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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 · VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 55 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

RAIN CLEAR

68 37

CROSS CAMPUS

MEN’S HOCKEY YALE BEATS SACRED HEART

AFRICA WEEK

VERITAS

ART SHOW

Students gather to celebrate diversity of African culture

SCHOLARS DEBATE MEANING OF HUMANITY

Undergraduate students display work at track house

PAGE B1 SPORTS

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 5 NEWS

PAGE 7 CULTURE

Inaugural gala honors women

Chairigami, beware! Scott

Stern ’15, president of the Student Origami Society and staff columnist for the News, has published his second how-to origami book. Released last week by Tuttle Publishing, “Fabrigami” teaches the magic craft of paper folding with no paper (just fabric). Now students can add new terms like “squash fold,” “insidereverse fold,” and “blintz base” to their vernacular with no fear of paper cuts.

Making money. Fewer than 30 lucky people work for Snapchat, which Google and Facebook recently offered billions of dollars to acquire. Chloe Drimal ’13 is one of them. Most recently, Business Insider named her “The Luckiest College Graduate of 2013” for snagging the job straight out of graduation. Here’s hoping the sudden success of Snapchat won’t disappear in 10 seconds or less. Burning money. It appears

that both Yale and Harvard are either burning money for fun or tossing cash into a black hole. The two schools reported deficits above $30 million for the 2013 fiscal year. Harvard’s deficit quadrupled to $34 million, but Yale’s $39 million topped even that amount. If Yale loses the game this year, at least students can brag that the University spent more money! Explaining the burning of the money. Meanwhile, President

Salovey has announced that he will soon begin sending campus-wide updates about Yale’s budget. Uh-oh. “From Jail to Yale.” In a

profile from the New Haven Register this weekend, George Chocos DIV ’16 recounted his journey “from jail to Yale.” The 39-year-old student spent years in and out of the system. Yet after meeting Reverend Martin Copenhaver DIV ’80, a member of the Divinity School’s Board of Advisers, he applied and was accepted on full scholarship last January. A meal of miles. The School of Forestry & Environmental Studies celebrated a “100-mile Thanksgiving” on Sunday. All students were encouraged to bring their own dish for the massive potluck affair. One Moore ranking. A blog post from the Brown Daily Herald ranked the Ivy League universities on “who wore it best” in terms of Henry Moore sculptures. Yale came in fourth with “Draped Seated Woman,” probably because the ranking was biased. Topping the list was the gender neutral fit of abstractionism “Ra Ra Brunonia!” that graces Brown’s campus. THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1964 Talks between Yale administrators and the Spanish government on the ownership of the allegedly stolen Saragossa manuscripts commence. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

y MORE ONLINE goydn.com/xcampus

Mixed mandates in Ward 1 BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTER

Rhythm and a keynote speech from entrepreneur Katie Rae SOM ’97 — aimed to promote the appreciation of women at Yale, recognizing female undergraduates for their leadership roles and encouraging more women to become leaders in the Yale community. Rae urged the audience to become leaders by surrounding themselves with support-

When asked if she wants to run for mayor of New Haven, Ward 1 Alderwoman Sarah Eidelson ’12 lets out a short laugh. “People are still surprised when I say that I don’t want to run for higher office,” she says over the buzz of Blue State Coffee on a Thursday afternoon, where she is holding her weekly office hours just over a week after winning re-election to the Board of Aldermen. “I’m 22 and, like most recent grads, I don’t have a 10-year plan.” But for at least two more years, Eidelson is staying in New Haven — in the same High Street apartment she lived in as a student — to represent almost three-quarters of Yale’s student body on the city legislature. Eidelson is the first Ward 1 representative in almost a decade to seek a second term, and if she completes it, she will be the first since the turn of the century to round out two terms on the Board. Ben Healey ’04 was first elected in 2001 and won re-election in 2003. But he vacated the seat in August of 2005 before the end of his second term. Each Ward 1 representative since has called it quits after just a single term: Nick Shalek ’05, Rachel Plattus ’09 and Mike Jones ’11.

SEE LEADING LADIES PAGE 6

SEE EIDELSON PAGE 4

LEON JIANG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The inaugural Leading Ladies Gala, hosted by the Women’s Leadership Initiative, was held Saturday in Silliman. BY STEPHANIE ROGERS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The lights came down, a hush fell over the audience, and three words flashed across a television screen: “Look around you.” This was the introduction that kicked off the first-ever Leading Ladies gala, hosted by the Yale Women’s Leadership Initiative in the Silliman dining hall on Saturday

night. The short video at the beginning of the gala urged women to look around and draw inspiration from one another, because many attendees could go on to become future senators, Nobel prize winners or multimillionaire founders of new startups. The event — which featured rousing speeches, a slam poetry performance, musical renditions from all-female a capella group Whim’n

Mental health dialogue continues at forum BY HANNAH SCHWARZ STAFF REPORTER Following on the heels of the Yale College Council Mental Health Report release in September, the YCC hosted a forum on Saturday afternoon to bring together mental health and well-being organizations on campus. The meeting of roughly

30 students at 17 Hillhouse Ave. was the first ever to bring together these organizations to brainstorm ideas about how to implement specific, concrete solutions to address mental health issues on campus. Over the nearly two-hour gathering, students discussed initiatives including creating a centralized mental health website, holding mental health work-

shops and encouraging wellness habits. Many of the students in attendance came from a range of campus organizations including Mind Matters, YMindful, Inspire Yale, Flourish, the Calhoun Happiness Project, Communication and Consent Educators, Chaplaincy Fellows and Freshman Counselors. “We knew coming in that our primary goal was to leave with

More grads call New Haven home BY RISHABH BHANDARI AND POOJA SALHOTRA STAFF REPORTER AND CONTRIBUTING REPORTER When Mayor-elect Toni Harp ARC ’78 and President Peter Salovey begin their partnership in January, the two will look to continue a trend that began over the past two decade under their predecessors. Over the past two decades an increasing number of Yale students choosing to work in the Elm City after graduation.

New Haven is becoming a very attractive destination for our students because of its affordability and … culture. JEANINE DAMES Director, Undergraduate Career Services

Although Undergraduate Career Services did not track the occupations and residence of Yale graduates before last year, all nine administrators and students interviewed said

that they have seen a gradual pattern of more students leaving Yale but not New Haven. According to data compiled by UCS for the postgraduate plans of the Class of 2013, 78 students of the 1,066 who responded to the first annual UCS survey of the senior class are still working in New Haven. “What we’re seeing is that increasingly students are wanting to stay in New Haven and contribute to what has become their home away from home,” said UCS Director Jeanine Dames. “New Haven is becoming a very attractive destination for our students because of its affordability and the culture it offers.” Though Dames said that 30 of the 78 students who remained in New Haven are working at Yale, she has also noticed that recently more students are working for companies in New Haven that are unaffiliated with the University. The University is the largest employer of Yale graduates, ahead of other popular destinations such as Teach For America, JP Morgan, and McKinsey & Company, according to UCS data. Dames SEE ALUMNI PAGE 4

concrete, actionable goals,” said Reuben Hendler ’14, one of three authors of the mental health report. “It’s important to move from a larger focus [on mental health] to implementational issues.” Students discussed the idea of a workshop that would teach participants how to reach out to a friend about whom they are concerned and how to consis-

tently practice mood-boosting habits, such as sleeping sufficiently, eating healthfully and exercising frequently. The forum also brought up working on increasing publicity for mental health resources by pulling together links to campus resources to create a centralized website, putting up stickSEE MENTAL HEALTH 6

Bourbonais off hockey team

BRIANNE BOWEN/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Clinton Bourbonais ’14 is no longer a member of the Yale Hockey Team, according to the University. BY GRANT BRONSDON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Yale forward Clinton Bourbonais ’14 is no longer a member of the men’s hockey team, according to the University. Associate Athletics Director Sports Publicity Steve Conn said that the University was unwilling to comment further on the situ-

ation. “All I can tell you is that he is no longer a member of the team,” Conn said. “That’s all I can say.” Calls to Bourbonais and head coach Keith Allain ’80 were not answered. Before committing to Yale, BourSEE BOURBONAIS PAGE 6


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “Previous generations have refused to take on the issue themselves, so yaledailynews.com/opinion

NEWS’ VIEW

Vote to divest

Y

ale's conservative divestment plan should be implemented.

“The application of negative injunctions, to be sure, will not rebuild cities or make deserts bloom,” The Ethical Investor, Yale’s guidelines for investment, reads. “But it can limit or halt the destruction of life, of opportunity and of beauty.” Today, we face falling cities and drier deserts, demolished homes and ruined lives. And Yale, with its institutional power and endowment, can help to limit these injuries. This week, the student body must vote to divest from the worst fossil fuel companies. The goal of Yale’s divestment is symbolic: It will have an almost negligible financial impact on the fossil fuel companies. But since only eight other colleges — whose combined endowment amounts to about a hundredth of Yale’s — have divested, our decision to divest will open up a social space for other institutions to follow suit. Humanity needs to make strides away from fossil fuels as much as we need to use fossil fuels for the immediate future. While Brown and Harvard’s administrators have rejected divestment proposals, Yale’s administrators have no reason to follow their lead. Our plan is much more conservative. A vote to divest would mean to follow Fossil Free Yale’s proposal, which sets a timeframe allowing companies to disclose and enact a plan to reduce emissions — and most importantly, only targets the worst carbon emitters among the top 200 list. Under The Ethical Investor's guidelines, Yale must divest when our investments are causing “grave social injury.” The University’s responsibility is determined by four criteria: need, proximity, capability and last resort. In the 1970s, the University fulfilled this responsibility by divesting from companies engaging with apartheid South Africa, and in 2006

from Sudanese government bonds and seven oil companies operating there. Climate change is less visually disturbing than political violence. But as the recent Typhoon Haiyan can attest, it is inflicting real injury on human lives. About 500,000 humans die each year from the effects of climate change, particularly those living in the globe’s most vulnerable communities. There is a clear need for action. Divestment also fulfills the other three criteria — and a practical function. We are in a unique position to pioneer a new front on an existing powerful environmental movement. Contrary to popular belief, divestment will have minimal impact on the endowment. A key study by Aperio Group conservatively estimates a loss of less than a standard deviation in their model. Neither will divestment politicize our endowment. Divesting is an acknowledgement of the scientifically proven link between carbon emissions and climate change, not an endorsement of policy. There is a difference between a negative injunction and a positive duty; we are not promoting sponsorship of green companies. It is rightly concerning that we are focusing on fossil fuels while our University may be investing in companies — tobacco, firearm, Congolese minerals — that more clearly constitute damage. As a result, we wish there were a mechanism to regularly review the social harm of all the businesses in which we invest. But inaction on other issues does not preclude us from acting, in this instance, to right a wrong. In an opportunity that hinges on 50 percent turnout, to squander an opportunity to vote — and to lead this movement at such a critical juncture — would be a disappointing failure on our part.

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COPYRIGHT 2013 — VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 55

that leaves us.”

'MRB' ON 'PUTTING THE LID ON THE COOKIE JAR'

A scholar’s kiss of death F

or members of the faculty, few issues are as contentious, or as stressful, as tenure. Last year, about twice as many new professors accepted job offers from Yale as in years past. Tenure will be a constant concern for so many of them. What path should junior faculty follow to obtain this plum prize? There is, of course, no one answer to this riddle, but Yale’s Faculty Handbook claims that the University looks at the “impact and continuing promise, at the very highest levels, of the candidate’s research and scholarship, as well as excellent teaching and engaged University citizenship.” Is teaching as important a consideration as scholarship? Shockingly — and troublingly — it would appear not. It is actually the worst-kept secret in higher education that good teaching paves no smooth path to tenure. In fact, faculty who are perceived as too focused on teaching may be seen as neglectful of their scholarship. We must ask ourselves: Should teaching be as important a criterion as scholarship in gaining tenure? No matter what we think, however, it’s not. For decades, professors across the country have spoken of the “kiss of death” in the tenure process. The phrase was famously invoked in a 1999 Perspectives in Biology and Medicine paper, and again in a 2006 Journal of Higher Education arti-

cle. This “kiss of death” is — surprisingly — the award for best teaching. Faculty members who are definiSCOTT tively supeSTERN rior teachers are assumed A Stern to be inferior Perspective scholars. And many times, they’re out of a job within a couple years. At Yale, the award for best undergraduate teaching is the prestigious DeVane Medal. (A separate DeVane Medal is awarded to an outstanding retiring teacher.) Looking at the DeVane Medal is probably the closest we can get to examining how didactically gifted junior faculty fare in the tenure game. In the last 25 years, six untenured professors (excluding lecturers, directors or adjuncts) won the DeVane Medal. Of these, only one went on to achieve tenure at Yale. The other five moved on to other universities, all within two years of winning the DeVane. At least three were actually denied tenure; the other two appear to have withdrawn before they were considered. It’s not as if these professors were subpar scholars. One was Susanne Lindgren Wofford, now the Dean of the Gallatin School at New York University, no small

feat. Another was Richard Garner, the Dean of the Honors College at Adelphi University. You may recognize the name of another — Steven Gillon, now a professor at the University of Oklahoma, and resident historian on The History Channel. All three of these professors were denied tenure from Yale. It would appear that Yale valued scholarship over teaching when it came time to decide who got tenure. In other words, sterling teachers had trouble becoming Sterling Professors. Upon further examination of the DeVane Medal winners, you may notice that the majority of them had already attained tenure when they won. This isn’t too surprising; many professors, we can assume, need time to grow into their teaching. But an examination of DeVane winners reveals a final, disturbing twist. For the last decade, almost all winners were tenured faculty; not a single was an assistant or associate professor. This comes in spite of a revamp of Yale’s tenure system back in 2007, redesigned explicitly to help junior faculty members rise through the ranks and feel more valued at Yale, a place where, historically, “nobody gets tenure.” When the new tenure system became policy in 2007, the News wrote a glowing review, claiming that junior professors who are treated better would become better teachers. The DeVane

Medal results of the last halfdecade reveal that this may not be the case. In the 1990s and early 2000s, it was common for junior faculty members to be named Yale’s best teacher. Now, it just doesn’t happen. Why? It is certainly possible that, after witnessing a generation of unusually gifted teachers fail to get tenure, new Yale professors decided to buckle down and focus on their scholarship, giving less attention to their teaching than they otherwise would have done. This is in no way an indictment of Yale’s junior faculty. They’re just doing what they have to do. It is an indictment of Yale’s senior faculty, or at least the culture that dictates the values that professors should possess. Promotion to tenure is largely decided by the “Board of Permanent Officers,” a committee entirely made up of tenured, full professors. These professors should consider teaching as much as they do scholarship. Top-notch scholarship is imperative, but Yale is not designed just to churn out wonderful research. It is intended to enrich young minds. By overemphasizing scholarship at the expense of teaching, these professors are actively damaging the quality of those at the blackboard. SCOTT STERN is a junior in Branford College. Contact him at scott.stern@yale.edu .

ANNELISA LEINBACH/ILLUSTRATIONS EDITOR

Y degrees of separation A

s readers of this column might know, I write often on China, and I’m not exactly happy with a lot of the things that are going on back home. Doing so puts me in a rather awkward spot: To my peers in China, I’m criticizing my own country in a foreign place, to a foreign audience and in a foreign language. In other words, I’m a sellout. While my suitemates have taken full advantage of the opportunity to make jokes about the Chinese government blacklisting me (though the authorities haven’t notified me yet), I often find myself wondering what I’m accomplishing with my writings about China, especially in the context of a campus newspaper. There is an obvious answer: International students like me can provide a unique inside perspective on what’s happening in our respective countries. That’s one of the reasons that we’re here, and what motivated me to write columns in the first place. For me, writing in English and for the Yale audience has been a liberating experience. One thing is for sure: I would not be comfortable writing these articles in Chinese. My dad once suggested that I translate my pieces

and publish them online. I stared at him as if he had gone mad. Censorship is only half the problem — XIUYI with it comes ZHENG the culture of the “silent Propermajority” that rewards retgandist icence and deference to authority, even if that silence is maintained only on a superficial level. Despite the voice I have gained through my writings, my ability to bridge the gap between the two countries has been limited. First of all, the language I use and the audience I face have colored my perspective. Certain words and phrases carry with them pre-established connotations and elicit well-conditioned emotional responses. Concepts such as “democracy” and “academic freedom” may be widely accepted in the U.S., but when translated into Chinese, they often lead to raised eyebrows and the disparaging label of “meifen” (pro-American liberal). Moreover, away from home, my understanding of current

events in China has been limited by the information that I have access to, consisting mainly of online sources — many of which are western media reports — and anecdotal evidence from friends and relatives back home. Having been in America since I graduated high school, I lack the common experience of living in China as an adult. As a result, I feel increasingly separated from the day-to-day life of the average Chinese 22 year old. I can comprehend his preoccupations, desires and frustrations, but it is difficult for me to step into his shoes. I’m not worried about being a sellout to my country or to any entity, as long as I am spelling out my convictions and representing accurately what I believe to be the truth. Yet what I am worried about is the possibility that I will gradually lose my “Chineseness,” or at least the ability to identify with what it means to be a young person in China today. When I am criticizing a new government policy or a certain social phenomenon, I hope that I am not doing so on the basis of a few New York Times articles, but because I know who the victims are in those cases and I can feel their pain. In the four years that we

spend in New Haven as Yale students, we experience rapid, even transformational growth both intellectually and emotionally. For international students, this change may be even more profound, given that we must adjust to a brand new social and cultural environment. As we contribute to the university’s diversity, we also inevitably become more Yale-ized and Americanized. This is far from a bad thing — I would not have written this column four years ago — and it is a natural consequence of receiving a college education in the U.S. However, with the empowerment that comes from looking beyond the borders of one’s own country also comes the risk of losing touch with one’s roots. I’m not selling out on my country by pointing out her flaws. To criticize is infinitely better than to help maintain a false façade of tranquility. However, regardless of where I am, who I’m talking to and which language I’m using, it is vital that I retain a sense of who I’m speaking for. XIUYI ZHENG is a senior in Davenport College. His column runs on alternate Mondays. Contact him at xiuyi.zheng@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“I’d rather invest in an entrepreneur who has failed before than one who assumes success from day one.” KEVIN O’LEARY CANADIAN INVESTOR

CORRECTIONS THURSDAY, NOV. 15

The WEEKEND article “The Learning Farm” misspelled the name of Justin Freiberg as Justin Freitag.

Africa Week zooms in on culture

KATHRYN CRANDALL/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Africa Week featured speakers, movie screenings and performances highlighting the diversity of the African continent. BY VIVIAN WANG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER This past week, the Yale African Students’ Association (YASA) hosted its annual Africa Week — six days of speakers, movie screenings and cultural shows on campus to celebrate a lesserknown face of the world’s second-largest continent. The theme of Africa Week this year was “Africa 360: A Panoramic Perspective of the Continent.” The week — which lasted from Nov. 11 to 17 and featured speakers ranging from the founder of news outlet Africa. com to the king of the Akyem Abuakwa traditional area of Ghana — aimed to promote a new perspective on African life, said Ameze Belo-Osagie ’16, vice president of YASA. “Often when we have discussions about Africa on campus, they are usually related to development,” Belo-Osagie said. “We talk about security and corruption, but we don’t talk about culture, literature or history. We really wanted to make the point that there are people making interesting contributions in a lot of different ways, and we wanted to put that on Yale students’ radars.” The week’s events were geared toward the rich culture of Africa, rather than focusing solely on politics, said YASA President Metabel Markwei ’15. For example, she said, one of the most popular events of the week was the talk given on Nov. 11 by Ngugi wa Thiong’o, a Kenyan writer and former visiting Yale professor, who Markwei called one of the “pioneers of African literature.” Other events included film screenings by famous African filmmakers and a discussion about the complicated identities of Africans compared to AfricanAmericans.

Discussion on Africa is not as common as it should be, given the position Africa is taking in the world. METABEL MARKWEI ’15 YASA President Beyond highlighting African culture, another goal of the week was to facilitate conversation between the various African interest groups on campus, Markwei said. Although all the events were planned and executed by YASA members, YASA invited other organizations to contribute as well. For example, the Nov. 15 discussion about African versus African-American identity was moderated by Patricia Okonta ’15, president of the Black Student Alliance at Yale. “Through Africa Week, we were trying to connect the dots

to Africa on this campus,” Markwei said. “The question for me was, what were the needs that we could meet on this campus, and what are the gaps in the conversation about Africa that we can have? We reached out to other groups of interest to see if they wanted to contribute to the creative process of coming up with that discussion.” Okonta said she was happy to join in the celebrations, as she felt a personal tie to the topics discussed, despite not being directly involved in YASA. As a first-generation American from Nigerian parents, Okonta said, she knows that Africa holds hope and a promising future. “The events YASA offered around Africa Week and throughout the entire school year show ways in which the continent of Africa and its people both in and outside the diaspora are thriving and excelling,” Okonta said in an email to the News. YASA members said they hope that the discussions prompted by Africa Week will raise greater awareness of how much the study of African life has to offer. In addition to acting as a “signpost” to promote YASA and the events it hosts throughout the school year, Belo-Osagie said, she wants students’ newfound awareness to prompt them to consider taking an African Studies class. Even within the walls of the University, there is much room for growth in African Studies, she added, explaining that Yale does not offer as many resources as she would like in order to fully engage in African issues. “Discussion on Africa is not as common as it should be, given the position Africa is taking in the world and how literally everybody has a stake in Africa,” Markwei said. “We as African students don’t feel like enough African diversity is represented in Yale’s African Studies Department. That’s a gap that Yale can fill when compared to other universities in the U.S.” However, Markwei also expressed hopes that Yale is moving in the right direction, and believes that Yale will make great strides in the very near future. Belo-Osagie said she is glad the theme YASA chose for the week worked well in conjunction with University President Peter Salovey’s recent initiative to extend academic ties with African institutions. “We are so excited to be at Yale at a time like this, so that we can push the African frontier,” Markwei said. “I think more of the effects of Africa Week will be felt by people coming to Yale five years down the line. These are the beginnings of what I feel is a huge wave of interest in Africa. It’s an awesome time to be a part of it.” The week concluded with a cultural show on Sunday. Contact VIVIAN WANG at vivian.y.wang@yale.edu .

Bucket list app wins Startup Weekend prize BY JR REED STAFF REPORTER In an effort to boost the local startup community, New Haven held its third annual Startup Weekend at Gateway Community College this past Friday through Sunday. Organized by the national non-profit Startup Weekend, the competition aims to give locals the experience of starting their own business ventures. The event, which charged a $99 entrance fee, drew more than 100 attendees of the college — a turnout similar to last year’s. U.S. Senator Chris Murphy, who made a guest appearance at the event after the final presentations, underscored the need to continually build up startup companies in the American economy, citing evidence that these companies create 3 million new jobs each year. According to Murphy, he and a few fellow Senators are planning to propose a pro-startup agenda in the coming months. “We need to be a startup economy in this new global economy, where lowvalue jobs aren’t available anymore,” Murphy told audience members. “The ideas here can power our economy going forward, and these are not just solutions for yourself, or your family, or New Haven, but solutions for the American economy at large.” On Friday evening, participants were given 60 seconds to present their ideas to an audience of local residents and fellow entrepreneurs, who voted to move forward with their favorite concepts. With the aid of expert coaches, participants then formed 11 teams to work together over a 54-hour period to develop products or business models. Following formal presentations Sunday evening in front of a six-member panel of judges, Buckit, a web-based application

designed to allow users to develop a more efficient, visually engaging bucket list, was announced the winner of this year’s Startup Weekend New Haven. Derek Koch, one of the organizers of Startup Weekend New Haven and founder and CEO of Independent Software, said that the event is not necessarily about starting new companies, but rather developing talent in the Elm City’s startup community. “We tend to focus on immediately developing companies, but the reality is it takes three or four ideas until someone can really prosper,” Koch said. “Every year, we have people who stay at it [following the event], and those are the ones that become the new generation of entrepreneurs.”

We need to be a startup economy in this new global economy, where low-value jobs aren’t available anymore. CHRIS MURPHY U.S. senator, Connecticut

Stephanie Yacenda, one of the leaders of the winning Buckit team, said that the product’s inspiration stemmed from her own frustrations of having significant life goals but no digital tool to gather research and organize them. She said the Startup Weekend was most beneficial in helping her realize the differences between what her team offers and the products already on the market, which do not provide graphics, to-dolists or timeline features to supplement

their bucket lists. “The real benefit is that we provide a tool that isn’t out there,” Yacenda said. The team already started talking to a local incubator at the Startup Weekend to help with funding, Yacenda said. She added that Buckit faces several major hurtles going forward, including pinpointing an audience dedicated to the product and finding a developer to join the team. Despite the event’s fledgling nature, Koch noted that the success of past Startup Weekend winners, including Applivate CEO and co-founder John Fitzpatrick, show that people can come into the event and ultimately “change the world” — specifically citing Fitzpatrick’s accomplishments in transforming diabetes management through his company’s mobile application ShugaTrak. Fitzpatrick, whose company took home first place in 2011, served as one of six judges on the panel to select this year’s winning business idea. He said the winning team had a good idea with good implementation, praising their outreach to their anticipated customer base. Fitzpatrick added that he and the other judges believe the team has great potential, especially given the progress they have made on their website. Despite the event’s success, Koch said that he hoped more connections can be fostered between Yale and New Haven in the future, noting that only one Yale student, a candidate at the medical school, participated in the event. Startup Weekend, which is headquartered in Seattle, Wash., presents itself as a “global grassroots movement of active and empowered entrepreneurs” and has held over 400 events in around 100 countries around the world since 2011. Contact JR REED at jonathan.t.reed@yale.edu .

Law students advocate through film BY LAVINIA BORZI STAFF REPORTER Amidst law reviews and court cases, filmmaking is establishing itself as a new form of legal scholarship at Yale Law School. Founded in 2010 by a group of YLS students and filmmakers, the Visual Law Project produces documentaries on controversial legal issues such as immigration policy and maximum security detentions. The VLP team, which is currently composed of five members and five directors, distributes these films across the country to varied outlets including universities and correctional institutes. A year after releasing a film called “The Worst of the Worst,” which exposed the reality of solitary confinement in Connecticut’s only super-maximum security prison and received widespread media attention, the VLP team is now working on a documentary about immigration reform that was commissioned by the nongovernmental organization Human Rights First. “The VLP brings boots-on-theground issues into the ivory tower,” Rebecca Wexler LAW ’16 said, adding that the project takes these issues and produces “accessible impact-driven scholarship.” Wexler, an independent filmmaker, was hired to teach film skills to the VLP team during the project’s pilot year. While working with the group, Wexler said she was inspired by the philosophy and mission of the VLP and decided to apply to YLS. Once admitted, Wexler joined the VLP team. The project aims to establish films and

filmmaking as a new analytic tool for legal research and education, she said. Jessica So LAW ’14, who is on the board of directors this year, said the VLP team focuses on using storytelling and advocacy to raise awareness about legal policy issues rather than focusing on the policy itself. The goal is to show the impact of the policies on people involved, said Leslie Couvillion FES ’15 LAW ’15, another director. “Even though we have to spend some time laying out the legal framework, what is ultimately most compelling are the stories of those people whose lives are affected by the laws we are questioning or challenging,” Couvillion said. The team works closely with legal scholars, who advise them on technical questions, she added. Aseem Mehta ’14, the only undergraduate in the VLP team, said that the project strives to give the most complete perspective possible, not only that of the victims. For the film “The Worst of the Worst,” the team captured the stories of the prison employees as well as the inmates, he said. “[The prison workers] said that this was a very accurate portrayal of their experience, in a way that no other media outlet has done,” Mehta said. “Similar brutality and trauma happens to you even if you’re working in a correctional institute.” Shortly after the film’s release, the maximum security prison, the Northern Correctional Institute, closed down one of its wings. More so than other mediums, film enables the inclusion of all perspectives, Wexler said. She added that, through

shooting and editing, the filmmaker is always looking for alternate points of view. Hope Metcalf, who runs a clinic at YLS that works for some of the inmates featured in “The Worst of the Worst,” said she would normally be skeptical about working with filmmakers out of fear that her clients might be misrepresented, but she said that she was impressed by how balanced and professional the VLP team’s approach has been. David Harris, a law professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law who advised the team on a documentary they made on stop-and-frisk in Connecticut, said that the VLP takes an ordinary concept — lawyers telling stories about cases and the people involved in them — and applies it in an innovative and effective way. “There is no reason at all that legal cases have to be told through the dusty dry language of legal briefs and judges’ opinions,” Harris said. “Film is a very strong medium, a way of telling a story that has a high impact.” Couvillard said the documentary about immigration reform, which will be completed in December, is a positive development because the team will have almost total control of the creative process, while Human Rights First will be covering the costs of production. Costs for these films range between $10,000 and $20,000, she said. Currently, 80,000 people are held in solitary confinement in the United States. Contact LAVINIA BORZI at lavinia.borzi@yale.edu .

YALE

The VLP released “The Worst of the Worst,” a film about solitary confinement in Connecticut’s super-maximum security prison, last year.


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more, and become more, you are a leader.” JOHN QUINCY ADAMS 6TH PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

Eidelson looks to next term EIDELSON FROM PAGE 1 Though Eidelson’s status as an alumnus came under attack by her opponent leading up to the Nov. 5 election, her decision to stick around throws into question a more deeply ingrained criticism of the Ward 1 alderman sometimes leveled by city residents and Yale students alike — that she or he is a political aspirant with only a shallow interest in serving the city. I n t h e l ea d - u p to t h e announcement that the Yale College Republicans would field Paul Chandler ’14 in the Ward 1 race, Republican Town Committee Chairman Richter Elser ’81 welcomed the prospect of a GOP challenge but offered a broader critique of politics in Ward 1. “The Board of Aldermen is not a stepping stone to a career in politics,” Elser told the News in April. “The city’s needs are serious, and Yale students should be cognizant of that when they run for office here.” In an effort to take seriously the needs of one segment of the city in particular, Eidelson has devoted her time on the Board to the city’s youth. Much of her work since taking office in January 2012 has been devoted to identifying gaps in youth services and, as chair of the Board’s youth services committee, helping to devise a youth violence prevention grant application that won $750,000 in state funds this October. Eidelson said the committee is now poised to roll out a youth map that will make existing youth services available for online browsing.

I heard the feedback that some students want more ways to engage with me and with information about what’s going on in the city SARAH EIDELSON ’12 Alderman, Ward 1 Those are the initiatives Eidelson stressed on the campaign trail — and the ones she said were endorsed when students voted 513 to 285 to re-elect her. “The discourse surrounding this election — and the results — really reaffirmed my belief that Yale students want to see the rest of the city move forward, and they want to be more connected to the rest of New Haven,” Eidelson said. “We don’t see ourselves as thriving when we’re isolated within the University.”

Despite her accomplishments in the city, some Yale students bemoaned Eidelson’s perceived lack of presence on campus. In response to a News survey sent out the week before the election, roughly a quarter of student respondents registered to vote in Ward 1 said the incumbent had not engaged the Yale community at all. The majority of students said she has engaged “somewhat” or “a little.” In interviews with students leaving the Ward 1 polling place, virtually all students who said they voted for Eidelson said her experience on the Board factored into that decision. Most cited the youth agenda. Of 15 students who said they voted for Chandler, 13 cited relative engagement with the student body. The critique is a familiar one. The headline of a 2009 News story appraising Plattus’s tenure in office read, “Plattus’s flaw is visibility.” In a 2003 letter to the News, Teddy Goff ’07, political consultant and digital director for President Barack Obama’s 2012 re-election campaign, said campus engagement was the dominant theme of the 2003 aldermanic race, when Dan Kruger ’04 ran unsuccessfully to unseat Healey. “Kruger’s entire campaign seems to be predicated upon his disappointment in the failure of [Healey] to consult with or even inform the Yale community regarding the decisions he has made that affect our lives,” Goff wrote. Chandler similarly made campus presence a centerpiece of his campaign pitch. At the aldermanic debate at the end of October, he said the question on voters’ minds was, “Where is Sarah?” In setting a blueprint for her second term, Eidelson said she will remain steadfast in her policy commitments — but added that she might tweak her method of engaging with her constituents. “I heard the feedback that some students want more ways to engage with me and with information about what’s going on in the city,” Eidelson said. She said she plans to increase her presence on social media and further emphasize her email newsletters. She added that her weekly office hours in Blue State have been an important way for students to get in touch with her. She said she plans to brainstorm ways to better publicize this opportunity. Healey said Eidelson will likely have an easier time engaging with students during her second term. The first two years are largely spent getting a handle on the city and government operations, he said. “Once you’ve figured things out a little more, you have the

space to engage with your constituents the way you really want to,” Healey said. “It’s hard to get your constituents involved when you yourself are just figuring out how things work.” Ward 1 students are not demanding sidewalk improvements or snow removal, he said, but they still want to know their representative — and to have an outlet for their ideas that affect the world beyond Yale’s gates. Healey said being an effective outlet for students is not a matter of being a student oneself but of having the experience to speak meaningfully across the town-gown divide. Jones said he engaged with students by working on issues that were the subject of activism on campus. He said he helped pass legislation in 2011 that added gender identity protections to the city’s non-discrimination ordinances with the help of students involved in Fierce Advocates, a student LBGTQ activist group. Drew Morrison ’14 and Tyler Blackmon ’16 — both Democrats who voted for Eidelson — agreed that student engagement matters. Blackmon said Eidelson has been effective in that realm. Morrison said there is room for improvement in her second term. “The voters made it clear that the thing to improve upon in the second term is constituent services and relations,” Morrison said. “The election was an endorsement of a lot of what Sarah cares about in the city. Because of that, she should take the opportunity to work with people in her ward who also care about those things.” Dimitri Halikias ’16, who voted for Chandler, said he sees Eidelon’s central challenge as reconnecting with the students he said she neglected during her first term. He said major decisions, including her vote in favor of the city’s sale of portions of High and Wall Streets to the University last June, should have been made only after consulting her constituents. In her most important work, such as trying to reopen the long-shuttered Dixwell “Q” House and converting the vacant Goffe Street Armory into a youth space, Eidelson said students have been engaged. She said she hopes to bring more of that engagement to campus, where students might feel more comfortable speaking up than in the aldermanic chambers of City Hall. No specific plans have been made for those campus discussions, she added. Eidelson’s second term will begin on Jan. 1, 2014. Contact ISAAC STANLEYBECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .

ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER (TOP) AND ALEXANDRA SCHMELING/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER (BOTTOM)

Sarah Eidelson ’12 is already looking towards her second term, which will begin in January.

New Haven retaining more Yale grads ALUMNI FROM PAGE 1 said that because the University provides a diverse variety of jobs from work in the Admissions Office to research opportunities in many disciplines, Yale graduates of any major can find employment opportunities within the University.

KEEPING TALENT IN THE ELM CITY

Beyond just employing graduates, Yale is also actively encouraging alumni to establish businesses in New Haven. In his October inaugural address, President Salovey said that he hopes to do more to “nurture student entrepreneurs from every school and department and encourage them to contribute to the local idea economy.” Director of University Properties Abigail Rider and Vice President of New Haven and State Affairs Bruce Alexander ’65 both cited the expansion of Higher One, a financial services company founded in 2000 by Yale students, as an example of successful student entrepreneurship in the city. “Keeping some of this intellectual talent, who come to be educated at Yale and other institutions of higher learning, is a great thing for New Haven

because it improves the economy and the prosperity of the region,” Alexander said. Mayor-elect Harp said that her administration will try to improve the affordability of housing and transportation within New Haven, in order to make the city more appealing to potential workers. Drew Morrison ’14 is one current student said he is likely to continue living in New Haven after graduation. Morrison, who was a prominent activist for Justin Elicker’s SOM ’10 FES ’10 mayoral campaign, said that working for a non-profit or economic think-tank would allow him to utilize the knowledge he acquired at Yale to do substantive policy work that would improve a community he deeply cares about. Christian Vasquez ’13, a Woodbridge Fellow who works in the Office of Administration, said that Yale’s spirit of public service and the extensive role community service plays in the lives of many students at Yale encourages recent graduates to continue contributing to New Haven. Vasquez said that in the four years he has been at Yale, he has observed more and more students choosing to work in non-profits or municipal government after their time at Yale

College is over.

TRANSFORMING URBAN LIVING

Students and administrators interviewed said that recent improvements in town-gown relations have contributed significantly to the uptick in number of Yale students who consider working in New Haven after college.

I think a lot of people who thought anything on the other side of the green was terra incognita. DAVID KAHN ’09 The process of making New Haven an attractive destination for Yale graduates has been gradual. In 1995, Yale launched the Office of New Haven and State Affairs, a liaison between the University and the City that is charged with fostering better town-gown relations. One major initiative the office undertook was the establishment of University Properties in 1996, which has helped expand the city’s tax base since, in con-

trast to Yale’s academic buildings, UP pays city taxes. UP’s revitalization of Broadway and Chapel streets with restaurants, bars and shops has made the city more comfortable and appealing to young people, Alexander said. He added that creating a city that offers a high quality of life is essential to attracting more residents. Several alumni cited this recent revamping of the downtown district as a potential factor in the increase of Yale alumni who have decided to stay in New Haven. When Peter Crumlish DIV ’09, the current director of Dwight Hall, moved to New Haven in 2007 to attend Yale’s Divinity School, he was surprised that a city the size of New Haven had so many quality restaurants, especially considering the lack of downtown development that his friends who attended Yale 20 years earlier had talked about. “I just remember walking from the train station to campus and it feeling kind of like a wasteland and that’s not the feeling you get now,” Crumlish said. David Kahn ’09, a native of New Haven who entered Yale as a freshman in 1998, also speculated that the city’s economic

development — largely through Yale’s investments in the city — has made it more attractive to alumni. Kahn said that when he came to Yale as a freshman Kahn said he was “in some ways proud of New Haven,” but that the attitude that his peers had about the city began to affect his own perception of his hometown. “I knew a lot of people who thought anything on the other side of the green was terra incognita.” After freshman year, Kahn took a six and a half year hiatus in California, where he worked for the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights. When he returned to New Haven in 2006, he noticed a shift in the way Yale students approached the city. He added that town-gown frictions had significantly decreased to the point where students are now more willing to do internships in the city and consider staying post-graduation. When Crumlish graduated from Cornell in 1990, there was a wave of young people wanting to move into New York City to work in the financial sector, he said. But now, with a growing urban movement, people are drawn to cities like New Haven. “It’s this new movement where you want to live in the city

not because you want to work in the finance center and make tons of money,” Crumlish said. “It’s because you want to be a part of a compact environment where you can walk and bike.” Vasquez said that he could not imagine having the same quality of life in any other city because of New Haven’s unique combination of affordable housing, a vibrant cultural scene and its sense of community. Though New Haven is becoming increasingly attractive to Yale graduates, Morrison is disappointed that few existing private firms in New Haven try to attract Yale students. Dames said that UCS continually reaches out to local firms with the hope that more businesses will attend career fairs or advertise job openings for Yale students. Of the 78 students from the Class of 2013 who told UCS that they were working in New Haven, 34 were working for a non-profit, 29 are working for a for-profit organization, 8 are working for either the local, state, or federal government, and 2 are self-employed. Contact RISHABH BHANDARI at rishabh.bhandari@yale.edu Contact POOJA SALHOTRA at pooja.salhotra@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“We cannot despair of humanity, since we ourselves are human beings.” ALBERT EINSTEIN GERMAN PHYSICIST

Academics probe nature of humanity BY DANA SCHNEIDER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Defining “what makes us human” is no easy task, according to speakers at Friday’s Veritas Forum. Rosalind Picard, founder and director of the Affective Computing Research Group at the MIT Laboratory, and Joshua Knobe, professor of philosophy and cognitive science at Yale, spoke to more than 300 members of the Yale community last Friday about what makes humans unique from technology. While Picard approached the question from a more religious perspective, Knobe examined the ways that people rationalize their intuitions about humanity.

The discussion was part of the Veritas Forum, a Cambridgebased group that partners with Christian groups on college campuses to promote discussion of both faith and science on an academic level. Both speakers at Friday’s forum referenced a “special sauce” that makes humans unique. Though traditional criteria for humanity include “consciousness” and “autonomy,” Picard said these definitions do not encompass all of humanity. The fact that certain disabled people may not have agency does not make them any less human, she said. Picard said that her worldview is based on the idea that meaning

arises from human relationships to family, friends and God. Knobe, whose research has helped popularize the field of experimental philosophy, explained that he studies how people come to understand deep philosophical questions, stressing the importance of questioning one’s own intuition. According to his research, people generally point to several factors when attempting to define what it means to be human: complex psychology, religious beliefs and even physical appearance. Picard — whose research focuses on affective computing, which is the use of technology to sense and communicate emotion — showed a video of Kismet, the MIT robot that physically

YBWC celebrates community BY WESLEY YIIN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Since its founding in 2006, members say the Yale Black Women’s Coalition has evolved into a strong organization that emphasizes diversity, leadership and community. Celebrating the closeness of the group, YBWC held one of its signature annual events on Saturday — Black Women’s Weekend, which featured a few hours of karaoke along with food, music and games at the Afro-American Cultural Center. According to Chelsea Handfield ’15, president of YBWC, the low-key event fit in perfectly with the organization’s goal of providing a safe space in which black women can come together to talk about sociopolitical events, discuss unique experiences and form a stronger community. Handfield said that as both a woman and a racial minority, she is grateful to have a group like YBWC, where she can meet and become friends with other women who are going through similar experiences. At a university like Yale, she said, she is even more aware of her identity, as students often ask unintentionally insensitive questions. Christina Lockett ’14, last year’s YBWC vice president, said it is important for an intersectional group like YBWC to exist because there are few spaces elsewhere to discuss issues specific to black female identity. “Traditional feminism ignores black women,” she said, adding that YBWC is like a sisterhood. Ashley Ison ’14, last year’s YBWC treasurer, said the group is a space where she can talk about experiences that she would not feel comfortable discussing anywhere else. Aside from shared experiences, members of YBWC said that they also look to the organization to meet women from other backgrounds and learn about their experiences. For instance, some of the women are from lowincome communities while others are wealthier, and some went to predominantly white schools while others lived in mostly black

responds in a human-like manner to praise or reproach. While computers might act as if they can experience feeling, Picard stressed that, at least for now, there is no evidence to believe computers can gain emotional experience. Though it might be possible in the future to genetically engineer living flesh, Picard emphasized that this does not mean scientists ought to. She added that having the ability to construct something does not indicate that scientists fully understand it. The forum was moderated by Nii Addy, a professor of psychiatry and of cellular and molecular physiology at the Yale School of Medicine. Each speaker gave a 20-minute PowerPoint pre-

sentation on their research and a brief summary of their beliefs, followed by a dialogue with Addy and questions from the audience. Attendees interviewed said the event gave them more questions than answers.

Yale is secular to the point of ignorance.. WILL DAVENPORT ’15 Veritas Forum attendee Many attendees said they had heard of the event through their churches. Sinclair Williams ’17 said he received an email from Yale Students for Christ and

MARIAH HARRIS/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

neighborhoods, Handfield said. According to all members interviewed, these differences help to strengthen the community. “It’s a great chance to see how we relate to each other and how we can learn from each other,” Ison said. In addition to hosting Black Women’s Weekend and a series of discussions, guest speakers, panels and information sessions, YBWC interacts with other groups and communities through joint events and mixers. Every year, YBWC hosts an awards ceremony for black men in conjunction with the Black Men’s Union’s own awards ceremony for black women, and YBWC also collaborates with BMU and the Black Students at Yale group to facilitate an open discussion about race and identity. Azmar Williams ’15, president of BMU, said the setup with three similar groups — BMU, BSAY and YBWC — allows black students to have the “best of everything.” “While they all have slightly different missions, the overall mission is unity in the African-American community on the Yale campus,” Williams said. “I feel like we’re all making that

possible.” An important goal of YBWC, according to members interviewed, is connecting black women across multiple class years and generations. To accomplish this, the organization hosts a graduate student panel every year with speakers from various professional schools. Handfield said that the event is meant to help prepare women for their future careers. Members of the group also mentor younger students at Barnard Environmental Studies Magnet School in New Haven. According to Handfield, many of the students had never even considered college as an option for their futures. Lockett spoke about a different kind of mentorship, explaining that, as a senior, she feels it is her responsibility to reach out to black female freshmen and help provide resources and solidify the community. Black Women’s Weekend this year kicked off at 6:30 p.m. at the Afro-American Cultural Center at 55 Whitney Avenue. Contact WESLEY YIIN at wesley.yiin@yale.edu .

Contact DANA SCHNEIDER at dana.schneider@yale.edu .

New Haven Chinese school seeks to reestablish Yale ties BY VIVIAN WANG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

The Yale Black Women’s Coalition celebrated its annual Black Women’s weekend at the Afro-American Cultural Center this past weekend.

came to the event to explore the topic of humanity in a different setting. Will Davenport ’15 said he appreciated the opportunity to hear a dialogue about faith and science, adding that, at Yale, he has been presented with a biased, one-sided view from both his classes and his church. “Yale is secular to the point of ignorance,” he said. The last Veritas Forum held at Yale invited Oxford mathematician John Lennox to campus to address the question “Is Anything Worth Believing In?” in September 2012.

Throughout the week, William L. Harkness Hall bustles with the sounds of Yalies engaging in lectures and seminars, with topics ranging from nuclear politics to Portuguese. But once a week, a different kind of learning takes place, with a decidedly different group of students. Every Sunday morning, WLH hosts the New Haven Chinese Language School, a community-based school that teaches Chinese to students ranging in age from pre-K through high school. Although the initiative has existed for over 30 years, NHCLS has recently begun to revitalize its relationship with the Chinese community at Yale. The school was founded in 1980 by a Yale professor, Tso-Ping Ma GRD ’74, and his wife. The couple needed a place for their children to learn Chinese, said Miaolin Zhou, one of the school’s co-administrators. But the school is now largely unrelated to the University, with Yale acting more as a landlord than a partner, she added. “We’d love to see more involvement,” Zhou said. “But of course we know that Yale students are all very busy.” However, the Yale community remains involved with NHCLS. The Chinese American Students Association, for example, has historically maintained a “vibrant” relationship with the school, said Lely Evans, the school’s other co-administrator. Stone, who is director of education at the private, nonprofit Yale-China Association, added that there is a thriving unofficial relationship between her association and NHCLS as well. Members attend each other’s events and act as resources for each other. “It’s good to bring [Yale’s involvement] back,” said Shwu-Huey Liu, a longtime parent of NHCLS students. “As Chinese people, we’d like to see our culture continue for the next generation, and this school is a great way to do it.” While CASA was very active in its relationship with NHCLS some years ago, that exchange has faded in recent years, Zhou said. Five or six years ago, CASA members went to classrooms to speak to the high school students about applying to college and formed a “big brother, big sister” relationship with NHCLS students, she said, but CASA is no longer as regularly engaged as it was in the past. In the last two years or so, she added, CASA has made an effort to revamp its relationship

with NHCLS. Last year, several CASA members came into the school during the MidAutumn Festival, a traditional Chinese holiday, to perform a skit for the kids, she said. They have also made appearances during other special events, such as NHCLS’s culture workshops involving food preparation and arts and crafts, Evans added. “The kids love it,” Evans said. “We’re encouraging CASA members to actually develop a relationship with our children, because our children can really benefit from seeing other Chinese-American role models.” In keeping with its effort to reestablish more regular interactions, CASA sent out an email at the beginning of the school year announcing that the NHCLS was looking for student volunteers to aid in its classrooms. Joyce Wang ’17, who had spent three years assisting at the local Chinese school in her hometown, was quick to respond. She attends the language classes every other week, helping teachers with demonstrations and activities. While not many Yale students know about the school, Wang said, she thinks that if there were greater awareness, students would be interested in getting involved. She said she has noticed a lot of interest among Yale students in learning about Chinese culture because the Chinese department is so strong. “I know a lot of people who are taking Chinese here who aren’t heritage speakers, and that’s really awesome,” Wang said. “I think there’s a lot of talent at Yale and a lot of interest.” The teachers at NHCLS have noticed an increase in non-native interest in learning Chinese as well. While the student body used to be largely composed of children whose Chinese parents wanted them to keep up with their native language, in recent years, there has been an influx of students who are simply interested in learning for the sake of learning. In fact, the enrollment of students who do not speak Chinese at home has increased so much that the school now holds a separate class for non-heritage speakers. “They were so accomodating to us,” said Leslie Stone, a non-native Chinese speaker whose children recently enrolled at NHCLS. “Their offering that class is really great. It adds a whole dimension, I think, that the language is not just an in-group kind of thing. It’s accessible to everyone.” There are currently 47 students enrolled in NHCLS. Contact VIVIAN WANG at vivian.y.wang@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“Every day is a great day for hockey.” MARIO LEMEIUX PROFESSIONAL ICE HOCKEY PLAYER

Women leaders celebrated LEADING LADIES FROM PAGE 1 ers, finding their voices and learning how to work well with others. WLI Outreach Chair Jade Shao ’15, a coorganizer of the event, said the planning for the gala began at the start of the semester. “We chose Katie Rae to speak because she embodies support,” said WLI Business Chair Tina Yuan ’16, the other organizer of the event. “Often women try to destroy and attack each other so we can see ourselves as better, but Katie exemplifies what it means to be a mentor. Like Katie, we all need to work at tearing down those institutional and even internal barriers and celebrate support for one another.” Rae, the managing director of a tech startup accelerator in Boston and the founder of a firm that invests and assists in early startups, said that 96 percent of venture capitalists invest in male entrepreneurs and only 4 percent choose to invest in female entrepreneurs. Rae added that she tries to play an active role in changing the gender imbalance in the startup world, as she understands that the stereotypes for women have to be remedied at the ground level. “The awful truth that I have heard from powerful men about why they don’t see more women in entrepreneurship is that they say women don’t create the big ideas,” Rae said. “The stark reality is that you don’t see more women in business because they don’t stay in the game, and even more startling is that women of privilege stay in the game less often.” Organizers of the gala said events celebrating the role of women are important even at Yale, in order to remind women of how far they have come but also how much there is left to do. The gala featured a variety of undergraduate speakers from diverse backgrounds, who recounted their

YCC hosts mental health forum MENTAL HEALTH FROM PAGE 1

where women are already empowered. But some WLI members said they still see imbalance in their lives at Yale. WLI member Joyce Chen ’16 said that although it has become more acceptable in society for women to hold leadership positions, women still have difficulty getting their voices heard. Chen recalled a recent consulting conference hosted by WLI in which the majority of attendees were women, but all the questions were asked and answered by men. The gala — which took place in a packed room with over a hundred attendees — was accompanied by refreshments and a jazz group.

ers in bathroom stalls with numbers students can call for help and creating a mental health resource and event newsletter that would be sent to interested individuals. In addition to discussing a website that pulls together mental health resources, students also discussed creating a website that features faculty and students discussing how they overcame mental health struggles, modeled after a similar resource, “Harvard Speaks Up.” Participants talked about creating a weeklong series of events where student groups could discuss their work in the area and mental health professionals would deliver lectures. “We want to tackle similar issues, so it’s good to get together,” said Chris Datskikas ’16, president of Mind Matters, a student group that promotes mental health dialogue through hosting speakers, study breaks, discussions and film screenings. In fostering dialogue between a range of campus organizations, the forum helped to create a more unified voice for mental health advocacy at Yale, said Emily Luepker ’16, president of Inspire Yale, a group that promotes emotional well-being among the student body. While the three study authors intend to hold a similar meeting in the future, and various forum participants had expressed interest in spearheading initiatives, YCC report coauthor Gerlach said it remains unclear how the collective group will move forward from here. “It’s pretty uncharted territory,” he said. Approximately 39 percent of Yale College students have used Yale Mental Health & Counseling, according to the YCC report.

Contact STEPHANIE ROGERS at stephanie.rogers@yale.edu .

Contact HANNAH SCHWARZ at hannah.schwarz@yale.edu.

LEON JIANG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The all female a capella group, Whim n’ Rhythm performed at the Leading Ladies gala this past weekend. difficulties in achieving success in a male-oriented world and gave advice on how to become a leader. Nicole Hobbs ’14 spoke about her journey from being a shy, inadequate-feeling freshman to becoming the Yale Democrats President. Her favorite bumper sticker, she said, reads, “A women’s place is in the House and the Senate.” Clemantine Wamariya ’14, who lived in eight different African countries when she was a child as a refugee from Rwanda, spoke about the role models in her life that gave her the strength to lead. She dared the female members of the audience to keep fighting forward, as women at Yale “have no excuse [and] have been privileged.” Wamariya added that “the world is crying” for strong women to implement change.

Ifeanyi Awachie ’14 performed a slam poem that centered on the internal barriers women put in place for themselves. She identified her own struggles with body image and conformation to other people’s ideals of beauty — speaking to loud cheers and snaps from audience members. All attendees interviewed said they felt the gala was a success. “This was a marvelously organized event,” said Yale College Dean Mary Miller. “It’s fun to be at an important occasion where men are in the minority because we are all working for that moment when a majority of women leaders feels normal.” Ethan Kyzivat ’15 said that he believes events such as the gala are important, even at a place like Yale

Hockey forward Bourbonais no longer on team BOURBONAIS FROM PAGE 1 bonais was a three-sport star in Dexter, Mich. In 2008-09, he scored the game-winning goal for the St. Louis Bandits of the North American Hockey League in double overtime to win the national junior championship.

He was a good guy, a good player... he will be missed PATRICK SPANO ’17 Goaltender, Men’s Ice Hockey Bourbonais was named to last year’s Frozen Four All-Tournament team. In the national championship game, he scored with 3.5 seconds remaining in the second period to break a scoreless tie against Quinnipiac in the 4–0 victory. In the third period, he recorded an assist as well. He also finished in sixth place on the team in points in each of the last two seasons, contributing four goals and 13 assists last year and seven goals and 14 assists the

year before. “He was a good guy, a good player,” goaltender Patrick Spano ’17 said. “He will be missed.” Though Bourbonais skated in the exhibition game against Ontario Tech, scoring a goal and notching an assist, he played in just one regular season game this year. His return to the ice in the 3–3 tie against Quinnipiac came after missing the first five games with an injury. With Bourbonais no longer on the roster, just three seniors remain with the team: defenseman Gus Young ’14, forward Kenny Agostino ’14 and fellow forward and team captain Jesse Root ’14. Bourbonais has seen action in 86 games throughout his Yale career, which is more game experience than all members of the team but Agostino and Root. “[The situation] is really within the team,” Root said. “I can’t really comment on anything.” Bourbonais is a biomedical engineering major in Timothy Dwight College. Contact GRANT BRONSDON at grant.bronsdon@yale.edu .

BRIANNE BOWEN/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Bourbonais, who was a member of the National Championship hockey team, has only played one regular season game.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

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NEWS

“The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls.” PABLO PICASSO SPANISH PAINTER

YCBA program reaches children

Student art show debuts BY ISABELLE TAFT CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

HENRY EHRENBERG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

“Exploring Artism” takes place at the Yale Center for British Art one Saturday per month. BY HELEN ROUNER STAFF REPORTER Last Saturday morning, nine children and their families reenacted “The Three Little Pigs” while they sat in front of a Canaletto oil painting at the Yale Center for British Art. The activity was part of “Exploring Artism,” a YCBA program for families with children of ages 5-12 whose cognitive abilities place them on the autism spectrum. The program, which takes place on one Saturday each month, features multisensory activities centered around a work of art in the museum’s collection. Director for Education at the YCBA Linda Friedlander said she founded the program last year in compliance with the Center’s mission to make its holdings accessible to a diverse population. This Saturday’s session centered on a mid-18th century Canaletto painting of Warwick Castle. Friedlander said that for each session, she chooses a work of art that features a large, singular image with an accessible theme, and one that hangs on a wall of its own to minimize confusion and distraction among participants.. “Words are fleeting; objects are static and can be experienced in a multimodal way,” said Leah Booth, an associate research scientist at the Child Study Center who specializes in speech-language pathology and has been involved with the program since its beginning. “They’re finding ways to relate objects to pictures and to tie this experience to the art.” This month’s session — like most, Friedlander said — began with a drawing activity in the Center’s docent room followed by a brief orientation to remind children of the rules of conduct and introduce them to the painting they would

work with. Friedlander and Assistant Curator of Education Jaime Ursic then sat the families in front of the Canaletto. Friedlander pointed out the features of the castle in the painting and used an iPad to display images of other types of buildings for comparison, such as the Sydney Opera House and the Eiffel Tower. Another activity that explored the theme of architecture was the multimedia retelling of “The Three Little Pigs,” which made use of structures built from pipe cleaners, tongue depressors and legos to represent the straw, wood and brick houses in the story. Children were then given paper with the outline of a castle to color as they pleased. Back in the docent room, the children built their own structures out of cardboard and donated Starbucks trays. Friedlander said that fine motor skills are an issue for many children on the spectrum, adding that the crafts activities allow children of various abilities to create what they can consider finished projects. Before families arrive at the Center, they receive what Friedlander called a social book, which includes photos of the aspects of the museum that the children will encounter, such as doors, elevators and security guards. She explained that transitions can be especially difficult for children on the autism spectrum even sensory changes like stepping from a brick floor onto a marble one can be upsetting. Scott Tivey, who attends the program with his family regularly, said that these materials help his 6-year-old son Scott Jr., who is on the autism spectrum, adjust to different environments. “He’s a visual thinker, and having these social stories that allow him to visualize where he’s going makes his life easier,”

Tivey said. Friedland said that the program is also a way for parents with children on the spectrum to connect with one another, as they often may feel isolated. Professor Jamie McPartland, the director of the Yale Developmental Disabilities Clinic who attended Saturday’s session, said that it is important for parents to have a space in which they do not feel they need to explain or apologize for their child’s behavior. Alongside the nine children and their families, Saturday’s session involved four undergraduate volunteers and a number of adults who came to observe the program, including McPartland. “It’s important that kids get this educational and recreational time,” McPartland said. “The theraputic time is what they’re getting the other six days of the week.” Friedlander invited Booth to speak with the Center’s security staff about how best to accommodate museum visitors on the spectrum. Friedlander said visitors from Chapel Haven, a local school that caters to adults on the autism spectrum and those with developmental and social disabilities, inspired her to start the program. She spent almost two years researching and observing programs for children on the spectrum and consulted with faculty at the Child Study Center before launching “Exploring Artism.” “A museum represents a social space where many parents would not consider bringing their children,” Friedlander said. “It was my desire to bring them in.” There will not be an “Exploring Artism” session next month.

Sixty-seven works of art hung on the walls of 45 Howe St. on Friday evening as members of the Yale community sipped wine and considered purchasing the works on display. Ten undergraduate artists displayed their work at the Undergraduate Art Show last Friday, the first one of its kind where attendees could purchase the pieces on view. Head curator Cristina Vere Nicoll ’14 organized the event, which drew roughly 400 students and faculty members over the course of the evening, in collaboration with Gerson Zevi, an online art gallery dedicated to helping young collectors find pieces by emerging artists. The show was advertised with the slogan “Start collecting the big names,” and Vere Nicoll said she hoped to provide a creative space where student artists tired of storing or discarding their works can display and potentially sell them. “We saw this as an opportunity to give the art a chance to live and breathe on the wall of someone who really enjoys it,” Vere Nicoll said. “At the end of the day I think these profits will support a lot of these artists and a lot of their future work.” Seven seniors, one junior, one sophomore and one former Yale student contributed their art to the exhibition. Their works explore a range of themes — from modern spirituality to memory as a repository for identity. The artists also used a variety of media to capture these themes, including photography and oil paint. Vere Nicoll said many attendees expressed interest in purchasing pieces, adding that 60 percent of the 67 works on view were sold on Friday night. The remainder will be available for purchase on the site gersonzevi.com. Ninety percent of revenue will go directly to the artists, while the remaining 10 percent will cover the cost of promoting the show and printing informational booklets for attendees, Vere Nicoll said. Johanna Flato ’14 made five of her nine pieces by melting plastic grass with an iron, which created a paint-like texture interspersed with patches of unmelted grass. She said she is intrigued by artificial materials that can seem natural, adding that she considers plastic grass the “perfect medium” to explore the bound-

ary between the natural and the artificial. She also said she uses plastic grass to explore the way humans use land. “For me, ironing, melting, burning are all reflections of processes that I know go on with actual land,” Flato said. “I see ironing in terms of burning land, trying to control land, make it uniform.” Artists and attendees noted the unusual diversity of the crowd present at the show — some said they think one reason for the diversity may be that the exhibition took place at the track house, which has never before hosted an art show. Curators said they tried to separate the work by artist as much as possible, but added that they made most decisions related to the placement of the pieces on the day of the show. The team of curators and designers had one day to clean up the space and set up the exhibition.

We saw this as an opportunity to give the art a chance to live and breathe on the wall of someone who really enjoys it. CRISTINA VERE NICOLL ’14 Head curator Nnamdi Udeh ’14, a resident of 45 Howe St. who attended the show, said he was impressed by the transformation of the space, adding that he thinks viewing art on the walls of his home instead of in a classroom or a gallery was an eye-opening experience. He added that he was pleased to see so many Yale athletes at the event. “I think [the turnout] shows athletes are open to the artistic community,” Udeh said. Gaby Bucay ’17, a prospective studio art major, said she thinks the strong turnout showed broad support for Yale’s artists, adding that the experience solidified her desire to pursue the art major. Gerson Zevi was founded by Harvard graduates Matteo Zevi and Alexander Gerson. Contact ISABELLE TAFT at isabelle.taft@yale.edu .

Join the conversation.

Contact HELEN ROUNER at helen.rouner@yale.edu .

British polician talks urban issues BY STEPHANIE ADDENBROOKE CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Yale students should consider their worldly responsibilities, rather than focusing solely on their own rights, according to British politician David Lammy. Lammy — a member of Parliament who serves Tottenham, one of the most ethnically diverse constituencies in Europe — spoke at an Ezra Stiles Master’s Tea on Saturday afternoon. Before an audience of roughly 30 students, Lammy said that members of Western society often take for granted the social and economic revolutions that have made their lives easier. He said the biggest question facing society today is, “how do we come back together in an age when it’s all about me?” Lammy, who is a member of the Labour Party, highlighted issues of immigration and discrimination with references to his own life. A second-generation immigrant, Lammy described his parents’ experience with arriving in England from Guyana in 1956. “What they found in London was not streets paved in gold, or the England they had read about in Dickens, or in Austen,” Lammy said, adding that they faced many challenges in England, including widespread racism. After his father left, Lammy’s mother

raised him and his four siblings on her own, working multiple jobs to make ends meet. Lammy said he felt his mother’s struggle to advance in the workplace was a product of discrimination toward immigrants. Lammy also discussed the possibility of running for Mayor of London in 2016, a post currently held by Boris Johnson, a Conservative politician. The position of mayor, according to Lammy, is a “growing role in British life” and gained increased influence during the 2012 Olympic Games. Lammy said he plays an active role in his constituency. He recalled the “rampant rioting” across Britain in 2011, which had begun in Tottenham, saying “it looked liked Britain had lost control for four days.” In the days following the riots, Lammy said he had to comfort parents and friends of those who lost their lives. With reference to the history of British urbanization, Lammy answered questions from students about unions — especially those within the fast food industry, in which Lammy previously worked — and gender discrimination in the workplace. Lammy, who was the first black Briton to attend Harvard Law, also spoke about the benefits of an international education and discussed the relationship between faith and politics. He said people were surprised when he, a Christian politician,

pushed to legalize same-sex marriage and described his faith as more open and inclusive than one might expect. Students interviewed said they appreciated Lammy’s message about taking responsibility. “Yale has set us up for a life much better than most, and it is easy to forget that,” said Gianna Kirsman ’16. Jasmine Horsey ’16, co-president of the Yale British Undergraduates, said Lammy has unique insight into the social and ethnic tensions in London, she said, especially because of the central role of his constituency in the 2011 riots. Horsey added that she appreciated having such a prominent British politician on campus, adding that Lammy has the potential to greatly shape British politics in future. Several students in the audience had worked with Lammy as interns through Yale’s Bulldogs in London program and praised the politician for actively involving interns in his work. “We dealt with issues hands-on — people who intern with him are truly thrown in to the deep end,” Carlene Miller ’14 said. Lammy visited Yale on a tour through the U.S. during which he met with several mayors. Contact STEPHANIE ADDENBROOKE at stephanie.addenbrooke@yale.edu .

Join the Yale Daily News.


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OPINION.

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

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BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST Showers with a chance of storms. High of 68 and a low of 37.

TOMORROW High of 48, low of 26.

WEDNESDAY High of 44, low of 32.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

ON CAMPUS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18 4:00 p.m. “Microtubules, Motor Proteins and Morphogenesis.” The Physics Club is hosting a talk with Jonathon Howard of the Department of Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry, who will be exhuming the inner workings of the cell. How do cells do anything at all? Sloane Physics Laboratory (217 Prospect St.), Rm. 57. 6:00 p.m. Original Reception for the Exhibit “Books of Secrets: Alchemy, Medicine and Magic.” Professor Paola Bertucci’s undergraduate seminar, “Spies, Secrets, and Science,” has curated an exhibit displaying a selection of books of secrets from the Medical History Library. This is the opening reception! Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library (333 Cedar St.).

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

9:00 a.m. ”A Thousand Hills to Heaven: Love, Hope and A Restaurant in Rwanda.” The Yale Global Health Leadership Institute presents a talk on the hope of foreign aid programs to end poverty with Josh Ruxin, director of the Access Project, Rwanda Works, and the Millennium Villages Project. LinslyChittenden Hall (63 High St.), Rm. 211. 5:30 p.m. “Still Waiting for Barbarians after 9/11? Cavafy’s Reluctant Irony and The Language of the Future.” Come for a talk by Maria Boletsi, assistant professor for the Department of Film and Comparative Literature, who will expound on the connections between poet Constantine Cavafy’s poetry and concept of barbarism. Luce Hall (34 Hillhouse Ave.), Rm. 202.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20 7:00 p.m. “Progress for Women in the Physical Sciences: How Far Have We Come, What More Can We Do?” Women in Science at Yale is hosting a panel on the challenges that women face in the field of science. Some panelists include Sara Demers, assistant professor in Physics; and Nilay Hazari, associate professor in chemistry. Becton Engineering and Applied Science Center (15 Prospect St.), Davies Aud.

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41 Cavity filler’s org. 43 Census gathering 44 Regard 46 Research sites 48 Revered entertainer 49 Naked 50 Inventor’s spark 52 Bone-dry 53 Gave for a while 54 Roughly 56 506, in old Rome 57 Bikini top

3 7 8 4 1 6 3 3 7 4 6 8 9 2 2 8 4 9 1 9 3 1 8 7


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YALE DAILY NEWS 路 MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 路 yaledailynews.com

THROUGH THE LENS

S

tudents typically rely on Bass and Sterling Libraries to work, but each of their residential colleges have gorgeous libraries too. KEN YANAGISAWA explores these libraries and captures the beauty behind all of these books.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NFL NY Giants 27 Packers 13

NFL Buffalo 37 NY Jets 14

SPORTS QUICK HITS

KEVIN DOONEY ’16 MEN’S CROSS-COUNTRY By placing 11th at the NCAA Division I Northeast Regional Championships, the Dublin native received All-Region honors. Dooney covered the 10k course in 30:28.4. All-Region honors are awarded to the top 25 finishers at each of the nine regional championships.

NFL Cincinnati 41 Cleveland 20

NFL Pittsburgh 37 Detroit 27

NFL Tampa Bay 41 Atlanta 28

MONDAY

HEAD COACH ERIN APPLEMAN VOLLEYBALL With the volleyball team’s 3–1 victory over Princeton on Saturday, Appleman notched the 200th win of her Yale career. The Elis won 18–25, 25–16, 25–20 and 25–20. The coach added her 201st victory when the Elis defeated Penn 3–0 on Saturday night.

“All I can tell you is that [Clinton Bourbonais ’14] is no longer a member of the team.” ASSOCIATE ATHLETICS DIRECTOR STEVE CONN YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

Yale doesn’t settle versus Pioneers BY FREDERICK FRANK STAFF REPORTER The Elis took a break from ECAC play this weekend, but the No. 9 Yale men’s hockey team did not take the night off against Sacred Heart.

MEN’S ICE HOCKEY Led by captain Jesse Root ’14, the Bulldogs (4–1–2, 2–0–2 ECAC) skated to a comprehensive 5–1 win over Sacred Heart (2–8–0, 1–3–0 AHA). “I really liked the way we played tonight,” said head coach Keith Allain ’80. “We want to play fast and to play fast you have to move the puck and move your feet and I thought as the game wore on we did a really good job at that. That tempo was hard to play against.” From the opening faceoff, the Elis played a fast and physical game. A steal by Root led to Yale’s first goal. His initial shot on goal was denied by Pioneer goaltender Alex Vazzano, but Root put away his own rebound to give Yale an early 1–0 lead. Sacred Heart responded before Root’s goal could be announced, tallying on their powerplay just 25 seconds later. Junior forward Ben Lake found some space and buried his shot in off the iron to tie the game. Yale could not find another goal in the period despite two power-

play opportunities and nine shots. Vazzano looked shaky in net, but he made eight saves and profited from 11 blocked shots from his teammates. The Bulldogs closed out the game in the second, peppering the Pioneers’ net with 16 shots and scoring three goals. “In the first period we weren’t skating very well, but in the second period we started moving our feet more and that really helped us out,” defenseman Ryan Obuchowski ’16 said. “We were able to put the puck in the back of the net because of our hard work.” Center Stu Wilson ’16 broke the deadlock and put Yale ahead for good, scoring a power-play goal at 9:08 in the second. Just over two minutes later, right wing Kenny Agostino ’14 scored a highlight reel goal, his first of the year, playing the role of bardown-bandito at 11:20 with his backhanded shot that went in off the crossbar to make it a 3–1 lead. “He’s a great player and he makes great plays, that’s what we expect out of him,” Obuchowski said. Forward Trent Ruffolo ’15 then got his second point of the night, scoring after a play from Carson Cooper ’16. Cooper grabbed his own rebound and slid the puck across the crease, where Ruffolo was waiting to tap the puck in for SEE MEN’S ICE HOCKEY PAGE B3

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

No. 24 Mike Doherty ’17 assisted on two goals against Sacred Heart on Saturday night.

Elis end season on top BY DIONIS JAHJAGA STAFF REPORTER It may have already clinched the Ivy League title, but the Yale volleyball team continued to compete with the same intensity as always this past weekend.

VOLLEYBALL In their final two conference matches of the season, the Elis were victorious against Princeton and Penn, winning 3–1 and 3–0, respectively. The Elis (19–4, 13–1 Ivy) were slow out of the gate on Friday against the Tigers (10–14, 6–8). Despite recording just one fewer kill than Princeton, the Bulldogs fell 25–18 in the first set.

Tigers perfect in Ivies

In previous matches Yale has played tentatively early on, but almost always comes back strong. In the five matches this year in which the Elis have dropped the first set, they are 3–2. The two losses came at the hands of No. 6 Missouri and Harvard, who snapped the Elis’ 23-game conference winning streak. “I don’t think we’re too concerned about it,” captain Kendall Polan ’14 said of Yale’s slow start on Friday. “It’s definitely something we need to work on, but I don’t think it’s something we have to really worry about.” The Elis bounced back in the second set with a convincing 25–16 victory, forcing Princeton into 10 errors and a 0.000 hitting percentage. Yale’s defense and offense were in sync for the SEE VOLLEYBALL PAGE B3

MARIA ZEPEDA/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

No. 19 Morgan Roberts ’16 went from quarterback to wide receiver and caught a touchdown against Princeton. BY ASHTON WACKYM STAFF REPORTER After the Elis won two straight games to bring their record to a respectable 5–3, the Princeton Tigers brought down the Bulldogs 59–23 in Princeton, N.J.

FOOTBALL

WILLIAM FREEDBERG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Outside hitter Mollie Rogers ’15 (No. 9) registered 27 kills in the final weekend of Ivy play.

STAT OF THE DAY 2

Despite Yale (5–4, 3–3 Ivy) scoring the first touchdown of the game, the momentum quickly shifted into the hands of the Tigers (8–1, 6–0 Ivy), who are undefeated in Ivy play and clinched at least a share of the Ivy League title with the win. An onside kick gone wrong and failed two-point con-

version early in the game counteracted Yale’s advantage in offensive yards in the first half. “We left a lot of plays out there today on both sides of the ball,” said head coach Tony Reno. “Against a really good team you can’t do that. Obviously that was the result today when you look at the score.” The Bulldogs marked the scoreboard first on a two play, 59-yard scoring drive in 39 seconds. Near midfield, Logan Scott ’16 faced pressure in the pocket and rolled to the left side. As he faced a blitzing defense, he dumped the ball forward to Candler Rich who then ran the ball just under 48 yards and into the end zone to put Yale

up 6–0. The Bulldogs then lined up for the two-point conversion, but were unable to convert the opportunity. In his first career start, Scott out-passed Princeton’s Quinn Epperly, who is on the watch list for the Walter Payton Award for FCS Player of the Year and broke an NCAA record with 29 straight completions earlier this season. Scott passed for 240 yards, completing 22 of 39 passes and throwing for all three of the Bulldogs’ touchdowns on Saturday. While Yale gained a short burst of enthusiasm from their early touchdown, the Bulldogs were SEE FOOTBALL PAGE B3

GOALS SCORED BY THE MEN’S SOCCER TEAM IN THE FIRST TEN MINUTES AT PRINCETON ON SATURDAY. Forwards Peter Jacobson ’14 amd Scott Armburst ’14 scored in their final collegiate games, but the 2–0 advantage would not hold and the Tigers won 3–2.


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

THE GAME

“Look around. There are no enemies here. There’s just good, old-fashioned rivalry.” BOB WELLS AMERICAN BASEBALL PLAYER

Princeton pounces on Yale FOOTBALL FROM PAGE B1 the Bulldogs’ energy when on the drive following the kickoff Princeton’s Dré Nelson broke away from the Yale defense for a 42-yard touchdown run. After putting the ball through the uprights in a conventional point-after attempt, Princeton gained a lead they would not lose for the remainder of the game. On Yale’s first drive following the Tiger touchdown, Princeton forced the Elis to punt and scored again on the subsequent drive with a 23-yard pass from Epperly to Connor Kelly, who stood alone in the end zone. “Defensively we tackled poorly and they capitalized,” captain Beau Palin ’14 said. “There is little room for error when you are going against a good team.” The Bulldogs struck back to make it 13–14, but Scott’s touchdown pass to Morgan Roberts ’15 was the last touchdown the Elis would

score in the first half. As Yale’s scoring declined to just a field goal in the second quarter and a single touchdown in the third quarter, Princeton’s production ramped up. “I think we started off really well defensively. We were really concerned about having enough possession to score points,” Reno said. “Defensively we did a nice job early on and as the game went on we wore down a little bit.” The Tigers matched Yale’s field goal in the second quarter and added a touchdown. In the third quarter, the Tigers punished the Bulldogs, scoring 21 points to the Bulldogs’ seven before padding their lead with a touchdown in the fourth quarter. The Bulldogs will take on Harvard in The Game this Saturday at the Yale Bowl at noon. Contact ASHTON WACKYM at ashton.wackym@yale.edu .

PRINCETON 59, YALE 23 PRINCETON

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YALE

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MARIA ZEPEDA/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Quarterback Logan Scott ’16 (No. 14) threw for three touchdowns in his first career start this Saturday.

Harvard holds off Penn, stays in Ivy hunt

HENRY EHRENBERG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The Crimson bested Penn 38–30 at home on Saturday to boost their Ivy record to 5–1 on the season. BY ASHLEY WU CONTRIBUTING REPORTER CAMBRIDGE, MA. — Harvard was able to send off its largest senior class in recent history with one last home win Saturday against Penn, outlasting the Quakers 38–30. The Crimson (8–1, 5–1 Ivy) faced a resilient Penn squad (4–5, 3–3) on Senior Day, as both teams fought for the chance to stay in the running for the Ivy League title. In the early goings of the game, it looked as if Harvard would run right through the Quakers in its last contest before The Game against Yale, leading 38–0 late into the third quarter. “We couldn’t do anything right in the first half, and again we gave up a lot of plays,” Penn head coach Al Bagnoli said. “And they executed great and in the second half we executed great … it’s a funny game when these two teams play … fortunate[ly] for us, our kids never gave up because it had a chance to get pretty ugly there at one point.” The Crimson scored first with 3:41 remaining in the first quarter

on a touchdown pass from quarterback Conner Hempel to tight end Cameron Brate following a missed field goal by Penn. From there, the floodgates opened for Harvard, as the Crimson scored the next 31 points of the game. Early in the second quarter, Harvard scored on a quarterback run by Hempel, giving the Crimson a two-score lead. Hempel provided the Crimson with a dual threat throughout the game, completing 21–25 of his passes while leading the team in rushing with 65 yards on 12 carries. Both teams punted on their next drives before Harvard had to settle for a field goal with 3:01 remaining in the half. Penn’s next possession ended in the Quakers’ block being blocked, giving the Crimson possession at the Penn 28 yard line with less than two minutes until halftime. Harvard running back Paul Stanton Jr. took advantage of the opportunity to run the ball into the end zone to put Harvard up 23–0 with 40 seconds remaining in the half. Ragone then threw his first interception of the year, giving the

Crimson another opportunity to score. A clean pass from Hempel to tight end Ryan Halvorson and a converted extra point by kicker David Mothander resulted in a 31–0 lead for Harvard at halftime. “We had great play calls, great game plan, and we were switching it up,” Hempel said. “Defense didn’t really know what was coming at them. I think our line brought it, everything they had today. It showed a lot up front. We were running the ball well and that makes it easy on me to throw the ball well.” The Crimson looked as if they would coast to a win. Harvard netted 290 total yards in the first half compared to Penn’s 56, running 44 offensive plays to the Quakers’ 24. Not only was the offense dominant, but the defense was as well, not allowing a single third-down conversion from Penn. Harvard had the opening possession of the second half and proceeded to march down the field again. Stanton scored his second touchdown of the day, giving him 13 touchdowns on the season. But a game that once seemed out of reach for Penn suddenly

became tight thanks to 30 straight unanswered points from the Quaker offense. Late in the third quarter, Penn was able to enter the red zone for the first time all day. Desperate for a score, quarterback Ryan Becker, who replaced Billy Ragone to start the second half, converted a fourth down, and quarterback Adam Strouss entered the game to score a touchdown with 4:25 remaining in the quarter. The score broke Harvard’s streak of six straight scoreless quarters by an opponent. Harvard was unable to convert a first down the rest of the game as the Penn defense stepped up. Strouss picked up his second touchdown of the day with 14:19 left in the game, cutting into the Crimson lead, 28–14. A penalty from Harvard on Penn’s next drive gave the Quakers an automatic first down, and Penn fullback Ben Challgren ran into the end zone after receiving a pass from Becker later in the drive. After a two-point conversion off a pass from Becker to running back Ryan Ripp, Penn trailed Harvard 38–22 with 8:30 remaining. Penn scored again less than

three minutes later when wide receiver Conner Scott received a pass from Becker. Tight end Ryan O’Malley then caught a pass in the end zone for another two-point conversion to make it an eightpoint game. Penn used its timeouts on Harvard’s ensuing possession to slow down the clock, and after the fifth consecutive three-and-out by the Crimson, the Quakers got the ball back with 3:42 remaining. Finally, Harvard’s defense made a stand, and Penn faced its third fourth down of the game. Becker threw a pass that was tipped by his intended receiver, but Quaker wide receiver Ryan Mitchell miraculously came up with the ball at Harvard’s 47-yard line. Penn made it all the way to the Crimson 20, converting another fourth down along the way, before Harvard broke up a pass on Penn’s fifth fourth down of the game with 16 seconds left. Harvard was finally able to exhale, coming away with a 38–30 victory, keeping its conference title hopes alive. “A year from now, all it is is a big win. And 20 years from now, hopefully all we’ll remember is the

38 to nothing part,“ head coach Tim Murphy said. “The bottom line is that momentum is really really an elusive thing.” The Crimson will head to New Haven to face Yale in the 130th edition of The Game on Saturday. A win by Harvard over Yale and loss by Princeton to Dartmouth in the final weekend of the regular season will give the Crimson a share of the Ancient Eight crown. “It’s always a pride game, the motivation is unquestioned, and for all those reasons it’s such an easy game to prepare for,” Murphy said. “It’s a unique dynamic in respect to the Harvard-Yale game.” The Yale-Harvard game will kick off on Saturday at noon from the Yale Bowl. Contact ASHLEY WU at ashley.e.wu@yale.edu .

HARVARD 38, PENN 30 HARVARD

7

24

7

0

38

PENN

0

0

7

23

30


PAGE B3

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

“If a tie is like kissing your sister, losing is like kissing your grandmother with her teeth out.” GEORGE BRETT AMERICAN BASEBALL PLAYER

Appleman wins 200th

FOOTBALL IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Princeton

6

0

1.000

8

1

0.889

2

Harvard

5

1

0.833

8

1

0.889

3

Dartmouth

4

2

0.667

5

4

0.556

4

Yale

3

3

0.500

5

4

0.556

5

Penn

3

3

0.500

4

5

0.444

6

Brown

2

4

0.333

5

4

0.556

7

Cornell

1

5

0.167

2

7

0.222

8

Columbia

0

6

0.000

0

9

0.000

MEN’S ICE HOCKEY ECAC

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

T

PTS

W L

T

%

1

Quinnipiac

5

0

1

11

11

1

1

0.885

2

Union

5

1

0

10

6

3

2

0.636

3

Clarkson

4

2

0

8

10

3

1

0.750

Colgate

4

2

0

8

6

6

1

0.500

Yale

2

0

2

6

4

1

2

0.714

St. Lawrence

2

2

2

6

6

4

2

0.583

Rensselaer

2

3

2

6

6

4

2

0.583

Cornell

2

3

1

5

4

3

1

0.563

Harvard

2

4

1

5

3

4

1

0.438

10

Brown

1

2

1

3

3

3

1

0.500

11

Princeton

1

5

0

2

2

7

0

0.222

12

Dartmouth

0

6

0

0

0

8

0

0.000

5

8

MEN’S SOCCER IVY

NICK DEFIESTA/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

1

Penn

5

1

1

0.786

8

8

1

0.500

2

Harvard

5

2

0

0.714

7

8

2

0.782

3

Princeton

4

2

1

0.643

7

9

1

0.441

4

Brown

3

2

2

0.571

7

7

3

0.500

5

Yale

2

3

2

0.429

4

11

2

0.294

6

Cornell

2

4

1

0.357

8

5

4

0.588

7

Columbia

1

3

3

0.357

8

6

3

0.559

8

Dartmouth

1

6

0

0.143

6

7

4

0.471

Middle blocker Maya Midzik ’16 (No. 8) totaled 11 blocks when Yale visited Penn and Princeton this weekend. VOLLEYBALL FROM PAGE B1 rest of the match, as they recorded 41 kills on a 0.367 hitting percentage through the final three sets. Princeton had 35 kills on just a 0.115 percentage in the same span. Middle blocker Maya Midzik ’16 recorded 11 kills, four digs, one block solo and three block assists to pace the Elis. Outside hitter Mollie Rogers ’15 contributed with a 13-kill, 11-dig double-double, while Polan finished the match with 45 assists. “Having the Ivy League title was comforting,” Rogers said. “We were able to play more loosely, and coach kept telling us to keep going for it.” On Saturday, the Elis took the court against Penn for their final Ivy League match of the season. The Quakers (14–11, 8–6), who were coming off a 3–2 loss at home against Brown the previous night, looked to bounce back strong against the Ivy League champs. In contrast to their start on Friday night, the Elis came out swinging. Yale recorded 17 kills in the first set and secured a comfortable 25–15 win. In the second set, the Elis stepped up their defense. Once again, Yale forced its opponent into double-digit errors (11) and a 0.000 kill percentage, winning the set 25–17. In the final set, the Bulldogs never trailed and cruised to a 25–21

victory. Rogers again led the team in kills with 14, while Midzik and setter Kelly Johnson ’16 each recorded six block assists. Johnson also had 11 kills and seven digs. The Elis displayed impressive blocking in both matches over the weekend. Yale rejected Princeton 12 times on Friday before recording 11 blocks against the Quakers the night after. “We work really hard on [blocking] in practice,” Rogers said. “It’s really impressive when we can face a team and have a lot of blocks. It shows that our hard work is paying off.” Polan put the finishing touches to her Ivy career with a 36-assist, 11-dig effort, solidifying her legacy as one of Yale’s alltime great volleyball players. Polan ranks in the top 10 in both assists and digs for Yale and played an integral role on four Ivy championship teams. “It’s awesome that me, [McHaney Carter ’15], and [Erica Reetz ’14] were able to be so successful in the last four years,” Polan said. “But mostly we’re just focused on the games ahead.” The Elis will now have a week off before they head to New York to take on Stony Brook (16–16, 9–5 AEC) and conclude their regular season. They will then have to wait for the Selection Show on Dec. 1 to learn who their opponent will be in the first

round of the NCAA tournament. Rogers said the team is anxious to learn who it will be matched up against, adding that the team hopes to be sent to a warmer climate state like California. But she emphasized that the Elis will be looking to get even better in the coming weeks. “It’s just about trying to get better,” Rogers said. “We want to take these next couple of weeks and just work hard to be a better team and be better individually, as well. We want to be as prepared as we can be for the tournament.” The Elis will take on the Seawolves on Nov. 26.

OVERALL

VOLLEYBALL IVY

Contact DIONIS JAHJAGA at dionis.jahjaga@yale.edu .

YALE 3, PRINCETON 1

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Yale

13

1

0.929

19

4

0.826

YALE

18

25

25

25

3

2

Harvard

9

5

0.643

14

9

0.609

PRIN.

25

16

20

20

1

3

Penn

8

6

0.571

14

11

0.560

Brown

8

6

0.571

12

13

0.480

5

Princeton

6

8

0.429

10

14

0.417

6

Dartmouth

4

10

0.286

11

15

0.423

Cornell

4

10

0.286

8

16

0.333

Columbia

4

10

0.286

6

17

0.261

YALE 3, PENN 2 YALE

25

25

25

3

PENN

15

17

21

0

Elis pioneer a victory

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

No. 20 Jesse Root ’14 netted two goals as Yale blew past Sacred Heart 5–1 at home on Saturday (left). The Bulldogs celebrate one of their five goals (right). MEN’S ICE HOCKEY FROM PAGE B1 a 4–1 Yale lead with just seconds remaining in the period. Goaltender Alex Lyon ’17 made his fourth start of the season and was forced into a several smart saves in the second period to deny the Pioneers on all seven of their shots. While Allain did not name Lyon the full-time starter, insisting the goaltending situation is still day-to-day, he added

that Lyon played very well against Sacred Heart. Although there were fewer goals, the third period was nonetheless exciting. The referees initially gave Agostino another goal at 14:10, but the officials overturned the goal. However, Yale scored 29 seconds later, on the power play after intricate passing. Obuchowski found winger Mike Doherty ’17 down low, who slid the puck across to

Root on the crease. Root’s initial shot was saved, but he gathered the rebound and put his second attempt in the back of the net for his second goal of the game. The third period ended without any further scoring. Vazzano finished the game with 37 saves in the loss. The Bulldogs went two for seven on power-play opportunities and killed off two of three penalties in the win. The Elis’ extra

man unit has not been very efficient this season, posting a .189 average thus far, but it looked good on Saturday night. The penalty kill has fared better, killing off .759 of every opportunity. “[The power play] has been an area we have been spending a lot of time on and we haven’t gotten the results that we would have liked,” Allain said. “Hopefully this is the sign of things to come on the power play and penalty kill as

well.” Lyon posted 22 saves in his first win of the season. Offensively, eight different Bulldogs tallied points. The Elis’ top line of Root, two goals, Agostino, one goal, and Doherty, two assists, posted a +4 collective rating. The Bulldogs will hit the road and head back to ECAC play with games against Colgate and Cornell next weekend. The puck drops at 7:05 p.m. in Hamilton, N.Y. on Fri-

day for the Elis’ first game of the weekend. Contact FREDERICK FRANK at frederick.frank@yale.edu .

YALE 5, SHU 1 YALE

1

3

1

5

SHU

1

0

0

1


PAGE B4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS MARK ARCOBELLO ’10 The Edmonton Oilers sent the Yale product to the AHL this weekend. Arcobello had 12 points this season, including two goals against the Florida Panthers Nov. 5. The winger had not recorded a point since that time, however, and was assigned to the Oklahoma City Barons.

Soccer blows lead over Princeton BY FREDERICK FRANK STAFF REPORTER In the final game of the season, the Bulldogs took a two-goal lead early in the first half but could not prevent Princeton from coming back to win 3–2 on the Tigers’ home turf. On Saturday, the Bulldogs (4–11– 2, 2–3–2 Ivy) surrendered a 2–0 lead for the third time this season, and the Tigers (7–9–1, 4–2–1) rode Ivy League top goal scorer Cameron Porter’s two goals to victory. “We had a great start to the game, and I think it was because everyone was so pumped to finish out the season on a high note,” forward Keith Bond ’16 said. “Unfortunately, Princeton did a good job not panicking and was able to withstand our pressure and settle down and adjust.” Despite starting the Ancient Eight campaign 2–0 and sitting in first place, the Elis won just one of their last seven games and saw their hopes for their first Ivy title since 2005 fade away. The game started brightly when forward Peter Jacobson ’14 scored his team-leading fifth goal of the season just 1:22 into the game. Jacobson met forward Cameron Kirdzik’s ’14 cross and put the ball in the back of the net with a header for the early lead. Just eight minutes later, the Bulldogs upped the tally to 2–0 when forward Cameron Kirdzik ’17 found forward Scott Armburst ’14 on the counterattack. The senior met Kirdzik’s long ball and scored Yale’s second goal with fewer than 10 minutes gone in the half. The senior classmates were able to tally goals in their final game for Yale and put the Bulldogs in prime position for an important win. The Tigers refused to roll over, however. “We knew coming in that Princeton was a dangerous team,” defender Nick Alers ’14 said. “Even two goals up, we knew that the game was definitely not over given how much time was left.” Princeton got back into the game with a goal in the 34th minute. Mid-

fielder Andrew Mills played a long ball that fell to Porter on the right edge of Yale’s box. The forward hammered a side volley across goalkeeper Blake Brown ’15 that nestled in the far left corner to halve Yale’s lead to 2–1. The half ended with Yale holding a 6–3 advantage in shots, but still up just one. The Tigers, the fourth-highest scoring team in the Ivy League, did not take long to tie the game. Just three minutes after the beginning of the second half, Mills slipped a through ball behind the Yale defense and midfielder Brendan McSherry hit a hard shot low and under Brown’s reach to even the scoring at two apiece. Princeton rode its momentum and scored what would eventually be the game winner in the 63rd minute. Mills cleared the ball all the way downfield after a spell of Yale pressure. After some poor defending and miscommunication between Brown and his defenders, the ball took an awkward bounce and Porter was able to latch onto the ball, hitting a looping header over Brown and into the unguarded net for a 3–2 lead. Yale was able to put some late pressure on the Tigers, forcing goalkeeper Seth MacMillan into a save in the 86th minute, but the Bulldogs couldn’t find the tying score. “It’s upsetting to lose any game, but this one definitely hurt a lot more just because it was the last game for our seniors and they’re such a great group of guys,” Bond said. The loss pushed the Elis down to fifth in the Ivy League. Yale has finished worse than fifth in three of the last four years. Contact FREDERICK FRANK at frederick.frank@yale.edu .

PRINCETON 3, YALE 2 PRINCETON

1

2

3

YALE

2

0

2

MARIA ZEPEDA/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

No. 9 Peter Jacobson ’14 scored in the second minute of his final collegiate game to give Yale a 1–0 edge.

Women’s basketball suffers first loss

KATHRYN CRANDALL/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Forward Alexandra Osbourn-Jones ’14 defends against Sacred Heart on Saturday (left). Guard Hayden Latham ’15 led the Bulldogs with 14 points on Saturday as Yale fell to Sacred Heart (right). BY ASHLEY WU CONTRIBUTING REPORTER On Saturday, the women’s basketball team was unable to overcome a 14–0 run by Sacred Heart in the second half, falling to the Pioneers 67–54. The Elis had looked to end their winless streak against the Pioneers, who won last year’s contest 67–62 and had defeated Yale in the teams’ past 11 meetings. The Bulldogs (2–1, 0–0 Ivy), however, looked rusty against Sacred Heart (1–1, 0–0 NEC), shooting only 33.9 percent from the field and 14.3 percent from long distance in their third game of the season. The team had shot over 33 percent from beyond

the arc in its first two games. “I think our offense could have been better,” guard Hayden Latham ’15 said. “We weren’t hitting open shots, and that happens sometimes. We should have stepped up in other areas to compensate.” Yale started the game with a turnover and was never able to get going, trailing the entire game. Fewer than 10 minutes into the contest, the Bulldogs were already down 23–11 to Sacred Heart. A rally kept Yale in the game, and the team pulled to within three of the Pioneers with 4:02 remaining in the half. Sacred Heart, however, responded with a run of its own, outscoring Yale 9–4 leading up

to halftime. Coming out of the locker room behind 37–29, the Bulldogs opened the second period on a positive note, scoring the first five points of the half. The two teams traded baskets up to the 12:55 mark, when the Pioneers rattled off 14 unanswered points, extending their lead to 60–43 over the Elis. Yale forward Alexandra Osborn-Jones ’14 stopped the bleeding, making a layup with 7:03 remaining, but Yale could not recover. The Bulldogs kept Sacred Heart scoreless over the last 3:18 of the game, but it was too little too late for the squad. Yale scored the last five points of the game to bring the final score to 67–54.

“I think the biggest difference in the game was that Sacred Heart was a much more experienced team,” head coach Chris Gobrecht said. “It’s a game you wish we could have a month from now. We just weren’t quite ready.” After a 43-point performance from the bench against UMass-Lowell last Tuesday, Yale received only 13 points outside its starting five on Saturday. Latham and Osborn-Jones paced the Elis, each scoring career-highs with 14 and 12 points, respectively. Together they accounted for almost 50 percent of Yale’s scoring output. Forward Meredith Boardman ’16 led the team with eight

rebounds. Still, the Bulldogs were outrebounded for the first time this season, grabbing 40 boards compared to the Pioneers’ 44. The 40 rebound total was well below the team’s season average of 52 rebounds per game. Turnovers are still a troubling area for the Elis, who gave up the ball 17 times, allowing Sacred Heart to score 19 points off turnovers. The Pioneers also dominated the Bulldogs in the paint, outscoring Yale 38–28 inside the key. “We definitely had the ability to beat them, but we lost focus at the end of the game,” Latham said. “We are going to be in similar situations throughout the season, and we need be able to

close out games if we want to come out with a win instead of a loss.” The Elis will be on the road this week, squaring off against Boston University at 7 p.m. on Wednesday. Yale last faced BU on Dec. 7, 2011, when they lost 59–54. Contact ASHLEY WU at ashley.e.wu@yale.edu .

YALE 39, COLGATE 22 YALE

14

13

6

6

39

COLGATE

0

7

7

8

22


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