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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 · VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 50 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

LIGHT SNOW CLEAR

40 25

CROSS CAMPUS

FAST FOOD ADVERTISING TARGETS YOUTHS

THEATER

PAGES 6-7 SCI-TECH

PAGE 5 CITY

BASKETBALL

New Haven signs away Shubert Theater to local non-profit

Yale falls to powerful UConn squad PAGE 12 SPORTS

University honors veterans

Antidivestment group founded

Admissions dean accepts his better half. Dean of

Undergraduate Admissions Jeremiah Quinlan has admitted a great number of students to Yale, but only one person to his heart. Quinlan’s wedding, which took place this past Saturday, was probably an affair similar to the regular applicant’s notification date on April 1 every year — a day of excitement for a select individual but longing, jealousy and resentment for the majority of others. Sorry to the former lovers Quinlan has waitlisted or rejected — here’s hoping they find their safeties.

IN LEAD-UP TO REFERENDUM, STUDENT FACTIONS FORM BY ADRIAN RODRIGUES STAFF REPORTER

Protecting protection. From now until Nov. 15, students can pick up free condom compacts — plastic holders for condoms — in exchange for undergoing STI consultations at Yale Health. Students can either find out they have an STI or protect themselves against future ones — win-win! From the tables down at Mory’s, to the steps of the

Supreme Court. Most recently in D.C., the Whiffenpoofs graced the offices of SCOTUSBlog with their a cappella. In case you missed it, Whiffenpoof Dan Stein ’14, former Opinion Editor at the News, was the SCOTUSBlog intern who became a veritable GIF for running a Supreme Court ruling down as if his life and future political career depended on it. Here’s hoping tomorrow Stein will run faster, stretch out his arms farther … And one fine morning…

Rhetorical question. A

Monday column from The Harvard Crimson chided Harvardians for being perpetual players of the “Who has it worse game?” where students constantly try to one-up each other’s misery. “Harvard students’ favorite game to play during midterm season” only creates a cycle of humble-brags, mutual resentment and extreme stress, the columnist pointed out. Too bad Harvard itself is so good at winning the “Who has it worse game” when compared to Yale.

Caterpillars become butterflies. College students

are like fine wine in that they improve with age. Recognizing this fact, a recent video created by the Dartmouth library entitled “Echoes of Dartmouth” juxtaposed interviews with eight seniors conducted this fall with interviews taped with their awkward former freshmen selves in 2009.

Strangers in a strange land. Campus Canadians

commemorated their own variety of Veterans Day in the Yale Law School courtyard on Monday with the passing of poppies, a symbol of veterans’ contributions in the land to the North.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1968 Ticket sales for the Yale-Harvard game cease as the event becomes oversubscribed.

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The annual Veterans Day ceremony took place on Beinecke Plaza yesterday in front of the World War I memorial. BY YUVAL BEN-DAVID STAFF REPORTER Over 100 people gathered on Monday afternoon in Beinecke Plaza for the annual Veterans Day ceremony to celebrate the increasingly public role of service men and women in the Yale community. The ceremony, which was attended by several university administrators as well as mayorelect Toni Harp ARC ’78, had a strong focus on students, according to Woodbridge Fellow Marj Berman ’13, who helped organize the event. Though members of the Yale University Police Department served as the honor guard, and World War II veteran Rev. Harry Adams ’45 DIV ’51 delivered a closing benediction, current Yale students — veterans and members of the Reserve Officers Training Corps on campus — were the central figures of the event. At the ceremony, Sarah Barbo FES ’14 SOM ’14, who served in the

U.S. Army from 2006 to 2013 and was nominated to give remarks by the Yale Student Veterans Council, encouraged listeners to commit themselves to something bigger than themselves and to embody veterans’ values in their lives at Yale. “What if we all lived like this?” she asked. “As if our lives depended on the people next to us fulfilling their potential?” More than 60 veterans are currently attending classes at Yale, according to University Secretary and Vice President for Student Life Kimberly Goff-Crews, who said in her welcome address at the ceremony that she is “optimistic about making Yale more veteran-friendly.” Silliman Dean Hugh Flick — a Vietnam War veteran and annual attendee of the ceremony — said he has seen an uptick in attendance at the Veterans Day ceremonies ever since the ROTC program returned to campus at the beginning of last year. In his tribute, current Eli Whit-

ney student Alex Hawke ’14 spoke about the “incredible public spirit” that is a hallmark of service members. Hawke especially pointed to women, African-Americans and homosexuals who fought for the nation abroad before fully earning their rights at home. Berman said the ceremony tried to incorporate as many veterans and students as possible, balancing Yale traditions and service traditions alike. She added that this year is the first that the ceremony has been live streamed online, in an effort to open the event up to families and alumni who could not be present on campus. Josh Clapper ’16, a student who is involved in the Navy Reserve Officers Training Corps, said students in attendance at the ceremony from the ROTC program were put in a unique position, as they were connected to the U.S. Armed Forces

Until now, student discourse on divestment at Yale has been one-sided, Alex Fisher ’14, the founder of Students for a Strong Endowment, told the News, adding that Students for a Strong Endowment wants to stimulate a conversation rather than a lecture. While membership is informal, the group has roughly 15 to 20 students interested in joining, he said. “Our underlying message is we accept and we understand why so many people are concerned with the environment

SEE VETERANS PAGE 4

SEE DIVESTMENT PAGE 8

Town-gown central for new leaders HARP, SALOVEY TO BUILD ON PRECEDENT AND PERSONAL COMMONALITIES BY MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS, POOJA SALHOTRA AND ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTER, CONTRIBUTING REPORTER, STAFF REPORTER On a quiet Thursday morning last week, two of the foremost leaders in New Haven met officially for the first time. Two days after she was elected mayor, Toni Harp ARC ’78 joined Yale President Peter Salovey for a brief meeting on the steps of City Hall, where the freshly minted president offered his congratulations to the mayor-elect and re-emphasized his desire to work closely with the city. The chat precedes what both foresee as extensive collaboration, in education reform, economic development and coping with the city’s budget shortfalls. The two new officials’ concurrent transitions into University and city leadership mirror those of former University President Richard Levin and outgoing Mayor John DeStefano,

Debate is ramping up in preparation for the Yale College Council’s campus-wide referendum on fossil fuel divestment to be held Nov. 17. Several days after Fossil Free Yale — a student group pushing for the University to phase out endowment investments in fossil fuel companies — submitted a prodivestment statement to the YCC’s referendum website, a new student group known as Students for a Strong Endowment submitted a “con” statement on Friday. Challenging Fossil Free Yale, Students for a Strong Endowment argued against using the endowment to make political statements, an action that they said could establish “troubling” precedents for the University. In the days leading up to the referendum, members of Students for a Strong Endowment said they will try to raise awareness for their cause.

Jr. 20 years ago. With town-gown collaboration a hallmark of their predecessors’ tenures, Salovey and Harp said they plan to expand upon Levin and DeStefano’s two-decade partnership. “There’s a considerable advantage in having the two of them come in at the same time so that they can learn to trust one another from the beginning,” said Yale School of Management Professor Douglas Rae, who served as the city’s chief administrative officer from 1990 to 1991 under former Mayor John C. Daniels. Salovey and Harp arrived in New Haven over 30 years ago for the same reason: education. “We both came to Yale for graduate school. We both met our spouses as graduate students. And then we both, upon completing graduate school, decided to stay in New Haven,” Salovey said. “We start off both caring passionately about this place, SEE TOWN-GOWN PAGE 4

Our underlying message is we accept and we understand why so many people are concerned with the environment and its future. ALEX FISHER ’14 Students for a Strong Endowment, founder

Smaller endowments outperform Yale BY ADRIAN RODRIGUES STAFF REPORTER The Yale endowment is no longer the top-performing fund for the past three- and five-year periods. According to preliminary findings released Nov. 6 from the NACUBOCommonfund Study of Endowments — the most comprehensive annual report on higher education endowments — American colleges and universities saw an average endowment return of 4.3 percent over the past five years. Though Yale bested the national average, the New York Times reported Friday that at least two lesser-known schools, Abilene Christian University in Texas and Spalding University in Louisville, have greatly outperformed Yale over the past three- and five- years periods. According to the NACUBO-Commonfund report, schools with large endowments have seen lower investment returns on average over the past five years than schools with small and mid-sized endowments. “Yale is the gold standard by which everyone else measures their performance,” said James Stewart, a business journalism professor at Columbia

and the author of the New York Times article. “[But] nothing lasts forever.” Smaller endowments’ strong performances over the past several years have been the result of high returns from investments in publicly traded companies, Stewart said. Schools with smaller endowments tend to allocate a larger percentage of their assets toward the stock market. Finance professor Roger Ibbotson echoed Stewart’s remarks, adding that stocks have outperformed private equity over the past few years. Still, he said Yale’s performance over the past decade has remained strong. Over the past 10 years, endowments with over $1 billion in total assets, such as Yale’s and Harvard’s, have continued to maintain the highest average return, according to the report. “It’s like the New York Yankees,” Ibbotson said. “Even if you have a great record, you can’t win every year.” In the fiscal year that ended Jun. 30, the nearly 500 U.S. colleges and universities surveyed for the NACUBOCommonfund study averaged a return of 11.7 percent, up from a loss of 0.3 SEE ENDOWMENT PAGE 8


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YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “Never fear to speak the truth as you see it” yaledailynews.com/opinion

The online game plan O

ver the last year, headlines for more than one of the News’ articles on Yale’s online education efforts have included the word “cautious.” While Stanford, Harvard and MIT have dived headfirst into the world of MOOCs — Massive Open Online Courses — Yale has only offered four. Yale continues to expand offerings on Open Yale Courses, where anyone can watch videos of lectures, though without the evaluations and other course material that many now expect with an online course. But it has yet to articulate a clear vision of what OYC is supposed to accomplish — or for whom. And while it has dabbled in online Summer Session seminar offerings, it has worked to keep those classes as close to brick-and-mortar ones as is technologically possible, even charging the same price as for on-campus summer courses. This apparent ambivalence about the role of technology and the Internet in higher education reflects a welcome note of carefulness and skepticism in a debate that often lacks either. There is no shortage of politicians, entrepreneurs and, increasingly, college administrators who eagerly play up the promise of MOOCs, arguing that they will democratize American higher education, enabling the same skills to be taught at a fraction of their former cost. But the evidence of their educational benefits remains scarce. Though often touted as a way of increasing America’s much bemoaned college graduation rates, the reality is that online offerings — far more than physical courses — tend to result in enormous discrepancies between the number of students enrolling and finishing a particular course. But while Yale is right to be skeptical of the power of unproven techniques to cure all that ails higher education, I wish it would be more ambitious taking advantage of technology within its own classes. In particular, I wonder why, in 2013, such a large portion of our course offerings is comprised of traditional, noninteractive lectures. Physical lectures may offer some marginal benefits over online versions. They provide structure that videos lack and offer students the opportunity to ask questions. And they maintain a certain interpersonal component. One of my professors this semester often breaks into short tangents in lecture to playfully mock a Teaching Fellow or to ask a student why he was late. He explained to me once that many of his comments — often tossed out with a careless air — are part of a conscious strategy to encourage his students’ active attention and engagement. Still, none of these arguments really explain why Yale’s approach to lectures hasn’t evolved with technology. While a traditional class may provide some students with structure, for

others who regularly miss lectures, online re co rd ings could increase viewership. As for offerHARRY ing a platLARSON form for students’ quesNothing in tions, many lectures I’ve Particular been in don’t seem to provide one. Even when lecturers do take questions, the result is often interruptions that most students find irritating and unnecessary. As for the idea that students in a room may be more engaged than those plugged into a laptop — well, that may very well be true. But that brings me to the most exciting aspect of the promise of online lectures. They leave space for professors and students to make better use of their time in the classroom. Often when people speak of putting lectures online, they seem excited by the notion that students will instead be able to take more seminars. We could learn introductory material on our own time — possibly with the help of TFs — but actually enroll in smaller classes, where we get to discuss material with professors. But even if that’s not the case — as Yale would need to offer six seminars in order to replace one 90-person lecture — putting lectures online could still greatly improve many courses’ potential. Professors could, for instance, use the time they previously spent preparing and giving lectures to instead lead some of their course’s discussion sections. It wouldn’t be a full seminar experience, but students would still get more frequent opportunities to engage with their professors, while many TFs would likely benefit from the chance to see experienced teaching firsthand. Alternatively, professors could require students to watch lectures online for homework, and then use class time to field questions, examine certain points in depth and even initiate a large class-wide discussion. Religious studies professor Christine Hayes used precisely that strategy to teach her course on the Old Testament once a recording of a previous year’s version was posted on Open Yale Courses. Student evaluations of the new method were enormously positive. Online courses are rightly heralded as possible game-changers for the structure of higher education. But even more important is the potential that online material has to improve the quality of our physical classes. It’s time for Yale to make that potential a reality. HARRY LARSON is a senior in Jonathan Edwards College. His column runs on alternate Tuesdays. Contact him at harry.larson@yale.edu .

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COPYRIGHT 2013 — VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 50

'THEANTIYALE' ON 'LOOKING TO BROWN AND CUNY'

GUEST COLUMNIST BEN MALLET

A historic Ward 1 candidacy O

n Election Day, the atmosphere in the War Room was electric. The staff of the Paul Chandler campaign had been energized for weeks. Six of us had stayed on campus with Paul over fall break, spending 10 hours a day canvassing, conducting policy analysis and debate prep. When the opportunity came to face off against our opponent directly at the debate, Paul did not disappoint. Endorsements from Democrats and Independents in the city came rolling in that week and it seemed that at every staff meeting, we heard anecdotes about how “one of my liberal friends is going to vote for Paul.” Aggressive canvassing, telephone calls and “get out the vote” efforts from our opponent’s campaign couldn’t shake us. We were even told by one of our opponent’s campaign staff that they had secretly voted for Paul. The momentum was on our side. But by 8:15 on election night, I found myself sitting with Paul as he telephoned Alderwoman Sarah Eidelson to concede the race. We were crushed. Announcing the result to a room full of 40 dedicated volunteers, many of whom had started out back in April, was one of the hardest things I’ve had to do. But after a few days, as we resumed our normal lives, we realized the historic nature of our result. A Republican, the first to run in over two decades,

had won nearly 40 percent of the vote in Ward 1 — a ward where registered Democrats outnumbered Republicans 10 to one. Paul had won the most votes out of any Aldermanic challenger across the city. For the first time in decades, a Ward 1 Alderman was seeking re-election, which gave us, the challengers, a duty to highlight her record in office. We raised her lack of engagement with the student body as well as her connection with the UNITE HERE union political machine. In holding our incumbent to account, we encouraged an informed debate on campus. The fact that Paul received support from Democrats at Yale and in the city, such as Ward 19’s alderman-elect, Michael Stratton, also reflects the true political divide in New Haven: one between union-backed politicians and independent representatives. In September, both Stratton and Ward 7’s Alderman Doug Hausladen sought to challenge the UNITE HERE political machine in city government and both found themselves fighting off aggressive primary challenges against union-backed candidates as a result. This previously hidden political divide in our city was an issue we wanted to bring to the attention of Yale students. We also challenged Yalies to consider the relationship they wanted with the city, and argued that it took an active and engaged current student to be

Yale’s voice in New Haven. The combination of these three narratives meant that a real discussion took place about Yale’s relationship with New Haven, its politics and its future — and we are incredibly proud to have been the catalyst for that discourse.

PAUL CHANDLER SPARKED A DISCOURSE ON THIS CAMPUS Regardless of your political affiliation, I think most of us can agree that strong political discussions at Yale are good. A university campus should not be an echo chamber for liberal rhetoric, nor should it be a presumed hotbed for one political party. The fact that many students who identified as liberal or as Democrats — and had never voted for a Republican before — put their trust in Paul is a testament to the mature and pragmatic nature of debate that can be achieved among scholars at Yale. One prominent member of the Yale College Democrats even confided to me: “You got me to vote for a Republican, which is a pretty big deal.” This race sparked a change in our University, which began to transform campus into a forum

for political debate and for challenging the status quo. Paul Chandler may have lost the election on Nov. 5, but he and many others in our city, such as mayoral candidate Justin Elicker, will be remembered as trailblazers. Those seeking to replicate their efforts, years from now, will recognize this election as the first step towards a transparent and accountable city government. In a recent opinion piece for the New Haven Register, Elicker declared this election “historic, in that it marks the beginning of a transformation in the principles defining government and political engagement.” He was right. Whether it’s two, four or six years from now, New Haven will elect more of the independent thinkers and principled public servants that it so desperately needs. The Paul Chandler campaign, a campaign dismissed by many as a joke three months ago, successfully shook up political discourse at Yale and challenged many students to retreat from the echo chamber. At the first full campaign staff meeting we held back in August, I told my team that we were in this race to make history — and that’s what we did. BEN MALLET is a sophomore in Davenport College and the former campaign manager of Paul Chandler for Alderman. Contact him at ben.mallet@yale.edu .

GUE ST COLUMNIST TINA LU

A Chinese DS? W

ith a certain comforting rhythm, Yale undergraduates publicly laud Directed Studies, or bemoan its narrow ethnocentricity. I have not taught in D.S. (but for full disclosure, my spouse teaches in D.S. and is furthermore a white male, teaching the writing of other white males). Still, you might think that I — a youngish, ethnically Chinese scholar of Chinese literature and moreover the intellectual product of the culture wars of the 1990s — would basically agree with certain critiques of the program, as an obsolete, biased, sepia-toned snapshot of Yale of the 1940s. Nothing could be further from the truth. Directed Studies is a timetested, but constantly evolving curriculum that makes a lot of sense as it is, spanning the classical period to the beginnings of the 20th century. By the end of the second semester, reading Marx takes on a wholly different resonance to students who will have read precisely the same classical thinkers Marx himself did. It’s a crash course in cultural and textual tradition, and it has been a privilege for me to teach students who have taken its courses and accepted its challenges. Perhaps I find D.S. so per-

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suasive as a model because I myself am a scholar of another, also largely self-enclosed textual tradition. When Professor Mick Hunter and I came up with the idea of East Asian Languages and Literatures 200, “The Chinese Tradition,” it was precisely to recreate not so much the Chinese canon (or one version of it) as, more broadly, the experience of canon — so that Yale students could hear the same complicated echoes across the 3,000 years of textual continuity as traditional Chinese writers themselves.

DIRECTED STUDIES IS NOT MEANT TO ENCOMPASS THE ENTIRE WORLD'S GREAT WORKS When we read Mencius now, we read his works partly as a primary text that dates back to the 4th century BCE, and partly through the prism of other writers. Early on, Mencius was one among many thinkers, all pondering similar questions about human nature and government,

Time to divest On a recent visit to New Haven, I was very pleased to learn of the active movement to get Yale to divest from the fossilfuel companies that are quite literally ruining the planet. Those promoting divestment, myself included, are not expecting Exxon to crumble. But there is a compelling need for the U.S. to get on a path of reducing its greenhouse gas emissions by about 6.5% a year between 2015 and 2050, and everyone should be taking whatever actions they can, including Yale. Climate disruption is not an ordinary issue. As leading investor Jeremy Grantham has noted, climate change “is not only the crisis of your lives — it is also the crisis of our species’ existence.” The ethical case for divestment is a powerful one. Ethical investors like Yale should not be partaking of the profits made by companies that are knowingly and irresponsibly ruining the planet for future generations and, beyond that, effectively ensuring that little or nothing is done about it. More practically, if more and more peo-

but by 1350 CE, the text had become state orthodoxy, memorized from early childhood, tested on in the examination system. A class like “The Chinese Tradition” coheres because of the examination system — like the University, one of the world’s most successful institutional models for cultural preservation — and also because of the continuity of the Chinese tradition, whose sheer volume of text dwarfs that of all European languages added together. But this tradition is far from a monolith, and one of the great pleasures of studying it from within is not simply to listen for call and response across time, but also to come to recognize that great traditions have been able to generate and integrate internal critiques. Yes, the Chinese state orthodoxy was terribly closed and inhumane to outsiders and commercial interests and women. But the writings of Li Yu (1610-1680) — to name one writer among scores I could choose — make this point with more subtlety, humor and intelligence than any outside observer ever could. I can understand how a student might be dissatisfied with the incompleteness and seemingly walled-in nature of D.S., but D.S. was never meant to be the summa of humanities stud-

ies, just an introduction and a demonstration of the value in carefully reading texts of historical importance. Yale College already has many classes in multiple departments that reflect the rich and diverse cultural legacy of the world. Many of these classes are small and housed in small departments — but that is what OCI and shopping period are for. In my own department, East Asian Languages and Literatures, most of the courses taught by professors have no prerequisites and no language requirement, and we welcome with open arms students with no previous exposure. To critics and fans of D.S., we are here; we are providing precisely the sort of content you are seeking. We will not offer you the canon, any more than D.S. can or does. There is no onestop shop. And no, we can’t recreate the past so that it looks the way Yale in its glorious equality and diversity does. But we can help you realize one of the great humanistic desires, to listen and to understand voices from other times, speaking in other languages.

ple join in the effort (as is happening), the campaign will have a major educational impact, shame the fossil companies and make everyone associated with them think a little harder. Finally, every movement requires victims and villains. We have seen the ranks of the coal, fracking, pipeline and other fossil fuel victims grow, and now we are seeing the rapid growth of actual climate change victims. On the other hand, the villainry has been diffused Pogo-like into “we have met the enemy and it is us.” What Bill McKibben and 350.org are now doing brilliantly is changing that by fingering, quite correctly, the fossil giants as the villains. For the first time, a real movement to head off climate disaster is building. These are the reasons I’d urge Yale to embrace divestment: ethical imperative (ill-gained money), educational impact and movement building. If in addi-

tion the campaign raises the price of capital and drives up fossil fuel prices, all the better. I am aware of some arguments on the other side of this issue. To claim that Yale would be diminishing its investment returns is an argument that denies the objective of investing ethically. If we look closely at what’s going on — to the climate and in our politics — investing in fossil fuels is not a close call. It’s clearly wrong. It’s also time to replace the strategy of working for change as a shareholder with something more effective. My hope is that Yale will demonstrate real leadership here.

TINA LU is the chair and professor of East Asian Languages and Literatures. Contact her at tina.lu@yale.edu .

JAMES GUSTAVE SPETH Nov. 10 The author is a former dean of the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, a 1969 graduate of the Yale Law School and a 1964 graduate of Jonathan Edwards College.


YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“All people are born alike — except Republicans and Democrats.” GRAUCHO MARX AMERICAN COMEDIAN

CORRECTIONS MONDAY, NOV. 11

Yale Republicans plan next move

The article “Student teachers make a Splash at Yale” incorrectly identified Amy Estersohn as an assistant director of undergraduate admissions at the University of Chicago. She is in fact the former assistant director. The article “Y-Hack brings coders to West Campus” omitted to name Matthew Rajcok ’16 as one of the students who worked on the second-place winning app, “Lux.”

Website may counter crime BY TASNIM ELBOUTE CONTRIBUTING REPORTER A recent report highlights SeeClickFix, an online tool that city residents can use to report nonemergency issues in their neighborhoods, as a potential tool to fight crime in New Haven. The website, first founded in New Haven in 2008, allows residents to report a wide range of local issues, including cracked sidewalks, downed trees and the need for a supermarket closer to a given neighborhood. In its “Community Index” report released in October, DataHaven found that neighborhoods that file more requests through seeClickFix typically witness less crime. “The number of SeeClickFix reports are inverse to the amount of crime in a neighborhood,” said Ben Berkowitz, CEO and founder of SeeClickFix. Approximately 13,000 New Haven residents have created SeeClickFix accounts since the service’s debut, Berkowitz said. He added it now serves as the primary means of communication between residents and City Hall. Once an issue is documented, that report is sent to the local government and other neighbors. Other viewers can share, comment on and vote up problems they would also like to see fixed to increase urgency, Berkowitz said. The report shows that, neighborhoods in the Elm City with lower crime rates tend to have more active SeeClickFix users. However, this does not necessarily mean that SeeClickFix is causing a decrease in neighborhood crime, said Ward 7 Alderman Doug Hausladen ’04. “The conclusion isn’t that SeeClickFix doesn’t decrease crime,” Hausladen said. “But it helps collect information on problems in neighborhoods.” Hausladen attributes his election to the Board of Aldermen in part to his ability to bring about small improvements in his ward through problems posted on SeeClickFix. He added that he

often uses it for problems that arise in his ward, and he cites its use for solving a recent flurry of complaints about garbage trucks driving through the ward too early in the morning and waking up residents. Hausladen partnered with the Common Ground center to teach 40 New Haven residents how to use SeeClickFix at the Wilson Branch library in 2009. After that event, the reporting platform saw a spike of abandoned land related issues. “It is an outreach effort. When you make the outreach, you see the user activity,” Hausladen said. Although the use of SeeClickFix in New Haven is becoming more prevalent, Berkowitz said the organization has a long way to go before the platform is adopted by the majority of New Haven residents. “We have some super users that truly get around to all neighborhoods,” Hausladen said. “But I have noticed that there is a gap in usage.” Seven New Haven residents surveyed on the New Haven Green had not heard of SeeClickFix, but all said they saw its potential as a useful tool in improving their neighborhoods. New Haven resident Charles Ellwood Sr. said he is “sick and tired” of seeing the same structural issues in his neighborhood. He said he is a proponent of SeeClickFix if it will help regulate citizens’ complaints and guarantee that people responsible for repairs are doing their jobs. SeeClickFix is organizing a meet up on Nov. 21 to discuss how to increase use of its platform in the city’s troubled neighborhoods. Berkowitz said he hopes this conversation will help spread the word about SeeClickFix in areas with low usage. SeeClickFix is used in 25,000 towns and 8,000 neighborhoods worldwide. Contact TASNIM ELBOUTE at tasnim.elboute@yale.edu .

ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Paul Chandler ’14, a former Republican candidate for Ward 1, lost the electionn on Nov. 5 to the democratic incumbent. BY LEO KIM CONTRIBUTING REPORTER In the wake of the recent Ward 1 aldermanic loss, the Republican Party at Yale is regrouping and working to change their image on campus. Paul Chandler ’14, the former Republican candidate for Ward 1, may have lost the election, but Republicans interviewed said that he was able to garner bipartisan support by appealing to moderates across campus. Appealing to a moderate crowd is a strategy they said they plan to capitalize on in the future. Often it is difficult for Republicans at Yale to avoid being grouped with extreme conservative ideologies, said Austin Schaefer ’15, the chairman of the Yale College Republicans. “The biggest problem that the GOP faces on campus is getting past people’s knee-jerk reaction to the word Republican,” Schaefer said. Catherine Shaw ’16, a member of Chandler’s senior staff, said Chandler’s campaign marked the beginning of moving Yale’s student body beyond the negativity associated with Republicans. Many people on campus responded well to him as a person and found him genuinely interested in improving New Haven, she

said. As a result of Chandler’s charisma, the Republican Party affiliation played a smaller role in the election than people would have assumed at the beginning, said Ben Mallet ’16, Chandler’s campaign manager.

The biggest problem that the GOP faces on campus is getting past people’s knee-jerk reaction to the word Republican. AUSTIN SCHAEFER ’15 Chairman, Yale College Republicans With Ted Cruz and Rand Paul representing the Republican party at the moment, the more extreme ends of the Party seem to be in the forefront of many people’s minds, and it is just this conception the campaign sought to combat, Schaefer said. “We showed lot of liberal Yalies what a Republican actually looks like,” said Schaefer. “Yale got to see a Republican candidate who was not only immensely

reasonable, practical and approachable, but who also really cared.” Though the Republicans said they believe they are making a comeback at Yale, Tyler Blackmon ’16, the communications director for the Yale College Deomcrats, said that Chandler’s appeal to moderates further proves that Yale continues to be a liberal campus. Paul Chandler, Blackmon said, did not run for alderman with a conservative agenda. “Paul Chandler was only able to get 37 percent, but only after tacking very far to the left. He had to distance himself from conservatism,” Blackmon said. “What this means is that Yalies don’t like conservatism and the center for this race was very far left.” Though Republicans at Yale said that they plan to continue to try to change the image of conservatism on campus, they did not specify how they plan to be politically active in the future. However, Schaefer said that Yale Republicans are excited to be involved in the gubernatorial and congressional elections next fall. In the recent election, Chandler received 285 out of 798 votes. Contact LEO KIM at leo.kim@yale.edu .

Crash sends bus, cruiser onto Green

ALEXANDRA SCHMELING/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

One of the two lampposts involved in the crash went through the bus’s front windshield, the other came to rest on top of the bus. BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTER A New Haven Police Department cruiser collided with a CT Transit bus on the corner of Elm and Temple Streets on Monday morning, knocking officer Vic-

tor Herrera unconscious as his vehicle slammed into a concrete block on the curb of the New Haven Green. The incident sent Herrera to the emergency room at Yale-New Haven Hospital and the woman operating the bus, as well as 23 of her passengers, to area hospi-

tals. No fatalities were reported. A number of children on the bus appeared visibly shaken as they awaited the arrival of emergency medical technicians. Two squad cars were responding to a call for service at Union Station, where a fight had broken out involv-

ing a “deranged person,” when one of them barreled into the bus, according to NHPD Chief Dean Esserman. Eyewitnesses on the scene said they saw two cruisers zipping down Elm Street with their sirens on as the bus moved southwest on Temple Street. Megan Kairiss, a high school student at Haddam-Killingworth High School, said the first cruiser passed the intersection safely before the second car collided with the bus. The cruiser ricocheted into a cement block on the western corner of the intersection as the bus swerved onto the Green across Temple Street, colliding with two lampposts. One pole went through the bus’s front windshield, the other came to rest on top of the bus. “It sounded like a dump truck hitting the ground after falling from two stories up,” said Kevin Swingle, who was standing at the curb at the time of collision, which police marked as occurring at 11:05 a.m. New Haven Mayor John DeStefano Jr., who was on the scene to attend a Veterans Day ceremony at Center Church on the Green, said Herrera sustained serious injuries but was taken to the emergency room in a stable condition. New Haven Fire Department Chief Michael Grant said firefighters were called to the scene and had to use hydraulic tools to force the driver’s side door open to free Herrera. Officer Mark Foster and NHPD Spokesman David Hartman confirmed that Herrera was knocked temporarily unconscious by the air bag in his vehicle. “Thank God the airbag deployed,” Esserman said, adding that it was emotionally difficult to watch firefight-

ers pulling Herrera, who has been with the force for nearly 19 years, from the cruiser. In a subsequent press statement, Hartman said the officer is being treated for injuries that are serious but “not life threatening.” The woman operating the bus sustained less serious injuries, Hartman said, as she was able to walk with family members to the ambulance. He said eyewitnesses alleging that the bus driver was speeding ignored the difficulty of suddenly stopping a vehicle of that size. Kelly Bowe, who was on the scene when the crash occurred, said it seemed as if the bus driver tried to slow down but that the vehicle was already in the intersection before the driver could avoid the cruiser. Esserman said the investigation into the crash is still ongoing and that all eyewitnesses seem to be cooperating with detectives. Hartman added that it is unlikely there will be a finding of fault or a discovery of contributing factors for weeks. The entire intersection was closed off following the crash, with squad cars stationed on the corner of College and Elm Streets to redirect traffic. By around 3 p.m., traffic had returned to normal. Monday’s incident marked the second time in just over three months that a collision at the Elm-Temple intersection has forced a police car into a stone post by the Green. In early August, a Cheshire teen ran a red light and crashed into a cruiser, which then hopped the curb and collided with a cement block. Contact ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” BENJAMIN FRANKLIN AMERICAN SCIENTIST AND STATESMAN

New leaders look to town-gown future

FIRSTNAME LASTNAME/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

University President Peter Salovey and Mayor-elect Toni Harp ARC ’78 plan to work closely together in their new roles, addressing problems such as education reform, economic development and shortfalls of the city budget. TOWN-GOWN FROM PAGE 1 both having spent essentially our entire adult lives in this city.” Rae said the leaders’ common reason for moving to New Haven provides a significant advantage in building their relationship. After DeStefano took office in 1994, Rae said, the mayor took several years to remove a “chip on his shoulder” over being from a blue-collar background — a personal discomfort that mirrored the broader dynamics of YaleNew Haven relations. “Historically, the town-gown animosity wasn’t just in the mayor’s office — it was in the body politic of New Haven,” said Will Ginsberg, CEO of the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven. Well over a decade before Levin and DeStefano re-envisioned the Yale-New Haven relationship, Harp entered public service after completing an architecture degree in 1978. Salovey joined the Yale faculty when he finished a series of advanced degrees in psychology in 1984. And while the two did not

meet during their time as Yale students, both said their relationship extends back well over a decade. Salovey said he first heard of Harp in the mid-’90s, when his wife Marta Moret SPH ’84 worked for the Connecticut Department of Social Services. Harp said she first remembers meeting Salovey in person when he was dean of Yale College in the mid-2000s. “I always admired him,” Harp said. “[He] has a really strong feel for what I would consider the human condition, with the work that he’s done on emotional intelligence.” Harp said she believes the University is strongest when the city is thriving, and vice versa. In considering how the partnership can move forward, she said she plans to look to other city-university relationships — such as the one between Brown University and Providence, R.I. Rae said he sees Salovey as being sensitive to the city’s fiscal needs, adding that, like Levin, the University’s new president will “give a high degree of focus to the city.” In coping with the

city’s immediate budget problems, Rae said, the University will be an indispensable ally. “We know Yale does a lot,” Harp said, referring to the University’s voluntary monetary contributions to the city. She added that the University is also an ally in lobbying the state for Payment in Lieu of Taxes program funding, which partially reimburses New Haven for the high percentage of tax-exempt properties within city limits.

Historically, the town-gown animosity wasn’t just in the mayor’s office — it was in the body politic. WILLIAM GINSBERG CEO, Community Foundation for Greater New Haven In devising long-term mechanisms for increasing the city’s revenue, namely through economic development, Yale can

play a major role while also serving its own interests, Rae said. In both his October inaugural address and recent interviews, Salovey said he plans to make employment — particularly in high-skill, high-wage jobs — a focal point of his work with the new mayor. “In this decade, the solution is really often about ideas and their commercial potential and the resultant creation of jobs,” Salovey said. While Levin focused on improving the city’s development through investment — especially by establishing Yale University Properties and the Yale Homebuyer Program — Salovey said that entrepreneurship will ultimately drive future growth. Salovey suggested that by encouraging Yale students and professors to start businesses and remain in New Haven, the University can play a major role in improving the city’s economic circumstances. At an alumni event in New York last week, Salovey highlighted the success of New Haven-based compa-

Students divided on divestment DIVESTMENT FROM PAGE 1 and its future,” Fisher told the News. “[But] we don’t think you need to put at risk the long-term financial stability of the institution in order to make that point.” According to the group’s statement, the primary purpose of Yale’s endowment is to support the University and fund its financial aid program, globally renowned faculty and worldclass research. The long-term success of Yale is linked to the growth of the endowment, Fisher said, adding that divesting from fossil fuels could limit the flexibility of investment options available to the Yale Investments Office. “Supporting divestment would be a signal that these crucial institutional goals are no longer our first priority,” the group said in the statement. Solene Goycochea ’14, a member of the Students for a

Strong Endowment, said divestment would unnecessarily complicate Chief Investment Officer David Swensen’s investing decisions. Divestment could be more damaging to the University than to the fossil fuel companies, she said. She also pointed to the research that companies like British Petroleum and Shell conduct on sustainable energy. If Yale were to divest from fossil fuels, the University would come under pressure to divest from other causes, the group wrote in the “con” statement. “I am sorry that there are a number of students on campus who are short-sighted in their desire to manipulate the Yale endowment for a political goal,” Tyler Carlisle ’15, a member of the Students for a Strong Endowment, said. In the coming days, the YCC will post any rebuttals from the “pro” and “con” sides on the

referendum website. Groups will be allowed to begin campaigning for student support on Nov. 12, and the YCC will host a town hall for students to debate the issue on Nov. 13. YCC communications director Andrew Grass ’16 said the YCC created the referendum process this year to empower student voice on campus, though he added that the YCC has not taken a position on the issue of fossil fuel divestment. The referendum comes several months after the YCC received a petition from Fossil Free Yale in support of fossil fuel divestment that garnered 1,374 signatures. Fossil Free Yale submitted a “pro” statement to the YCC referendum website on Nov. 3. asserting that the University has a moral obligation to divest from the fossil fuel industry. Furthermore, studies have shown that fossil free portfolios generate

comparable returns to standard portfolios, the group said in the statement. According to the stipulations outlined in the Ethical Investor, the University’s guidelines on ethical investing, there are two conditions for divestment: the companies must be causing grave social injury, and divestment must have the prospect of producing a positive change. Students at Yale’s peer schools have also debated fossil fuel divestment during the past year. Though students at both Harvard and Brown expressed strong support for divestment through petitions and referenda, administrators at both schools decided against any action. The referendum will be held from Nov. 17 to Nov. 20. Rebuttals from either side will be collected on Nov. 11. Contact ADRIAN RODRIGUES at adrian.rodrigues@yale.edu .

nies like Higher One, which was founded by Miles Lasater ’01, said Yale spokesperson Michael Morand ’87 DIV ’93. Ginsberg said the base of New Haven’s future economy flows from the University in the form of biomedical and scientific research. Spinoff businesses in the pharmaceutical industry and other growing enterprises should be encouraged to stay in New Haven, he added — a prospect that could be facilitated by developing transportation infrastructure and furthering education reform to make city residents job-ready. Morand said he anticipates further encouragement of alumni entrepreneurship, given the personal stories of Harp and Salovey. “New Haven is a great place to live and work,” he said. “And you have leaders who know those are facts because that is their own life story … they came here for education but decided to stay and pursue a career here.” In addition to expanding collaboration on economic development, Salovey and Harp both pledged to continue partnerships

between Yale and New Haven Public Schools. Emphasizing Yale’s role in improving public education throughout the city, Salovey said he has discussed the matter with recently-appointed Superintendent Garth Harries ’95 in a lengthy meeting. In particular, Salovey pledged to continue New Haven Promise — a college scholarship funded by Yale, the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven and other partners — which is widely cited as a hallmark of successful collaboration under Levin and DeStefano. Salovey said the resources of Yale’s museums and libraries can be harnessed for the benefit of New Haven youth. Salovey officially assumed the University presidency on Oct. 13 of this year. Harp will be inaugurated as mayor on Jan. 1, 2014. Contact MATTHEW LLOYDTHOMAS at matthew.lloyd-thomas@yale.edu and POOJA SALHOTRA at pooja.salhotra@yale.edu and ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .

You watch them. You cheer for them. Why not write about them? Join SPORTS, and write about your favorite Yale teams. JOIN@YALEDAILYNEWS.COM


YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“There were centuries when civilization had no theater.” ORSON WELLES AMERICAN ACTOR

City sells Shubert Theater to local non-profit BY J.R. REED STAFF REPORTER Following a 12-year stint in the theater industry, New Haven has officially taken its last bow in show business. In a unanimous vote during a public hearing late last Thursday night, the Board of Aldermen struck a deal to transfer the ownership of the Shubert Theater from the city to the Columbus Association for the Performing Arts (CAPA), a nonprofit arts and theater management organization, for a price tag of $1. The city government first took full ownership of the theater 12 years ago, as part of an effort to revitalize one of New Haven’s most historic cultural landmarks. But, due to looming renovation costs, Mayor John DeStefano Jr. and the city’s Economic Development Administration concluded that it would be best for the city’s financial health to transfer ownership of the century-old theater. Under the ratified land disposition agreement, the city will pay CAPA a total of $4.5 million over 10 years, including $2.5 million in capital repairs and $2 million in operating support for the theater venue. During that time frame, the city will gradually reduce its annual operating subsidies to the theater, which cost New Haven $250,000 this past year alone, according to the 2012–’13 municipal budget. Furthermore, the agreement requires the city’s approval if CAPA were to ever to sell the building, and the building must continue to serve as a theater, hosting shows for at least 150 nights each year. If CAPA violates any of the requirements of the deal or loses the property, the city is entitled to re-take ownership of the building. Ward 9 Alderwoman Jessica Holmes underscored that, as a result of the ownership transfer, the CAPA can now more easily raise funds from foundations and the private sector to make the much-needed physical renovations. Otherwise, she said, all the funds would have to come directly from the city budget. “CAPA would like to build an endowment for the theater, and

KATHRYN CRANDALL/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The Board of Aldermen struck a deal to transfer the ownership of the Shubert Theater from the city to the Columbus Association for the Performing Arts last Thursday. that will be easier if the Shubert is independently owned,” Holmes said. “Hopefully they will be able to appeal to donors and develop a [funding] base to make the theater more self sustaining.” According to the theater’s executive director John Fisher, the Shubert has not undergone a major renovation in 30 years and must use $7–$8 million in repairs to bring the venue up to current federal safety codes. Although the city has contributed approximately $300,000 annually to keep the theater running, the Shubert has not been able to afford these much-needed

renovations. In addition to repairing the theater, CAPA administrators have said they intend to build a second performance area, which would accommodate a 100–200-person audience and offer an additional venue for rehearsals, performances, functions, and conferences. With the city no longer responsible for capital improvements, Holmes said this deal provides New Haven with an exit strategy, adding that the city should not be involved in the theater business in the long term. Several aldermen expressed confidence that CAPA will manage the theater’s busi-

ness operation well, as they have directed the venue’s day-to-day operations since 2001. Thanks to the deal, the city no longer holds the burden of operating the business, but can still reap the economic benefits the Shubert provides. According to Fisher, the Shubert brings an estimated $20 million into the city’s economy each year in the form of restaurant meals and parking fees — attracting people to the downtown area and spurring more jobs for the Elm City. Ward 22 Alderwoman Jeanette Morrison said that the ownership transfer is a “win-win for every-

one”, as it allows the city to save money, CAPA to “do what they love” and the city’s many performers — including many Yale students — to continue using the space. “The Shubert will continue to bring revenues into our community — our restaurants and our different hotels,” Morrison said. “We will be able to reap the benefits of the hundreds of thousands, along with the fact that we, as residents, can continue to enjoy a great play in the heart of downtown.” Holmes believes that transferring the ownership to CAPA will also enable the Shubert to expand

their education and training programs for New Haven public school students interested in the arts, including an ongoing relationship with the nearby Co-Op High School. The Shubert opened in New Haven in 1914, acting as a try-out theater for many popular shows that would reach Broadway. Economic hardships forced the theater to shut down in 1976, but it was reopened in 1983 as the centerpiece of a revived downtown entertainment district. Contact J.R. REED at jonathan.t.reed@yale.edu .

Potential for growth in New Haven retail BY SARAH BRULEY CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Last night, urban retail planner Bob Gibbs spoke to a crowd of about 30 New Haveners in The Bourse, a loft on Chapel St. Gibbs, who is also the head of an urban economic planning and consulting business, discussed the ways in which cities can optimize their shopping centers. He shared case studies from cities like Charleston, Southhampton and Columbus in an effort to inspire ideas that can be brought to New Haven. His goal in urban planning, he said, is to revitalize cities’ retail centers by adapting to the residents’ needs. “We think that you should have stores that your commu-

nity needs and desires,” Gibbs said. Gibbs said he thinks the future of retail in New Haven is bright. He predicted that Target could consider opening a store in New Haven within the next five years because New Haven, according to Gibbs, needs another large chain store that sells basic necessities. Gibbs predicted that New Haven would see a 25–30 percent increase in total sales if Target came to the Elm City. Former mayor John DeStefano Jr. attended the talk and agreed with Gibbs’ prediction about New Haven retail. DeStefano said that a store like Target would be a great asset to the Elm City. He added that while New Haven already has Ikea, the fur-

niture store does not hold consumers in the area, unlike an establishment like Target. Lindy Gold, senior specialist in the office of business and industry development at Connecticut’s Department of Economic and Community Development, said that from her experience as a New Haven resident she has noticed that while downtown has plenty of boutiques and specialty shops, it lacks places where residents can buy essentials. “I don’t think anyone can buy anything they actually need downtown,” Gold added. Although DeStefano and Gold agree with Gibbs about Target, unlike Gibbs, DeStefano believes that more of New Haven’s chal-

lenges in terms of retail lie in developing population density, housing development and institutional development. He also expressed interest in generating more activity from the food cart business outside of New Haven’s hospitals. Gibbs also said that as the oldest planned city in North America, New Haven can improve its retail by taking advantage of its authenticity — a selling point which he believes cannot be recreated in newer areas. He stressed that shopping areas that try to imitate the authenticity of an old town often fail. Gibbs discussed other reasons that stores fail, including a lack of consumer visibility. He

noted that many shopping areas underperform because of hidden storefronts, excessive detail around shopping centers (which distracts from storefronts) and poor location of anchor stores. He added that well-known chains attract large numbers of customers to a shopping center. Retailers wishing to compete with shopping malls, Gibbs said, must adapt to the new demographic of consumers. He explained that the average female shopper of the ’80s and ’90s went to the mall at least three times a month as a social occasion, but that today’s women generally do not have time to shop leisurely. In fact, according to Gibbs, 75 percent of shopping is done at night and

on Sundays. “Now, shopping is just another chore,” he said. Gibbs also gave advice to retailers for the upcoming holiday season. He said that a shoplocal campaign around the holidays could be successful, and stores should also consider extending hours and featuring owners in advertisements. He said that stores in the United States traditionally earn 40 percent of their profits between Thanksgiving and Christmas. According to Gibbs, women make up 80 percent of shoppers in the United States. Contact SARAH BRULEY at sarah.bruley@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

“’Tis healthy to be sick sometimes.” HENRY DAVID THOREAU AMERICAN AUTHOR

Fast food ads continue to target children

BY PHOEBE KIMMELMAN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

BY ISABELLE TAFT CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Although one in three American children are overweight or obese, fast food companies continue to spend billions advertising mostly unhealthy foods to children and teens, according to a new study by the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity. The study, entitled Food Advertising to Children and Teens Score (FACTS), evaluated fast food ads across television, social media and restaurant websites. The researchers found that just six fast food companies are responsible for over 70 percent of all television ads viewed by children and teens. Although the study praised companies for increasing the number of healthier options they offer compared to 2010 when the Rudd Center published the last FACTS report, it noted that just three percent of all fast food meals aimed at children meet the National Restaurant Association’s “Kids LiveWell” nutrition standards. “Unless they change that environment inside the fast food restaurant, there really should not be any advertising encouraging children and teens to go there,” said Jennifer Harris, director of marketing initiatives at the Rudd Center and lead researcher for FACTS. Fast food restaurants spent $4.6 billion on advertising in 2012 — eight percent more than in 2009. The 2013 FACTS study found that much of this increase has been driven by a push to expand digital media advertising. Fast food companies are targeting children with special websites, social media promotions and ads on third-party websites, Harris said. Social media advertising has proved particularly effective at engaging children because the ads are interactive and spread through networking platforms, Kendrin Sonnevile, director of nutrition training at the Division of Adolescent Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital, said in an email to the News. But fast food companies and consumer choice advocates say that fast food ads are not the problem. Justin Wilson, senior research analyst at the Center for Consumer Freedom, said that fast food restaurants have taken steps to offer numerous healthy options and cannot be held responsible if customers purchase hamburgers instead of salads. Wilson added that parents can limit children’s exposure to advertising or encourage them to order healthy food. “You can lead a horse to water but you

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: KATHRYN CRANDALL, PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR/ANNA-SOPHIE HARLING, CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER/KATHRYN CRANDALL, PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR,

A recent report published by the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity recommends that fast food companies expand their healthy options and cut down on ads that target children. can’t force him to drink,” he said. Despite some improvements on fast food menus and slight declines in children’s exposure to television ads, children are still vulnerable to advertising that promotes unhealthy food, Harris said. She added that advertisements showing healthy items can lead to the impression among parents that kids’ meals are healthier than they actually are.

Harris said fast food companies must expand healthy options to help meals meet nutritional standards. “Just because the meal had apples and milk doesn’t make the chicken nuggets or cheeseburger any healthier,” she said. The report recommends fast food companies improve the overall nutritional quality of meal combinations and stop targeting children with ads

that encourage them to eat fast food frequently. Harris said that children are uniquely vulnerable to advertising because they lack the ability to consider the long-term consequences of eating unhealthy foods. Wilson said he was skeptical that there is a link between fast food advertising and childhood obesity rates. “We have seen that food marketing is capable of at least changing chil-

dren’s understanding of food,” Wilson said. “But we have never seen any link between actual increases in obesity rates and the amount of marketing children see.” After the 2010 FACTS report came out, fast food companies ended some of their most “egregious” advertising strategies, such as setting up advertising websites specifically for children, Harris said. Going forward, Harris said

Relationships of pregnant teens examined BY STEPHANIE ROGERS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER While some parents say children are their greatest joy, a recent Yale study found that in young couples, the quality of the relationship and the mental health of the individuals decline after the birth of the baby. The Parent and Relationship Training and Risk Study (PARTNRS) interviewed young pregnant couples three times — once during pregnancy, once six months postpartum, and once 12 months postpartum — to evaluate how life and relationship satisfaction change during the transition to parenthood. A range of factors, including issues of attachment and fear of abandonment, predicted the health of relationships postpartum. In response to this research, the study investigators created a program that aims to strengthen relationship skills among young couples, said Trace Kershaw, lead author and professor of epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health.

The results are also informing programs to ... support young families. ANNA DIVNEY Former project coordinator, PARTNRS “Our study shows the importance of fostering positive relationships at the early stages of parenthood,” Kershaw said. “A better relationship with a partner has been shown to encourage a plethora of benefits such as better parenting, longer life spans and more stable mental health.” In 61 percent of the 296 pregnant couples sampled, relationship quality and mental states of the partners declined from pregnancy to the postpartum period. Kershaw said financial and occu-

Psychotic disorders more likely in left-handed

pational issues often impede the happiness of new couples. In the study, average household income was $13,399 for women and $17,271 for men. “External stressors of daily life will often get in the way,” he said. “They take emphasis off the relationships and individual health.” According to the study, certain factors determined how the quality of the relationship changed on a couple-to-couple basis. Partner violence is often a key risk factor for developing depression in adolescent pregnant couples, Kershaw said. The study suggests that partner violence does not solely occur because of one domineering partner, but rather because the couples have trouble regulating and resolving arguments, he said. Some young couples in the study exhibited a propensity for anxious attachment — fear of being abandoned — but others showed discomfort with closeness and dependency. Both conditions contribute to higher rates of depression and unhappiness for both men and women after birth of the child, Kershaw said. The results of the study have informed a new 15-week course that takes young couples through a variety of relationship skills related to communication, identifying and managing emotions, empathy, conflict resolution and family planning, said Anna Divney, former project coordinator for PARTNRS. “The results are also informing programs to strengthen relationships and support young families transitioning to parenthood,” she said. Less than eight percent of teen mothers marry their baby’s father within one year of the birth, according to the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. Contact STEPHANIE ROGERS at stephanie.rogers@yale.edu .

she hopes the new FACTS report spurs further changes, such as an end to the advertising of full-size portions from the regular menu on kids’ television shows. On average, preschoolers viewed 2.8 fast food ads per day in 2012, children ages 6 to 11 saw 3.2, and teenagers saw 4.8. Contact ISABELLE TAFT at isabelle.taft@yale.edu .

A new Yale-led study revealed that left-handed people are more likely to develop psychotic disorders that alter thinking and perception, like schizophrenia, but have no greater chance of developing mood disorders like bipolar disorder or depression. While about one in 10 Americans is left-handed, the study found that roughly 40 percent of individuals with schizophrenia were lefthanded. In contrast, only 11 percent of those with mood disorders were found to be left-handed. The study did not investigate the mechanism behind this pattern, but study authors speculate that handedness may be an indicator for individual differences in brain structure that contribute to the development of psychiatric diseases. “What we found that was somewhat startling to us was how many more people were left handed in the psychotic category than in the mood disorder category,” said Jadon Webb, lead author and psychiatrist at the Yale Child Studies Center. The study was conducted among 107 patients in a lowincome, urban psychiatric clinic that treated patients with both psychotic and mood disorders. Patients were asked directly which hand they wrote with and were not presented with extensive questionnaires, brain tests or lab tests, as are typical of more traditional psychiatric research, a study design choice which Webb said helped attract as many participants as possible. In the finding, study authors stated that abnormalities in development of relative cognitive and physical function of the two hemispheres of the brain are thought to be integral to schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. Hand dominance is useful in

studying brain abnormalities because it has been shown to correlate to with language expression, memory skills and visual and emotional processing, which are impaired in the presence of some psychiatric illness. Correlation between lefthandedness and schizophrenia was first proposed in a 2005 study, and correlation between left-handedness and bipolar disorder was first suggested in a 2008 study, according to study authors. In both of these previous studies, patients with psychiatric illness were compared to

New research from the Yale Psychology Department suggests individuals with bipolar disorder not currently suffering from its symptoms are able to perceive others’ emotions just as accurately as healthy people. To measure emotional perception, the research team used a theory of mind test, which gauges subjects’ abilities to sense others’ emotional states. While they suspected the bipolar patients would be less accurate in emotional perception, the results showed that individuals with remitted bipolar disorder demonstrated no differences in their ability to accurately perceive the emotions of others compared to individuals with unipolar depression and healthy subjects. In the study, individuals with bipolar disorder, depression and healthy controls were shown a series of pictures, each depicting a human face displaying a particular emotion, and were then asked to identify the emotion exhibited as quickly and accurately as possible. Contrary

to the researchers’ hypothesis, the groups did not differ in accuracy. However, reaction times varied widely between groups, as the bipolar subjects made emotional state judgments much more rapidly than the control group and the unipolar group, said June Gruber, study author and Yale professor of psychology. “Our findings suggest that the quicker [the bipolar subjects] guessed the emotion of another the worse life-functioning difficulties they exhibited,” Gruber said. “We imagine in everyday life, where facial expressions are more complex, that this kind of impulsive guessing of other people’s emotions may cause them difficulty.” Twelve months after the initial theory of mind test, the researchers followed up with the subjects to assess their overall quality of life and social functioning. The investigators found that those that reacted fastest in the initial study — individuals who tended to be bipolar — had more social impairments. Gruber said faster reactions to emo-

tion may lead those with bipolar disorder to jump too quickly to conclusions about others’ emotional states. This connection between reaction time and social functioning in bipolar disorder may lead to new targeted treatments for bipolar disorder, said Rebecca Boswell, a graduate student at Yale in clinical psychology. Gruber said that the greatest limitation of the study was that it took place in a laboratory, adding that she hoped to examine how their results generalized to everyday social interactions. “This study has gotten me more interested than ever in studying the social context in which emotion unfolds,” Gruber said. “It is a humble reminder of how important understanding emotion in our everyday lives is.” According to the National Institute of Mental Health, roughly 2.6 percent of the U.S. adult population will exhibit symptoms of bipolar disorder in any 12-month period.

schizophrenia with early-life events that cause left-handedness to see whether there is overlap between them. Webb said that discovery of such an overlap could enable doctors to determine which courses of treatment would be most effective for their schizophrenic patients. “It may also be that if you’re left-handed and psychotic that that could tell you something about your treatment course or maybe even possibly tell you about what treatments are more or less likely to be effective,” he said. Study author and professor

BY PIERRE ORTLIEB CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Yale professor and environmental economist William Nordhaus ’63 has written prolifically on the relationship between economics and climate change. In his new book “The Climate Casino,” Nordhaus hopes to elucidate the complexities and controversies of climate change for the general public. The News talked with Nordhaus about his inspiration for the book, its potential impact and the long-term politics of climate change in the modern world.

than I thought it would.

A

The inspiration was that people would ask me very often, “What’s a good book on climate change for nonspecialists?” And I would respond, “Hm, I don’t know that there is one.” So I thought, why don’t I just write one, a real short book that describes it for the people. It turned out to be a little longer than I thought, and turned out to take longer

A

It’s not for specialists, climate scientists or climate economists. It’s for people who are knowledgeable and interested in the subject; it’s written without any equations in it! I wouldn’t say it’s a populist or proselytizing book in any way, just an explanation of the issue at hand. The main aspect is that it focuses on the economy, and that it analyzes the unique contribution of economics.

the study of climate change?

A

The most important, I think, is that climate change is a malfunction of the price system, that emissions are underpriced. The main message from economics is that you have to get the price right, and that you have to raise the price of carbon emission, which is currently zero. It’s essentially an externality, where people impose costs on other people without compensating them. In this particular case, by burning fossil fuels and putting CO2 in the atmosphere, it causes harm to people now and in the future, here and around the world.

a more general perspective, how QFrom do you feel about attitudes to climate

A

TASNIM ELBOUTE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

William Nordhaus ’63 wrote his book with the goal of informing laypeople about the economics of climate change.

actual science.

you think the book ended up being public opinion polls may not QDo QWhile reflect scientific truth, do you worry accessible to a general audience?

inspired you to write a book like you give an example of this QWhat QCould unique contribution of economics to this?

Contact MARC CUGNON at marc.cugnon@yale.edu .

GEORGE SAUSSY/CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATOR

Contact PHOEBE KIMMELMAN at phoebe.kimmelman@yale.edu .

Nordhaus talks climate

change in the United States? I recently came across a study that reported that about 40 percent of Americans don’t believe in the science behind global warming. How do you feel this popular perception impacts the politics and economics of the subject, as well as your book itself?

ANNELISA LEINBACH/ILLUSTRATIONS EDITOR

at the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy Mary Schroeder said that she is optimistic that left-handedness and other potential biomarkers will be useful for further research and may even enable doctors to develop more fastacting and cost-effective treatments. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, approximately 2.4 million Americans have schizophrenia.

ANNELISA LEINBACH/ILLUSTRATIONS EDITOR

Emotional perception studied BY MARC CUGNON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

individuals who showed no mental abnormalities. In contrast, this research is the first to directly compare handedness in these two clinical groups, according to the study. Since schizophrenia is such a complex condition, this research provides another clue about the complex neurobiology of the condition, said David Valle, a researcher at the Johns Hopkins Conte Center for Schizophrenia Research. Webb said that future research may make use of this study’s results by comparing early-life events that cause

I actually did a fair amount of work on public opinion in this area. If you look at the evidence, it says that somewhere between 50 and 60 percent of people say that the globe is warming, but there is still a substantial amount of people who say that it’s not real. However, I don’t think that science is an opinion poll. Public opinion polls don’t ask what people think. If 80 percent of people were to say that there are witches, that wouldn’t be evidence that there are witches in Salem, Massachusetts. This is more of a political phenomenon — which we also need to deal with — than

that efforts to mitigate global warming may be harmed by the fact that so many people in the United States don’t believe that the globe is warming?

A

I think it’s important to remember that this is a global phenomenon, which requires a global solution and pretty strenuous effort. It doesn’t have to be tomorrow, but it can’t wait indefinitely. The U.S. is in that way unusual and unique in having a system in which one of the major parties is very skeptical about global warming. It’s going to require effort and continued persuasion. The struggle on smoking, which has been going on for 40 years now, is an analogy: From the 1950’s onwards it took patience, courage and continuous effort from the medical community to show people that smoking is dangerous for your health. I see this as a long-term effort, and we will continue to talk to people and persuade them to take steps.

you feel optimistic about the QDo future? How do you feel about the effort of Yale specifically?

A

I tend to be optimistic. Evidence continues to drip in, your roof is leaking and your house is getting wetter and wetter and eventually you realize, “Oh my god, my roof is leaking!” People will be convinced eventually, and they will see that you can take steps to curb climate change. I think the contribution of economics is to tell people to work through a mechanism such as a carbon tax which is embedded in the economy and can gradually reduce emissions. And people have estimated that this would only cost in the order of 1 percent of income over the next 20 years. As for Yale specifically, I think we’re doing what universities do, which is, we‘re working on the science and the economics, trying to understand public attitudes, and providing courses where people can learn that. That is the contribution of the University. Yale is the leading university in terms of economics and climate change, and I think we’ve been doing more than our fair share in this area. Contact PIERRE ORTLIEB at pierre.ortlieb@yale.edu .


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

“’Tis healthy to be sick sometimes.” HENRY DAVID THOREAU AMERICAN AUTHOR

Fast food ads continue to target children

BY PHOEBE KIMMELMAN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

BY ISABELLE TAFT CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Although one in three American children are overweight or obese, fast food companies continue to spend billions advertising mostly unhealthy foods to children and teens, according to a new study by the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity. The study, entitled Food Advertising to Children and Teens Score (FACTS), evaluated fast food ads across television, social media and restaurant websites. The researchers found that just six fast food companies are responsible for over 70 percent of all television ads viewed by children and teens. Although the study praised companies for increasing the number of healthier options they offer compared to 2010 when the Rudd Center published the last FACTS report, it noted that just three percent of all fast food meals aimed at children meet the National Restaurant Association’s “Kids LiveWell” nutrition standards. “Unless they change that environment inside the fast food restaurant, there really should not be any advertising encouraging children and teens to go there,” said Jennifer Harris, director of marketing initiatives at the Rudd Center and lead researcher for FACTS. Fast food restaurants spent $4.6 billion on advertising in 2012 — eight percent more than in 2009. The 2013 FACTS study found that much of this increase has been driven by a push to expand digital media advertising. Fast food companies are targeting children with special websites, social media promotions and ads on third-party websites, Harris said. Social media advertising has proved particularly effective at engaging children because the ads are interactive and spread through networking platforms, Kendrin Sonnevile, director of nutrition training at the Division of Adolescent Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital, said in an email to the News. But fast food companies and consumer choice advocates say that fast food ads are not the problem. Justin Wilson, senior research analyst at the Center for Consumer Freedom, said that fast food restaurants have taken steps to offer numerous healthy options and cannot be held responsible if customers purchase hamburgers instead of salads. Wilson added that parents can limit children’s exposure to advertising or encourage them to order healthy food. “You can lead a horse to water but you

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: KATHRYN CRANDALL, PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR/ANNA-SOPHIE HARLING, CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER/KATHRYN CRANDALL, PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR,

A recent report published by the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity recommends that fast food companies expand their healthy options and cut down on ads that target children. can’t force him to drink,” he said. Despite some improvements on fast food menus and slight declines in children’s exposure to television ads, children are still vulnerable to advertising that promotes unhealthy food, Harris said. She added that advertisements showing healthy items can lead to the impression among parents that kids’ meals are healthier than they actually are.

Harris said fast food companies must expand healthy options to help meals meet nutritional standards. “Just because the meal had apples and milk doesn’t make the chicken nuggets or cheeseburger any healthier,” she said. The report recommends fast food companies improve the overall nutritional quality of meal combinations and stop targeting children with ads

that encourage them to eat fast food frequently. Harris said that children are uniquely vulnerable to advertising because they lack the ability to consider the long-term consequences of eating unhealthy foods. Wilson said he was skeptical that there is a link between fast food advertising and childhood obesity rates. “We have seen that food marketing is capable of at least changing chil-

dren’s understanding of food,” Wilson said. “But we have never seen any link between actual increases in obesity rates and the amount of marketing children see.” After the 2010 FACTS report came out, fast food companies ended some of their most “egregious” advertising strategies, such as setting up advertising websites specifically for children, Harris said. Going forward, Harris said

Relationships of pregnant teens examined BY STEPHANIE ROGERS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER While some parents say children are their greatest joy, a recent Yale study found that in young couples, the quality of the relationship and the mental health of the individuals decline after the birth of the baby. The Parent and Relationship Training and Risk Study (PARTNRS) interviewed young pregnant couples three times — once during pregnancy, once six months postpartum, and once 12 months postpartum — to evaluate how life and relationship satisfaction change during the transition to parenthood. A range of factors, including issues of attachment and fear of abandonment, predicted the health of relationships postpartum. In response to this research, the study investigators created a program that aims to strengthen relationship skills among young couples, said Trace Kershaw, lead author and professor of epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health.

The results are also informing programs to ... support young families. ANNA DIVNEY Former project coordinator, PARTNRS “Our study shows the importance of fostering positive relationships at the early stages of parenthood,” Kershaw said. “A better relationship with a partner has been shown to encourage a plethora of benefits such as better parenting, longer life spans and more stable mental health.” In 61 percent of the 296 pregnant couples sampled, relationship quality and mental states of the partners declined from pregnancy to the postpartum period. Kershaw said financial and occu-

Psychotic disorders more likely in left-handed

pational issues often impede the happiness of new couples. In the study, average household income was $13,399 for women and $17,271 for men. “External stressors of daily life will often get in the way,” he said. “They take emphasis off the relationships and individual health.” According to the study, certain factors determined how the quality of the relationship changed on a couple-to-couple basis. Partner violence is often a key risk factor for developing depression in adolescent pregnant couples, Kershaw said. The study suggests that partner violence does not solely occur because of one domineering partner, but rather because the couples have trouble regulating and resolving arguments, he said. Some young couples in the study exhibited a propensity for anxious attachment — fear of being abandoned — but others showed discomfort with closeness and dependency. Both conditions contribute to higher rates of depression and unhappiness for both men and women after birth of the child, Kershaw said. The results of the study have informed a new 15-week course that takes young couples through a variety of relationship skills related to communication, identifying and managing emotions, empathy, conflict resolution and family planning, said Anna Divney, former project coordinator for PARTNRS. “The results are also informing programs to strengthen relationships and support young families transitioning to parenthood,” she said. Less than eight percent of teen mothers marry their baby’s father within one year of the birth, according to the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. Contact STEPHANIE ROGERS at stephanie.rogers@yale.edu .

she hopes the new FACTS report spurs further changes, such as an end to the advertising of full-size portions from the regular menu on kids’ television shows. On average, preschoolers viewed 2.8 fast food ads per day in 2012, children ages 6 to 11 saw 3.2, and teenagers saw 4.8. Contact ISABELLE TAFT at isabelle.taft@yale.edu .

A new Yale-led study revealed that left-handed people are more likely to develop psychotic disorders that alter thinking and perception, like schizophrenia, but have no greater chance of developing mood disorders like bipolar disorder or depression. While about one in 10 Americans is left-handed, the study found that roughly 40 percent of individuals with schizophrenia were lefthanded. In contrast, only 11 percent of those with mood disorders were found to be left-handed. The study did not investigate the mechanism behind this pattern, but study authors speculate that handedness may be an indicator for individual differences in brain structure that contribute to the development of psychiatric diseases. “What we found that was somewhat startling to us was how many more people were left handed in the psychotic category than in the mood disorder category,” said Jadon Webb, lead author and psychiatrist at the Yale Child Studies Center. The study was conducted among 107 patients in a lowincome, urban psychiatric clinic that treated patients with both psychotic and mood disorders. Patients were asked directly which hand they wrote with and were not presented with extensive questionnaires, brain tests or lab tests, as are typical of more traditional psychiatric research, a study design choice which Webb said helped attract as many participants as possible. In the finding, study authors stated that abnormalities in development of relative cognitive and physical function of the two hemispheres of the brain are thought to be integral to schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. Hand dominance is useful in

studying brain abnormalities because it has been shown to correlate to with language expression, memory skills and visual and emotional processing, which are impaired in the presence of some psychiatric illness. Correlation between lefthandedness and schizophrenia was first proposed in a 2005 study, and correlation between left-handedness and bipolar disorder was first suggested in a 2008 study, according to study authors. In both of these previous studies, patients with psychiatric illness were compared to

New research from the Yale Psychology Department suggests individuals with bipolar disorder not currently suffering from its symptoms are able to perceive others’ emotions just as accurately as healthy people. To measure emotional perception, the research team used a theory of mind test, which gauges subjects’ abilities to sense others’ emotional states. While they suspected the bipolar patients would be less accurate in emotional perception, the results showed that individuals with remitted bipolar disorder demonstrated no differences in their ability to accurately perceive the emotions of others compared to individuals with unipolar depression and healthy subjects. In the study, individuals with bipolar disorder, depression and healthy controls were shown a series of pictures, each depicting a human face displaying a particular emotion, and were then asked to identify the emotion exhibited as quickly and accurately as possible. Contrary

to the researchers’ hypothesis, the groups did not differ in accuracy. However, reaction times varied widely between groups, as the bipolar subjects made emotional state judgments much more rapidly than the control group and the unipolar group, said June Gruber, study author and Yale professor of psychology. “Our findings suggest that the quicker [the bipolar subjects] guessed the emotion of another the worse life-functioning difficulties they exhibited,” Gruber said. “We imagine in everyday life, where facial expressions are more complex, that this kind of impulsive guessing of other people’s emotions may cause them difficulty.” Twelve months after the initial theory of mind test, the researchers followed up with the subjects to assess their overall quality of life and social functioning. The investigators found that those that reacted fastest in the initial study — individuals who tended to be bipolar — had more social impairments. Gruber said faster reactions to emo-

tion may lead those with bipolar disorder to jump too quickly to conclusions about others’ emotional states. This connection between reaction time and social functioning in bipolar disorder may lead to new targeted treatments for bipolar disorder, said Rebecca Boswell, a graduate student at Yale in clinical psychology. Gruber said that the greatest limitation of the study was that it took place in a laboratory, adding that she hoped to examine how their results generalized to everyday social interactions. “This study has gotten me more interested than ever in studying the social context in which emotion unfolds,” Gruber said. “It is a humble reminder of how important understanding emotion in our everyday lives is.” According to the National Institute of Mental Health, roughly 2.6 percent of the U.S. adult population will exhibit symptoms of bipolar disorder in any 12-month period.

schizophrenia with early-life events that cause left-handedness to see whether there is overlap between them. Webb said that discovery of such an overlap could enable doctors to determine which courses of treatment would be most effective for their schizophrenic patients. “It may also be that if you’re left-handed and psychotic that that could tell you something about your treatment course or maybe even possibly tell you about what treatments are more or less likely to be effective,” he said. Study author and professor

BY PIERRE ORTLIEB CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Yale professor and environmental economist William Nordhaus ’63 has written prolifically on the relationship between economics and climate change. In his new book “The Climate Casino,” Nordhaus hopes to elucidate the complexities and controversies of climate change for the general public. The News talked with Nordhaus about his inspiration for the book, its potential impact and the long-term politics of climate change in the modern world.

than I thought it would.

A

The inspiration was that people would ask me very often, “What’s a good book on climate change for nonspecialists?” And I would respond, “Hm, I don’t know that there is one.” So I thought, why don’t I just write one, a real short book that describes it for the people. It turned out to be a little longer than I thought, and turned out to take longer

A

It’s not for specialists, climate scientists or climate economists. It’s for people who are knowledgeable and interested in the subject; it’s written without any equations in it! I wouldn’t say it’s a populist or proselytizing book in any way, just an explanation of the issue at hand. The main aspect is that it focuses on the economy, and that it analyzes the unique contribution of economics.

the study of climate change?

A

The most important, I think, is that climate change is a malfunction of the price system, that emissions are underpriced. The main message from economics is that you have to get the price right, and that you have to raise the price of carbon emission, which is currently zero. It’s essentially an externality, where people impose costs on other people without compensating them. In this particular case, by burning fossil fuels and putting CO2 in the atmosphere, it causes harm to people now and in the future, here and around the world.

a more general perspective, how QFrom do you feel about attitudes to climate

A

TASNIM ELBOUTE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

William Nordhaus ’63 wrote his book with the goal of informing laypeople about the economics of climate change.

actual science.

you think the book ended up being public opinion polls may not QDo QWhile reflect scientific truth, do you worry accessible to a general audience?

inspired you to write a book like you give an example of this QWhat QCould unique contribution of economics to this?

Contact MARC CUGNON at marc.cugnon@yale.edu .

GEORGE SAUSSY/CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATOR

Contact PHOEBE KIMMELMAN at phoebe.kimmelman@yale.edu .

Nordhaus talks climate

change in the United States? I recently came across a study that reported that about 40 percent of Americans don’t believe in the science behind global warming. How do you feel this popular perception impacts the politics and economics of the subject, as well as your book itself?

ANNELISA LEINBACH/ILLUSTRATIONS EDITOR

at the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy Mary Schroeder said that she is optimistic that left-handedness and other potential biomarkers will be useful for further research and may even enable doctors to develop more fastacting and cost-effective treatments. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, approximately 2.4 million Americans have schizophrenia.

ANNELISA LEINBACH/ILLUSTRATIONS EDITOR

Emotional perception studied BY MARC CUGNON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

individuals who showed no mental abnormalities. In contrast, this research is the first to directly compare handedness in these two clinical groups, according to the study. Since schizophrenia is such a complex condition, this research provides another clue about the complex neurobiology of the condition, said David Valle, a researcher at the Johns Hopkins Conte Center for Schizophrenia Research. Webb said that future research may make use of this study’s results by comparing early-life events that cause

I actually did a fair amount of work on public opinion in this area. If you look at the evidence, it says that somewhere between 50 and 60 percent of people say that the globe is warming, but there is still a substantial amount of people who say that it’s not real. However, I don’t think that science is an opinion poll. Public opinion polls don’t ask what people think. If 80 percent of people were to say that there are witches, that wouldn’t be evidence that there are witches in Salem, Massachusetts. This is more of a political phenomenon — which we also need to deal with — than

that efforts to mitigate global warming may be harmed by the fact that so many people in the United States don’t believe that the globe is warming?

A

I think it’s important to remember that this is a global phenomenon, which requires a global solution and pretty strenuous effort. It doesn’t have to be tomorrow, but it can’t wait indefinitely. The U.S. is in that way unusual and unique in having a system in which one of the major parties is very skeptical about global warming. It’s going to require effort and continued persuasion. The struggle on smoking, which has been going on for 40 years now, is an analogy: From the 1950’s onwards it took patience, courage and continuous effort from the medical community to show people that smoking is dangerous for your health. I see this as a long-term effort, and we will continue to talk to people and persuade them to take steps.

you feel optimistic about the QDo future? How do you feel about the effort of Yale specifically?

A

I tend to be optimistic. Evidence continues to drip in, your roof is leaking and your house is getting wetter and wetter and eventually you realize, “Oh my god, my roof is leaking!” People will be convinced eventually, and they will see that you can take steps to curb climate change. I think the contribution of economics is to tell people to work through a mechanism such as a carbon tax which is embedded in the economy and can gradually reduce emissions. And people have estimated that this would only cost in the order of 1 percent of income over the next 20 years. As for Yale specifically, I think we’re doing what universities do, which is, we‘re working on the science and the economics, trying to understand public attitudes, and providing courses where people can learn that. That is the contribution of the University. Yale is the leading university in terms of economics and climate change, and I think we’ve been doing more than our fair share in this area. Contact PIERRE ORTLIEB at pierre.ortlieb@yale.edu .


PAGE 8

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“It is easy to take liberty for granted, when you have never had it taken from you.” DICK CHENEY 46TH VICE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

Yale endowment falls behind smaller schools ENDOWMENT FROM PAGE 1

UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENTS GROWTH FROM 2008–2013

206

Universities that completed the NACUBO-Commonfund Study of Endowments survey

4.8%

Effective spending rate in fiscal year 2013 of surveyed institutions with assets over $1 billion

1.2

Average number of reported full-time employees devoted to investment management in fiscal year 2013

10

+9.0% +8.0%

8

6

4

+4.3% +4.7%

$14.6 million

$312 million

$21

2

billion

0 Survey average*

Yale University

Spalding University

*Average endowment returns from 2008–2013 for the 206 universities that completed the survey

Abilene University

percent in the previous fiscal year. John Griswold, executive director of the Commonfund Institute, said endowment returns are beginning to rebound. He added that he hopes the strong returns continue. Though William Jarvis ’77, managing director of the Commonfund Institute, said this year’s results may seem very encouraging, he cautioned against interpreting them as indicative of a trend. The global economy is still relatively weak, Jarvis said, adding that endowments have yet to return to their prerecession values. “I don’t think there’s anybody who has a good sense of what the future holds,” he said. The report also found a reversal in the longtime trend of increasing allocations toward alternative assets last year. Yale and other top universities tend to invest heavily in these alternative classes, which include private equity, hedge funds and natural resources. Pioneered by Yale’s Chief Investment Officer David Swensen, this diversified style of investing is known as “the Yale model.” But in fiscal 2013, the average allocation toward alternative assets fell to 47 percent from 54 percent the previous year. The overall performance of alternative assets has not been strong since the financial crisis, Stewart said. In the current volatile market, investors have favored stocks and bonds because they are more liquid, meaning that they can more easily be sold for cash if the need arises, Stewart said. In a joint statement, NACUBO President and Chief Executive Officer John Walda and Commonfund Institute Executive Director John Griswold said the shift away from alternative strategies could suggest a desire for more liquid assets. However, because domestic equities returned an average of 20.5 percent in fiscal 2013, the shift toward this asset class could simply be the result of “market action,” they said. The full results of the study will be released in January and will include data from more institutions. Contact ADRIAN RODRIGUES at adrian.rodrigues@yale.edu .

Veterans honored in Beinecke Plaza ceremony VETERANS FROM PAGE 1 without yet having fully experienced active service. “The visual effect of Beinecke Plaza, with the World War I memorial, is very striking,” he said. “It’s one of those moments when you feel very connected to the history of the place.” Esther Portyansky ’16 said she attended the event because she is currently enrolled in professor Jay Winters’ “Europe in the Age of Total War” class, which made her more appreciative of the lives of soldiers and veterans.

What if we all lived ... as if our lives depended on the people next to us fulfilling their potential? SARAH BARBO FES ’14 SOM ’14 Veteran, U.S. Army Rachel Miller ’15, another student in attendance, said she was drawn to the event because she has a personal connection to Veterans Day. “Both my grandparents served in World War II, including one who came to Yale after the war, so I thought I’d honor my grandparents,” she said. The ceremony, which lasted roughly 45 minutes, concluded with a wreath laying, a playing of taps and Adams’ benediction. ALEXANDRA SCHMELING/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Various members of the Yale community gathered on Beinecke Plaza today to honor active and past members of the military for Veterans Day.

Contact YUVAL BEN-DAVID at yuval.ben-david@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

WORLD

“There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full.” HENRY A. KISSINGER AMERICAN DIPLOMAT

Typhoon victims plead for aid

Iran, US trade blame BY BRIAN MURPHY ASSOCIATED PRESS DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Iran and the United States on Monday blamed each other for the failure to reach agreement on a deal to limit Iran’s uranium enrichment in exchange for an easing of Western sanctions. In spite of the accusations, there was some diplomatic progress as Iran promised to offer more information and expanded access to U.N. nuclear inspectors — including more openings at a planned reactor and uranium site. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Iranian envoys had backed away

from a wider deal this weekend seeking to ease Western concerns that Tehran could one day develop atomic weapons. Iran’s foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, countered by criticizing Kerry’s remarks, telling an Iranian TV talk show that the American’s “conflicting statements” damaged confidence in the process, adding that “considerable progress was made” in Geneva. The flurry of announcements and comments showed both the complexities and urgency in trying to move ahead on an accord between Iran and world powers after the talks in Geneva failed to produce a deal.

BULLIT MARQUEZ/AP PHOTO

Typhoon survivors queue up in the hopes of boarding an evacuation flight on a C-130 military transport plane on Tuesday in Tacloban, Philippines. BY TODD PITMAN AND JIM GOMEZ ASSOCIATED PRESS TACLOBAN, Philippines — Bloated bodies lay uncollected and uncounted in the streets and desperate survivors pleaded for food, water and medicine as rescue workers took on a daunting task Monday in the typhoon-battered islands of the Philippines. Thousands were feared dead. The hard-hit city of Tacloban resembled a garbage dump from the air, with only a few concrete buildings left standing in the wake of one of the most powerful storms to ever hit land, packing 147-mph winds and whipping up 20-foot walls of seawater that

tossed ships inland and swept many out to sea.

I don’t believe there is a single structure that is not destroyed or severely damaged in some way. PAUL KENNEDY Brigadier general, U.S. marine “Help. SOS. We need food,” read a message painted by a survivor in large letters on the ravaged city’s port, where water

lapped at the edge. There was no one to carry away the dead, which lay rotting along the main road from the airport to Tacloban, the worst-hit city along the country’s remote eastern seaboard. At a small naval base, eight swollen corpses — including that of a baby — were submerged in water brought in by the storm. Officers had yet to move them, saying they had no body bags or electricity to preserve them. Authorities estimated the typhoon killed 10,000 or more people, but with the slow pace of recovery, the official death toll three days after the storm made landfall remained at 942.

However, with shattered communications and transportation links, the final count was likely days away, and presidential spokesman Edwin Lacierda said “we pray” it does not surpass 10,000. “I don’t believe there is a single structure that is not destroyed or severely damaged in some way every single building, every single house,” U.S. Marine Brig. Gen. Paul Kennedy said after taking a helicopter flight over Tacloban, the largest city in Leyte province. He spoke on the tarmac at the airport, where two Marine C-130 cargo planes were parked, engines running, unloading supplies.

EBRAHIM NOROOZI/AP PHOTO

IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano answers reporters on the progress of nuclear negotiations with Iranian officials in Tehran.


YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 10

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

Snow showers likely, mainly before 9am. Cloudy, then gradually becoming mostly sunny, with a high near 39.

TOMORROW

THURSDAY

High of 39, low of 26.

High of 50, low of 32.

THAT MONKEY BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

ON CAMPUS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12 3:30 p.m. “Disabilities of the Soul: Mental Illness, Activism, Community and Teaching from the Heart at Yale.” Anthropology professor Karen Nakamura will discuss her recent book, which examines schizophrenia and mental illnesses in Japan. This event is in association with an exhibit of 2012-2013 publications by Yale’s East Asia Faculty. Sterling International Library (120 High St.), International Rm. 7:00 p.m. “Lost in Beijing.” Directed by Li Yu, this film is part of the Retrospective of Chinese Women Directors (1950s-Present) Series. This film series will present the works of four remarkable women directors, each negotiating a perspective or commentary alternative to the mainstream cinema of the time. Luce Hall (34 Hillhouse Ave.), Aud.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13 5:00 p.m. “An Economic View from the Provost’s Office.” The Yale Journal of Economics will host Provost and William C. Brainard Professor of Economics Ben Polak for a talk. Provost Polak is an expert on decision theory, game theory and economic history, and his research ranges from theoretical work to applied topics in corporate finance and law and economics. This event celebrates the publication of the fall 2013 issue of the Yale Journal of Economics. Linsly-Chittenden Hall (63 High St.), Rm. 101. 8:00 p.m. Camilo José Vergara: “Harlem: The Unmaking of a Ghetto.” Chilean-born photographer and writer Camilo José Vergara will speak at this Poynter Fellowship event. Vergara’s subjects include: representing time, the American ghetto, ruins and American popular culture. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Aud.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

5:00 p.m. “Death or Disability?” Some scholars question when death is preferable to life with a disability. Scholar and ethicist William Peace argues that disability studies and bioethics as fields of inquiry are ideally suited to address this issue together. Anlyan Center (300 Cedar St.), Aud.

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Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Editor in Chief Julia Zorthian at (203) 432-2418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

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CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 In short supply 6 Basics for Dick and Jane 10 XT computers 14 Mandel of “America’s Got Talent” 15 Actress Lollobrigida 16 “La maja desnuda” artist 17 Primary artery 18 First name in advice 19 Baseball’s Hershiser 20 Amt. 21 Playskool’s Rocktivity products, e.g. 24 Mugs, e.g. 25 Old British coin 26 Clinic helper 31 Big concert setting 32 Gambler’s IOU 33 Lawyers’ org. 36 Peer pruriently at 37 Kermit’s color 39 Coffee-brewing choice 40 Boozer 41 High-fiber food 42 Longtime “Masterpiece Theater” host Alistair 43 Decree that spells things out 46 Nighttime shindig 49 TV warrior princess 50 One’s toughest critics, often, and, literally, three different words hidden in 21-, 26- and 43Across 53 Internet letters 56 Uses a straw 57 Fairy tale start 58 D-Day beach 60 Promote big-time 61 Slangy turnarounds 62 Poe’s “ebony bird” 63 Tiny hill builders 64 Criteria: Abbr. 65 Trapped on a branch

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11/12/13

By Ed Sessa

DOWN 1 Cager-turnedrapper O’Neal, familiarly 2 Old grump 3 Haywire 4 “Picked” complaint 5 Olympians in red, white and blue 6 Andre of tennis 7 Netanyahu of Israel, familiarly 8 “Squawk on the Street” airer 9 “Huh?” 10 Outfielder’s cry 11 B in chemistry 12 “Poppycock!” 13 Doritos scoopful 22 “What can Brown do for you?” shipping co. 23 Manhattan’s __Fontanne Theatre 24 Mr. Peanut prop 26 Vietnam neighbor 27 Golden Fleece vessel 28 Suspenders alternative 29 What a hound follows 30 With 53-Down, stadium fans’ rhythmic motion

Monday’s Puzzle Solved

SUDOKU EASY

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(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

33 Yankee infielder, to fans 34 Ride the Harley 35 Copycat 37 Heartrending 38 Scavenging pest 39 Cartoon explorer 41 Uncle Remus’s __ Fox 42 Monarch’s spouse 43 Tears (away) from 44 Superabundance 45 Maiden name intro

11/12/13

46 Slangy sibling 47 Bulb in a garden 48 Addition to the conversation 51 Attending to a task 52 Like some coffee or tea 53 See 30-Down 54 Roller coaster cry 55 Hand-held scanner 59 Vandalize

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YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

SPORTS

“Squash — that’s not exercise, it’s flagellation.” NOEL COWARD ENGLISH PLAYWRIGHT

Yale, Harvard face off on ice special.” As the sport of football grew and developed in America, the tradition of The Game grew with it. Teams sprung up around the country, but year after year, fans across the U.S. looked to Cambridge or New Haven to see the nation’s two oldest universities compete in the country’s most popular sport. Sobotka added that he thinks there is potential for similar growth to help fuel the “Rivalry on Ice.” “As college hockey grows — and by all indications, it is growing rapidly — I think an annual game between Harvard and Yale played at a nationally recognized venue like Madison Square Garden could become

MEN’S HOCKEY FROM PAGE 12 “Rivalry on Ice” game for two seasons. NBC, which annually broadcasts The Game, has committed to broadcasting the “Rivalry on Ice.” Given Yale’s 2013 national championship and the Ivy League’s growing prominence in NCAA hockey, fans said that they hope the “Rivalry on Ice” can become as distinguished as The Game. “The Game is more than just a game — it’s a spectacle,” Andrew Sobotka ’15 said. “It’s an event in and of itself, with more than 100 years of history. It’s part of the fabric of American sporting history, which is something that really very few sporting events can say. That’s

a noteworthy event in the college hockey world,” Sobotka said. The rapid growth of college hockey has caused some difficulties for the administration. Last year, when the Bulldogs headed to the Frozen Four, Yale offered subsidies different from those of competitor schools such as UMass-Lowell, and thus had to create more affordable subsidized ticket plans. Tickets for the “Rivalry on Ice” went on sale yesterday morning, and while some ticket prices have been driven up to $200, tickets for students are subsidized by the University and sell for just $15. Members of the team said

they hope for the “Rivalry on Ice” to grow into an event as prominent as The Game. “I hope the rivalry on ice becomes a lasting tradition,” said hockey captain Jesse Root ’14. “I think it’s a great event for each school’s hockey program and for the teams’ fan bases and alumni. Hopefully it will be as successful as the Harvard Yale football game and generate similar excitement and school spirit for hockey.” The puck will drop in Madison Square Garden at 8:00 p.m. on Jan. 11. Contact ASHTON WACKYM at ashton.wackym@yale.edu .

Bulldogs fall to UConn

JAMES BADAS/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

No. 20 Javier Duren ’15 scored 15 points and dished out four assists, but Yale lost to UConn 80–62. MEN’S BASKETBALL FROM PAGE 12

Yale strong at Scrimmages SQUASH FROM PAGE 12 David Talbott, who serves as head coach for both Yale teams, said that the men’s performance was especially surprising because the team graduated its top three players last season. He credited freshmen Kah Wah Cheong ’17, Thomas Dembinski ’17 and Liam McClintock ’17 for the squad’s quick rebound. “This year was looking to be a bit of a rebuilding year,” Talbott said. “But the freshmen really stepped up, and maybe exceeded expectations in terms of where they are at this point.” Throughout the weekend, Neil Martin ’14 was particularly strong for the Yale men, winning all three of his matches against Columbia, Princeton and Harvard. In his Princeton matchup, Martin swept an opponent who had defeated him 3–0 just a week before in an individual tournament. For the women, No. 2 Kim Hay ’14 and No. 4 Issey Nor-

man-Ross ’15 also went undefeated during the weekend. Hay was cleared to play just a month ago after injuring her Achilles tendon this past January. The Eli women made a statement in their opening game with a perfect sweep of fifth-seeded Cornell, the sixth ranked team in the CSA rankings. The men showed similar domination in the first round of the tournament, defeating sixth-seeded Columbia 7–2. The team’s only losses were at the top of the ladder, as Cheong and Dembinski fell to brothers Ramit Tandon and Rishi Tandon at numbers one and two, respectively. Ramit Tandon is ranked third individually in the country by the CSA. In the women’s tournament, Yale moved on to play Harvard, last year’s CSA champion and the first ranked team in the preseason. The Bulldogs again proved their strength in a remarkably close match, but

finished with a 5–4 loss. Millie Tomlinson ’14, playing at the number one position, lost an extremely close match to Harvard’s Amanda Sobhy, who is undefeated in her college career. “[Tomlinson] played incredibly,” Fast said. “Each game was so tight until the very end, and I think she might have surprised herself a little.” The men’s team played second-seeded Princeton in the semifinals with a chance to make the finals in six consecutive Ivy Scrimmages. With seven matches completed, the Bulldogs held a slim 4–3 advantage. Caine took his opponent to five games at the number seven spot. The final game was tied 8–8 when Caine scored three points in a row to win the game — and clinch the match — for Yale. “At some point, when it’s eight-all in the last game of a match, it just comes down to who wants to win more,” Caine

HENRY EHRENBERG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The men’s squash team placed second at the Ivy Scrimmages, while the women’s team finished third.

said. “Both people are equally tired and clearly, your skill levels are pretty similar. I just told myself I wasn’t going to lose.” On Sunday, the tournament’s second day, the Yale women moved on to the third place match against thirdseeded Penn, a team that defeated Yale 7–2 at the tournament and 8–1 in the regular season last year. Seeking revenge, the Bulldogs quickly took care of their opponent with a 7–2 upset victory. In the women’s championship, the Crimson lost to Princeton in an upset. The men’s team entered the championship match against Harvard with a disadvantage, as Caine needed to leave campus for personal reasons on Sunday, and No. 6 McClintock was out because of a back injury. Dembinski, Martin and Zac Leman ’16 won their matches at numbers two, three and four, respectively. Talbott said that Dembinski’s 3–1 victory over Harvard co-captain Gary Power was particularly impressive. “Nobody thought [Dembinski] was going to be in that match,” Talbott said. “I think that was the biggest upset of the weekend.” But Yale, lacking depth without Caine and McClintock, ultimately fell 6–3 to give Harvard the tournament championship. Caine said that the team outperformed people’s expectations in the match but still has room for improvement before the season begins next month. “We need to continue to get fitter and stronger,” Caine said. “We’re all always working to get better.” The Eli men and women will open their seasons at Williams on Dec. 6. Contact GREG CAMERON at greg.cameron@yale.edu .

which was not enough against a Husky squad that saw four players score in double digits. Early on, the Huskies were unable to break away as the teams appeared to be feeling each other out. When captain and guard Jesse Pritchard ’14 knocked down a corner three-pointer with 11:16 remaining in the first half, the score was even at nine apiece. At that point, the Huskies received some much-needed foreign aid. Forward Niels Giffey of Berlin, Germany, proceeded to hit four three-pointers in a row for UConn. When the shooting barrage was over, UConn had pulled ahead 21–12. Giffey would connect on one more three-pointer before the first half was over for a total of 15 points within five minutes. He would go scoreless in the second half, but the damage was done. Jones said that a couple of defensive miscues allowed Giffey to take advantage of open opportunities after the Husky guards were able to penetrate and create space for the German sharpshooter. “It took us a while to find out who Giffey was,” Jones said. “He shot lights-out, five-for-five in the first half, which was really the difference in the ball game. We didn’t do a good job at finding shooters on the perimeter for sure.” Yale, which shot at a 54.4 percent clip on Saturday in its season opener against Central Connecticut State University, was unable to find its groove offensively on Veteran’s Day. The Bulldogs shot just 26.9 percent in the first half while UConn shot over 60 percent from the field and 75 percent from three-point range. When the teams entered the locker rooms at intermission, UConn had secured a 39–24 advantage thanks in large part to its hot shooting. The 15-point deficit was in the same ballpark as the 17-point deficit that Yale managed to overcome against CCSU in its first game. But the University of Connecticut was on a whole other level compared to Central Connecticut. The Huskies extended the lead to a game-high 21 points thanks to a three-pointer from guard Ryan Boatwright with 10:24 to go in the game. That shot accounted for three of Boatwright’s 14 second-

half points after Yale held him scoreless in the first 20 minutes of play. The tandem of Boatwright and Napier makes for what many experts consider one of the top backcourts in the entire country. In the end, UConn proved to be too much for the Bulldogs to handle. When Yale went on a 7–0 run to cut the lead to just 11 with 4:06 remaining, Boatwright and Napier answered with eight consecutive points to extinguish any hopes of a late-game Bulldog comeback. “We knew Yale was going to be good,” Napier said. “Their big guys played tremendously good. If their guards had played a little better and helped them out, this game would have been much tougher.” The Yale team prides itself on its size and ability to fight down low — but in UConn the Bulldogs simply ran into a bigger team, as demonstrated by the play of freshman seven-foot center, Amida Brimah. He rejected seven Yale shots and altered many more around the rim. However, Yale will not find many frontcourts in the Ivy League on par with UConn. Sears said that the team gained a lot of confidence from how they handled the Husky big men, as Yale outrebounded UConn 43–31. “Us being able to rebound against a frontline like that with seven-footers and athletes like that definitely gives us some confidence going into our games in the future where we’re not playing frontlines that are as imposing and intimidating as theirs,” Sears said. If only due to such rebounding ability, Yale proved why it should be a legitimate contender in the Ivy League. Outsized down low, the Bulldogs even more notably posted an impressive 22–4 edge on the offensive boards. Giffey, for one, was surprised by the Bulldogs’ rebounding prowess. “They were pretty long,” Giffey said. “When they stepped on the court, they didn’t look like the cliché Ivy League team.” Yale will face a tough road test once more on Thursday when the Bulldogs face yet another American Athletic Conference opponent in Rutgers (1–1, 0–0). Tipoff against the Scarlet Knights is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. at the Rutgers Athletic Center in Piscataway, N.J. Contact JAMES BADAS at james.badas@yale.edu .

Elis close season with win FIELD HOCKEY FROM PAGE 12 In the second half, Yale continued to pressure the Brown defense, outshooting the Bears 18–3 and earning more penalty corners, 8–3. Eventually, the Elis were able to break through again, with Holland scoring off a feed from forward Rhoni Gericke ’17 after a penalty corner. Goalkeeper Emily Cain ’14 replaced Schlesier in goal for the second half and made a save on the final play of the game, a Brown penalty corner as time expired. The Elis honored Holland, Gogel, Shuckert, Cain, forward/ midfielder Erica Borgo ’14, and forward/midfielder Gabby Garcia ’14 before the game as part of Senior Day. This class of seniors was part of a run that led to an Ivy League title in 2011. Over four years, they have led Yale to a 17–10 record in the Ivy League; the team has also earned NFHCA National Academic Team Award the past three seasons. The seniors have also been key

contributors throughout this season. Borgo led the team with 22 points on the year, followed by 20 points from Holland and 19 points from Schuckert. “Playing in my final game as a Bulldog didn’t feel much different than any other game. We went out with the intention of following our game plan and picking up one last win,” Holland said in an email. “As seniors, it was really nice to earn the win in our final match and have something to celebrate as we left Johnson Field for the last time.” As the season concludes, the field hockey team will now begin to focus on next year. Despite the loss of the senior class to graduation, the future remains promising. Three players who played all 17 games—forward Jessie Accurso ’15, back Megan Kirkham ’15 and midfielder Nicole Wells ’16—will return to the squad next year. Contact ASHLEY WU at ashley.e.wu@yale.edu .

TASNIM ELBOUTE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Midfielder Nicole Wells ’16 (No. 19) had one shot on Saturday.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NBA Atlanta 103 Charlotte 94

NBA Indiana 95 Memphis 79

SPORTS QUICK HITS

FOYESADE OLUOKUN ’17 FOOTBALL TEAM The defensive back was named the Ivy League Defensive Player of the Week and the Ivy League Rookie of the Week for his effort in Yale’s 24–17 win over Brown. He recorded 13 total tackles, 12 of which were solo, and broke up two passes.

NBA Boston 120 Orlando 105

NBA San Antonio 109 Philadelphia 85

y

FOR MORE SPORTS CONTENT, VISIT OUR WEB SITE yaledailynews.com/sports

JUSTIN SEARS ’16 MEN’S BASKETBALL TEAM The forward was named the Ivy League Co-Player of the Week yesterday along with Penn guard Tony Hicks. Sears registered career highs in points (26), rebounds (13) and blocks (4) in Yale’s 93–77 win over Connecticut State on Saturday.

NBA Chicago 96 Cleveland 81

“We outperformed people’s expectations, but at the same time, we have areas to improve on.” ERIC CAINE ’14 Captain, Men’s squash YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

Huskies sink Bulldogs “The Game” on ice

MEN’S BASKETBALL

BY JAMES BADAS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Yale went into Hartford expecting a strong opponent in No. 18 UConn. What the Bulldogs did not expect was just the 10th tripledouble in UConn’s prized history, keying the 80–62 loss to the nationally ranked Huskies. Yale (1–1, 0–0 Ivy) was led once again by forward Justin Sears ’16, who put together his second double-double in as many games. His performance was not enough as UConn (2–0, 0–0 AAC) and guard Shabazz Napier, who registered his second career triple-double, one-upped Sears. “[Napier] had a triple-double so that’s a pretty big impact,” said Yale head coach James Jones. “He did a great job at finding his teammates and making them better, and he made a couple big shots… He had a very nice game.” Napier scored 14 points, pulled down 11 rebounds and dished out 10 assists. He is the only UConn player with multiple triple-doubles during his career as a Husky. His other triple-double came against Coppin State on Nov. 20, 2011. Sears and company did their best to keep the Bulldogs within striking distance. Sears had 17 points on the afternoon, including two ferocious jams, one of which was a rimshaking two-handed put-back that forced UConn head coach Kevin Ollie to call a timeout. In addition to his offensive output, Sears snatched 10 rebounds, eight of which came on the offensive glass. Sears said he is still adjusting to his larger role and is still improving. “The season’s still early and I’m still learning the proper times to step up,” Sears said. “We missed a lot of shots so our coaches were really big on chasing the ball. That’s one thing we can control — our effort.” Guard Javier Duren ’15 also had a significant impact on the action at the XL Center, scoring 15 points and assisting on a teamhigh four baskets. Duren and Sears combined for more than half of the Bulldogs’ points, SEE MEN’S BASKETBALL PAGE 11

ALLIE KRAUSE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The “Rivalry on Ice” will pit the men’s hockey teams from Yale and Harvard against each other in Madison Square Garden on Jan. 11, 2014. BY ASHTON WACKYM STAFF REPORTER

JAMES BADAS/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

No. 22 Justin Sears ’16 scores two of his team-high 17 points against UConn.

Elis exceed expectations

Although The Game will take place for the 130th time on Nov. 23 at the Yale Bowl, there is also a new rivalry game in the works for the Bulldogs and the Crimson. On Jan. 11, 2014, the Bulldogs and the Crimson will meet in Madison Square Garden for the first ever equivalent of The Game on ice. Athletic directors, players, coaches and fans all aspire for an event that will add another dimension to the age-old YaleHarvard athletic rivalry. “This is something that is an exciting opportunity for people who love to watch college hockey,” said Director of Athletics Tom Beckett. “The idea of bringing Yale and Harvard together in one of the greatest cities in the world is a terrific idea.” The Leverage Agency is the

full-service sports, entertainment and media marketing company that helped organize the “Rivalry on Ice.” Ben Sturner, the founder and CEO of Leverage Agency said in a message to the News that there will be pregame and postgame parties as well as discounted hotel and Amtrak ticket offers for students. The rivalry on the gridiron began in 1857 in New Haven, but the Bulldogs’ battle with the Crimson did not take to the ice until 1900. While Harvard prevailed in the first matchup on the field, the Elis defeated the Crimson 5–4 in their first on-ice contest in front of a black-tie audience at Madison Square Garden, but the rivalry has not returned to the Garden since then. The two universities signed a contract to compete in the SEE MEN’S HOCKEY PAGE 11

Bulldogs finish strong

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s and women’s squash teams took on Ivy League opponents this weekend. TASNIM ELBOUTE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

BY GREG CAMERON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Gaining their first in-game experience of the year at the Ivy Scrimmages this weekend, both the men’s and women’s squash teams proved that they can compete at a high level.

SQUASH The men’s team won its first two matches, but lost to Harvard in the championship of the tournament. The women’s team defeated Penn in a consolation match to finish third after falling to Harvard in the semifinal round. “We’re pretty happy with [our per-

formance],” men’s captain Eric Caine ’14 said. “We outperformed people’s expectations, but at the same time, we have areas to improve on.” All Ancient Eight schools compete in the single-elimination tournament, held this year at Yale, every Fall. As its name implies, the event does not count towards any of the schools’ records, but allows teams to estimate the progress of their training. Both Bulldog squads surpassed expectations at the Scrimmages, as the men’s and women’s teams were seeded third and fourth, respectively, based on preseason rankings by the Collegiate Squash Association. SEE SQUASH PAGE 11

STAT OF THE DAY 22

Forward Jessie Accurso ’15 (No. 18) tallied two shots on goal against Brown on Saturday. BY ASHLEY WU CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The field hockey seniors led the team to victory in the final game of the season, with captain and midfielder/ back Georgia Holland ’14 scoring the go-ahead goal with less than six minutes to play to defeat Brown 2–1.

FIELD HOCKEY With the win over Brown (6–11, 1–6 Ivy), the Elis (8–9, 4–3) finished with a winning record in the Ivy League, an accomplishment that they

have now achieved four times in the last five seasons. “It was great to get a win in our last game on Johnson Field,” forward Brooke Gogel ’14 said. “We have worked incredibly hard over the last four years and it was awesome to end on such a high note. It meant a lot to us that we could put on our Yale uniforms one last time and really show what Yale Field Hockey is all about.” Midfielder Emily Schuckert ’14 opened the scoring in the first half, putting Yale ahead 1–0 less than five minutes into the game. Brown responded minutes later, however,

with forward Meghan O’Donnell scoring at the 10:11 mark to tie the game at one. Yale’s defensive prowess was on display, limiting Brown to just four shots in the first half, three of which were saved by goalkeeper Heather Schlesier ’15. On offense, the Bulldogs proved similarly dominant, recording 15 shots and five penalty corners in the opening half. Bears goalkeeper Shannon McSweeney made key saves to limit the Bulldogs and keep Brown in the game. SEE FIELD HOCKEY PAGE 11

OFFENSIVE REBOUNDS PULLED DOWN BY THE MEN’S BASKETBALL TEAM IN YESTERDAY’S MATCHUP AGAINST UCONN. The Bulldogs grabbed 18 more offensive rebounds than the Huskies, and their 22 offensive boards were one more than their defensive boards.


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