. Although the AAU’s annual meeting of 62 colleges presidents in Washington is confidential, Salovey said the major topic is typically how universities can persuade the federal government to better support research and teaching at universities across the country.

LEADING FROM WITHIN

Salovey said the discussion of access he began during his freshman address was not just about the University opening its gates — it was also about encouraging Yale graduates to do the same for others. “I do think we have an obligation to put that education that we receive to a good use, to figure out ways to give back, to figure out ways to encourage others to obtain a similar kind of education,” Salovey said. Students interviewed said some of the issues raised in Salovey’s freshman address have stuck with them. Emmet Hedin ’17 described the speech as “an affirmation of the importance of education,” while Russell Cohen ’17 said the president’s address has set the tone for his time at Yale. Isiah Cruz ’17 said that Salovey’s freshman address had played a role in encouraging him to help reduce socioeconomic inequality, in an as-of-yet undetermined capacity, following graduation. As president, Salovey is responsible for the “moral custodianship of the University,” political science professor Steven Smith said. “We are not just purveyors of value-neutral information, but should be teachers of moral values like responsibility, service, and preservers of an intellectual heritage and tradition,” Smith said. “If we at the University don’t care about these things, who will?” The question whether anyone will listen. Sometimes a sweating freshman in Woolsey Hall can be tougher to get through to than a senator. “The tool I have most at my disposal is verbal exhortation. But as a behavioral psychologist, I know that verbal exhortation is not typically the key to behavior change in others,” Salovey said. “On the other hand, trying to lead by example and help students develop their own sense of efficacy in leading a life of purpose is likely to be more effective.” Contact MATTHEW LLOYDTHOMAS at matthew.lloyd-thomas@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

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Three dead after Kansas shooting BY MARIA SUDEKUM ASSOCIATED PRESS OVERLAND PARK, Kan. — A man in his 70s opened fire Sunday outside of a Jewish community center and nearby retirement community, killing three people, authorities said. Overland Park Police Chief John Douglass said at a news conference Sunday evening that a person who had been reported to be in critical condition earlier was among three killed in the attacks, which apparently occurred minutes apart. “Today is a sad and very tragic day,” Douglass said. “As you might imagine we are only three hours into this investigation. There’s a lot of innuendo and a lot of assertions going around. There is really very little hardcore information.” Shots were fired behind the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City in a parking lot about 1 p.m., Douglass said. One male died at the scene, another male died at a hospital. The gunman then fled and opened fire at nearby Village Shalom, killing a female, before later being arrested near an elementary school. Two other people were shot at, but the gunfire missed them, Douglass said. Douglass said it was too early in the investigation to determine if the shootings were hate crimes. The Jewish festival of Passover begins Monday. “We know it was a vicious act of violence, and we know obviously it was at

two Jewish facilities. One might make that assumption,” Douglass said. He described the suspect as a white man in his 70s who is not from Kansas. He said the suspect is being held at the Johnson County Detention Center, but did not provide further information. “We have no indication he knew the victims,” Douglass said, adding that the suspect was not known to Kansas Cityarea authorities before the shootings. Douglass said a shotgun was used, and investigators were trying to determine whether a handgun and assault-style rifle also were involved. The Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City in Overland Park posted on its Facebook page Sunday afternoon that a “shooting incident” happened near its White Theater entrance. “Everyone participating in JCC programming has been released to their homes,” the center posted later Sunday. There was a heavy police presence at the campus, which spans several acres in an affluent area of Johnson County, Kan. Police had also taped off the entrance to Village Shalom on Sunday afternoon, and several patrol cars and a crime scene unit van were parked in front. St. Louis resident Kristy Straeb, 47, said her sister-in-law Stacie Ventimiglia was at the center’s pool with a friend and four little girls under the age of seven for a swimming lesson, which ended about 12:45 p.m. Straeb said they decided at the last minute to get the girls showered.

ORLIN WAGNER/ASSICATED PRESS

Village Shalom in Leawood, Kan. was the second location of shootings that started at the nearby Jewish Community Center.

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S&P 500 1,815.69, -0.95% 10-yr. Bond 2.62, +0.00%

T Euro $1.38, -0.01%

IRS audits lowest in years

J. DAVID AKE/ASSOCIATED PRESS

The IRS has already received nearly 100 million tax returns and anticipates getting 35 million more by midnight Tuesday. BY STEPHEN OHLEMACHER ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — As millions of Americans race to meet Tuesday’s tax deadline, their chances of getting audited are lower than they have been in years. Budget cuts and new responsibilities are straining the Internal Revenue Service’s ability to police tax returns. This year, the IRS will have fewer agents auditing returns than at any time since at least the 1980s. Taxpayer services are suffering, too, with millions of phone calls to the IRS going unanswered. “We keep going after the people who look like the worst of the bad guys,” IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said in an interview. “But there are going to be some people that we should catch, either in terms of collecting the revenue from them or prosecuting them, that we’re not going to catch.” Better technology is helping to offset some budget cuts. If you report making $40,000 in wages and your employer tells the IRS you made $50,000, the agency’s computers probably will catch that. The same is true for investment income and many common deductions that

are reported to the IRS by financial institutions. But if you operate a business that deals in cash, with income or expenses that are not independently reported to the IRS, your chances of getting caught are lower than they have been in years. Last year, the IRS audited less than 1 percent of all returns from individuals, the lowest rate since 2005. This year, Koskinen said, “The numbers will go down.” Koskinen was confirmed as IRS commissioner in December. He took over an agency under siege on several fronts. Last year, the IRS acknowledged agents improperly singled out conservative groups for extra scrutiny when they applied for tax-exempt status from 2010 to 2012. The revelation has led to five ongoing investigations, including three by congressional committees, and outraged lawmakers who control the agency’s budget. The IRS also is implementing large parts of President Barack Obama’s health law, including enforcing the mandate that most people get health insurance. Republicans in Congress abhor the law, putting another bull’seye on the agency’s back. The animosity is reflected in the

IRS budget, which has declined from $12.1 billion in 2010 to $11.3 billion in the current budget year. Obama has proposed a 10 percent increase for next year; Republicans are balking. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, R-Fla., chairman of the House subcommittee that oversees the IRS budget, called the request “both meaningless and pointless” because it exceeds spending caps already set by Congress. Koskinen said he suspects some people think that if they cut funds to the IRS, the agency won’t be able to implement the health law. They’re wrong, he said. The IRS is legally obligated to enforce the health law, Koskinen said. That means budget savings will have to be found elsewhere. Koskinen said he can cut spending in three areas: enforcement, taxpayer services and technology. Technology upgrades can only be put off for so long, he said, so enforcement and taxpayer services are suffering. Last year, only 61 percent of taxpayers calling the IRS for help got it. This year, Koskinen said he expects the numbers to be similar. To help free up operators, callers with complicated tax questions are directed to the agency’s website.


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

WORLD

“All wars are civil wars because all men are brothers.” FRANÇOIS FÉNELON FRENCH BISHOP AND POET

Kiev to deploy troops in Ukraine’s east

12 dead in Chile fire

EFREM LUKATSKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pro-Moscow protesters have seized a number of government buildings in the east over the past week, undermining the authority of the interim government in Kiev. BY PETER LEONARD ASSOCIATED PRESS DONETSK, Ukraine — Turning to force to try to restore its authority in the vital industrial east, Ukraine’s government announced Sunday it was sending in troops to try to quash an increasingly brazen pro-Russian insurgency, despite repeated warnings from the Kremlin. Accusing Moscow of fomenting the unrest, Ukrainian President Oleksandr Turchynov said in a televised address that such a “largescale anti-terrorist operation” would ensure Russia did not “repeat the Crimean scenario in Ukraine’s east.” Turchynov pledged to offer amnesty to anyone surrendering their weapons by Monday morning. Reliance on the military is a response that hints at concerns over the reliability of the police, who have often proven unable or unwilling to repel pro-Russian gunmen and other

Moscow loyalists from seizing key state facilities. With tens of thousands of Russian troops massed along Ukraine’s eastern border, there are fears that Moscow might use unrest in the mainly Russian-speaking region as a pretext for an invasion. Speaking late Sunday on Russian state television, ousted president Viktor Yanukovych accused the CIA of being behind the new government’s decision to turn to force, a claim the CIA denied as “completely false.” Yanukovych claimed that CIA director John Brennan met with Ukraine’s new leadership and “in fact sanctioned the use of weapons and provoked bloodshed.” CIA spokesman Dean Boyd said that while the agency doesn’t comment on Brennan’s travel itinerary, the “claim that Director Brennan encouraged Ukrainian authorities to conduct tactical operations inside Ukraine is completely false.”

LUIS HIDALGO/ASSOCIATED PRESS

A raging fire leaped from hilltop to hilltop in the port city of Valparaiso, destroying more than 500 homes. BY GRACIELA IBANEZ AND MARIANELA JARROUD ASSOCIATED PRESS VALPARAISO, Chile — A raging fire leaped from hilltop to hilltop in this colorful Chilean port city and stubbornly burned out of control in places more than 24 hours later, killing 12 people and destroying at least 2,000 homes. More than 10,000 people were evacuated, including more than 200 female inmates at a prison. With hot dry winds stoking the embers, some of the fires that authorities had declared contained broke out again as a second night fell. The blaze began Saturday afternoon in a forested ravine next to ramshackle housing on one of Valparaiso’s 42 hilltops, and spread quickly as hot ash rained down over wooden houses and narrow streets that lack municipal water systems. Electricity failed

as the fire grew, with towering flames turning the night sky orange over a darkening, destroyed horizon. Eventually, neighborhoods on six hilltops were reduced to ashes, including one hill several blocks from Chile’s parliament building. Flames later broke out again on at least two of those hills, burning out of control and threatening to consume other neighborhoods. “It’s a tremendous tragedy. This could be the worst fire in the city’s history,” President Michelle Bachelet said as 20 helicopters and planes dropped water on hotspots. The fire destroyed at least 2,000 houses by Sunday evening, and the death toll rose to 12, Interior Minister Rodrigo Penailillo said. Authorities warned that the toll could rise once the fires cool enough for them to search for bodies. Patricio Bustos, who directs the national forensics ser-

vice, said DNA tests would be needed to identify some of the remains. More than 500 people were treated at hospitals, mostly for smoke inhalation. It was already the worst fire to hit the picturesque seaside city of 250,000 people since 1953, when 50 people were killed and every structure was destroyed on several of the city’s hills. The fires were contained to the hills, but Bachelet declared the entire city a catastrophe zone, putting Chile’s military in charge of maintaining order. While 1,250 firefighters, police and forest rangers battled the blaze, 2,000 Chilean sailors in combat gear patrolled streets to maintain order and prevent looting. “The people of Valparaiso have courage, have strength and they aren’t alone,” said Bachelet, who cancelled a planned trip to Argentina and Uruguay this week.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TOMORROW

Patchy fog before 10am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 66.

WEDNESDAY

High of 56, low of 34.

High of 50, low of 33.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

ON CAMPUS MONDAY, APRIL 14 12:00 p.m. “Confucianism and Liberal Democracy: Uneasy Marriage or Productive Partnership?” Speaker Joseph Chan teaches political theory and researches in the areas of Confucian political philosophy, contemporary liberalism and perfectionism, human rights and civil society at the University of Hong Kong. Luce Hall (34 Hillhouse Ave.), Rm. 202. 4:00 p.m. Physics Club: “IceCube and the Discovery of HighEnergy Cosmic Neutrinos.” The IceCube project transformed one cubic kilometer of Antarctic ice into a neutrino detector that recently isolated a flux of high-energy cosmic neutrons. Francis Halzen will discuss the instrument, the analysis of the data and the significance of the discovery of cosmic neutrinos. Sloane Physics Laboratory (217 Prospect St.), Rm. 57.

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

TUESDAY, APRIL 15 4:30 p.m. “Ken Rogoff: Policy Dilemmas in the Aftermath of the Financial Crises.” Ken Rogoff, author of the bestseller “This Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly,” will speak about policy changes in the post-crisis economic landscape. Rogoff served as chief economist and director of research at the International Monetary Fund until 2003. Linsly-Chittenden Hall (63 High St.), Rm. 101. 7:00 p.m. “Teenage.” Film screening followed by a Q&A with the director, Matt Wolf. In this living collage of rare archival material, filmed portraits, and voices lifted from early 20th century diary entries, a struggle erupts between adults and adolescents to define a new idea of youth. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Rm. 208.

XKCD BY RANDALL MUNROE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16 5:30 p.m. Sketching in the Galleries. Enjoy the tradition of sketching from original works of art in the center’s collection and special exhibitions. Jaime Ursic, the center’s assistant curator of education, will offer insights on drawing techniques and observational skills. Drawing materials will be provided. Register in advance. Yale Center for British Art (1080 Chapel St.).

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

To reach us: E-mail editor@yaledailynews.com Advertisements 2-2424 (before 5 p.m.) 2-2400 (after 5 p.m.) Mailing address Yale Daily News P.O. Box 209007 New Haven, CT 06520

Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Editor in Chief Julia Zorthian at (203) 4322418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

To visit us in person 202 York St. New Haven, Conn. (Opposite JE) FOR RELEASE APRIL 14, 2014

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis Sean Dobbin is an English teacher at the Community High School of Vermont (CHSVT) in St. Johnsbury. 12 students worked on today’s puzzle. ACROSS 1 Steady look 5 Uneducated guess 9 Knife and fork separator, in a place setting 14 Black cat, to some 15 Like a guru 16 Long-eared hoppers 17 Hand Vac maker 19 Haloed messenger 20 Nocturnal annoyance 21 Once in a while 23 Until now 25 Road groove 26 Bermuda hrs. 29 Special “Jeopardy!” square 36 Stir-fried hodgepodge 38 Ad-lib comedy style 39 Hailed vehicle 40 Cavity filler’s letters, or, said another way, a hint to 17-, 29-, 49- and 65-Across 42 Comedian Cook 43 “The Real Slim Shady” rapper 46 Big name in gloves 49 A&E reality series featuring the Robertson family 51 Arid 52 Past-tense verb that sounds like a number 53 EMT technique 55 Squirrel’s discard 60 Continental bank notes 64 Hauled to the hoosegow 65 Computer component 67 Speak one’s mind 68 Good earth 69 Peak 70 Moisten, as a lawn 71 Tolkien tree creatures 72 Ash Wednesdayto-Easter time

Want to place a classified ad? CALL (203) 432-2424 OR E-MAIL BUSINESS@ YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

By Sean Dobbin & the CHSVT Cruciverbalism Class

DOWN 1 Zeus and Apollo 2 Idi of Uganda 3 None 4 Way in 5 Nor. neighbor 6 DVR pioneer 7 “Not a chance!” 8 Steeple section with a ringer 9 “The __ of the Opera” 10 Touch down 11 Jason’s ship 12 New driver, often 13 Immigrant’s subj. 18 Closing documents 22 German automaker 24 Cross-shaped Greek letter 26 Played a part (in) 27 SeaWorld orca 28 Poisonous, as waste 30 Mil. roadside hazard 31 Winona’s “Beetlejuice” role 32 Prom hairstyle 33 Mark with an iron 34 Introvert 35 “__ Breath You Take”: Police hit

4/14/14

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

SUDOKU EASY

2

(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

37 Internal color of a medium steak 41 Puncture sound 44 1970s Mary Tyler Moore co-star 45 Folk story 47 Non-prescription: Abbr. 48 Used a keyboard 50 Tattoo tool 54 Not urban 55 California wine valley 56 Textbook chapter

4/14/14

57 Fork prong 58 Big cat 59 Test for a future atty. 61 Like a red tomato 62 Cookie cooker 63 Modern message between trysters, perhaps 64 Spreadsheet feature 66 Metric distances: Abbr.

7 6 8 2 9

9 8 4 7

7 6 5 6 9 5 8 7 4 2 3

4 8


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 10

THROUGH THE LENS

A

s dusk fell Thursday, many of Yale’s rising seniors emerged to transform New Haven into a bustling spectacle. A host of characters darted to and fro as the sun faded, from amicable Luigis and singing Belles to taunting gorillas and disturbing hazmat crews cradling fishbowls — showing that the 135-year-old secret society Tap Night tradition is still alive in 2014. ERICA BOOTHBY reports.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

MLB L.A. Dodgers 8 Arizona 6

MLB Cincinnati 12 Tampa Bay 4

SPORTS QUICK HITS

MLB Toronto 11 Baltimore 3

NBA Indiana 102 Oklahoma City 97

MONDAY

ANOTHER NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP MEN’S CLUB BASKETBALL TEAM One year to the day that the men’s hockey team secured its first national title by downing Quinnipiac 4–0 in Pittsburgh, Penn., the club team defeated Cal Poly 60–48 to win the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association National Basketball Championship.

ADRIENNE TARVER ’14 WOMEN’S LACROSSE TEAM The captain of the Bulldogs celebrated Senior Day in style, picking up her 99th career ground ball to claim sole possession of second place on the all-time list at Yale. Tarver trails only Jenn Warden ’09, who had 136 for her career.

MLB Atlanta 10 Washington 2

“The cliche term is that ‘hitting is contagious.’” ROBERT BALDWIN ’15 BASEBALL

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

Women’s lax wins on senior day BY CAROLINE HART CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The Yale women’s lacrosse team celebrated its nine graduating seniors with a win against Columbia on its annual Senior Day this past Saturday at Reese Stadium. The Bulldogs beat Columbia 9–6 after starting all nine of its seniors.

WOMEN’S LAX Yale’s seniors started the game in an aggressive fashion, domi-

Bulldogs beat Bears MEN’S LAX

nating Columbia to take a 5–0 lead early in the game. “We have the biggest and most talented senior class that we’ve had in a long time,” said midfielder Tori Virtue ’16. “Despite the distractions and emotions that accompany Senior Day, our team had a solid start to the game with all nine seniors leading us out on the field, and we took an early lead which carried us through the game.” Although Columbia won the SEE W. LAX PAGE B3

IHNA MANGUNDAYAO/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s lacrosse team beat Brown 7–6 on the road in overtime this weekend. BY FREDERICK FRANK STAFF REPORTER

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

The women’s lacrosse team defeated Columbia 9–6 at home this weekend.

The No. 13 men’s lacrosse team denied Brown a thrilling comeback victory after midfielder Michael Bonacci ’16 scored with 2:49 left in overtime to give the Bulldogs their third straight win. “A win is a win,” said attackman Brandon Mangan ’14. “We knew it was going to be a hard fought game and it’s just important we came out with a W.”

The Elis (7–3, 3–2 Ivy) jumped out to an early 6–1 lead in the second quarter but were held scoreless for 40 minutes of play as Brown (6–5, 1–3 Ivy) came all the way back to tie the game and send it to overtime Friday night in Providence. Yale opened the scoring less than two minutes into the first period after Colin Flaherty ’15 scored his 10th goal of the season, but Brown was quick to tie the game. The Bulldogs responded by scoring five unanswered goals in a 15-min-

ute span. Sean Shakespeare ’15 found the back of the net on a man advantage before attackman Jeff Cimbalista ’17 finished off a great passing play to give the Bulldogs a 3–1 lead going into the break after the first period. Mangan drew a slide behind the net and dished the ball back up top to midfielder Shane Thornton ’15, who drew a defender and found the freshman wide open. Cimbalista took a step and put SEE M. LACROSSE PAGE B3

Crew takes three titles over weekend BY ERICA PANDEY CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The Yale women’s, men’s heavyweight and men’s lightweight crew teams saw intense competition from Dartmouth, Boston University, Penn, Columbia and Cornell this weekend.

CREW

JENNIFER LU/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s heavyweight crew maintained its hold on the Olympic Axe after beating Dartmouth.

STAT OF THE DAY 0.0

The teams hosted the five schools at home at the Gilder Boathouse. The Eli women swept Dartmouth and Boston University and claimed the Class of 1985 Cup. The heavyweight team also swept the Big Green to hold on to the Olympic Axe. The lightweight men raced both Saturday and Sunday, beating out Columbia and Penn for the Dodge Cup on Saturday and falling to Cornell on Sunday. “It was an exciting race, and it’s going to be an exciting season,” said women’s head coach Will Porter. “And we were really lucky with these conditions.” The Yale crews rowed in ideal conditions on the Housatonic after practicing through strong winds during the week. Women’s captain Maddie Lips ’14 said all of the women’s boats performed well. According to Lips, the Bulldogs will continue

to work with their coaches to find speed in all of their boats. “It was a great weekend for the entire Yale crew program,” she said. “Having all three Yale teams racing on our course made for a great sense of spirit and camaraderie.” All five of the women’s crews have been undefeated thus far. The first and second varsities finished the 2000-meter course in 6:07.6 minutes and 6:17.6 minutes, respectively, and both won by four seconds. The two fours and the third varsity eight saw even wider margins of victory.

Having all three Yale teams racing on our course made for a great sense of spirit and camaraderie. MADDIE LIPS ’14 Captain, Women’s crew team The heavyweight team also maintained their undefeated record after the weekend’s races. The first varsity finished in 5:27.6 minutes, beating Dartmouth by SEE CREW PAGE B3

SECONDS REMAINING ON THE CLOCK WHEN MEN’S CLUB BASKETBALL PLAYER EZRA RITCHIN ’15 DRAINED A THREE POINTER TO DEFEAT DAYTON 53–50. Ritchin’s triple sent Yale to the quarterfinals of the NIRSA National Basketball Championship, which Yale eventually won.


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

“There are three types of baseball players: those who make it happen, those who watch it happen and those who wonder what happens.” TOMMY LASORDA HALL OF FAME MANAGER

Baseball holds Rolfe lead

MEN’S LACROSSE IVY SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Cornell

3

1

0.750

9

3

0.750

Harvard

3

1

0.750

7

5

0.583

Yale

3

2

0.600

7

3

0.700

Penn

3

2

0.600

6

3

0.667

5

Princeton

2

2

0.500

7

4

0.636

6

Brown

1

3

0.250

6

5

0.545

7

Dartmouth

0

4

0.000

1

8

0.111

1

BASEBALL FROM PAGE B4 and allowed an additional run. Yale was unable to score in the seventh and fell 8–2. Dartmouth came on strong against starting pitcher Michael Coleman ’14, as the Big Green’s second batter tripled to drive in a run and then scored on a throwing error to take a 2–0 lead within minutes of the first pitch. Yale remained scoreless until the seventh, when Baldwin went after the first pitch he saw and belted his second home run of the year to left field. Dartmouth, meanwhile, tallied four more runs in the third off Coleman and another five off Yale’s relief pitchers in the remainder of the game. Coleman exited the game in the fifth and finished with six runs allowed, five earned, one strikeout and eight hits in four innings pitched. Yale manufactured two more runs in the eighth, but the damage had been done. The Bulldogs ended the game with two men left on base and a final score of 12–3. In game two on Sunday, starter David Hickey ’14 followed Lanham’s performance by holding the Big Green to four runs through six innings. The outing would have earned the win with Yale’s six runs in the first game of the day, but the Bulldogs could only put up two for Hickey in that contest. Both teams were scoreless through four frames, and designated hitter Richard Slenker ’17 took the initial lead for Yale in the fifth with a double that scored right

3

WOMEN’S LACROSSE IVY

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The baseball team holds a one-game lead over Dartmouth in the Red Rolfe division after this weekend. fielder David Toups ’15 and Hanson. But Dartmouth came roaring back with runs in three consecutive innings to take the 4–2 lead and the eventual win. Relief pitcher Chris Moates ’16 shut Dartmouth down in the seventh and eighth, increasing his count of consecutive scoreless innings to 6.2. Despite the three losses over the weekend, players on the team remained positive going forward. “We have a one game lead, with six out

of our final eight [Ivy contests] at home,” Baldwin said. “If we would have been placed in this situation before the season started, I think almost everyone on the team would have taken it.” Yale will host Sacred Heart tomorrow afternoon. More important, however, is a key four-game series at home against Harvard this upcoming weekend.

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Penn

3

0

1.000

7

3

0.700

2

Princeton

4

1

0.800

8

4

0.667

3

Harvard

3

2

0.600

7

5

0.583

Cornell

3

2

0.600

6

6

0.500

Yale

2

3

0.400

8

5

0.615

Brown

2

3

0.400

9

4

0.692

Dartmouth

2

3

0.400

5

6

0.455

Columbia

0

5

0.000

3

7

0.300

5

8

BASEBALL LOU GEHRIG

Contact GREG CAMERON at greg.cameron@yale.edu .

Track hangs tough with Harvard ties by taking first with a distance of 5.52 meters. Alisha Jordan ’15 took second, just 0.11 meters behind, but later took first in the triple jump with a distance of 11.92 meters. Kristen Proe ’14 competed in the triple jump as well, finishing third. Wilson rounded out the field events with another strong second-place performance in the shot put. “We were all very proud to wear the ‘Y’ on Saturday, and I think it showed,” Urciuoli said. In the first track event for the men, the 3000-meter steeplechase, Duncan Tomlin ’16 was the only male athlete from either team to compete, bringing in Yale’s first victory of the day and gaining points for the Bulldogs. James Randon ’17 then took third in the 1500-meter run, followed by Daniel Kemp ’15 who took third as well in the 110-meter hurdles. More third-place finishes followed, one from Chandler Crusan ’17 in the 400-meter dash and another in the 100-meter dash by Daniel Jones ’14. The Bulldogs finished the 800-meter run in top form, with James Shrivell ’14 taking first with a time of 1:52.43. William Rowe ’15 then finished second in the 400meter hurdles, blowing away the third

place Harvard finisher by four seconds. In a photo finish in the 100-meter dash, Jones finished in second place, less than 0.3 seconds behind Harvard’s Damani Wilson. Yale continued to show its strength in the long-distance runs with freshman Andre Ivankovic ’17 taking first in the 3000meter run. In the field events, Harvard dominated for the men until Torren Peebles ’17 took third in the javelin throw. Ivankovic said that he ran a personal best in the 3000-meter race, with a time of 8:27.34. He said his record run boosted his confidence about his fitness and racing abilities. The Bulldogs compete in their first home event since February this weekend at the Dewitt Cuyler Athletic Complex for the Yale Mark Young Invitational. The Elis look forward to being at home after such a long break, added Vogel. “Performing at home is always an advantage. Our legs don’t get stiff from the traveling and we can do our normal routine. We also get to have Yale friends come out to support and watch,” Vogel said. Competition begins for the men and women on Saturday, April 19. Contact SYDNEY GLOVER at sydney.glover@yale.edu .

OVERALL

SCHOOL

IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Penn

11

1

0.917

19

12

0.613

Columbia

9

3

0.750

16

15

0.516

3

Cornell

6

6

0.500

25

14

0.517

4

Princeton

4

6

0.400

9

19

0.321

RED ROLFE SCHOOL

W

IVY L %

OVERALL W L %

1

Yale

6

6

0.500

13

18

0.419

2

Dartmouth

5

7

0.417

10

117

0.370

3

Harvard

3

7

0.300

8

20

0.286

4

Brown

2

10

0.167

8

17

0.320

1

TRACK FROM PAGE B4

OVERALL

SOFTBALL NORTH

The men’s track and field team lost to the rival Crimson 104–34 this weekend.

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Dartmouth

12

0

1.000

23

13

0.639

Harvard

7

0

1.000

21

11

0.656

3

Yale

1

11

0.083

5

27

0.156

4

Brown

0

12

0.000

2

26

0.071

SOUTH SCHOOL

W

IVY L %

OVERALL W L %

1

Penn

7

4

0.636

12

15

0.444

2

Princeton

4

6

0.400

14

19

0.424

3

Cornell

5

5

0.500

13

19

0.406

4

Columbia

5

7

0.417

16

18

0.471

1

FOLAKE OGUNMOLA/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

IVY

Dartmouth downs softball in four straight SOFTBALL FROM PAGE B4 improve moving forward.” In the first game of the series, Dartmouth needed extra innings to finally defeat the Elis 3–2. The game on Saturday afternoon was

a pitcher’s duel from the start, with pitcher Kristen Leung ’14 starting in the circle for Yale. Leung scattered 11 hits across eight innings, allowing only two runs to the league’s top offensive lineup while striking out five.

BRIANNA LOO/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The Bulldogs dropped four straight to Dartmouth this weekend.

Dartmouth pushed two runs across in the bottom of the fourth inning, stringing together a single and two doubles. With only one out and a runner in scoring position, the Bulldog defense put together a double play to end the inning. The Big Green threatened again in the sixth inning, loading the bases with no outs on three consecutive singles. Leung escaped the jam by striking out the next two batters and inducing a groundout. Last season’s Ivy League Pitcher of the Year Kristen Rumley was cruising, pitching a twohit shutout through the first six innings. In the top of the seventh, however, Yale struck back. Captain and center fielder Tori Balta ’14 led off with a double for her second hit of the game. First baseman Lauren Delgadillo ’16 then clubbed her second home run of the season, tying the game at two runs apiece. The Big Green looked to respond in the home half of the inning but could not capitalize, stranding runners on first and second base. Neither team managed a hit in the eighth inning, sending the game to the ninth. Rumley, relieved by pitcher Morgan McCalmon in the ninth inning, performed on the plate as well as the mound. Her third single of the game was the difference maker, plating the wining run and giving Dartmouth the walk-off victory. The second game of the

day was not as tightly contested as the first, with the Big Green needing only six innings to defeat the Bulldogs 10–1. McCalmon, who came on in relief the first game pitched a complete game in the bottom of the doubleheader to pick up her seventh win of the year. Dartmouth wasted no time in the second game, scoring in the bottom of the first inning when pitcher Chelsey Dunham ’14 gave up a bases-loaded walk. Yale responded quickly and scored in the next inning. Delgadillo picked up her third hit of the day and advanced to third on a ground out and single before scoring on a wild pitch. Two walks to start the bottom of the fourth inning doomed Dunham, who allowed a threerun home run to first baseman Maeline Damore. Dartmouth tallied four more runs in the fifth inning, with Damore hitting her second home run of the game, this time a two-run shot. The Elis looked to add runs to their total in the sixth, but they were unable to string together more than two singles. The Big Green again turned to Damore in the bottom of the sixth inning, and following a two-out walk she pounded out her third home run, adding two RBIs to her seven RBI total for the game. With Dartmouth ahead by more than eight runs, the game was called early. The Bulldogs had an oppor-

tunity for redemption the next day with another doubleheader against the Big Green to look forward to. The Elis came out strong in the first game on Sunday afternoon, with Onorato tripling in the first at-bat. Following a walk to shortstop Laina Do ’17, Balta singled, scoring Onorato. With runners at first and third with no outs, Rumley, in the circle for the second consecutive day, retired the next three batters to escape the inning without further damage. Dartmouth went threeup, three-down in its first two innings at the plate, but the Big Green would not be held hitless for long. The floodgates opened in the bottom of the third inning, as Dartmouth had seven hits, all singles, to score five runs. Yale was unable to close the deficit, falling 5–1. The Elis had one last chance to record a win against Dartmouth in the fourth game of the series. Yale turned to pitcher Lindsay Efflandt ’17, who pitched the first three innings of Sunday’s first game. McCalmon started the game for the Big Green, and Yale, facing her for the third time in four games, finally seemed to figure out her pitches. The Bulldogs put the pressure on in the first inning, as Onorato walked and Do singled to begin the game. McCalmon, however, struck out the next batter and induced a twin killing to keep the game scoreless.

In the second inning, Yale broke through. Right fielder Camille Weisenbach ’17 singled with one out and third baseman Hannah Brennan followed up with a home run, putting the Elis ahead. Second baseman Rachel Paris ’17 then doubled, putting her in scoring position for Onorato, who hit a run-scoring single, giving the Bulldogs a three-run lead. Dartmouth looked to its offense to make up the deficit, and the lineup scored two runs in the home half of the second inning to close the gap. Yale looked to extend its lead with a two-out rally in the fifth inning when Balta doubled. Delgadillo was intentionally walked and both runners advanced on a wild pitch. After another walk to load the bases, the Big Green brought in Rumley, who picked up the final out of the inning. Another barrage of hits from Dartmouth, combined with a wild pitch, allowed the Big Green to take the lead with three runs in the bottom of the fifth inning. Yale was unable to mount another rally in its final two at-bats, leading to a final score of 5–3. The Elis will be on the road again Wednesday, when they will play a doubleheader against Sacred Heart beginning at 3:00 p.m. Contact ASHLEY WU at ashley.e.wu@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

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SPORTS

“Baseball is the belly button of society. Straighten out baseball, and you straighten out everything else.” BILL LEE FORMER MLB PITCHER

Elis top Columbia

Lax snipes bears in OT

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

The women’s lacrosse team scored the first five goals against Columbia Saturday. W. LAX FROM PAGE B1 opening faceoff, strong defense by the Bulldogs helped Yale take the lead. Columbia was unable to score until the very end of the first half, finally finding the back of the net with 2:40 remaining before halftime. In the second half of the game, Columbia went on a tear, only to be met by the Bulldogs’ resilience. After Columbia scored three times in a row attack Nicole Daniggelis ’16 netted a goal, pulling the Elis to a score of 9–5. The Bulldogs endured the temporary loss of a player due to a yellow card with less than 12 minutes to go. Although Columbia tacked on another goal with 6:20 remaining, goalkeeper Erin McMullan ’14 blocked any further shots by the Lions. “In terms of our performance on

Saturday, we all know we could’ve played better as a team, but I’m still proud of the fact that we were able to pull out the win,” said captain Adrienne Tarver ’14. At the very end of the game, Tarver controlled a Columbia pass that got away to claim second place on the school’s all-time ground balls list, with a total of 99. Defenseman Maggie Moriarty ’16 said the win was great for Yale’s standing in the Ivy League and that the contribution the seniors have made to the team has not gone unnoticed. “Our record has improved each of the last four years,” Moriarty said. After beating Columbia, Yale looks forward to games against Cornell and Brown, which will determine the Bulldogs’ place in the Ivy League Tournament.

“We are looking at the rest of the season as a chance to prove that we deserve a spot in the Ivy tournament,” Virtue said. “One game down yesterday and two more to go in order to make that happen.” While the team is excited about the win, Tarver said the Elis intend to take it one game at a time in order to put forth their best effort. The Bulldogs are set to face Cornell in Ithaca next Saturday. Contact CAROLINE HART at caroline.hart@yale.edu .

YALE 9, COLUMBIA 6

IHNA MANGUNDAYAO/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

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Crew strong at home

JENNIFER LU/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Yale crew teams hosted five schools at the Gilder Boathouse this weekend. CREW FROM PAGE B1 12 seconds. The third varsity boat also won by 12 seconds, finishing the course in 5:47.7 minutes. The closest race for the heavyweight men was the first — between the Dartmouth and Yale second varsity eights. The Bulldogs were able to win with a much slimmer margin of three seconds. The second boat pulled a 5:41.6. The Eli lightweights won in two of four races. The first and second varsity squads triumphed in tight races against Columbia in 5:34.99 and 5:43.2 minutes, respectively, with

wins of two and one second margins. Penn lagged slightly behind in both races. The first freshman boat was disqualified from its race due to a collision at the turn, and the third varsity was beat by Columbia, but finished with a strong time of 6:06.9 minutes. “Lightweight rowing is intense and incredibly competitive, as the results show,” said lightweight captain Matt O’Donoghue ’14. “[The second varsity] did an especially remarkable job this weekend, fighting hard in two incredibly close races.” Though the Cornell boats swept

The men’s lacrosse team improved to 3–2 in the Ivy League after beating Brown this weekend.

the Yale lightweight boats, Yale’s second varsity gave the Big Red tough competition. The race was nearly too close to call with Yale finishing in 6:11.9 minutes and losing to Cornell by just 0.11 seconds. The Bulldogs’ first varsity finished the course in 5:59.46 minutes. The lightweight men will host Dartmouth and MIT this weekend, while the heavyweight team will host Columbia and Penn. Women’s crew will travel to face Princeton for its first away race of the season. Contact ERICA PANDEY at erica.pandey@yale.edu .

a bounce shot past Brown goaltender Jack Kelly. The Elis continued their run in the second quarter thanks to two further man-up scores. Shakespeare scored on a bounce shot near the net after Thornton found him wide open on the right side. Yale’s midfielders continued their scoring form after Eric Scott ’17 scored three minutes later. Shakespeare also had a hand in the next goal, drawing a flag after getting taken down while cutting towards the net. Attackman Conrad Oberbeck ’15 scored from long range on the advantage after good ball movement from the Bulldogs. Brown was down 6–1 but was not out of the game and broke Yale’s run four minutes before halftime when Bailey Tills scored on a bounce shot after cutting around from behind Yale’s net. The Bears came out of halftime a totally different team, playing much better defensively. The Bulldogs were held scoreless for both the third and fourth quarters and were frustrated offensively. Brown scored the only goal of the third period on a tally from star midfielder Brandon Caputo, who scored from his stomach after being knocked down. The Bears dominated the fourth quarter with 21 shots in the final 15 minutes en route to three goals to come all the way back to tie. Kelly was crucial in the comeback, stopping seven shots in the second half, while defenseman Larken Kemp frustrated the Eli attack, causing three turnovers and picking up five ground balls. All the Bears’ goals came in the final six minutes of the quarter. Tyler Landis scored while Yale was a man down, cutting the deficit to two. Caputo scored his second of the game with a great shot across his body that ended up in the top corner. Yale won the ensuing faceoff, and Mangan had a chance to stop the bleeding, but his shot was blocked. A Brown player was closest to the ball, giving the Bears a crucial final possession and a chance to tie the game. Kylor Bellistri sent Stevenson Field into a frenzy, scoring on a bounce shot from 20 yards out with just over a minute left to play. The attackman ripped from long range to deceive Yale goaltender Eric Natale ’15. Brown had a final chance to score after a faceoff win, but the ensuing shot went wide and a crease violation gave Yale the ball. With only a few ticks left on the clock in regulation, midfielder Mark Glicini ’15 took the ball from the halfway line but saw his last minute shot saved by Kelly. “Brown got some really good play

from their goalie and they kept coming at us,” said defenseman Michael Quinn ’16. “We played a lot of defense in the second half and they were able to put a couple goals on us.” In the four-minute overtime, the Bulldogs did not let Brown touch the ball once. Yale’s faceoff specialist Dylan Levings ’14 had a good game, winning 11 of 17 restarts. He also won the final draw of the night, giving the Elis a crucial possession. After working the ball around, Oberbeck dodged and threw the ball back to Mangan behind the cage. The senior spotted Bonacci open on the left wing, who caught the pass and loaded up to shoot. The sophomore then faked the shot, causing his defender to duck, whereupon he rolled and stepped into a low bounce shot that beat Kelly to end the game. “Obviously scoring an overtime winner is a pretty awesome feeling, regardless of the importance of the individual game, but this one was a little better than any I’ve ever had,” Bonacci said. “This game was very important for our Ivy League tournament hopes and had we let the game slip away we would be in a tough situation. Our defense held strong all game and, despite some second half offensive struggles, we got it done as a team and that’s what it’s going to take to achieve our ultimate goal.” The Bulldogs had a poor second half, losing the shot and ground-ball battle. The Elis took four penalties in the final frame, which led to two goals for Brown. Yale stayed in the game thanks to the Bears’ 21 turnovers, Natales’s 10-save performance and Levings’s performance at the faceoff X. The win pushed Yale above 0.500 in the Ivy League and into fourth place in the conference. The Elis will next play two nonconference games before ending the season with a crucial matchup against Harvard at Reese Stadium on April 26. “Like I have said before we need to play a whole 60 minutes,” Mangan said. “We played a great first half but we need to continue that for a full game.” The Bulldogs play Michigan in the Big House this Saturday at 4 p.m. Contact FREDERICK FRANK at frederick.frank@yale.edu .

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS BUBBA WATSON The golfer added a spiffy new green jacket to his wardrobe on Sunday after winning the Masters for the second time in three years. Watson shot -8 for the tournament and took home $1,620,000 in winnings along with his new jacket.

Baseball keeps Red Rolfe lead

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The baseball team beat Dartmouth 6–0 in seven innings in the first game on Sunday. BY GREG CAMERON STAFF REPORTER On paper, the Yale baseball team had everything it needed to win its four-game series at Dartmouth this past weekend. The Bulldogs headed into the weekend leading the Big Green by three games in the Ivy League standings and had posted better numbers than a young Dartmouth squad both offensively and defensively.

BASEBALL But in the end it was Dartmouth (10–17, 5–7 Ivy) over-

powering Yale (13–18, 6–6) at the plate and taking a 3–1 series victory on its home field. Yale dropped two games on Saturday, 8–2 and 12–3, came back to win 6–0 in the first game on Sunday and then fell 4–2 in the series finale. “Dartmouth is always the favorite in our half of the league,” captain and shortstop Cale Hanson ’14 said in an email. “We expected them to be good regardless of their record going into this weekend. … We only scored two runs in game four, but I was proud of the way our team came back after a rough two games on Saturday.”

Softball swept by Dartmouth BY ASHLEY WU STAFF REPORTER The softball team was at the mercy of Dartmouth this past weekend, dropping a four-game series to the top team in the Ivy League.

SOFTBALL Yale (5–27, 1–11 Ivy) traveled to Hanover, N.H. to face Dartmouth (23–13, 12–0 Ivy), which has started its conference play undefeated this year. Harvard (21–11, 7–0 Ivy) is the only other remaining undefeated squad, although the Crimson has only played half of its Ancient Eight games due to

The Elis’ lead over the Big Green in the Red Rolfe standings dropped from three games to one with the losses. With Dartmouth’s tiebreaker advantage, the lead will need to remain that way for Yale to make the Ivy League championship series. The main positive of the weekend was ace pitcher Chris Lanham ’16, who stymied yet another offense with a complete game shutout in the third game of the series. In three starts in Ivy League play, Lanham has allowed just one run through 20.1 innings — good for a league-best 0.45 conference ERA. Lanham’s efforts led Yale to a

6–0 victory in the third game. He fanned four while scattering four singles, two in the seventh, that turned out to be harmless. “Chris Lanham has been incredible for us this season,” Hanson said. “I think most of his success comes from his ability to throw all three of his pitches for strikes at any time he wants to. He keeps hitters off balance and [that] leads to a lot of weak contact.” Yale held just a 1–0 lead through five until the offense eventually figured out Big Green starter Michael Danielak in the sixth. Five of Yale’s first seven batters in the inning hit singles,

leading to five runs and a 6–0 victory. But the six-run effort by the offense happened in the game in which the Bulldogs needed it least. In the other three games, Eli pitchers suffered from a lack of run support as Yale fell 8–2, 12–3 and then 4–2. “That’s just baseball, I guess,” catcher Robert Baldwin ’15 said in an email. “The cliche term is that ‘hitting is contagious.’ … We had runners in the correct positions the other games, but lacked the big hit or lucky bounce which could bust the inning and game open.” During game one on Saturday,

starting pitcher Chasen Ford ’17, who pitched six shutout innings against Cornell the weekend before, was knocked around from the beginning, as the Big Green scored on two hits and a fielder’s choice in the first frame. The Bulldog offense responded to assist Ford and kept the game close at 3–2 through three and a half innings. Dartmouth’s Nick Lombardi took the game over at that point, however, homering in his next two at-bats to drive in four runs. Relief pitcher Nate O’Leary ’15 replaced Ford in the sixth SEE BASEBALL PAGE B2

Track races rival Harvard

poor weather conditions. The Bulldogs challenged the Big Green all weekend. “I think for the most part we were competitive with Dartmouth,” catcher Sarah Onorato ’15 said. “Although obviously disappointed by the results, there are a few things we can take away. Our defense was great all weekend, and we need to continue to increase our effectiveness at the plate. In many of the games we have played, we [have been] a timely hit or two away from changing the result. Focusing in at the plate, especially with runners on, is somewhere we can SEE SOFTBALL PAGE B2

FOLAKE OGUNMOLA/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The women’s track and field team fell to Harvard 87–53 on the road this weekend. BY SYDNEY GLOVER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The track and field teams headed to Cambridge this weekend to face off against archrival Harvard. While the Crimson won overall, the Elis had many top-three finishes and multiple athletes broke personal records.

TRACK AND FIELD BRIANNA LOO/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The softball team fell to 1–11 in the Ivy League after this weekend.

“It was awesome to have so many people P.R. in a meet against some of our

toughest competition,” Renee Vogel ’16 said. After a few races without any top-three finishes, Kelsey Lin ’14 took third in the 100-meter dash with a time of 12.50, less than one second behind the first-place finisher from Harvard. Shannon McDonnell ’16, Frances Schmiede ’17 and Grace Brittan ’16 took second, third and fourth, respectively, in the 800-meter run, while Elizabeth McDonald ’16 showed her skill in the 3000-meter run, taking first with a time of 10:00.14. The Yale field competitors stayed close

with Harvard, starting with first- and second-place finishes by Emily Urciuoli ’14 and Vogel in the pole vault. Amanda Snajder ’14 and Megan Toon ’16 took second and third in the javelin throw, while Karleh Wilson ’16, Kate Simon ’17 and Taylor Eldridge ’16 took second, third and fourth, respectively, in the discus throw. The same three girls competed in the hammer throw — Eldridge ended in second, Wilson in third and Simon in fourth. Snajder showed her long-jump abiliSEE TRACK PAGE B2


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