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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014 · VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 123 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY CLOUDY

62 40

CROSS CAMPUS

BASEBALL BEATS CRIMSON 3-1 IN SERIES

SPEAK OUT

FORAGING

Take Back the Night events bring students together

YALE FARM SHOWS STUDENTS EDIBLE NEW HAVEN

PAGE B1 SPORTS

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 3 CITY

An abundance of caution

And the beat got sicker.

Chance the Rapper cancelled its second weekend performance at Coachella after Chance fell ill on Friday and was admitted to the hospital. The rapper is expected to make a full recovery, no doubt in time for Spring Fling.

Pageant stars. The annual Mr. Yale competition was held last night. The lucky winner was Christian Probst ’16 from Pierson College. Easter on Cross Campus. The

Campus Kindness team of Yale Faith and Action hosted an Easter egg hunt on Cross Campus on Sunday. Two hundred eggs were hidden around the area, filled with candy and encouraging notes to help Yalies make it through the final week of classes. The Campus Kindness team of YFA works on projects to demonstrate God’s love on campus.

Easter for all. The Hellenic

Society hosted an Orthodox Easter celebration in the Ezra Stiles courtyard on Sunday. Attendees were treated to a spread with Greek food, picnic tables, music, dancing and a roast.

Egg hunt on the Green. Trinity Church on the New Haven Green held its fifth annual Easter Egg Hunt on the Upper Green on Sunday. Young children and their parents participated in a search for plastic eggs and prizes. Easter special. Blue State

Coffee served special, colorful white chocolate chunk M&M cookies for Easter.

Bunnies in blankets. Stressedout students were treated to a study break this weekend featuring baby animals. The Barn Babies petting zoo visited various residential college courtyards, allowing attendees to pet bunnies wrapped in blankets, baby chicks wrapped in blankets or even a goat in a diaper. Covered in color. The annual Net Impact Color Run was held this Saturday on the New Haven Green. The 5K run and paint party benefited Kiva Microfinance. Hungry hungry hips. The Yale Belly Dance Society held a fundraiser titled “Hips Against Hunger” this weekend. The performance benefited the Downtown Evening Soup Kitchen and featured guest performances from CT College Belly Dance, Yale’s Bollywood Dance Troupe and more. THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1955 Ten Yale groups join the newly formed Christian Community Council, which is meant to be an umbrella organizing group. A special service is held in the Dwight Hall Memorial Chapel to mark the start of the organization. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE goydn.com/xcampus

I

n November, campus shut down after rumors of a rogue gunman reached the New Haven Police Department. Although the tip did not prove correct, in the wake of shootings at Columbine and Sandy Hook, universities are more concerned about campus safety than ever before. MAREK RAMILO reports.

UPCLOSE At 9:48 that morning, an anonymous caller informed the New Haven

Police Department that someone was on his way to campus, armed and ready to shoot. Police later determined that the call had been made from a phone booth on Columbus Avenue, less than 2 miles from Yale’s campus. “Yale Police advises those on campus to remain in their current location and shelter in place until there is additional information,” read the first of numerous Yale Alert messages that kept students, faculty members and staff informed throughout the day. Few credible details emerged over

Six candidates vie to replace Gary HolderWinfield in House PAGE 5 CITY

Incident draws attention to drug use BY MAREK RAMILO AND WESLEY YIIN STAFF REPORTERS

the next several hours, and those remaining in New Haven for Thanksgiving break were forced to stay put as police, with the help of agents from the FBI, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, the Department of Homeland Security and United States Marshals swept the grounds. Officers knocked on every door, leaving nothing to chance. When police determined that the tip had been a hoax, law enforcement agents, faculty members and stu-

In the wake of a March incident at Durfee Hall in which several students used LSD and cocaine, University officials are attempting to stymie the growing problem of hard drug use on campus. On March 28 and March 29, two parties involving hard drugs took place in a suite in Durfee, the freshman dormatory for Morse College. The first night’s event, a birthday party, involved cocaine but passed without major incident, while the second night involved four to six students taking LSD and resulted in one student suffering an extremely negative reaction, according to three Morse freshmen with knowledge of the situation. The intoxicated student caused significant physical damage to both himself and his surroundings, having become belligerent after taking the drug, they said. The student who experienced the negative reaction declined to comment, citing involvement in an ongoing Executive Committee investigation. “While everything was going fine for the majority of the night, one student who took

SEE LOCKDOWN PAGE 6

SEE DRUG INCIDENT PAGE 4

GUSTAVO SANCHEZ/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

A military-grade Humvee sat on Elm Street, outside the gate normally used by students to enter Calhoun. On Nov. 25, a fully armed SWAT team poured through those same doors, searching for a rogue gunman and hoping to prevent Yale from becoming the next Columbine, the next Virginia Tech, the next Sandy Hook.

ELECTION

Panel questions Peabody ownership BY STEPHANIE ROGERS STAFF REPORTER A recent campus debate about two carvings at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History has sparked a broader discussion about the role of museums to return culturally important objects. At a panel discussion in the Yale Hall of Graduate Studies last Tuesday afternoon, panelist Ashley Dalton ’15 argued that the Peabody should proactively return the carvings to their home, an act known as repatriation. Although Dalton and Peabody officials agree that the museum has no current legal obligation to return the objects, she and other speakers who presented on other topics related to artifact repatriation

argued that the museum should still return the objects because they are sacred to native groups. “Museums have a role to step up and create a cultural healing by recognizing our nation’s past and recognizing [a tribe’s] agency,” Dalton said. The two carvings were taken from a Tlingit village on the coast of Alaska during the Harriman Expedition of 1899 led by railroad tycoon Edward Harriman. At the time, the carvings belonged to a clan who left the Tlingit village, and were seemingly abandoned after the clan fled a smallpox outbreak. Harriman and his crew removed the carvings along with other objects like totem poles, house posts, and ceremonial SEE PEABODY PAGE 4

KATHRYN CRANDALL/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Speakers at a recent panel urged the Peabody Museum to repatriate two Tlingit carvings taken in 1899.

YCC presidential election heads to runoff BY LARRY MILSTEIN STAFF REPORTER A runoff election for Yale College Council President — between Leah Motzkin ’16 and Michael Herbert ’16 — will be held online from Tuesday to Wednesday, as none of the four candidates claimed a majority of votes in the race that ended Friday evening. Although Herbert received 30.03 percent of the student body vote, the YCC Constitution states that a candidate with less than 40 percent of the vote must receive 10 percent more votes than the nearest candidate to be declared a winner. Motzkin received 28.37 percent of the vote, Sara Miller ’16 received 24.18 percent and Ben Ackerman ’16 received 17.42 percent. Maia Eliscovich Sigal ’16 was elected vice president out of SEE YCC RUNOFF PAGE 4

HENRY EHRENBERG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Michael Herbert ’16 and Leah Motzkin ’16 will face each other in a runoff election for YCC president, with voting on Tuesday and Wednesday.


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “Debt is the chain by which the oppressors hold the proletariat capyaledailynews.com/opinion

Time for change A

s my second year at Yale comes to a close, I’ve come to realize that Yale is undergoing a period of serious change. Our policies are slowly getting more progressive, campus conversation increasingly includes issues of socioeconomic class and students are beginning to make clear to administrators that we should have a role in decision-making. The campus is in the process of physically changing in preparation for the two new residential colleges. All of this, combined with the upcoming selection of a new dean, indicates that administrators and students alike will soon be faced with crucial decisions that will guide the direction of the University. Last year marked the resurgence of the conversation about financial aid and class at Yale. Freshman Scholars at Yale launched partially in response to a column in the News calling for a bridge program. Initial complaints about the rising student contribution to financial aid were voiced in various campus publications. This year, the group UFLIP was formed to provide a space for discussion about class. Even more strikingly, all four candidates for Yale College Council president incorporated financial aid reform into their platforms. This marked the first time that financial aid was discussed during YCC elections since 2011, when candidates mentioned student contribution, termtime jobs and the International Summer Award in their platforms. Student opinion has been vocalized on a variety of issues. Fossil Free Yale successfully mobilized students to vote overwhelmingly in favor of fossil fuel divestment in November’s referendum. Although gender-neutral housing for sophomores was rejected for 201415, the administration knows that students strongly support it. Concerns over mental health and sexual assault policies have covered the pages of campus publications, forcing administrators to respond. The University released a series of sexual misconduct scenarios to clarify University policy. We have also been given a slightly larger role in decisionmaking. Unlike last year’s presidential search committee, this year’s dean search committee included an undergraduate. At last week’s debate, three candidates for YCC president stated that a student should sit on the Yale Corporation. While this may be far from becoming a reality, Corporation members have begun interacting more directly with students through “University teas.” When we return to campus in the fall, we’ll be returning to a Yale faced with decisions. Students have raised concerns and the administration is well aware. Both parties will need

to decide whether or not to pursue real change in policy. Will the YCC choose to actively push for DIANA financial ROSEN aid reform, or will talks Looking Left of lowering the student contribution remain campaign rhetoric? In 2005, YCC passed a resolution calling for a reduction to the student contribution. Since then, some smaller attempts have been made to negotiate with the financial aid office. Given now financial aid has such a large role in this year’s YCC campaigns, it stands to reason that the winning candidate should make the issue a priority.

YALE IS POISED FOR CHANGE, BUT WE MUST NOT LOSE MOMENTUM

tive.”

G U E ST C O LU M N I ST NAT H A N ST E I N B E R G

From Nuland, to us N

ever had I seen a man so nostalgic. Professor Sherwin Nuland MED '55 peered out the window of his office for several long seconds before finally speaking. “I wrote that entire book here,” he said finally. “It was such a demanding undertaking that I often forget how rewarding each minute was.” My professor and I were referring to Nuland’s magnum opus, “Doctors.” The book was the assigned reading for the freshman seminar “History of Scientific Medicine.” The class became Nuland’s only freshman seminar and the only one he taught after retirement. “History of Scientific Medicine” was a survey of the study of anatomy and medicine from the Greek Hippocratics to the founding of Johns Hopkins Medical School. In that span of two millennia, we discussed the healers who grappled with the complexities of the human cadaver and enlightened Western civilization with modern treatments. On Mar. 4, 2014, Professor Sherwin Nuland passed away at his home in Hamden. I would like to share a piece of advice he offered me late last year. In early December, Nuland

DIANA ROSEN is a sophomore in Pierson College. Her columns run on Mondays. Contact her at diana. rosen@yale.edu .

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“The main goal of Yale’s programs of study is to instill knowledge and skills that students can bring to bear in whatever work they eventually choose.” I looked up from the page. The quote seemed oblique. “Too many students don’t realize what opportunities they have here,” he said with more conviction than I had every seen in class. “Students are growing estranged from Yale’s liberal arts opportunities. There is plenty of time for vocational training down the road.” I thought about the many doctors we had discussed during the seminar. Rudolf Virchow, pioneer of the cell theory, was a German statesman and chemist. Andreas Vesalius, famous for his in-depth studies of human anatomy, was an avid writer, literary scholar and classics enthusiast. “I spent many days in this office,” he continued. “I’ve studied healers from every era, continent and civilization. And all of them cared just as much about another field of study as they did medicine. Human knowledge is far too vast to limit one’s self to anatomy.” “I agree with you,” I replied. I would have spoken further,

but Professor Nuland appeared quite content. “If you learn nothing else from me, heed this advice: follow your interests. Medical school will still be there on the other side. This world needs healers who examine the human body as art, akin to how an English scholar might interpret a Shakespearean sonnet or a curator might treat a drawing of Rembrandt’s.” He guided his eyes back to the window, and then slowly sat down in a wooden chair. With the light from the small window, I finally noticed the frailty of the 83-year-old surgeon. Professor Nuland had lived a long and accomplished life. He held sagacious surgical expertise, written thirteen books on the human body for laymen, and had seen Yale since 1958. I could learn a lot from him. “Is that all you needed, Nathan?” I had clearly overstayed my welcome. “Yes, thank you Professor.” I closed the door and let the old man think in peace. NATHAN STEINBERG is a freshman in Timothy Dwight College. Contact him at nathan.steinberg@yale. edu .

Levin goes digital

GUEST COLUMNIST LEAH LIBRESCO

Focus on small clubs

YALE DAILY NEWS PUBLISHING CO., INC. 202 York Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (203) 432-2400

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY Daniel Weiner

brought our class to his home turf: the Yale Medical School. After class, I found myself in his office in the corner of the medical school library. Our conversation drifted to the discussion of premedical requirements. “How do you feel about students who are premed?” I asked. Yale’s premedical studies track is not a major, but a laundry list of courses. An aspiring doctor would adhere to such a curriculum if he or she wanted to engage in medical training after receiving an undergraduate diploma. I had wrestled with premed for some time. From my peers’ feedback, I gathered that premed requirements significantly clutter the schedule of Yale undergrads. After all, according to Yale College’s premed page, the track requires eight classes and six labs. I was convinced that this was too much. “I mean, there’s nothing wrong with training to be a doctor,” I continued, aware that the question caught him off-guard. His gaze drifted from the window to the bookshelf. He snatched open a dog-eared copy of Yale College Programs of Study. He handed me the book and asked me to read.

I L LU ST R AT I O N S E D I T O R A N N E L I SA L E I N B AC H

If Fossil Free Yale’s divestment proposal is rejected over the summer, will they organize students to protest in the fall? Fossil Free has staged some small actions this semester, but much larger numbers will be necessary if they intend to override this type of administrative decision. Divestment movements on other college campuses have chosen to take a more radical tone and Fossil Free Yale will be forced to decide if it wants to take a similar path. Students will also need to decide whether or not administrative responses to mental health and sexual violence policies are sufficient. Will further discussion be enough, or will there be a push for actual policy change in those areas? As our administration continues to turn over, first with President Salovey, and now with Mary Miller’s replacement, the possibility for change will grow. The new dean will be accompanied by a new YCC, and the shift in interactions between the two may have serious implications for the student body. The groundwork for progress on the issues students care about has been laid. Next semester will reveal whether administrators are serious about changing their policies in response to student criticism. It will also reveal if students care enough to push administrators to change.

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EDITOR IN CHIEF Julia Zorthian

'YALEMARXIST' ON 'DEBT AND THE YALE STUDENT'

W

hen I come back to Yale for alumni events, I usually get a fuller tour of the campus than I planned. Often times, the debate I’ve returned for has to shift rooms at the eleventh hour because a class has preempted a reservation or because the strategic loitering to lay claim to an unreservable room has failed. While many, including those in these pages, have argued that students should take more responsibility for their extracurricular expenses (“Bring back the bake sale,” April 17), the undergrads I know have asked me for contributions in order to rent off-campus space for discussions of politics and philosophy. It turns out that paying landlords for space is easier than persuading Yale to make it available for student use. When I hosted prefrosh or sit down for alumni interviews, I used to single out Yale’s generosity toward student groups as the trait that best distinguished it from its academic peers. I can admit that Harvard also has intelligent, interesting undergraduates, but Yale did more to let stu-

dents make the best use of each other. Yale’s generous funding is the reason I was able to craft my own sword, using the materials bought for the Freestyle Dueling Association, or co-direct a production of Iolanthe my senior year, with the modest sets and costumes covered by Sudler funding. The easy accessibility of Yale’s funding and support made it easy to turn an idle conversation into a fully realized event (and to learn a little bit about how hard it is to turn theory into practice along the way). One of the student organizations I joined as an undergrad, Point, could be a poster child for Yale’s previous profligate approach to extracurriculars — and the way that the investment can pay off. Point was yet another literary magazine, which, like most of them, died after my friends and I graduated. But, while it lived, Yale subsidized our printing costs (the tea and cookies, to my recollection, we bought or baked ourselves). I got more out of that intimate, friendly editing circle than

I ever did from a writing tutor (or the writing seminars I wouldn’t have won admission to). I got to observe other pieces being edited and brought in some not-forclass writing that I never would have troubled Yale’s official resources with. But Yale has been using financial and logistical pressure to put the squeeze on student groups. The extracurricular groups I belonged to, which form the ties that draw me back to campus, are having a harder time getting material support, from funds to access to Yale’s rooms and resources. College common rooms become unbookable, ostensibly to keep them free for everyone’s use, with no alternate spaces provided. While I was an undergraduate, Commons dining hall stopped its dinner service, leaving some of my clubs without a place to eat together. Our large groups were scolded when we tried to claim tables in the residential college dining halls. I don’t doubt that Yale still spends an enormous amount of money on undergraduate life, but that money does less good when

it’s channeled into generic activities, run through the residential colleges. A college study break, however delicious, does less to bring students together than many small pizza events thrown by specialized groups like the Objectivist Study Group at Yale or the Party of the Left’s “Pizza and West Wing” on Bulldog Days. Yale’s student funding works best according to a model of subsidiarity, where money and rooms are preferentially allocated to the smallest and most decentralized recipients possible, since they’ll have the best understanding of their own needs. This will certainly produce more “waste” but I prefer to think of it as overhead costs. In order to let small, particular, and peculiar groups flourish, I’ll spend some money on groups that do nothing or fall apart after a semester or so. That seems like more profitable waste than bureaucratic support for college-wide events that remain predictably bland. LEAH LIBRESCO is a 2011 graduate of Jonathan Edwards College and a former staff columnist for the News .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

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NEWS

“The car has become the carapace, the protective and aggressive shell, of urban and suburban man.” MARSHALL MCLUHAN CANADIAN PHILOSOPHER

Students take stand against sexual violence

SANTIAGO SANCHEZ/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

A Speak Out session was held on Cross Campus Friday, as part of the Take Back the Night events organized by the Women’s Center and other campus groups, to encourage open discourse about sexual violence and consent. BY WESLEY YIIN STAFF REPORTER On Friday afternoon, over 100 members of the Yale community gathered on Cross Campus to take a stance against sexual violence. They were attendees of Take Back the Night, an event planned by 10 undergraduates to encourage the campus to stand together against sexual misconduct and build a community of respect. The organizers included Community and Consent Educators, and students involved with the Women’s Center and Students Against Sexual Violence at Yale. Though TBTN officially spans several days, Friday afternoon’s event featured a Speak Out session that encouraged students to share their thoughts and experiences on sexual violence. Evan WalkerWells ’14, a CCE who helped plan

the event, said TBTN is intended to focus on empowerment. “Instead of there being a right way to talk about this, or the right kind of story to tell ... we wanted to make sure that people really feel in control of their stories,” WalkerWells said. “This was a chance for people to think constructively of where to go from here.” Walker-Wells said Friday’s event was not officially associated with the national Take Back the Night Foundation — which has hosted events fighting against sexual violence since the 1970s — but the theme of the event fell in line with the national organization’s message. Performances from singing groups such as the Yale Alley Cats and the Yale Gospel Choir were interspersed throughout the speak out. Amy Napleton ’14 said the

event was “incredibly powerful” and perfectly mixed storytelling and poetic and musical performances to address the nuances and complexity of sexual violence, she said. “It didn’t take any one tone. It took a really multifaceted approach to a complicated set of issues that are present in society without zoning into one thing,” Napleton said. Though he was not involved in planning previous TBTN events, Walker-Wells said this year’s Speak Out was a “more focused, more perfected” version of a similar event that was held last year. He added that though the format of the event is common across the country, not all are held in public locations. Holding the event on Cross Campus seemed to encourage more attendees to speak in front

of the audience than if the event had been held in a private space, he said. “In a private circle, it can feel like there’s a lot of pressure to speak,” he said. “In some ways, I think [the event’s public nature] what made Friday’s event so special: a sense of community.” In a public space, Walker-Wells said, it is easier to powerfully convey the message that sexual violence is something that needs to be discussed and addressed. Walker-Wells said the interspersed musical performances contributed to a positive tone while also allowing for reflection on the speakers’ words. Elizabeth Villarreal ’16, who serves as business coordinator of the Yale Women’s Center but was not involved in the event planning, said the stories told at the event reiterated important points

Still no Urban Studies at Yale BY POOJA SALHOTRA STAFF REPORTER Although the number of interdisciplinary majors at Yale has increased substantially over the past decade, a growing body of students and faculty would like to see one more added to the Bluebook — urban studies. While majors like Ethics, Politics and Economics (EP&E) and Architecture allow students to pursue a concentration in urban studies, Yale does not offer an urban studies major. Yale’s urban studies website lists over 50 courses that pertain to urban studies, but some students and faculty feel that the lack of an urban studies department makes it difficult to create a cohesive plan of study, which puts Yale a step behind its peer institutions. Several other Ivy League schools — including University of Pennsylvania, Columbia, Brown, Cornell and Princeton — offer undergraduate programs in urban studies. “Right now, if you are interested in urban studies you have to seek out a lot of the opportunities through different paths,” said Alan Sage ’14 who plans to work in urban development after graduating. “There isn’t much cohesion, and I think a major would provide that.” Urban studies at Yale has a storied past. When Jay Gitlin ’71 MUS ’74 GRD ’02 was a sophomore at Yale in 1968-’69, he planned to major in city planning — a program that was under the School of Architecture. But that same year, the major was cut because it was perceived as being too “preprofessional,” Gitlin said. He said that the major was replaced with a single introductory course, called “Study of the City.” Since that program was cut, Gitlin and several other faculty members have expressed interest in launching an urban studies program. In 1994, four professors from different departments came together to create “New Haven and the American City,” a class about cities that uses New Haven as an example. Both Cynthia Farrar ’76 and Alan Plattus ’76 helped create the class 20 years ago with the hope that this would help jump start an urban studies major. But 20 years later no official program or major has been institutionalized.

“Yale is increasingly open to the idea of interdisciplinary work and I think if there were a commitment by faculty to this, it could certainly happen,” she said. “What it needs is a group of faculty being able to devote time to it. And that’s the challenge.”

I think we owe it to ourselves to know more about the city and the relationship between Yale and New Haven. JAY GITLIN ’71 MUS ’74 GRD ’02 Professor, Yale University In 2001, Farrar along with several other professors in an Urban Studies Committee drafted a proposal to make urban studies a correlated program, which students could complete in addition to their major, similar to a minor. But in 2002, the committee withdrew the proposal because it did not align with the administration’s vision for a correlated program. “It just wasn’t a good fit between what we wanted to do and what they wanted correlated programs to do,” Plattus told the News after the committee withdrew the proposal. Since 2002, there have been no formal proposals for an urban studies major. But professors and students interested in the field are continuing to work towards increasing urban studies opportunities at Yale. In an effort to facilitate the process of locating urban studies classes at Yale, architecture professor Elihu Rubin ’99 revamped the urban studies website last fall and compiled a list of the Yale classes related to urban studies. He said that the website had not been updated for at least three years. For Rubin, urban studies does not necessarily need to become its own major. He said he just wants to ensure that students interested in the field have ways to pursue it, whether that be through more classes, speaker events or modifying the website to better relay information to students. “My attitude is one step at a time. I think that there are a lot of ways to

strengthen the urban studies community at Yale and many of us are working to do that,” Rubin said. “I think that down the line, it may be that turning it into a formal major is the best path, but its not absolutely necessary in order to students to pursue urban studies.” President of Yale student organization Urban Collective Josh Isackson ’15 agreed that there are a number of options for students interested in urban studies. He said that even if there were an urban studies major, he is not sure whether he would choose it over the architecture major with an urban studies concentration. Still, Isackson supported the creation of an urban studies major because the cohesive department would mean more funding for speakers and research projects, he said. But other students and faculty said that there is no excuse for Yale not to have an urban studies program. Drew Morrison ’14, who is focusing on urban studies within his political science major, said that in a time where more than 50 percent of the world’s population lives in an urban environment, Yale should put more focus on studying cities. “As a University interested in public service and how the world works, for Yale to not show an interest in cities is to miss the ball on what the 20th century is about” Morrison said. Gitlin, who now teaches in the history department, agreed, noting that most Yale graduates move to cities like New York or D.C. Gitlin said that he plans to bring up the idea of an urban studies major to other faculty this May, when they get together to select a recipient of the Richard Hegel Prize for a Senior essay on New Haven. Gitlin added that Yale’s location in an urban setting is an added reason to offer an urban studies program. “One of the attractions and problems of Yale is that we are in an urban environment. I think we owe it to ourselves to know more about the city and the relationship between Yale and New Haven,” he said. Yale’s new urban studies website was launched on Nov. 3, 2013. Contact POOJA SALHOTRA at pooja.salhotra@yale.edu .

about sexual violence. “Sexual assault isn’t about sex — it’s about power,” she said, adding that she was pleased with the audience’s respectfulness and the overall turnout. Other themes addressed at the event were intimate partner violence, sexual violence in homosexual relationships and violence against males. In addition to Friday’s Speak Out, other TBTN events took place over the weekend, including a dance at the Afro-American Cultural Center on Friday evening and an informal brunch on Saturday at the Women’s Center. Villarreal, who attended both these events, said the dance was a “cool experiment to put what [was] discussed into practice.” The brunch, Villarreal said, allowed casual discussion about the previous day’s events and

afforded the opportunity for students to meet people in the Yale community who also recognize the importance of addressing issues of sexual violence. WalkerWells, who also attended the brunch, said he hopes the followup events helped demonstrate that the conversation about sexual violence does not end after the Speak Out does. “We want to use the Speak Out as a jumping-off point for folks to think seriously about what this community looks like and what we can do to help,” he said. The event also received support from the Yale College Dean’s Office, the Sexual Harassment and Assault Response & Education Center and 22 other campus groups. Contact WESLEY YIIN at wesley.yiin@yale.edu .

Yale farm promotes foraging BY LILLIAN CHILDRESS STAFF REPORTER On Friday, the Yale Farm taught a group of students and New Haven residents to make a salad out of weeds found on New Haven streets. Justin Freiberg, director of the West Campus Farm, lead a group of about 15 students around the Yale Farm, pointing out various authentic New Haven weeds growing among the plots of vegetables. The group then made its way through the streets of New Haven, where they were told which weeds are safe to eat. Organizers of the event said the act of eating plants not traditionally cultivated on a farm — called foraging — is important both for safety and expanding one’s food options. “It’s really important that people understand foraging,” said Kate O’Shaughnessy, Lazarus Fellow of food and agriculture at the Yale Farm. “So something like this is a great introduction.” Each person on the tour was allowed to taste the plants Freiberg introduced, which included dandelions, magnolia flowers, and Japanese knotweed. However, while all the plants introduced were edible, Freiberg warned that there may be pesticides or other substances on the plants in an urban setting, so foragers should be wary of what they pick. Participants were shown defining characteristics of each plant and learned different uses for the oftenignored weeds, ranging from medicinal to dietary. For example, dandelions can be used as a valuable nutritional supplement, roasted and ground as a coffee substitute, fermented as wine, added to a spring salad or battered and deep-fried, according to Freiberg. “I had no idea that so many nutritious, diverse things grow around here,” said McLane Ritzel ’14, a student who participated on the tour. Ritzel took a bunch of white pine needles with her after the tour that the group had foraged, saying that she planned to use them to make tea in the dining halls. After the tour was over, a meal was

prepared with the plants highlighted on the tour. On the menu were dishes such as pesto pasta made with ramp, a type of weed, dandelion and wild mustard salad with chive vinegar and sheep sorrel lemon sherbet with Japanese knotweed compote.

I had no idea that so many nutritious, diverse things grow around here. MCLANE RITZEL ’14 Freiberg explained that many plants that have useful purposes are classified as “weeds” simply because they cannot be easily marketed in a traditional supermarket context — either because they wilt quickly or because they are hard to cultivate on a mass scale. However, many edible weeds are herbs imported from Europe. Mugwort, a weed that covers many vacant lots in New Haven, can be eaten and steeped into tea, as well as used to flavor rice, Freiberg said. Additionally, Mugwort is used by indigenous cultures in teas to stimulate vivid dreams. Abraham Siegel, who attended the tour because he is helping set up a small farm and gardens at Trinity College in Hartford, was impressed with the nutritional qualities of the plants. “I think that food can help you much more than medicine in so many situations,” Seigel said, who is a supporter of plant-based diets. Freiberg said plants are on a spectrum — there are plants that are not completely toxic but still do contain some toxins. It is important to know how much of these you can eat and where it is safe to eat them, and even Freiberg said he is still learning about how to become better at foraging. On Thursday, Freiberg will lead a tour on West Campus on how to forage mushrooms. Contact LILLIAN CHILDRESS at lillian.g.childress@yale.edu .


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT Herbert, Motzkin still in race

“No drug, not even alcohol, causes the fundamental ills of society.” P. J. O’ROURKE AMERICAN WRITER AND SATIRIST

Incident raises awareness of drug use DRUG INCIDENT FROM PAGE 1

KATHRYN CRANDALL/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

There was a large field of candidates in this year’s YCC race, which made for a spirited debate last week. YCC RUNOFF FROM PAGE 1 three candidates. Voter turnout this year was noticeably increased from last year. 2,647 students voted in this year’s presidential election — nearly 2,000 more than the 725 people who voted for YCC president last year. “All four candidates were wonderful,” said Kyle Tramonte ’15, current vice president and chair of the YCC Elections Committee. He added that he looks forward to students being able to learn more about the two remaining candidates in the next five days. Herbert said his total votes, 795, were fewer than he anticipated. Nevertheless, he said he is excited for the runoff and will look to further contrast his views and positions with those of Motzkin, who received 751 votes. He added that he is pleased with the support he has received and looks forward to engaging with the student body in the coming days. Motzkin said she is honored to be moving forward in the election. She added that she is excited at the prospect of serving the student body as YCC president and that the runoff puts her one step closer to that role. “The runoff was inevitable with so many candidates running, and especially with three YCC [members] splitting the vote,” Motzkin said. She said her experience on YCC, her ability to engage with administrators and her commitment to representing a wide swath of the student body all set her apart

from Herbert. Herbert said the two main differences between him and Motzkin are his strong leadership abilities and the specificity of his platform. Though he may not have served on YCC, he said, he has experience founding a fraternity and serving as vice president of the Saybrook College Council. “There has been this fetish with YCC experience up to this point,” he said. “But if you look at my track record, you see leadership indicative of a firmer, better vision.” Motzkin said she plans to spend the time before the runoff highlighting the reasons she would be best suited to the role of YCC president and encouraging students to vote again. The other YCC executive board races were decided in Friday night’s results. Eliscovich Sigal defeated Allison Kolberg ’16 and Chris Moates ’16 for vice president with 52.52 percent of the vote. Connor Feeley ’16 was elected finance director, and Jaime Halberstam ’16 was elected events director, both in unopposed elections. Eliscovich Sigal said she attributes the success of her landslide victory to her experience on YCC. She added that she hopes both other candidates will stay involved in student government next year. She plans to remain neutral during the runoff and will work with the winner over the summer towards making reforms to shopping period and seminar registra-

tion, she added. Miller said she will be supporting Herbert. Though he has not been a member of YCC, she said, he has demonstrated himself to be a competent leader on campus and she believes he has the capacity to work well with administrators. On the other hand, Ackerman said that “given the current options,” he “reluctantly” supports Motzkin. But, he said, he trusts his supporters to weigh the field carefully and make a decision on their own. In class council results, Thomas Rosenkranz ’17 edged out Sukriti Mohan ’17 by 43 votes to become the Sophomore Class Council President. In the Junior Class Council presidential race, Emily Van Alst ’16 won in an unopposed election. Campus reactions to Friday’s results varied greatly. Alex Ratner ’15 said he is not particularly surprised that the presidential race is now in a run-off, since he felt the two remaining candidates had very strong platforms. Each of the candidates offered something unique, reasoned Smita Shukla ’15. Zach Jacobs ’17 said he was disappointed that some of the YCC executive board positions were again uncontested races. The runoff election will begin on Tuesday at 9 a.m. and end on Wednesday at 9 p.m. Contact LARRY MILSTEIN at larry.milstein@yale.edu .

acid began to have a bad trip,” a witness of the incident who requested to remain anonymous said in an email. “The student in question became enraged and began screaming and making a general mess of things.” He added that the intoxicated student damaged several pieces of furniture, hurting himself and causing a loud commotion in the process. As the episode unfolded, he said, some of the students present proceeded to either exit the suite or lock themselves in their bedrooms. He said no one present was restrained against their will at any point in the night, and Morse Freshman Counselors entered the suite at one point to contain the intoxicated student. The student, who has close ties to the suite, said the students ordered the LSD through the mail and obtained the cocaine through a person not affiliated with the University. A second student with close ties to the suite denied rumors that the intoxicated student inflicted any self-harm with suicidal intentions. Police arrived at around 5 a.m., according to one student with knowledge of the situation. “Very few people were awake to be alarmed, but I know there were people who noticed that things were going on, specifically [in] the suites below them,” he said. Members of the Yale Police Department could not be reached for comment, and daily crime logs do not indicate any police activity regarding drugs in Durfee during the days in question. Four Morse freshmen interviewed said the suite where the incident took place has thrown many parties throughout the year, and one added that Morse’s Freshman Counselors had previously sent an email to all Durfee residents regarding complaints about the recent smell of marijuana in Entryway A before the incident. Another student with knowledge of the incident said the students concerned are not the only people who do hard drugs. “There are definitely more people that do acid and things like that, so I guess this is more of a wake-up call,”he said. “It is a thing that people don’t really want to talk about, but it’s there.”

The Morse Freshman Counselors declined to comment. Assistant Dean of Student Affairs Melanie Boyd said she could not comment due to the confidential nature of individual student incidents. Similarly, Student Affairs Fellow Garrett Fiddler ’11 declined to comment on any individual student incidents but said in an email that the Yale College Dean’s Office is thinking more about how to address non-marijuana drug use on campus. “The online education module for incoming freshmen does include information on a wide range of drugs, but the majority of our office’s efforts have been focused on alcohol because it’s the drug that’s causing by far the most harms on campus,” Fiddler said in an email. On April 9, Yale Health Medical Director Michael Rigsby MED ’88 sent an email to all University students, warning about the growing prevalence of drug use on college campuses across the country. Rigsby said in the email that his note was prompted in part by a string of events that has caught the attention of several administrators. “Several recent incidents have raised our concern that the use of drugs such as LSD, cocaine, and heroin is on the rise among college students,” Rigsby said in the message. “All of these are powerful drugs with profound and potentially serious physical and psychological risks … These drugs are not benign.” Rigsby said in an email to the News that he does not have any data on the prevalence of hard drug use on campus. “Our concerns are based primarily on individual episodes that come to our attention — usually because of a medical or psychiatric complication,” he said. “But we don’t have any way of knowing about overall prevalence of drug use.” He declined to comment on any specific instances, citing privacy concerns. Durfee Hall houses a total of 125 freshmen and eight Freshman Counselors. Contact MAREK RAMILO at marek.ramilo@yale.edu and WESLEY YIIN at wesley.yiin@yale.edu .

Peabody repatriations under discussion PEABODY FROM PAGE 1 items and distributed the objects to museums across the country. Since no tribe member was present to give consent, the Harriman Expedition acquired all of these Tlingit objects without asking permission of the native tribe, Dalton said. “The records of the objects clearly show that they were taken without the consent of the Tlingit, and thus the museum should act independently of repatriation claims,” said Rosita Worl, the President of the Sealaska Heritage Institute and a native Tlingit. Erin Gredell, repatriation officer at the Peabody, said the museum has been in full compliance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, which enforces the return of “cultural items” such as human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony to lineal descendants or

culturally affiliated Native American tribes. The carvings fall under the cultural patrimony and sacred objects categorization, and thus would be returned if the Tlingit requested. She added that museum officials were not formally invited to attend or present at the panel discussion but attended as members of the audience. In February, Gredell sent a letter of support for the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska’s application for a NAGPRA consultation and documentation grant. With this grant, the Central Council can visit the Peabody and discuss the objects with museum officials. The Central Council has yet to ask the museum to return the carvings, said Derek Briggs, director of the Peabody. If the museum were asked for these items, he said the museum would go through the normal procedures involved in a repatriation request. “You know we’re going to follow

the law,” said Tim White, director of collections and operations at the Peabody. “They’ve started the process to come and visit, so that would be the first step, just like anybody doing scientific research you start with a reconnaissance trip to do your research.” Over the past two decades, the Peabody has been in continuous contact with the Tlingit tribe, Gredell said. On Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2011, the Peabody filed a notice of intent to repatriate a cultural item to the Tlingit tribe — a chilkat blanket that was an unassociated funerary object — and physically transferred the Tlingit object the following year. Dalton suggested the Yale Peabody should follow the example of the Harvard Peabody Archaeology and Ethnology museum. In 1999, the Harvard museum repatriated a totem pole that was an object of cultural patrimony originating from the Harriman Expedition after the tribe filed a claim to repa-

triate. To honor the Tlingit clan, the Harvard Peabody replaced the totem pole with a cedar tree with the same markings. “There is always an opportunity to use changes that have occurred as a teaching moment” said Rae Gould, repatriation coordinator at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, who spoke on the Tuesday panel. “Sometimes when museums repatriate something and there is a huge gap in their exhibits they will actually leave that space empty and take that opportunity to put a plaque explaining why there is an empty space.” The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act was signed into law by George H.W. Bush on Nov. 16, 1990, and since then, more than 600 notices of intent to repatriate have been filed nationwide. Contact STEPHANIE ROGERS at stephanie.rogers@yale.edu .

ELENA MALLOY/CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

The museum has repatriated Tlingit objects in the past.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“Fettuccine alfredo is macaroni and cheese for adults.” MITCH HEDBERG AMERICAN COMEDIAN

Students vie for food research prize BY LILLIAN CHILDRESS STAFF REPORTER Over the weekend, six students dueled for a prize for best research in food and agriculture. The “Food Matters” competition, a new event hosted by the Yale Sustainable Food Project, took place at Saint Anthony Hall on Saturday and featured six student presentations centered around food and agriculture research. The winner was Julie Botnick ’14, who showcased her research on agriculture as a means of forming a collective identity in a Zionist agricultural colony. Taking second place was Vivienne Hay ’14, who presented on urbanization and food waste. The first prize winner was awarded $100 in cash and a gift certificate to Miya’s Sushi, while the second prize winner received a YSFP tote bag, a $25 gift card to the New Haven farmer’s market and a book. “[The competition] is an opportunity to showcase amazing work that’s already being done but also a way of stirring up interest and showing people what’s out there,” said Abigail Bok ’14, one of the organizers of the competition. “The prize is just an added incentive.” While the YSFP hosted a similar event last year where undergraduates presented food-related research, this was the first year a prize was offered. In general, the organization aims to facilitate research in food and agriculture, while bringing more sustainable food options to Yale’s campus. Botnick’s winning presentation focused on a Zionist Agricultural colony of around 200 people that existed in Utah from around 1911 to 1915. She spoke about how the descendants attempted to create an identity for themselves out of the “back to the soil” mentality that had spurred their ancestors, but actually created an identity out of their own perceptions of their past. Her research was based on her senior thesis. Hay’s second-place presentation focused on the waste of food that is endemic to developed countries. According to Hay, around 40 percent of food sold in the United States is wasted. She spoke about various

Six scramble to replace Holder-Winfield

solutions to the food waste problem, including shifting consumer preferences away from meat towards fruits and vegetables, advocating for smaller portion sizes and creating oxygen-sensitive packaging to better preserve the freshness of food products. Topics of other presentations included “Policy Recommendations For a Continued Viable Local Food Economy,” “Mapping Food Sovereignty in Maine” and “The Modern Surrealist: The Id, the Ego, and Natural Transformation,” which compared fermented food to surrealist art. “It’s really awesome to see what’s being done is so many different disciplines,” said Jacquline Lewin, programs manager for professional experience for the YSFP.

[The competition] is an opportunity to showcase amazing work that’s already being done. ABIGAIL BOK ’14 Mark Bomford, director of the Yale Sustainable Food Project, and Maria Trumpler, a women’s, gender and sexuality studies professor who has a background in food judged the competition. Bok said the two were “natural picks” to judge the competition because of their involvement with the YSFP and the different expertise that they each brought. “We all have different approaches, but we’re all right,” said Alma Alegria ’15, one of the participants in the competition. “I came because I wanted to share my perspective but also hear everyone else’s,” she added. Alegria’s presentation was titled “Food as a Site of Healthy Discomfort, Questioning, and Bond-making.” The YSFP is celebrating its 10th anniversary this year. Contact LILLIAN CHILDRESS at lillian.childress@yale.edu .

ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The election for the 94th assembly district’s state representative has presented voters diverse candidates to choose from. BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTER It’s a free-for-all in the race to replace Gary Holder-Winfield as state representative for Connecticut’s 94th assembly district. When voters go to the polls this Thursday, they will find four Democrats and one Republican on the ballot. The diversity of candidates is a testament to the diversity of the district: southern Hamden, New Haven’s Newhallville and Prospect Hill neighborhoods and a slice of Yale, including Trumbull, Calhoun, Berkeley, Silliman and Timothy Dwight Colleges. Two of the four Democratic hopefuls are from New Haven, the other two from Hamden. No candidate has been backed by the district’s Democratic committee, which declined to vote on an endorsement at a March meeting amid confusion over which delegates still lived in the district. Still, Hamden’s Democratic establishment has rallied around Berita Rowe-Lewis, an at-large Hamden city council member representing all nine municipal districts. At the March convention, Hamden’s delegates were all poised to support her. Rowe-Lewis works as a supervisor at Yale-New Haven Hospital. She was first elected to political office in 2003, as a Hamden councilwoman representing a district abutting New Haven. Rowe-Lewis said she is politically adept and has the experience to follow in Holder-Winfield’s footsteps, emphasizing her work bringing farmers’ markets to Hamden and helping to convert a blighted building into low-and-middle-income housing. Reynaud Harp, brother-in-law of Mayor Toni Harp, is the other Hamden resident with his sights set on the seat. He works in New Haven for Renaissance Management, the real estate firm founded by the mayor’s late husband, Wendell Harp. The firm is now run by Mayor Harp’s son, Matthew Harp. Because he lives in Hamden but works in New Haven, Harp said, he has ties in both halves of the district. Harp moved to New Haven

from Minnesota in the late 1990s. He served as an insurance commissioner before entering private practice as an attorney. He was disbarred from the legal profession in the state in 1997. The state Supreme Court cited his failure to pay required fees and taxes, keep proper legal records, abide by the terms of his probation and cooperate with a disciplinary investigation.

I don’t think what happened 20 years ago has an awful lot to do with this race. MATTHEW HARP Director, Renaissance Management “I don’t think what happened 20 years ago has an awful lot to do with this race,” Harp said, explaining that he was having medical issues that interfered with his ability to keep up with the requirements of his legal license. Mayor Harp declined to issue an endorsement in the race but offered hearty praise for her brother-in-law, whom she called “one of the smartest people” she knows. Fellow candidate Charles Ashe, a Newhallville barber and business owner, said Harp’s past indiscretions should matter. “When voters make that important decision to send someone to office, they would certainly want to know about an integrity issue,” Ashe said. Ashe, a lifelong New Haven resident, said the community is reaching a crisis point with rising taxes, blighted property and increasingly dangerous streets. As a political outsider, he said he brings a fresh perspective. Robyn Porter, also a Newhallville resident, is the final Democratic candidate on the ballot. She works as an administrative assistant for the Communications Workers of America, the largest communications and media labor union in the country. She also sits on the Newhallville ward

committee in New Haven. Porter called herself a “single mom turned community activist,” touting her work with the Newhallville Community Resilience Team. She has been endorsed by a handful of union locals, including the local arm of the AFL-CIO, the Working Families Party and the Carpenters’ Union. A fifth Democrat, Jerome Dunbar of New Haven, is running as a writein candidate. There is one Republican name on the ballot: Leonard B. Caplan. Candidates described similar commitments — more state resources for municipalities, more economic development and jobs, less violence — and agreed that those issues affect Hamden and New Haven alike. The municipal border is arbitrary, they said. Porter said she would be interested in working with the General Assembly’s Achievement Gap Task Force to continue tackling education reform. She also said she will lobby for more funding under Payment in Lieu of Taxes, which reimburses cities for tax-exempt property. Harp listed safety as a majority priority following the recent spate of shootings, which took the lives of three young people. Rowe-Lewis also emphasized strategies to address gun violence and increase PILOT funding, saying she supports the changes Democratic leadership has proposed to the way cities are compensated for nontaxable land. Ashe also threw his weight behind PILOT reform but said he would take a deeper look at the state’s tax structure, sitting down with economists and business owners to devise legislation that would allow municipalities to balance their budgets without over-taxing their residents. Holder-Winfield vacated the House seat when he ascended to the state Senate in a February special election to replace Mayor Harp, who left Hartford in January to take the city’s helm. Holder-Winfield also declined to make an endorsement in Thursday’s election. Contact ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .

recyclerecyclerecyclerecycle ELENA MALLOY/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Students showcased their research in food and agriculture in a competition hosted by the Yale Sustainable Food Project.

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PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“Distrust and caution are the parents of security.” BENJAMIN FRANKLIN AMERICAN STATESMAN AND SCIENTIST

Caution in a post-Columbine world SCHOOL LOCKDOWNS 2013–2014 Yale’s Nov. 25 Lockdown 10:17am First Yale Alert message goes out reporting anonymous call about possible gunman on campus. No confirmations or sightings, shelter-in-place advised. NHPD and YPD investigating. Subject line: "Shelter in place."

Lockdowns at schools in the Northeast during the last year

Dec. 16, 2013 Harvard University (Cambridge, MA) Length of lockdown: 6 hours Cause: An undergraduate student sends anonymous emails to university administrators, police and the Harvard Crimson, indicating that he had placed bombs in campus buildings. Result: Police evacuate the named buildings and lock down the rest of campus to look for the bombs, which are never found. The suspect, a 20 year old undergraduate student, admits to devising the plan in order to avoid taking a final exam. April 3, 2014 University of Connecticut (Storrs, CT) Length of lockdown: 4 hours Cause: An anonymous call reports a bomb planted in the university's Gordon W. Tasker Admissions Building. Result: The admissions building is evacuated, all other buildings are told to shelter in place. Investigative teams and from university and Connecticut State Police fail to find a bomb.

11:02am "Confirmed report of person with gun on/near Old Campus. SHELTER IN PLACE. This is not a test." 11:12am SWAT teams first sighted on campus. 11:31am Police blockade Elm St. in front of Calhoun. 12:33pm NHPD reportedly detain one suspect. 1:02pm Police, University hold first press conference in Shubert Theater to publicly announce updates. 1:45pm Room-to-room searches begin. Students told to keep doors locked, refuse entry to anyone until proper ID is displayed. 1:54pm Humvee, SWAT teams seen outside Elm St. Calhoun gate. 3:10pm Lockdown lifted everywhere except Calhoun, Old Campus. 3:30pm Lockdown lifted everywhere except Old Campus. 3:42pm NHPD, YPD hold debrief press conference. Chiefs Esserman and Higgins discuss possibility of a hoax, insist on need for abundance for caution.

Oct. 8, 2013 Princeton University (Princeton, NJ) Length of lockdown: 2 hours Cause: Reports of gunfire in Nassau Hall, the oldest building on campus. Result: Authorities later determine that a chisel and hammer caused the noise that was mistaken for gunfire. Nov. 4, 2013 Central Connecticut State University (New Britain, CT) Length of lockdown: 3 hours Cause: Several people report seeing a man walk around campus with a gun and body armor. Result: Authorities arrested the suspect at the scene, later determining that he was wearing a Halloween costume.

March 27, 2014 Hillhouse High School, Wexler-Grant School (New Haven, CT) Length of lockdown: 1 hours Cause: Reports of nearby gunfire. Police arriving at the scene find a car struck by bullets. Result: Nearby public schools are put on lockdown as a safety measure, while police search for the shooter. The incident is believed to be an instance of urban, rather than pre-meditated violence. Dec. 3, 2013 University of New Haven (West Haven, CT) Length of lockdown: 5 hours Cause: A man is sighted in a nearby parking lot, heading toward campus with a rifle. Result: The suspect is arrested and later faces charges of illegal possession of an assault weapon and breach of peace. Authorities later find 2,700 rounds of ammunition and newspaper clippings from the Aurora, Colo. mass-shooting in the suspect's off-campus home.

Nov. 25, 2013 Yale University (New Haven, CT) Length of lockdown: 7 hours Cause: Local police receive a tip that a man is on his way to campus with a gun and plans to open fire. Result: No suspect is found, and authorities conclude the initial call to have been illegitimate.

Dec. 19, 2013 Hillhouse High School (New Haven, CT) Length of lockdown: 4 hours Cause: Local police receive a call similar to the one triggering the Nov. 25 lockdown at Yale, in which an anonymous caller threatened to shoot a teacher at the school. Result: No suspect is found, and authorities look for a connection to the Yale incident.

4:50pm Lockdown lifted everywhere. LOCKDOWN FROM PAGE 1 dents interviewed said they were relieved that a threat never materialized. Still, some began to wonder, were the Humvee, the SWAT teams, and the high-powered rifles all necessary? Did a threatening phone call require the allhands-on-deck response that overwhelmed the campus that day? “We are confident that the community takes it most seriously when an alert is issued,” Ronnell Higgins, chief of the Yale Police Department, said in an email. “The University doesn’t reach out unnecessarily.” To authorities at the University, city, state and national levels, there is no such thing as too much caution.

A STRING OF FALSE ALARMS

The Nov. 25 incident came on the heels of two similar ones that took place in the New England area. By the end of 2013, the big three Ivy League schools, Harvard, Yale and Princeton, had all undergone their own lockdowns. In each case, the scare turned out to be a false alarm. “Hello, I am in Nassau Hall … and I heard some noises. I’m not sure, probably nothing, but it sounded almost like shooting,” a female caller at Princeton told emergency dispatchers at 7:52 p.m. on Oct. 8. A transcript of the 911 call shows that the conversation never felt particularly urgent. The caller repeatedly recognized the possibility that the noises were benign, but her insistence on reporting suspicious noises speaks to a heightened sensitivity to situations in which campus safety may be threatened. Authorities eventually determined that a hammer and chisel, not an assault rifle, were to blame for the noises, but not before a two-hour lockdown brought in police crews — similar to those seen at Yale — to secure the area. Even so, Mike Lawlor, the criminal justice advisor to Gov. Dannel Malloy, said the Princeton caller’s instinct to reach out to police was appropriate given the risks of not doing so. Her quick reaction was indicative of the heightened societal sensitivity to mass violence in the wake of recent school shootings such as Sandy Hook, he added “Nowadays, people realize that you can’t wait because a lot of these shootings start and finish in a matter of minutes,” Lawlor said. “People lock down first and ask questions later when they get anything that sounds like a credible report of somebody with a gun. That’s why it’s happening more frequently.” Yale was just one of four universities in Connecticut to undergo campus-wide lockdowns in the five-month span between November 2013 and April 2014. The University of New Haven and

the University of Connecticut weathered incidents involving a confirmed gunman and anonymous bomb threats, respectively, while Central Connecticut State University locked down after a student in a Halloween costume triggered reports of a gunman on campus. At the University of New Haven, Police tracked down and arrested 22-year-old student William Dong after a woman reported seeing him retrieve a long gun from the trunk of his car and place it in the front passenger’s seat. Dong left the car to attend a class on campus, and the woman walked over to investigate. After confirming that there was, in fact, a loaded assault rifle in Dong’s car, she placed the only call police received that day about the threat. “If it wasn’t for [the caller], we wouldn’t have gotten any other calls,” said Ronald Quagliani, the associate vice president of public safety and administrative services at the University of New Haven. “I don’t know what would’ve happened. Thank God for her.” Quagliani said the university’s administration and public safety officials revamped their emergency preparedness model after the Sandy Hook shootings to engage students, faculty and staff on a deeper level. This preparedness, he added, was critical to the campus’s cooperation with law enforcement as they closed in on the source of the threat — which, unlike cases at the other Connecticut universities, turned out to be a real person armed with a loaded weapon. “Somebody was here on campus with a gun, and no one was injured or killed,” Quagliani said. “It’s helpful after the fact, too, because people say ‘I understand it happened in other places like Virginia Tech or Columbine. But it didn’t happen at the University of New Haven.’” Quagliani, who was once the chief of the West Haven Police Department, added that he believes the campus felt more at ease because police knew exactly for whom they were searching. Ending the lockdown without reaching a definite conclusion would have left some frustrated and others anxious, he said, as was the case in the wake of other incidents where no suspect has been identified. But even in the event of a hoax, authorities have been able to bring closure to affected university communities by tracking down perpetrators like Harvard sophomore Eldo Kim, who sent anonymous emails to the university’s police department, administrators and student newspaper on Dec. 16, indicating that bombs had been placed in campus buildings. Kim later confessed that he had sent the bomb threats to avoid taking a final exam that day. Janet Lindner, Yale’s vice pres-

ident for administration, added that the University found some sense of closure in its gunman scare by pursuing all leads, no matter how dubious. “When the anonymous call first came in, I think those of us deciding whether to send a message suspected the call was a hoax, but there’s no way we could treat it as such,” Lindner said. “Then, we received a call from an employee that someone with a gun was on Old Campus. This was a credible source.” The lockdown trend has also deeply affected New Haven Public Schools: Hillhouse High School and Wexler-Grant School have both faced threats to school safety in recent months. David Hartman, a spokesman for the NHPD, emphasized that these public school lockdowns do not reflect a problem specific to New Haven or even to Connecticut. “These incidents are happening all over the world,” Hartman said. “You have to be more cautious now.” Save for a single fatal shooting at Purdue University in January and the mass-stabbing that took place at a Pittsburgh-area high school earlier this month, none of the campus lockdowns from the past few months have ended with any casualties or injuries. Lawlor said he believes that people will continue to take the issue of school safety seriously. He resisted the notion that a string of false alarms might desensitize people to campus threats and prevent universities from staging full-blown responses to them. “That will become a much bigger problem when there’s nothing but false alarms,” Lawlor said. “But, for now, it’s not hard to think of a recent example where stuff started happening and there really was someone running around with a gun trying to shoot as many people as possible.”

A MEANINGFUL EXERCISE

Just three days before Yale ordered its campus to shelter in place, the Yale Alert system issued a perfunctory test email to the entire University community, which, at the time, was gearing up to host the 2013 Yale-Harvard football game. At the bottom of the message, a disclaimer stated that instructions and updates would be available on the University’s emergency management website were a real crisis to unfold. Those instructions and updates went live, just three days later, swapping out disclaimers for bolded warnings and clear orders. University President Peter Salovey said in retrospect he was thankful that Yale orchestrated such a robust response, as the University was able to analyze its performance without incurring any losses. “Even if this incident turned out to be a hoax, it was still a meaningful exercise,” Salovey

said in an email directly following the incident. “We are now even better prepared to address any emergency situation like this that may arise in the future.” When police failed to find a gunman at the end of the day, some, as Quagliani predicted, began to question the need for such an overwhelming response. In total, hundreds of officers from numerous agencies manned the streets of the Elm City. They were joined by at least four SWAT teams, arriving in tanks and carrying specialized equipment.

These incidents are happening all over the world. You have to be more cautious now. DAVID HARTMAN Spokesman, New Haven Police Department Hartman said that the large force on the ground allowed law enforcement to conduct a speedy search, given the number of buildings they had to canvass. He added that, following a bulletin from the Connecticut State Police, local departments across the state began to send their officers to New Haven without checking whether the influx was necessary. FBI Special Agent Dan Curtin also emphasized the importance of acting before questioning a situation. “Until you get into the mix, you’re not going to know what you have,” Curtin said. “You have to take it seriously.” As officers combed the streets below, students were kept in their rooms for hours on end, unable to access dining halls or any other facilities outside their suites. Claire’s Corner Copia and Atticus Bookstore Café were among the many local businesses to report significant financial losses, as their operations were forced to stay on hold throughout the daylong search. Hartman asserted that such problems become magnified in the wake of an episode in which no one was hurt. Still, he added that the only concern of the law enforcement units involved was to keep everyone safe. “We’ll never sacrifice manpower because we feel that having so many officers out there might scare people or inconvenience people,” Hartman said. “It’s a lot better to be scared or inconvenienced than victimized.” Though all of the law enforcement and university officials interviewed said that they were pleased with how the crisis was handled, they admit that there is still much to learn in its wake. In addition to tactical lessons that Hartman said the depart-

ment has since internalized, Yale Director of Emergency Management Maria Bouffard said that administrators went through several rounds of debriefing and internal review to go over the day’s successes and failures. This exercise resulted in the administration phasing a number of improvements into the Yale Alert communication model over the next few months, including an expansion of its reach to non-Yale New Haven residents. “We periodically engage in ‘table-top exercises’ to understand the chain of command and the necessary emergency responses,” Yale College Dean Mary Miller said immediately after the lockdown. “The lesson I learned is that administrators should conduct such drills regularly.” Such training initiatives were, in fact, conducted more regularly, at both the University and city levels. Collaborative efforts peaked in late March when the Federal Emergency Management Agency hosted a workshop at West Campus to drill response protocol in the face of large-scale lockdowns, as well as natural disasters and other crises. Many of the groups present for the Nov. 25 incident, such as the Connecticut State Police and FBI, were again in attendance at the workshop to undergo the training alongside YPD and NHPD officers. United States Marshal Joseph Faughnan said that, in a pre-Columbine world, the response at Yale would likely not have been so large. Still, he added, now that school officials understand the swiftness with which a shooting can unfold, the response was warranted. Lawlor said the nation’s collective experience following the shootings at Sandy Hook, Virginia Tech and Columbine High School, in particular, has forever shaped the way people approach the issue of school safety. He likened these shootings’ lingering impact to that of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, which he said “changed the way people went about their business.” The additional protocols and safety guards put in place, he added, have since succeeded in preventing any other major terrorist attacks from taking place on American soil. “The main goal is to prevent the attack from happening,” Lawlor said. “Sometimes you do that far in advance, sometimes you do that in real time, but I think people are responding appropriately in the case of false alarms.”

ERRING ON THE SIDE OF CAUTION

Because there is still a delicate balance to be struck between an abundance of caution and a numbing paranoia, authorities have yet to establish an

all-encompassing formula for approaching such situations. Take, for example, the episode that unfolded at the Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, where reports very much like the ones received at Yale, at CCSU and elsewhere, never triggered a full-scale lockdown. The school’s alert system notified students, but those in charge took little further action. “Certainly, we wanted to make people aware that someone [with a gun, reportedly,] had been sighted in the area,” said Gil Chorbajian, the school’s director of communications. “But we did not give the lockdown order at that time. It was more of a recommendation to stay in place until we had more information.” When asked what it would have taken to give that lockdown order, Chorbajian did not have an answer, largely due to the number of variables involved in such a decision. Ronald Stephens, the executive director of the National School Safety Center, said that a sense of balance is critical for schools to craft appropriate policy and emergency management plans that prioritize both safety and rationality. “It’s appropriate that schools find a balance between keeping their campuses safe without overreacting,” Stephens said. “It’s still very much about reason and good judgment.” Former Mayor John DeStefno Jr. agreed with the importance of maintaining a proper perspective and allowing it to inform, rather than distort, how to proceed after a crisis unfolds. Doing anything more or anything less would have been a misstep, he said. “It never analogized in my mind to something like a Sandy Hook,” DeStefano said. “You’re responding to the threat that was called in.” Those University officials and law enforcement agents involved in Yale’s November lockdown maintain that they did react appropriately, setting a standard for emergency preparedness that they hope will serve them well in the future. That standard, much like the shelter-in-place that they ordered, remains tied to an abundance of caution that they understand can be inconvenient, but are confident will save lives. Ultimately, campus safety will always be their top priority. “I believe administrators in higher education are — and should be — taking every threat or potential threat seriously,” Lindner said. “We’ve all lived through experiences that prompt us to react swiftly and not brush off cases as ‘hoaxes,’ so we use our best judgment to assess the situation in each case and err on the side of caution.” Contact MAREK RAMILO at marek.ramilo@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

WORLD

“Grace is not part of consciousness; it is the amount of light in our souls, not knowledge nor reason.” POPE FRANCIS

Pope Francis, huge crowd celebrate Easter BY FRANCES D’EMILIO ASSOCIATED PRESS VATICAN CITY — Marking Christianity’s most hopeful day, Pope Francis made an Easter Sunday plea for peace and dialogue in Ukraine and Syria, for an end to terrorist attacks against Christians in Nigeria and for more attention to the hungry and neediest close to home. Well over 150,000 tourists — Romans and pilgrims, young and old — turned out for the Mass that Francis celebrated at an altar set up under a canopy on the steps of St. Peter’s Basilica. So great were their numbers that they overflowed from sprawling St. Peter’s Square, which was bedecked with row after row of potted daffodils, sprays of blue hyacinths and bunches of white roses. Waving flags from the pope’s native Argentina as well as from Brazil, Mexico, Britain, Poland and many other countries, they also filled the broad boulevard leading from the square to the Tiber River. Easter is the culmination of Holy Week and marks Christian belief that Jesus rose from the dead after his crucifixion. Francis noted that this year the Catholic Church’s celebration of Easter coincided with that of Orthodox churches, which have many followers in Ukraine. Francis prayed that God would “enlighten and inspire the initiatives that promote peace in Ukraine, so that all those involved, with the support of the international community, will make every effort to prevent violence.” In eastern Ukraine, the holiday was marred by a deadly shooting Sunday fueled by tensions between pro-Russian supporters in the east and those loyal to an interim government in Kiev. The clash appeared to defy an international agreement reached last week in hopes of ending months

L’OSSERVATORE ROMANO/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pope Francis waves to the crowd from the balcony of St. Peter’s Basilica where he delivered the Urbi et Orbi at the end of the Easter Mass in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican on Sunday. of unrest. Francis also prayed that all sides in Syria will be moved to “boldly negotiate the peace long awaited and long overdue.” Syria has been wracked by a three-year civil war that has cost 150,000 lives and forced millions to flee the country. Christians make up about 5 percent of Syria’s population. In comments to mark Easter there, the Greek Orthodox patri-

arch vowed that Christians there “will not submit” to extremists who attack “our people and holy places.” Francis makes a pilgrimage to Jordan, the Palestinian territories and Israel next month, so on Easter he prayed that hopes sparked by the resumption of Mideast peace negotiations will be sustained. Thousands of pilgrims from around the world flocked to the

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celebrate Easter in the Holy Land, where Christian communities, as well as elsewhere in the Middle East, have been declining as the faithful flee regional turmoil. Francis also spoke of those suffering in Africa from an epidemic of deadly Ebola and urged a halt to “brutal terrorist attacks” in parts of Nigeria. Nigerians marked Easter with heightened security against a spreading Islamic uprising,

mourning the deaths of 75 bomb blast victims and fearful of the fate of 85 abducted schoolgirls. The homegrown terror network Boko Haram has claimed responsibility for last week’s rush-hour explosion in the capital, Abuja, and threatened more attacks. In Venezuela, there have been hopes Vatican mediation can help end the country’s violent political unrest, and Francis urged that “hearts be turned to

reconciliation and fraternal concord” there. But Francis’ Easter message also urged people to pay attention to the needy close to home. He said the “good news” of Easter’s joy means “leaving ourselves behind and encountering others, being close to those crushed by life’s troubles, sharing with the needy, standing at the side of the sick, elderly and the outcast.”


PAGE 8

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST Sunny, with a high near 62. Calm wind becoming south 5 to 8 mph in the afternoon.

TOMORROW

WEDNESDAY

High of 64, low of 46.

High of 62, low of 38.

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

ON CAMPUS MONDAY, APRIL 21 4:30 p.m. “Seeing is (Dis)Believing: Theatricality and Truth Claims in the Photographic Culture of Late Qing China.” Shengqing Wu, the associate professor of Asian languages and literatures at Wesleyan University, will be giving a talk as part of The Council on East Asian Studies China Colloquium. Luce Hall (34 Hillhouse Ave.), Rm. 203.

TUESDAY, APRIL 22 3:30 p.m. “Synapses Lost and Found: Developmental Critical Periods and Alzheimer’s Disease.” This Gruber Science Fellowship Lecture, sponsored by the Gruber Foundation, will be given by Carla Shatz. Dr. Shatz is one of the pioneers of early brain development. Free to the general public. Luce Hall (34 Hillhouse Ave.), Aud.

XKCD BY RANDALL MUNROE

7:00 p.m. CEAS China Film: “A Touch of Sin.” Yale International Relations Association’s Global Perspectives Society, the Whitney Humanities Center and Film at the Whitney is sponsoring a screening of “A Touch of Sin,” a film by Jia Zhangke (2013) 125 min. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Aud.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23 3:45 p.m. “Mental Illness at Yale: An Activist Performance.” With the growing conversation on mental health and illness at Yale comes an increasing number of students sharing their stories. “Mental Illness at Yale” is a public reading of students’ experiences during Bulldog Days. Submit stories at the project website. Cross Campus.

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

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Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Editor in Chief Julia Zorthian at (203) 4322418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

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Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 Campus drilling gp. 5 Repairs, as a lawn’s bare spot 9 On the higher side 14 Fictional lab assistant 15 Be certain 16 Garbo of the silver screen 17 Man-made organic pump 20 Take care of 21 Start of Caesar’s incredulous question 22 GI rations 23 1040 publisher: Abbr. 25 Prefix meaning “high” 27 Dish not made from the reptile it’s named for 34 Kissing pair 35 Out __ limb 36 Get a feeling about 37 Feed bag morsel 38 Like a soloist on a dark stage 41 Fill up on 42 Barn-raising sect 44 Electrified particle 45 Falls behind 46 Pseudonym 50 “The Lord of the Rings,” e.g. 51 Encouragement “on the back” 52 Bog fuel 55 Capone nemesis Eliot 58 Triangular Greek letter 62 Finger-pointing perjury 65 Sing like Bing 66 50+ org. 67 Company with bell ringers 68 Shell out 69 Zebras, to lions 70 Actor Hackman DOWN 1 Narrow inlets 2 Folklore monster 3 Carryall with handles 4 They give films stars

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5 Slalom item 6 It may be enough 7 “Just __”: Nike slogan 8 Try to whack, as a fly 9 “Gross!” 10 Logical proposition 11 Apple relative 12 To be, to Brigitte 13 “Peanuts” phooey 18 Tuning __ 19 Break in the action 24 Break in the action 26 Word with tube or pattern 27 Florida metropolis 28 Vision-related 29 Game with Skip cards 30 Mathematical comparison 31 Wee hr. 32 Grammarian’s concern 33 Lizards and snakes, for some 34 Do nothing 38 Use FedEx 39 Comical Costello 40 Clouseau’s rank: Abbr.

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

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43 Cowboy’s hat 45 Reason for an ump’s safe call 47 Emmy winner Fey 48 Arctic expanse 49 It means nothing to Juan 52 Inferiors of cpls. 53 Tombstone lawman 54 Burn-soothing substance

4/21/14

56 Mark from a surgical procedure 57 Having no doubt 59 Occurring as you watch it 60 Huckleberry Hound, for one 61 Songstress Murray 63 Conclusion 64 Plant gathering information

4 5 7 2 5 6 3

2 9 5 9 4 6 1 7 9 6 8 1 7 2 4 1 8 5 7 9 9 2


PAGE 10

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

THROUGH THE LENS

C

hildren of all ages flocked to the New Haven Green Sunday morning for the 5th annual Easter egg hunt hosted by Trinity Church. The scramble for the treat-filled eggs was over in minutes, but the experience left smiles on the kid’s faces for much longer. KATHRYN CRANDALL reports.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NBA San Antonio 90 Dallas 85

NBA Miami 99 Charlotte 88

SPORTS QUICK HITS

BLUE-WHITE GAME FOOTBALL The Yale football team played its annual spring showcase game this Saturday, as offense competed against the defense in the Blue-White game. The offense wore white jerseys, while the defense donned blue uniforms.

NHL Boston 4 Detroit 1

NHL Philadelphia 4 NY Rangers 2

MLB Washington 3 St. Louis 2

MONDAY “We were able to accomplish our objectives for the weekend and learn where we can improve to find more boat speed.” MATT O’DONOGHUE ’14 CREW

IVY STANDINGS UPDATE BASEBALL After a crazy weekend of conference action, the Bulldog baseball team still finds itself at the top of the Red Rolfe division; in fact, the Elis extended their lead by a game over Dartmouth. Columbia moved into a tie for first in the Lou Gehrig division with Penn.

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

Baseball walks off twice BASEBALL

Lax tops wolverines BY FREDERICK FRANK STAFF REPORTER The No. 11 men’s lacrosse team was unfazed playing in the largest college stadium in the United States, as the Bulldogs rolled over Michigan in the Big House for their fourth straight win.

MEN’S LACROSSE Yale’s attackmen led the charge offensively with 18 points, including six goals from Conrad Oberbeck ’15, four from Jeff Cimbalista ’16 and five assists from Brandon Mangan ’14. The Bulldogs (8–4, 3–2 Ivy) won by a score of 13–7 after four goals in the third quarter ensured the Wolverines (4–10, 1–3 ECAC) lost their sixth straight game. “We were definitely pleased with the performance we put forward this weekend,” defenseman Michael Quinn ’16 said. “Offen-

sively we did a great job of sharing the ball and [goaltender Eric Natale ’15] was a stalwart in cage for us. All around it was a satisfying effort. We can’t spend too much time thinking about it though, as we have Quinnipiac on Tuesday night and a big home game versus Harvard on Saturday afternoon that has big Ivy playoff implications.” On Saturday afternoon three Elis had career days, with Oberbeck, Cimbalista and Natale setting personal bests. Oberbeck notched two assists along with his six goals for eight points, while Cimbalista doubled his season total goal-haul from four to eight. In net, Natale, who has posted eight double-digit save games this season, stopped a career-high 14 shots. The junior has the best goals against average and save percentage in the Ivy SEE MEN’S LACROSSE PAGE B3

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The baseball team, playing at home, took three of four games against Harvard this weekend. BY GREG CAMERON STAFF REPORTER Led by several bouts of timely hitting and another dominant pitching performance from starter Chris Lanham ’16, the Yale baseball team beat Harvard 3–1 in a four-game series this weekend and increased its lead on Dartmouth in the Red Rolfe division to two games. The Bulldogs (17–19, 9–7 Ivy) dropped the first game of the weekend 6–2, but rallied to win game two 8–2 and then took both games on Sunday in walk-off fashion. “Like [head coach John Stuper] said, I don’t think there have ever been three wins where a team bonded together like we did this weekend,” said center fielder

Green Campbell ’15. “It was just incredible. All three wins, we came together and had outstanding performances from everyone.” Catcher Robert Baldwin ’15 ended the first game against Harvard (10–24, 5–11) on Sunday with a walk-off sacrifice fly to left that drove in first baseman Eric Hsieh ’15. Baldwin’s RBI in the eighth inning was the first of the contest, as Lanham and Harvard’s Sean Poppen both tossed eight-inning gems. Lanham’s eight-inning, two-hit shutout was merely the usual for him, as he has given up just one earned run in all of Ivy League play thus far. Lanham let Harvard’s batters put the ball in play and retired 24 of the 28 batters he faced despite striking out only five.

The Bulldogs also sent Sunday’s second game into extras after a late comeback. This time, Campbell took a turn at being the hero. With two outs in the bottom of the tenth, Campbell, who had previously pitched in the game, singled up the middle to drive in third baseman Derek Brown ’17 from third and win the final contest 7–6. Hsieh led the team offensively in Saturday’s games and finished 6-for-12 on the weekend, driving in three runs and scoring three more himself. “The last couple of weekends I’ve been struggling, so it was nice to finally get some hits, get on base and score some SEE BASEBALL PAGE B3

IHNA MANGUNDAYAO/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s lacrosse team won at the Big House on Saturday, beating Michigan 13–7.

Men’s Golf second at Yale Spring Invitational BY ASHTON WACKYM STAFF REPORTER A streak of three straight second-place finishes is an impressive record for the Bulldog men’s golf program, but being beaten out by Harvard the past two weekends has not sat well with the team.

GOLF

MARIA ZEPEDA/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s golf team placed second at home at the Yale Spring Invitational, falling by 13 strokes to Harvard.

STAT OF THE DAY 2

At the annual Yale Spring Invitational, the Yale men’s golf team took second place with a score of 586, falling 13 strokes shy of Harvard’s title-taking score of 573. In the one-day tournament, the conditions were atypical and Harvard played consistently to top a field that included Dartmouth, Brown, Hartford, Fordham, Central Connecticut State University, Wagner, UMassLowell and Holy Cross. “In a one-day tournament, you either have it or you don’t,” Will Davenport ’15 said. “Harvard had it and we didn’t. We played poorly in the morning and they played well, and 36 holes is not enough time to make up a deficit like that.” Davenport finished 11th at the end of competition, with a total

score of 148 split between a first round of 77 and a second round of 71. Just one stroke ahead of Davenport was Jonathan Lai ’17, who ended in a tie for ninth with a score breakdown of 75 in the first round and 72 in the second round. Joe Willis ’16, however, was the Elis’ top performer in the invitational.

In a one-day tournament, you either have it or you don’t. WILL DAVENPORT ’15 Men’s golf team Willis shot a 74 and 69 in the two rounds, respectively, for a total score of 143 — enough to put him in a tie for third place. Willis was the only Bulldog to finish in the top five. Willis said that Harvard’s biggest strength was consistency. He added that four out of Harvard’s starting five players finished in the top five as individuals. SEE GOLF PAGE B3

NUMBER OF EXTRA-INNING WALK-OFF WINS FOR THE YALE BASEBALL TEAM ON SUNDAY. The Elis won in the eighth inning in the first game of a doubleheader against Harvard before winning in the 10th in the second game.


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

“The score never interested me, only the game.” MAE WEST AMERICAN ACTRESS

Crew grabs three titles

MEN’S LACROSSE IVY 1

CREW FROM PAGE B4

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Cornell

4

1

0.800

10

3

0.769

Harvard

4

1

0.800

8

5

0.615

seconds off their morning time. The second varsity had the widest margin of victory, finishing the 2000-meter course in 5:40.51, 16 seconds faster than MIT.

3

Penn

4

2

0.667

7

3

0.700

4

Yale

3

2

0.600

8

3

0.727

5

Princeton

2

3

0.400

7

5

0.583

All boats came away with a better understanding of what we need to improve to get faster.

6

Brown

1

4

0.200

6

6

0.500

7

Dartmouth

0

5

0.000

1

9

0.100

WOMEN’S LACROSSE IVY

MADDIE LIPS ’14 Captain, Women’s crew team The Eli women saw tough competition from the Tigers on Princeton’s home turf. Princeton retained the Eisenberg Cup this weekend after its first varsity beat Yale’s boat by three seconds. “We had a great chance to see some tight racing this weekend,” said women’s captain Maddie Lips ’14. “Our fours did an excellent job of racing hard.” The varsity four clinched a one-second victory over Princeton, with rowers Emily Patton ’17, Olivia Maclean ’17, Kate O’Brien ’17 and Schuyler Ritchie ’17 and coxswain Laura Grimbergen ’15. Princeton saw wide margins of victory over Yale’s second and third eights, beating the boats by eight and 18 seconds, respec-

JENNIFER LU/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Princeton

6

1

0.857

10

4

0.714

2

Penn

4

1

0.800

8

4

0.667

3

Harvard

4

2

0.667

9

5

0.643

Cornell

4

2

0.667

7

7

0.500

Yale

2

4

0.333

8

6

0.571

Brown

2

4

0.333

9

5

0.643

Dartmouth

2

4

0.333

5

8

0.385

Columbia

0

6

0.000

3

9

0.250

5

The men’s crew teams will be on the road next weekend. tively. “All boats came away with a better understanding of what we need to improve to get faster as we work towards the Ivy Championships,” Lips said. The women will race Harvard at home and travel to Brown next week, while the

heavyweight men will face Cornell and Princeton at Princeton. The lightweight men will race the Crimson and the Tigers at Harvard.

8

BASEBALL LOU GEHRIG

Contact ERICA PANDEY at erica.pandey@yale.edu .

Q&A FROM PAGE B4

Q

You played for Bobby Valentine’s AllAmerican team during your sophomore summer in high school. What was that experience like? What is Bobby like?

A

That was a pretty incredible summer. I played with kids who are playing professional baseball right now, kids who are playing college baseball — I’ve actually played a few of them. Playing under Bobby was pretty incredible. It was very educational, and you learn a lot from him. He’s been around the game for so long, he’s a good person to talk to and learn from.

second on the team in batting QYou’re average. What has been the key to your success this season?

A

I just try to stay consistent and hit the ball hard. Coming into the season, I was around the older guys as much as I could, and they all just say you can’t let the peaks and the troughs of the season get to you too much. You just try to hit the ball hard, and the hits will fall. I definitely try to keep a pretty even-keeled approach to the season.

Q

You have only nine strikeouts all season, by far the fewest among anybody on the team with as many at-bats as you’ve had. Is that part of your approach at the plate?

A

Yeah, when I get down to two strikes I try my best just to fight. With two strikes, you have to shorten up and try to take a little bit different approach to put the ball in play and challenge the defense. I try my best not to go down without giving the defense a shot to mess up. If I can hit it, I might as well hit it.

team had two walk-off wins [on QThe Sunday], and you had a weekend earlier in the season where you had two walkoffs. Is that a team mentality? How has the team been able to have so much success?

A

I’ve never had as many walk-offs in a season, and that’s just us. We haven’t given up all season. We’ve come back from deficits pretty late in the game. That’s just our team character. We definitely don’t give in, and we fight, and we make things happen. [Yesterday], the second game was 10 innings, and we had guys in scoring position and chances to win the game earlier, but it didn’t work

IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Penn

13

3

0.812

22

14

0611

Columbia

13

3

0.812

21

15

0.583

3

Princeton

7

9

0.438

12

22

0.353

4

Cornell

6

10

0.375

15

19

0.441

RED ROLFE SCHOOL

W

IVY L %

OVERALL W L %

1

Slenker shares secrets

OVERALL

out. Finally, Green [Campbell ’15] today was the guy to do it. It’s just a testament to how hard we play.

1

Yale

9

7

0.562

17

19

0.472

2

Dartmouth

7

9

0.438

12

19

0.387

just one weekend left in the seaQWith son, how confident are you in your

3

Harvard

5

11

0.312

10

24

0.294

4

Brown

4

12

0.250

10

20

0.333

team and your team’s ability to win the Red Rolfe division?

A

If we just take the right approach, we play hard and [how] we fought hard today, I think that if we take that same approach for next weekend we’ll be fine. I have a lot of confidence in everyone on the team, and if you look at the box scores everyone did something and contributed, so I have a lot of confidence that we can get the job done.

you have any long-term goals for QDo your entire Yale career?

SOFTBALL NORTH

IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Harvard

13

0

1.000

27

11

0.711

2

Dartmouth

15

1

0.938

26

14

0.650

3

Yale

1

15

0.062

5

32

0.135

4

Brown

1

15

0.062

3

31

0.088

SOUTH SCHOOL

W

IVY L %

OVERALL W L %

A

I just want to continue to hit. As of right now, I’m looking towards next weekend. I think the group of guys we have going forward, even after this year, is a very strong group of guys. I’m very excited to see what we can do.

1

Penn

10

5

0.667

15

17

0.469

2

Columbia

8

8

0.500

21

19

0.525

3

Princeton

7

9

0.438

15

24

0.385

Contact GRANT BRONSDON at grant.bronsdon@yale.edu .

4

Cornell

6

8

0.429

15

23

0.395

Harvard stays unbeaten versus Ivy foes SOFTBALL FROM PAGE B4 in the top of the second inning. Again, Yale looked to answer, and third baseman Hannah Brennan ’15 led off the home half of the inning with a single. But three outs quickly followed. Pitcher Chelsey Dunham ’14 relieved Efflandt after the second inning and shut down the Crimson line-up. Neither team managed much offense after the second inning, with Harvard picking up three more hits and the Bulldogs adding two more singles. Dunham also started the second game on Saturday afternoon, and the Harvard hitters adjusted by the third inning. The scoring started in the top of that inning for the Crimson when right fielder Andrea Del Conte bunted her way on base. A single, double and two stolen bases gave Harvard a tworun lead. Yale was able to cut the deficit in half in the bottom of the third inning when Do scored on a sacrifice fly following a lead-off double. The Bulldogs tied the game in the bottom of the fifth inning thanks to two errors by the Crimson defense. Harvard, however, struck back in the sixth inning, scoring three runs off a Del Conte home run. The Crimson tallied one more run for insurance in its final at-bat following a string of three singles. The Elis had runners on first and second base in the bottom of the inning following singles from first baseman Lauren Delgadillo ’16, her third hit of the game, and catcher Sarah Onorato ’15. The Bulldogs, however, were unable to

capitalize and fell short of a win, falling 6–2. Yale had a rough third game of the series on Sunday afternoon, allowing 11 runs, of which only five were earned. The two teams were tied at 0–0 through three innings, but four errors doomed the Elis over the next two innings. Harvard scored its first run in the top of the fourth inning before the floodgates opened, scoring five unearned runs in the fifth. The Crimson loaded the bases in the sixth inning, but Yale escaped, allowing only one run. Harvard topped off its offensive display with four runs in the last inning. Although the game seemed to be out of reach, the Bulldogs refused to go down without a fight.

Harvard is a good hitting team and our pitchers kept them off balance. LAINA DO ’17 Shortstop, Softball team The Elis began their last at-bat with two walks, putting a runner in scoring position with no outs. Balta doubled in one run before Do hit a run-scoring single. Delgadillo added another run to the board by hitting a sacrifice fly that scored Balta. Yale, however, was unable to plate any more runs, resulting in the final score of 11–3. The last game of the series was tightly contested, with Harvard eventually coming out on top fol-

lowing a six run fourth inning. The Crimson struck first, as was the trend throughout the series, scoring one run in the second inning. Yale responded with a run in the home half of the inning when Brennan, who doubled to start the frame and advanced to third on a sacrifice, stole home on a double steal. Brennan fueled the offense in the third inning, powering the Bulldogs to a three-run lead following her home run. Harvard, however, received a three-run home run of its own in the top of the fourth, tying the game at four. The Crimson then built a lead with three more runs in the inning. An error early in the inning gave Harvard an extra out, and four of the six runs scored in the fourth were unearned. The Elis managed another run in the bottom half of the inning, but the Bulldogs could not close the gap any further over the last three innings, eventually falling 7–5. “Our pitchers held off a very strong Harvard offense and our hitters have been aggressive at the plate,” Brennan said. “We kept our energy up throughout all four games, especially in the tight spots when we really needed it. We have all the pieces; we just need to put them all together in a solid seven-inning stretch.” Yale has now lost ten straight games, and the team will look to regroup in a Wednesday double header against Rhode Island beginning at 3 p.m. Contact ASHLEY WU at ashley.e.wu@yale.edu .

BRIANNA LOO/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The softball team will try to snap a 10-game losing streak at Rhode Island on Wednesday.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE B3

SPORTS

“Golf is so popular simply because it is the best game in the world at which to be bad.” A.A. MILNE ENGLISH AUTHOR

Baseball bests Harvard BASEBALL FROM PAGE B1 runs,” Hsieh said. Prior to the weekend’s contests, head coach John Stuper made the decision to switch around the pitching rotation and send left-hander David Hickey ’14 to the mound for the first game instead of Chasen Ford ’17, who pitched the second game on Saturday. Hickey pitched all seven frames, but he allowed 10 hits and six runs to a strong Crimson offense. The Bulldogs could only supply him with two runs in the first inning, driven in by Baldwin and Hsieh, and they recorded just one hit in the last six. In the day’s second game, the Bulldogs provided the offense that Hickey could have used. They scored two in the first six innings and eventually opened the game up in the seventh with four runs on three singles and an error. Yale tacked on another two in the eighth inning for insurance. The combination of Ford and reliever Chris Moates ’16 kept Harvard’s offense in check throughout the nine frames. The two pitchers allowed a run apiece, each getting out of several jams, as Ford pitched five for the win and Moates tossed the latter four. The two high-scoring offenses came to an abrupt halt at the start of the next day when aces Lanham and Poppen stepped onto the mound. Harvard gave Lanham a scare early, however, as the Crimson’s third hitter got on base with an infield single and eventually reached second. The next batter blooped a ball over Hanson’s head to left, but left fielder Joe Lubanski ’15 ran in to make a diving catch to end the inning and

keep Harvard scoreless. Lanham then proceeded to retire the next 15 Harvard players to step up to the plate. He finally allowed another single in the seventh, but got out of the inning safely and pitched another clean frame in the eighth. “I can only remember one ball that was hit hard all day,” Hsieh said. “He’s been unbelievable, attacking the zone low and having a lot of confidence in all of his pitches.”

I don’t think there have ever been three wins where a team bonded together like we did this weekend. GREEN CAMPBELL ’15 Outfielder, Baseball team

Yale’s offense was also scoreless through seven despite tallying six hits in that time frame and loading the bases in the third. In the eighth, Hsieh led off with a single and eventually reached third on an out and a wild pitch. Harvard walked the next two batters to load the bases, and Baldwin made them pay for deciding to pitch to him. His deep sacrifice fly to left gave Harvard’s left fielder no chance to throw out Hsieh at home. The two offenses recovered in the second game of the day, as the Bulldogs put up three runs in the second, and Harvard matched them with the same tally against pitcher Michael Coleman ’14 in the third. Harvard added another three in the sixth, with two being

charged to Coleman and the third credited to Campbell, who came in to pitch midway through the inning. Campbell held the Crimson scoreless for the rest of his outing. The Elis were six outs away from defeat in the eighth when second baseman Nate Adams ’16 tripled to score two, and then third baseman Tom O’Neill ’16 doubled down the right field line to score Adams and tie the game at six. It took Yale two more innings to land the knockout punch. On a 2–2 count with the bases loaded, Campbell’s hard single up the middle scored Brown and handed the Bulldogs their second walkoff win of the day. “I couldn’t feel my right arm, just from pitching so much,” Campbell said. “I was just thinking, do whatever you can to get your bottom hand to this baseball, because my top hand was off … it was an incredible feeling.” Playing at the same time in Providence, Dartmouth split its series with the Brown Bears, who are 4–4 in conference under the leadership of a new head coach. The Bulldogs have a twogame advantage on the Big Green heading into the final weekend of Ivy League play. “We understand that we have a lot of baseball left to play and a lot of business to take care of,” Campbell said. “We’re just looking at this weekend like any other weekend, expecting to get a fourgame sweep. We’ll see what happens at the end of the day, but we’re feeling great as a team right now.” The Bulldogs will play a homeand-home series with Brown next weekend. Contact GREG CAMERON at greg.cameron@yale.edu .

Golf second at home

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The baseball team added another game to its advantage in the Red Rolfe division this weekend.

Lax wins in Big House MEN’S LACROSSE FROM PAGE B1 League. Oberbeck opened the scoring on a man-advantage with three minutes left in the opening quarter. The Bulldog’s man-up unit has been on fire in the last four games, connecting on 10 of 18 opportunities. Mangan cited patience and better shot selection for the Elis’s uptick in conversions in the latter half of the season. Yale scored off the ensuing face-off to double its advantage after all three of the Elis’ Tewaaraton Award Watch list nominees touched the ball. Faceoff specialist Dylan Levings ’14 controlled the draw and picked up the ground ball, giving it straight back to the Bulldog’s offense. Oberbeck found the rock and dished it to Mangan, who broke the back of the net for Yale’s second tally inside 15 seconds. Natale helped keep Michigan at bay in the first quarter with four saves and let the Elis head into the break up 2–0. The second quarter featured more open play from both teams. Yale broke through just 13 seconds into the period, with Levings winning the face-off, and then Mangan finding Cimbalista for his first goal of the day. Levings, who controlled 15 of 23 restarts, has taken over the second half of the season and ranks second in the Ivy League with a .588 winning percentage. Michigan got on the board three minutes later, but Yale rattled off

three straight goals to expand the lead to 6–1. The Bulldogs had 13 shots in the quarter, but the Wolverines climbed back into the game with two goals before the halftime whistle. Michigan attackman Ian King scored his 27th goal of the season in the frame, breaking a program record set back in 2012. The third quarter was the backbreaker for Michigan. Oberbeck had a hat trick within seven minutes, while Natale had five saves and Levings went 4-for-6 from the face-off dot. At the end of 45 minutes of lacrosse, Yale led 10–4 and the Wolverines seemed to have no answer to the Bulldogs’s sparkling offense or stifling defense. “It was definitely nice to put up a lot of early goals in this game,” midfielder Colin Flaherty ’15 said. “As an offense, we focused on keeping out foot on the pedal to ensure there was no comeback.” The two teams traded goals in the final quarter, with each side scoring thrice. Flaherty scored for the third straight game, while Cimbalista had his fourth goal of the game. Attackman J.W. McGovern ’16 finished the scoring at 13 with 1:33 remaining shortly after Michigan tallied its final goal on one of the team’s 17 shots in the quarter. “It was awesome that a lot of guys were able to get quality playing time in an environment like that,” Mangan said. “On offense, we started to play a little more free and lose and when

that happens Jeff [Cimbalista] gels really well with me and Conrad.” The Bulldogs round out their non-conference schedule this Tuesday against local rival Quinnipiac before ending the season with a crucial matchup with conference leader Harvard next Saturday. While Yale clinched a berth in the Ivy League tournament, a win on home turf against the Crimson could vault the Elis into second place. Should No. 12 Cornell lose to No. 14 Princeton Saturday afternoon, there could be a four-way tie for the Ivy League regular season title with the Big Red, Crimson, No. 10 Quakers and the Bulldogs locked at 4-2 in the conference. However, this scenario would still not see Yale host the league tournament. “Every game is extremely important and we are not worried about Harvard right now,” Mangan said. “Quinnipiac comes first.” The Bulldogs take on the Bobcats at Reese Stadium this Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. Contact FREDERICK FRANK at frederick.frank@yale.edu .

YALE 13, MICHIGAN 7 YALE

2

4

4

3

13

MICH.

0

3

1

3

7

MARIA ZEPEDA/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s golf team will conclude its season this weekend at the Ivy League Championship. GOLF FROM PAGE B1 Just as consistency was the key to Harvard’s success, Willis also attributed his performance to consistent play throughout both rounds. “For me, I didn’t putt very well, but I hit the ball pretty solid all day,” Willis said. “I hit a lot of fairways and greens and played the par threes well, which are some of the tougher holes out there.” Playing consistently is easy when the course lies as expected — but according to members of the team, it’s the uncontrollable that tests golfers’ abilities to perform under all conditions. At the Spring Invitational, there were strong winds typical of the spring season, however, the course was much faster than usual. “The course was playing uncharacteristically firm and fast for this time of year,” Sean Gaudette ’14 said. “That,

along with the strong wind, made for very difficult conditions. This was reflected in the scoring in that there were only three rounds under par all day.” With two straight finishes behind the Crimson, the Bulldogs said they have a bitter taste in their mouths. In preparation for the Ivy League Championships next week, the Bulldogs are getting ready to take their last shot at the Crimson this season. “Losing to Harvard back-to-back weeks doesn’t sit well with us,” Davenport said. “We are really looking forward to the Ivy League championships this weekend after back to back disappointing weeks.” The Elis will tee off on April 25 at the Baltusrol Golf Club in Springfield, N.J. for the three-day Ivy tournament. Contact ASHTON WACKYM at ashton.wackym@yale.edu .

IHNA MANGUNDAYAO/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s lacrosse team will take on Quinnipiac at home on Tuesday.


PAGE B4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

“You’ve got to get to the stage in life where going for it is more important than winning or losing.” ARTHUR ASHE AMERICAN TENNIS PLAYER

Men’s crew strong on the weekend

JENNIFER LU/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s crew squads won their regattas this weekend, while the women’s team fell to Princeton. BY ERICA PANDEY CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The Yale heavyweight crew team beat out Columbia and Penn this weekend, while the lightweights swept MIT and Dartmouth and the women fell to Princeton.

CREW The heavyweight team won its fifth consecutive Blackwell Cup

against the Lions and Quakers on the Housatonic with the first and third varsity boats delivering victories. The lightweight team participated in two home races on Saturday, sweeping Dartmouth in the morning for the Durand Cup and MIT in the late afternoon for the Joy Cup. The No. 11 Yale women traveled to No. 7 Princeton, where the three eights and the second four saw their first losses of the season. The varsity four remains undefeated.

“We kept icy cool through the first 1000 meters, and we asserted our dominance with a ruthless rhythm in the second 1000 meters to win comfortably.” said heavyweight Ollie Wynne-Griffith ’17. Wynne-Griffith raced in Yale’s first varsity eight, which finished in 5:23.7 minutes, beating Columbia by just over five seconds. The first boat remains undefeated this season, while the second and third eights have lost one race each. When it comes to the

first boat’s performance, “the devil is in the details,” WynneGriffith said. “And this week we will continue to nail those details.” he added. The second varsity race was the tightest of the day. The Quakers secured the win, and the Lions came in second place, just one second behind. The Bulldogs finished three seconds behind Penn in 5:32.8 minutes. The Yale third varsity pulled a 5:37.9 and had the widest margins

Slenker ’17 talks team

of victory of the day. The lightweight team shared the Gilder Boathouse with the Yale heavyweights on Saturday. “We had great performances in both races,” said lightweight captain Matt O’Donoghue ’14. “We were able to accomplish our objectives for the weekend and learn where we can improve to find more boat speed.” O’Donoghue added that the weekend’s races presented an opportunity to practice for the

schedule of the Eastern Sprints, during which the team will again race twice in a day. The lightweights’ first varsity finished against Dartmouth in 5:31.16 minutes. The second varsity and first freshman boats faced off against Dartmouth’s second varsity and beat the Big Green by 11 and five seconds, respectively. Against the Engineers, the first varsity pulled a 5:31.31, only 0.15 SEE CREW PAGE B2

Softball drops tenth straight BY ASHLEY WU STAFF REPORTER The softball team had a tough weekend against undefeated Harvard, falling in a four-game sweep at the hands of its northern rivals.

SOFTBALL Yale (5–32, 1–15 Ivy) had plenty of chances to become the first Ancient Eight team to defeat the Crimson (27–11, 13–0 Ivy) this season, but each opportunity slipped through the squad’s hands as the Bulldogs lost 5–0, 6–2, 11–3 and 7–5 this past weekend. “We fought hard every game this weekend,” shortstop Laina Do ’17 said. “Harvard is a good hitting team and our pitchers kept them off balance. We need to continue to swing the bat and stay relaxed in tough situations. If we put everything together, we will come out on top.” The first game saw a dominant performance from Harvard ace Laura Ric-

ciardone, who pitched a complete game four-hitter. She received all the support she needed from her offense in the first two innings, as the Crimson notched two runs in the first and three in the second. Of the five runs scored by Harvard, only three were earned as the Elis recorded two errors in the first two innings. The game started off on the wrong foot for Yale when pitcher Lindsay Efflandt ’17 walked Harvard’s first batter. Two singles followed to load the bases for the Crimson before an error allowed two to score. The Bulldogs looked to respond in the bottom of the first inning. Following a leadoff single from captain and center fielder Tori Balta ’14 and a sacrifice bunt, Balta stood in scoring position with only one out. The Elis, however, were unable to push the run across, trailing 2–0 after one inning of play. Three hits and a walk allowed Harvard to add three runs to the scoreboard SEE SOFTBALL PAGE B2

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Infielder Richard Slenker ’17 (No. 9) is currently second on the men’s baseball team in hitting with a 0.326 average. BY GRANT BRONSDON STAFF REPORTER The Yale baseball team (17—19, 9—7 Ivy) finds itself in prime position to win the Red Rolfe division for the first time since 1995 — and a big part of that has been third baseman Richard Slenker ’17. The freshman is second on the team with a 0.326 batting average and third in on-base percentage (0.402) and slugging percentage (0.384). The News sat down with Slenker to ask about his season and the team’s success.

has the transition to college QHow baseball been?

more precise, and you have to execute.

A

the biggest difference QWhat’s between playing in high school and

It’s an adjustment, it’s definitely an adjustment. The game’s a lot quicker and the pitching’s obviously a lot better. In terms of batting, you really have to take advantage of pitchers’ mistakes, not only the situation, and as [assistant] coach [Tucker] Frawley really points out, you have to understand a lot more of what pitches you’re going to face and what you’re going to get rather than what you want to get. It’s a much cleaner game. Everything you do has to be much

playing in college?

A

It’s the speed of the game, definitely. And the caliber of players is on a different level. Everyone you face is going to be good. I think that’s definitely the biggest difference. BRIANNA LOO/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

SEE Q&A PAGE B2

The softball team was swept by Harvard this weekend, dropping all four games in New Haven.

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