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T H E O L D E ST C O L L E G E DA I LY · FO U N D E D 1 8 7 8

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2013 · VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 39 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY CLOUDY

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CROSS CAMPUS Skull and bones. Remains of a human skeleton emerged from the Lincoln Oak on the New Haven Green during a storm in October of last year. The New Haven Museum has announced it has accumulated enough evidence to present the secrets of the skull and bone fragments to the public at a panel on Halloween. Whether the secret society has any ties to the buried corpse remains to be revealed. Skull and bowls? In a chilling coincidence, Scott Strobel — the woodworker behind Yale Bowls — also announced this weekend that he had completed a wooden bowl carved from the same New Haven Green Lincoln Oak where the skeleton was unearthed. The oak was originally planted on the 100th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s death and was 103 years old when it fell. “Tangled in the tree’s roots was the skeleton buried during the colonial period. It’s the perfect bowl for Halloween candy!” Yale Bowls announced morbidly on its Facebook page. PSet fame. Sarah Hughes ’09, an Olympic gold medalist figure skater, was once a humble GG100a: Natural Disasters student. In a 2006 interview with Sports Illustrated, she expressed her disappointment that the course “was supposed to be a good class… But since it was a geology and geophysics class, it turned out to be one of the most difficult ones because there was calculus and physics and chemistry every week in the homework.” Her participation in the class did not go unnoticed to teaching staff who wrote a problem on the course’s sixth problem set with her as a subject. But the problem-set writers also threw in the note that “She loved the class of course… well, actually… no she didn’t but that’s another story.” Hitchcocktails. Drinks pair nicely with chocolate, cheese and apparently cinema. The Bow Tie theater chain — including the New Haven Criterion — is hosting a Movies & Mimosas series, showing classic films and even more classic cocktails. The New Haven branch has screenings scheduled for Saturdays and Sundays, with the next two movies being The Birds (1963) and Ghostbusters (1984). No name, no fame. Writers can now have their work read without ever receiving credit. Yet another publication has sprung up on the campus’s crowded writing scene. Orca released its first set of works this weekend, with nine pieces of poetry and prose. Students were encouraged to submit entirely anonymously to the magazine, which might encourage either artistic bravado or a shameless flood of low-quality work. THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1963. Kingman Brewster is elected 17th president of Yale. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE goydn.com/xcampus

FOOTBALL BULLDOGS BUCKLE TO RAMS

VITA ET VERITAS

MAYORAL RACE

CONSERVATIVE

Yale’s first pro-life conference attracts interfaith speakers

HARP AND ELICKER PREPARE FOR THE FINAL PUSH

Buckley conference brings Wyoming Senator to campus

PAGE B1 SPORTS

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 5 NEWS

Panorama raises $4 million

S U S TA I NA B I L I T Y

Beinecke, Fifty years later

ZUCKERBERG AMONG INVESTORS IN YALE STARTUP BY ADRIAN RODRIGUES STAFF REPORTER Panorama Education, a technology startup founded by several recent Yale graduates, is gaining attention in Silicon Valley. On Monday, the company announced that it has raised $4 million in funding from investors including Mark Zuckerberg’s foundation, Startup:Education, as well as SoftTech VC, Google Ventures, YCombinator and Ashton Kutcher’s A-Grade Investments. Founded in 2012 by Aaron Feuer ’13, Xan

F

ifty years after its founding, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library has turned into one of the world’s premier strongholds of literature, history and research. But at the same time, it is aiming to move into the future, both in the scope of its collections and the accessibility of its resources. VIVIAN WANG reports.

Their company is an exciting example of the way technology can help teachers, parents and students make their voices heard. YDN

BY VIVIAN WANG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Nested in the heart of campus, a box-shaped building rises out of a granite plaza, strangely out of place among the neo-classical grandeur of Commons and the Gothic elegance of the Yale Law School. It is the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library,

half a century old and home to books nearly half a millennium old. In honor of its 50th anniversary, the library has hosted various events this year — from a reading by the Poet Laureate of the United States to a conference about the use of literary archives in teaching and research — culminating in a gala concert this past Saturday at Sprague Hall. The concert, which

MARK ZUCKERBERG Founder, Startup:Education

featured Yale musicians performing works inspired by Beinecke’s collections, drew both current and former Beinecke employees as well as members of the Beinecke family, who funded the opening of the library in 1963. Over the last fifty years, Beinecke

Tanner ’13 and David Carel ’13, Panorama Education uses data analytics and feedback surveys in over 4,000 K-12 schools to address issues such as bullying prevention, school safety and student academic

SEE BEINECKE PAGE6

SEE PANORAMAPAGE6

Man shot near Stop & Shop BY MAREK RAMILO STAFF REPORTER On a Sunday morning walk, 24-year-old New Haven resident J.R. Glasper passed Augusta Lewis Troup School to find that a late-night shooting had left bullet holes in the school’s windows. The victim of the early Sunday morning shooting survived, preventing the city’s 2013 homicide total from jumping to 16.

At 2:06 a.m., the New Haven Police Department dispatched officers to Platt St. in response to several reports of shots fired and a man down. The victim, 34-year-old Leroy White, survived the incident and was transported to Yale-New Haven Hospital from the scene. White is in stable condition and spoke with the NHPD and hospital staff, according to a NHPD press release. The press release also said that the police have not yet

Unions pack elections punch WARD 19 TO GO UNCONTESTED, BUT UNION AFFILIATIONS CONTINUE TO DIVIDE ELECTIONS BY POOJA SALHOTRA STAFF REPORTER Maureen Gardner, a member of Yale’s Local 34 Union and a former candidate in the Ward 19 aldermanic race, dropped her bid for the seat on Thursday, leaving a non-union backed Mike Stratton unopposed in the upcoming general election. Although union affiliation is no longer a factor in the uncontested Ward 19 election, it remains a point of contention among city leaders who disagree about whether the current majority of union-backed alderman on the Board represents the city’s interests. In both the mayoral race — in which union-backed Toni Harp ARC ’78 faces non-union affiliated Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM

announced an official suspect, but will release an update of the investigation on Monday. “Officers arrived quickly and found [the victim]. He’d suffered several gunshot wounds and was outside of 20 Platt Street,” department spokesman David Hartman said in the release. The shooting took place somewhere between Augusta Lewis Troup School and a house at 20 Platt St., which are on

opposite sides of Platt St. near a side entrance of the school. The scene of the shooting is only 10 blocks from Old Campus, near the shopping center on the corner of Whalley Ave. and Orchard St. The Stop & Shop Supermarket — a five-minute walk from the shooting — is a popular location for University students to buy groceries. Though it appears that the shooting took place directly in front of the house, the victim

was found further up Platt St. near its intersection with Edgewood Ave. In addition to the multiple bullet wounds found in the victim’s body by emergency services at the scene of the crime, bullet holes were found on both sides of Platt St. — both on the wood paneling next to a house’s front door and also on the ground-level windows at Augusta Lewis Troup’s cafeteria SEE SHOOTING PAGE 4

Students clamor for Stephen Colbert BY LARRY MILSTEIN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

’10 — and the aldermanic races that pit union and non-union affiliates against each other, union affiliations are becoming a salient factor in candidates’ appeal. The Board’s union powerhouse dates from 2011, when a unionorganized coalition sought to improve the representation of New Haven residents by bringing new voices to an administration they perceived as undemocratic. In the September 2011 primaries, candidates supported by Yale’s UNITE HERE Local 34 and 35 unions swept 14 of the 15 aldermanic races in which they ran, giving them control over 20 out of the 30 seats on the Board starting in January 2012. Non-union affiliates argue

Over 400 students crammed into the Yale Law School auditorium Friday to hear television personality and author Stephen Colbert answer questions about comedy, politics and religion. Though the conversation with Colbert, which was hosted and moderated by the Yale Political Union, began roughly 45 minutes after its scheduled starting time, students still welcomed Colbert with cheers and high-fives as he entered through the auditorium aisles. Colbert, who plays a conservative political pundit on his Comedy Central television show, “The Colbert Report,” shifted in and out of character throughout the event and discussed how a combination of breaking news and his personal views inform the direction of his show. Though he described his television persona as being a “well-intentioned, poorlyinformed, high-status idiot,” Colbert said that there are times that he and his character are in agreement. Still, he said he chooses not to

SEE UNIONS PAGE 4

SEE COLBERT PAGE 4

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Colbert entered the Law School auditorium to cheers and chants from the audience.


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT yaledailynews.com/opinion

GUEST COLUMNIST JULIE BOTNICK

GUEST COLUMNIST SAIFULLAH KHAN

Don’t neglect us I

have never told anyone on campus that I sought treatment at Yale Mental Health & Counseling my sophomore year. I went for a chronic mental disorder that, at Yale, started affecting me to the point where I needed professional help. What I regret is never sending the email I drafted to my dean and master asking for help after I had such a terrible experience with the system. But now, as a senior, and after reading the Yale College Council’s Mental Health Report, I need to share some of what I wrote. The state of mental health care at Yale is unacceptable, and we should be outraged. The majority of students in the report felt the care they received was less than good enough, and that the time they waited to have an appointment scheduled was unreasonable compared to the urgency of their condition. I waited over a month to be assigned permanently to a staff member, and even then, she was a social worker, not a psychiatrist as I had requested. Like others in the report, I felt she was bored and unresponsive to what I was actually saying. I told her I wanted to tell my best friend about my condition, but I had never told anyone and I was nervous about my friend’s reaction. She said I should tell my friend because she would have a negative reaction to what I said, and that would shame me so much that my symptoms would disappear. She also told me that there were others with my same rare condition here. But when I expressed an interest in group therapy, she said I would have to organize it on my own by putting up fliers around campus with my name and contact information. I felt uncomfortable doing that — and further, people with a mental condition do not want to be seen pulling off tabs from fliers. I stopped going after two or three sessions, and I was never contacted to see if I was allright. Two years later, my condition is still untreated, and I still have not talked to any of my friends about it. Of course, not every Yale student has a mental illness. But we do glorify stress and encourage a veneer of constant happiness; and as a result, we neglect discussion of mental illness and stigmatize those who might actually need treatment. Sufferers of mental illness cannot just “pull themselves out of it.” And sadly, they are also usually the individuals least comfortable with calling

“Even high school kids are just as busy as Yalies are, if not busier.” 'YALE12' ON 'TIPPING THE SCALES'

the health center every day to advocate for themselves. The most devastating part of the report is a paragraph from a sophomore who was “near suicidal” and did not get an appointment. “They said if I felt as though my needs were ‘extremely urgent’ then I could get an appointment sooner,” the sophomore stated. “The problem is that when you’re depressed, it’s already a lot to reach out to someone. To be told that your case needs to be an emergency makes you feel as though you’ve been rejected.” The sophomore should have received an appointment immediately. They somehow got through their struggle, but many do not — including other Yale students and my own sister. Cameron Dabaghi ’11 took his own life the spring before I started Yale. I remember wondering how his death would be brought up in orientation. But while I learned all about hazing and how many ounces are considered “one drink,” his suicide — and the broader topic of mental health — was not once mentioned in passing. I wish it had been. Over a year ago, I grieved over the death of Zachary Brunt ’15, though I had never met him. A fellow student was gone, and as someone who had gone through freshman orientation and dealt with Mental Health & Counseling, I doubted that he had known where to turn for help. And even though we have experienced two of these tragedies in the past three years — and a remarkable 39 percent of students in the report have sought mental health counseling — basically nothing has changed. Students need to be equipped with basic suicide prevention skills and the ability to recognize symptoms of clinical depression and anxiety. But students whose conditions fall outside of these categories also need to know there will be someone to turn to when we need professional help. As a campus, we have come together for dialogue on issues that affect us all, like our sexual culture. It is past time for us to come together on this issue. We all need to be well versed in the vocabulary of mental illness. We need to move past our stigmas about our conditions. We need a comprehensive response from the administration on how they will fix our ineffective mental health counseling system. JULIE BOTNICK is a senior in Branford College. Contact her at julie.botnick@yale.edu .

They killed my uncle O

n Tuesday morning, my uncle Arsala Jamal was killed in a bomb blast in a mosque in Afghanistan. The bomb was planted inside the mosque’s microphone and detonated while he was delivering a speech about Islamic values of non-violence and education. At 1:00 in the morning, while studying for my neuroscience midterm, I got a call from my friend who had heard the news on the radio in Kabul. His voice trembled hesitantly as he said, “Arsala Jamal has been killed in a suicide attack.” I was too paralyzed to give him a reply so I disconnected the call. After regaining some sort of consciousness, I started to take in the gravity of what had happened. That night, Arsala’s wife and six kids were celebrating their youngest daughter’s second birthday at their home in Canada. I wasn’t sure whether they’d heard, so in the midst of my confusion and sorrow I called them. They had not yet been told about his death, and it was the hardest news for me to break. Yet, there was no way to silence the news or to undo any of it. And at least they didn’t hear it from the media, but from a loved one instead.

Beyond being a cherished member of my family, Arsala was an influential and respected leader, having served as the governor of two provinces and the Minister of Tribal Affairs. In Kabul, whenever I would mention his name in a social setting, people would instantly respect me because of what my uncle represented. In the span of several hours after his death, many of my Afghan friends on Facebook changed their profile pictures to photos of him. The United Nations condemned his death, and Afghan President Hamid Karzai attended his funeral. Messages began pouring in offering my family condolences and words of kindness. I realized that this was not just a personal loss for my family — it was a loss for all of Afghanistan. With Arsala, the terrorists took away an intellectual leader with deep roots in the provinces he governed. He was dedicated to improving life for the average Afghan; recently, he was working on the development of the world’s second biggest copper mine, located at Mes Aynak in Logar province. He was also on the vanguard of promoting education for Afghan youth. President Karzai offered my uncle safer jobs, like the ambassadorship to Canada. But he chose to work in Afghani-

stan so as to directly impact civilians there. He knew the risks entailed by his public service to the country, and he had been attacked more than a dozen times before his death. I remember my concerned dad saying the terrorists just needed to get lucky once, while Arsala needed to get lucky every time in order to escape. Unfortunately, this time he didn’t get lucky. Hopeless from thousands of miles away, I wanted to return for the funeral processions, and Yale University had offered to pay for my flight. Although I could not go home because of my singleentry U.S. visa limitation, Yale’s offer, along with the kindness of my master, dean and professors, consoled me and showed me the immense support system this community offers. This incident adds a new layer of complexity to my long-term question of whether to return home to Afghanistan. All Yalies struggle with decisions about how to balance their various interests and direct their careers. Not only do I grapple with these issues, but also questions of how to balance my career in neuroscience with my lifelong dream of helping Afghans in a concrete and direct manner.

I always knew there would be a risk in returning to Afghanistan. But I could not fathom it hitting so close to home. I go back home to Afghanistan every summer and try to identify the best ways that I can help out. In 2010, for example, I worked in the Independent Election Commission of Afghanistan during the Wolesi Jirga elections. Friends always told me that it was risky. Yet it was not until last week, when I received that phone call, that I could fathom how genuine those fears were. The realization that someone who wishes to lead the country could be killed adds a new coat of confusion to my considerations of going back home. But I don’t want to succumb to my trepidation. The prime objective of terrorists is to spread fear and discourage intellectuals from stepping up to fill in leadership positions left vacant. I see my uncle as a beacon of courage, and someone who truly lived by the values he espoused. Remembering Arsala, it becomes clear to me that I want to go back home — and that he would have wanted the same. SAIFULLAH KHAN is a sophomore in Trumbull College. Contact him at saifullah.khan@yale.edu .

Race discussion now A

little more than a week ago, the words “Race War Now” appeared on a wall on the second floor of the African American Studies department. Yale Police began an investigation and the words were removed. Department Chair Jonathan Holloway GRD ’95 released a statement, calling the graffiti a “one-time act of stupidity.” He and President Salovey sent a joint email to the department condemning the incident. “This is important,” Holloway told the News. “This is a real thing, [but] we want to keep it in scale. This was a stupid and small act, [not a] stupid and big act.” Anyone with information about the graffiti was directed to call a phone number. And that was it. Students heard no more about the incident. There were no public forums, no panels, no student demonstrations. Holloway is right: This was a relatively small act, not a big one. But it reflects something bigger about Yale. Prejudice remains among us — far more silent and subtle than ever before, but present nonetheless. Many of us like to think we live on a campus that has overcome prejudice. We like to skirt around it and accuse those who do discuss it of being overly sensitive. Our silence has stunted much of the progress made in achieving diversity and tolerance. Our silence obscures the fact that this latest appearance of hateful graffiti

eerily mirrors past events on Yale’s campus. Indeed, bigoted graffiti has been appearing at Yale every couple of years. SCOTT Last May, grafSTERN fiti appeared on a wall in a A Stern chemistry lab Perspective t h re a te n i n g the Slifka Center for Jewish Life with arson. In 2007, the words “N----- School” appeared by the York Street gate to Pierson. Later that week, the words “drama f---” appeared on the side of the University Theater. In 2003, students broke into the room of an anti-war activist and left a message on her white board: “I love kicking Muslim a-- b------ a--! They should all die with Mohammad.” (The message continued for several more sentences.) In the days that followed, more anti-Muslim graffiti appeared in front of the AfroAmerican Cultural Center. However uncomfortable you felt reading that last paragraph, it’s probably not as uncomfortable as I felt writing it. The offensive words that appeared in campus graffiti are difficult to read on paper, much less discuss openly. We are so careful about the way we talk about acts of prejudice that sometimes we are unable to address

them directly. It is difficult for us to candidly explore our campus’ history of prejudice and the particular slurs that people here have employed. But if we can take away the taboos that prevent us from constructively discussing racial slurs, we will diminish the power of these words and those who wield them. It’s important to be able to talk about prejudice frankly, and to respond to intolerant incidents when they occur. In the past, there were usually responses to the hateful words. In the wake of the 2007 graffiti, students organized a rally and vigil demanding that the University implement structural or curricular responses to prejudice on campus. After the 2003 incidents, a group called Concerned Students at Yale gathered outside Woodbridge Hall to agitate against the University’s lukewarm reaction. Following a similar incident in 1990, student activists organized a two-day boycott of classes. But after this latest incident at the African American Studies department: nothing. Many may claim that last week’s graffiti is less offensive than some of those other incidents. That’s debatable. But they all share similarities — each incident was motivated by hate, made some students feel unwelcome on campus and until this time, generated some sort of public discussion. There should be a response to a call for a race war at Yale. Students

or administrators should be hosting panels or protests. When racist graffiti began appearing all over Oberlin last semester, the University cancelled classes for a day to hold discussions about tolerance and prejudice. It later emerged that much of this graffiti was part of a hoax, but Oberlin’s decision remains an example for Yale to consider. This is not just an indictment of the Yale administration — I spoke with very few students who were truly up in arms about this latest appearance of hateful words. And this incident can be used to stimulate broader discussions of race. I want additional diversity training for freshmen, especially during their first weeks on campus. Meetings addressed to bystanders of prejudice — modeled after the tremendously successful sophomore bystander intervention workshops — would be a good start. In his powerful freshman address, President Salovey told freshmen to feel more comfortable talking about socioeconomic class, calling it, “one of the last taboos among Yale students.” We should also feel more comfortable discussing another taboo subject — racial prejudice. We cannot afford to keep pretending that it does not exist, when in fact it’s written on the walls. SCOTT STERN is a junior in Branford College. Contact him at scott. stern@yale.edu .

G U E S T C O L U M N I S T V I C T O R I A H A L L - PA L E R M

A burglary and a failed system

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J

ust over a year ago, my common room in Berkeley North Court was burglarized. On a Sunday night, two local teenagers followed Yale students into the courtyard and then into my entryway. They went up to our thirdfloor suite, found it propped open, came in, took the first things they saw — my laptop and my suitemate’s backpack — and promptly left. The entire thing took place so quickly that my suitemate, who was in the bathroom next door, didn’t encounter them in passing. Even scarier, these two teenagers came to our room directly from Temple street, where they had just finished assaulting a grown man. They were clearly violent. But despite all this, we were really lucky: the criminals were stopped by Yale Security leaving our entryway. Our belongings were returned to us, and no one was hurt. A few months after that happened, I got a call from someone identifying herself as the lead prosecutor for the case. Since

I was one of the victims of the crime, she thought she owed me an update on how things were progressing, which I very much appreciated. But at the very end, she posed a question that threw me off. “So, what exactly do you want to see out of this trial?” I didn’t exactly know what she meant, so I asked her to repeat herself. “I mean, as the victim, how harshly do you want them to be tried?” For lack of a better response, all I said was that she should just do it “the normal way” and let the legal system run its course. She thanked me and hung up. But that question has haunted me ever since. To me, it seems to reflect a fundamentally incorrect view of the justice system. Why exactly do we prosecute and imprison people? Is it to make people like me, whose life was affected by their acts, feel better? I sincerely hope it isn’t — for as much as I was shaken by the burglary, I don’t think that my experience is what should drive how we

deal with criminals, especially not in the prosecutorial stage. In the sentencing process, I can understand why victims’ input can sometimes be crucially important. I know that Yale, for example, allows the victims of sexual misconduct to weigh in on the penalties of the rapists, which can empower victims to speak up. In other cases such as determining bail, the victims’ experience can be educational in terms of determining whether or not this criminal is likely to act again, or poses a threat if released back into society. But this prosecutor was not asking me that question. Her question essentially boils down to asking me how upset I was, and how I wanted her to prosecute these criminals as a result. But that is not how our courts are meant to work. People are punished for breaking the law, not for making me upset. These criminals are not more or less guilty depending on how strongly I feel. Moreover, if prosecutors modify how well they do their job based on the

feelings of the victims, how does that lead to a fair and just system? If the same exact thing had happened to someone who, a month later, was still livid and bent on revenge, would the verdict a year later have been any different? I certainly hope not — for as long as we insist on viewing our trials as simply retributive or punitive on behalf of the victim, there is no way that the system can transcend petty grievances. The entire criminal justice system should not be a charade to effect personal revenge, but rather a method by which lawbreakers are fairly made to deal with the repercussions of their actions. This goal is not served by catering to my unhappiness; my involvement should have ended the moment the two of them were apprehended. Treating me otherwise only perpetuates a cycle of bad behavior. VICTORIA HALL-PALERM is a junior in Berkeley College. Contact her at victoria.hall-palerm@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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NEWS

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CORRECTIONS WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16

The article “Cabaret to stage play about Raymond Carver” misspelled the surname of Phillip Howze DRA ’15. FRIDAY, OCT. 18

The article “Scientists experiment with crowdsourcing” gave the impression that Jacob Marcus’ research was being funded by Microryza. In fact, the research is being augmented by a Microryza fund that would go to support a research chemist to assist the project. Marcus is optimistic about the project’s completion, but not about successfully crowd sourcing to fund a chemist. Finally, the research for the project began over a year ago and not with the recent crowdsourcing initiative.

Network Week fosters connections BY LAVINIA BORZI STAFF REPORTER In its second run this year, the Yale School of Management’s Global Network Week last week focused on bolstering the school’s international profile and also sparking new channels of networking for visiting students. Taking place from Oct. 14-18, the biannual program — which was held for the first time in spring 2013 — invited students from around the world to study at SOM. Six total participating schools from Mexico, Ireland, China, Spain and Israel sent students to SOM for week-long studies on behavioral economics, and in turn, 45 SOM students went abroad to take classes in the major fields of study at these six schools. The Global Network itself consists of 23 management schools around the world, and roughly 300 total students among the seven schools participated in the week of academic exchange.

One of the things that [was] striking is that they’re building LinkedIn profiles. DAYLIAN CAIN Professor, Yale School of Management “The first Global Network Week in March of last year was a pilot, we wanted to see if we could make it happen,” said SOM Senior Associate Dean David Bach, who spearheaded the program’s organization. “Emboldened by its big success, we tried it again [this year], reaching out to more schools.” Bach said he aims to eventually have Global Network Week built into the calendar of a wide range of top-tier business schools, and for the program to become a fundamental part of each school’s MBA curriculum. The expansion and implementation of Global Network Week at a large group of schools would benefit SOM by making it “the most distinctively global U.S. school,” Bach said, as prospective students would be presented with various opportunities to take classes outside of Yale’s campus. SOM professor Ravi Dhar, who gave a lecture called “Consumer Insights in the Market-

place,” said that the program sets SOM apart from other U.S. business schools because it looks beyond the “traditional business-school model” of studying abroad for a semester. Instead, he said, the program allows students to experience the different cultures and academic styles of other countries without taking more than a week away from their time at Yale. “The program creates the opportunity for students to say, ‘Yes, I want to sample what is happening in Asia for example, but I don’t have time to do it for a whole semester,’” Dhar said. Students have the opportunity to be taught by world specialists in different fields, Bach said, as each school designs a program around its strongest discipline. But students interviewed said that what they found most valuable about the program was the chance to make connections and build personal global networks with other students. Belisario Velazquez, a student from the EGADE Business School in Mexico, said that the “multicultural interactions” of the program helped him learn about different business environments, which will be important to his future career. SOM professor Daylian Cain, who taught a lecture called “Leadership Mind Games: Overconfidence and Trusting Your Gut” said he was impressed by the students’ eagerness to make connections. “One of the things that [was] striking is that they’re building LinkedIn profiles, exchanging information,” Cain said. “This is really networking on another level.” Between taking classes on behavioral economics and networking amongst themselves, the students also prepared final presentations for the last day of the program that focused on the psychological strategies that weigh into economic decisions. Bach said that the next Global Network Week will be held in March 2014, and that several schools from the Global Network have already signed up. The next challenge, Bach said, is to coordinate schedules and standardize credit transfers for the program. Visiting students celebrated the end of the week with a karaoke night on Thursday. Contact LAVINIA BORZI at lavinia.borzi@yale.edu .

Number of surviving copies of the Gutenberg

Also known as the 42-line Bible, the Gutenberg Bible was the first book to use a typography system that used movable components. The University is one of the few institutions that owns a copy, currently on view at Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library.

Yale hosts first pro-life conference BY GEORGE SAUSSY CONTRIBUTING REPORTERS Last weekend Yale hosted “Vita et Veritas,” the first pro-life conference to be held at the University. Presented by the student organization, Choose Life at Yale, the conference featured speakers and panels representing a wide range of pro-life perspectives on the issue of abortion. Students involved with planning the conference and representatives from sponsoring pro-life groups said they hoped the event helps educate the Yale community about the pro-life stance and encourage students to create a more pro-life campus. “The dialogue is expanding and not just at Yale, but everywhere,” said Suzy Ismail, a speaker from the Center for Muslim Life who participated in an interfaith panel this weekend. The interfaith panel, which took place on Friday, discussed the importance of cooperation in the pro-life community between religious and secular groups. Ismail, who spoke for the Muslim pro-life community, said many Muslims do not speak out about abortion despite holding pro-life views. In the past, Ismail said she has been told, “Don’t talk about that,” when she has spoken about abortion at Muslim conferences. Muslims have a responsibility to speak out on this issue, she said. Secular Pro-Life President Kelsey Hazzard, who also spoke on the interfaith panel, said her group works to highlight non-religious arguments against abortion and con-

nect non-religious individuals with pro-life views with each other. Raising awareness is the focal point of her activism, she said. “I think my message was well received [at Yale],” she said, adding that Secular ProLife has seen a lot of support at college campuses. Hazzard said there are currently 6 million Americans who are non-religious and pro-life, adding that this is a function of the current generation being both more pro-life and more secular than previous generations. During a talk entitled “Refuse to Choose: Reclaiming Feminism,” on Saturday afternoon, Sally Winn, vice president of the organization Feminist for Life, drew from her own experiences. Winn said she became unexpectedly pregnant while in college and decided to have the baby. Raising a child was difficult, she said, in part because of the lack of support for mothers at colleges. Winn said there are no baby-changing stations in college bathrooms or day care opportunities for undergraduates. Under Yale’s basic health plan, for example, abortions are fully covered, while most delivery costs are not covered, she said. A student could have to pay $400 out of pocket for a delivery even with “Hospitalization/ Speciality Coverage,” she added. Winn said colleges need to improve their resources for mothers in order to give women the freedom to have a child on campus. “I think the future is really bright if we focus on what women need,” she said. “In my daughter’s lifetime it will be more com-

monplace for pregnant women to be on college campuses.” The conference grew over the two days, with many speakers coming from out of state to join. Speakers and attendees ate lunch together on Saturday and mingled in the lobby, exchanging pro-life pamphlets. Ismail said she enjoyed connecting with people from such different backgrounds. The last talk of the conference, entitled “The Secret Agenda: A Former Abortionist Speaks Out,” attracted approximately 50 audience members. Ryan Proctor ’16, a member of Choose Life at Yale, said he was pleased with how the conference went and hopes the conference will be an annual event. “It was a great turnout for a first year,” he said. “It came together nicely, and we are were looking forward to being able to build on what we’ve done.” Though most attendees were affiliated with Choose Life at Yale, Dimitri Halikias ’16 said he attended the conference despite not holding pro-life views and found the event interesting. “They did a really good job trying to attack the issue from different perspectives instead of using stereotypical arguments,” he said. Still, Halikias said the conference will likely not cause a major change in the way most Yale students perceive abortion. The conference took place at the St. Thomas More Chapel. Contact GEORGE SAUSSY at george.saussy@yale.edu .

Mayoral candidates race to the finish BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTER There is no rest for the weary candidates running for the city’s top post. Mayoral candidates Toni Harp ARC ’78 and Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM ’10 kept busy over the weekend as their campaigns entered the final stretch of what Elicker described on Sunday as a “roller coaster” of a race. Amid preparations for Tuesday’s debate and final fundraising efforts, the two candidates also spent time reaching out to city residents who will go to the polls in just over two weeks to elect one of them to succeed retiring New Haven Mayor John DeStefano Jr. Harp clinched September’s four-way Democratic primary in a decisive victory that has positioned her as the frontrunner leading into the general election. That status was on display when she met on Saturday with members of Women of Color Inc., who addressed the current Conn. state senator as “the mayor-elect” and engaged in a round-table discussion with the candidate about youth programming and violence in the city. Elicker, who has stayed in the race as a petitioning Independent candidate following his loss in the primary, mobilized support across the city on Sunday — stopping by Yale in the early afternoon, followed by a canvass on Whalley Ave. and a fundraiser at a supporter’s home in Westville. “My main challenge is name recognition,” Elicker told approximately 35 supporters crowded into the living room of the Westville home. “There are a lot of people who just haven’t done their homework about the election.” Harp set out on Sunday to do a bit of homework of her own, reaching out to members of the non-profit youth services and business advocacy organization Women of Color, Inc., to learn about resources for the city’s youth from the perspective of service providers. Harp said that restoring funding for community spaces — many of which have been dismantled over the past 40 years — depends on heightened political consciousness among a coalition of minority groups within the city. “In the mid-70s, no one in the black and Hispanic communities seemed to be aware that they were an emerging majority population, and there seemed to be very little

understanding of the responsibility of governance that [comes] with being a majority population in a democracy,” she said. Harp called on city residents to lobby the city and the state for resources for oncethriving spaces like the Dixwell “Q” House. She added that youth programs are also vital for working mothers, who have traditionally borne the brunt of childcare. Harp asked the women gathered to hold her accountable as mayor, to “knock on [her] door” and make sure she is living up to her campaign pledges. Meanwhile, Elicker took his campaign across the city on Sunday, announcing a new partnership with New Haven city/town clerk incumbent Ron Smith. The pair canvassed on Whalley Ave. in the afternoon. Smith’s challenger, Democratic nominee and Ward 8 Alderman Michael Smart, is running on a ticket with Harp. Elicker said Smith has deep ties to the city and that the city clerk will help him win votes in areas where he does not have the same name recognition as his opponent, including Newhallville, Dixwell and upper Westville. Dropping in on Sunday’s freshman barbecue on Old Campus, Elicker chatted with freshly minted residents of the Elm City about their experiences beyond Yale’s gates, encouraging them to register to vote and support his candidacy for mayor. Maxwell Ulin ’17 said he remains unde-

cided — that he supports Elicker’s policy proposals but appreciates Harp’s 20 years of experience as a state senator. Justin Wang ’17 said he voted for Elicker in the primary and plans to support him again in the general election, mainly because of the candidate’s experience as an environmental consultant. Elicker rounded out the weekend with a meet-and-greet and fundraiser in Westville. Pierrette Silverman, former director of elderly services and deputy chief of staff in the DeStefano administration, hosted the event. She praised Elicker for his keen understanding of the city’s budget and noted similarities between Elicker and Destefano. “They’re both progressive thinkers with great fiscal minds,” Pierrette said. She parried critiques of Elicker’s young age and perceived lack of experience by saying that DeStefano was 37 — the same age as Elicker — when he was elected. Elicker asked his supporters to dig deep to support his candidacy in the final two weeks of the race. He said the stability of his campaign and his ability to manage his campaign’s finances responsibly prove he will be able to lead the city effectively through times of change. The election will take place Nov. 5. Contact ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .

KATHRYN CRANDALL/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

As the mayoral race nears its end, both Toni Harp ARC ’78 and Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM ’10 continue their preparations for Tuesday’s debate while preparing final fundraising efforts.

Music, Drama schools collaborate for Beinecke celebrations BY JESSICA HALLAM STAFF REPORTER This weekend, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library celebrated its 50th anniversary with a gala concert — an event that organizers said highlighted the need for increased collaboration between the School of Music and the School of Drama. During the concert, which took place Saturday evening and closed the Beinecke’s yearlong anniversary celebration, students from the two schools showcased the library’s musical and nonmusical collections. Faculty members and stu-

dents from the music and drama schools worked together to create a piece that used performative, musical and visual elements to showcase “La Prose du Transsiberien” — a book of illustrated poetry from the Beinecke’s collection. Organizers and performers interviewed said the concert allowed for the kind of partnership between the two professional schools that should happen more often. The sharing of resources between the two schools enables members of each to grow into well-rounded artists, they said. “That’s one of the crying shames of Yale, [there is] not enough interaction between the

School of Music and School of Drama,” said clarinetist for the performance of “La Prose” Ashley Smith MUS ’14. Composer Matthew Suttor, director Elizabeth Diamond, narrator Max Gordon Moore DRA ’11 and the technical design crew are affiliated with the School of Drama, while members of the Jasper String Quartet — who performed with Smith — are alumni of the School of Music. Diamond said that the interdisciplinary approach to the performance of “La Prose” is an example of the multifaceted works that could result from further collaboration between the two schools. She noted that although

she thinks the number of interdisciplinary opportunities between the schools has grown in recent years, the schools’ fastpaced degree programs may be hindering this effort. “I think the big challenge is that within these … programs, there’s so much within the disciplines that must get conveyed and taught that there’s a real challenge in creating the time for really serious and sustained forays,” Diamond said. Smith said the two schools need to collaborate on a variety of artistic projects if their students are to become well-rounded artists. Experiencing one art form as independent from other art

forms is a flawed approach to art, Smith said. Music performances should be accompanied by visual elements, he added, as contemporary audiences are increasingly demanding multidimensional performances instead of traditional concerts. Timothy Young, curator of modern books and manuscripts at the Beinecke and the commissioner of the piece, said that through the performance of “La Prose,” he hoped to show that a library book can impact the worlds of drama, music and staging. He explained that in order to do this, he needed the help of Yale community members from different niches of the

school. “We’ve been making a lot of effort to reach out to the professional schools to bring people in and make them aware that we have archives,” Young said. Diamond said that the Beinecke’s archives have the potential to provide further opportunities for art that includes performative elements, adding that the library itself has the potential to serve as a dramatic stage. The Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library opened in 1963. Contact JESSICA HALLAM at jessica.hallam@yale.edu .


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“There are a hell of a lot of jobs scarier than live comedy. Like standing in the operating room when a guy’s heart stops, and you’re the one who has to fix it.” JON STEWART HOST OF THE DAILY SHOW

Colbert attracts crowds at YPU event COLBERT FROM PAGE 1

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Stephen Colbert spoke out-of-character to a filled room about the behind-the-scenes of “The Colbert Report.”

Shooting victim stable SHOOTING FROM PAGE 1 across the street. Yellow police tape was on the ground outside the school’s windows on Sunday morning. Residents of the house with the bullet hole said that they did not witness the incident, but that they did come out onto the street after they heard gunfire. The residents said that several police cars arrived at the scene, and that the police remained at the scene for a while. None of the residents recognized the name of the victim, and confirmed that he does not live at 20 Platt St. The four residents of the house declined to give their names.

It’s a good community. You just have bad apples everywhere. … You just have to stay positive and keep hoping.

publicize these moments of consensus because he enjoys keeping the viewer uncertain about where he stands politically. When asked whether he considers his character to be “politically correct,” Colbert said his character may not be politically correct but is always “correct.” Colbert said his character can make controversial comments without risk of ramifications. “He can say terrible things and nobody blames him,” Colbert said. Still, there are some topics that Colbert said he does not joke about, particularly in reference to religion. During the recent Alfred E. Smith dinner held in New York City, Colbert said he removed a line from his speech about communion because it made him uncomfortable to joke about the body of Christ. “Is that politically correct or is that being pious?” Colbert said. “I don’t know.” Colbert answered most inquiries with witty responses that often poked fun at the person asking the question. When asked about his daily schedule, Colbert said he wakes up at around noon when the sun is warm and shaves everything “from the chin down.” Once the audience’s laughs had subsided, Colbert said his real schedule involves educating himself about current events and continually revising the script for the nightly program. Colbert said he is constantly “cramming” to stay up to date on the day’s news. Each morning, Colbert categorizes material for that evening’s show into three groups accord-

ing to how well the idea has been developed at that point. Material in “the pantry” is nearly ready to be performed, while material in “the hopper” has not been written into a script yet, and “ideas” are vague notions about what might make a good comedic piece.

What really stood out to me, was how willing he was able to engage with the student body. NICK STYLES ’14

“If nothing is in the pantry, it’s going to be a rough day,” he said. In response to a question about why he chose a career in comedy, Colbert retorted, “What’s the other option? Tragedy?” As the youngest of eleven children in an Irish-Catholic family that Colbert called a “humoracracy,” Colbert said that being funny became a type of currency between his siblings. Colbert said there is great similarity between theater and politics because both involve communicating effectively and making emotional connections with an audience or constituency. Colbert stayed after the talk to speak with students, answer further questions and even pose for “selfies” with a select few. Akhil Amar ’80 LAW ’84, who helped facilitate the discussion after appearing on Colbert’s show last January, said Colbert was so popular among students that the crowd following him after this event rivaled the group that had

surrounded Hillary Clinton LAW ’73 and Bill Clinton LAW ’73 a few weeks earlier. Before the event, students waited for over an hour in lines that began inside the auditorium and stretched around the Law School courtyard multiple times. Members of the YPU were given priority access and some nonmembers were turned away due to the limited number of seats. Sukriti Mohan ’17 said she was disappointed that she was not able to attend the talk and would have preferred if the YPU were clearer in directing students to arrive a few hours before the event. “If I had known that I had to be there at 4 [p.m.] to get in, I would have been there,” she said. Austin Igelman ’16 said that Colbert’s facial expressions, gestures and stage presence were most striking about the evening. He said he particularly enjoyed when Colbert ran around with his middle finger raised in protest to a remark about the “The Daily Show.” “What really stood out to me, was how willing he was able to engage with the student body,” said Nick Styles ’14, vice president of operations for the Political Union. “He even engaged with the tapping and hissing that is so characteristic of the YPU event.” While on campus, Colbert and his family visited the rare book library and several other attractions, accompanied by Amar. “The Colbert Report” airs Monday through Thursday on Comedy Central and has been nominated for seven primetime Emmy Awards. Contact LARRY MILSTEIN at larry.milstein@yale.edu .

Elections split along union lines UNIONS FROM PAGE 1 that this majority has been problematic. Ward 10 Alderman and mayoral candidate Justin Elicker said that, although individual aldermen have worked to engage the public on political issues, the fact that unions back so many members has precluded public hearings from taking place. “They hold two thirds of the Board, so they have no reason to have public hearings, they can just decide on their own,” he said. Ward 29 Alderman Brian Wingate disagreed, saying that that the union-backed alderman are not a singular voting block and that they are sometimes even divided on what they think is best for the city. He added that the current Board has made measurable progress in reducing crime in the city and has worked to increase government participation among New Haven residents. “In the past couple of years, more people have been getting involved and more people are voicing their opinions about policies in the city of New Haven,” he said.

Still, some say that the current Board is not accurately representing the interests of New Haven residents. Stratton, who used to be a part of the Take Back New Haven movement — established by Ward 7 Alderman Doug Hausladen ’04 to oppose “machine” dominated city politics — said that, since most union members live in suburbs outside the city, the union-backed Aldermen are not adequately representing residents inside the city.

The only reason for the government to exist is to act upon what is in the best interests of the residents. DOUG HAUSLADEN ’04 Alderman, Ward 7 “The only reason for the government to exist is to act upon what is in the best interest of the residents,”

he said. “We have strayed so far from that in New Haven while under the union-backed board.” Regardless of the results of this November’s four contested aldermanic elections, union-backed aldermen will continue to represent a majority. Still, union affiliation is affecting the discourse around the Ward 1 and Ward 8 aldermanic races. In Ward 1, Republican Paul Chandler ’14 is challenging the incumbent, Sarah Eidelson ’12, who has garnered wide support from local unions. In Ward 8, Andy Ross, who is running as an Independent, is opposing unionbacked Aaron Greenberg GRD ’18. Greenberg serves as the president of the Graduate Employees and Students Organization, an affiliate of Local 34 and 35. Ross said that, although he considers himself “pro-union,” voters need to understand that the unions are special interest groups, and that with a majority on the Board, they can single-handedly cost the city a lot of money. Greenberg did not respond to multiple requests for comment. The mayoral candidates also dif-

fer on their union affiliation. In an interview with the News, Elicker expressed concern about the possible combination of a union-backed mayor and a union-backed majority on the Board. “We have a system of checks and balances in government for a reason — to make sure that no one group runs the show,” he said. “I think having a mayor and a Board of Aldermen who are backed by unions is not a positive thing for the city.” But Harp, who took 49.77 percent of the votes in the four-way mayoral democratic primaries, said that because the unions encourage Yale and other major city employers to hire New Haven residents, New Havenites should not be worried about a union majority on the Board. “[The unions] have a broad societal goal to get more New Haven residents employed,” she told the News. “I don’t think this is a bad goal.” The general elections will take place on Nov. 5. Contact POOJA SALHOTRA at pooja.salhotra@yale.edu .

J.R. GLASPER New Haven resident The New Haven Police Department has made progress in the investigation, but it is still unclear who was involved and when that information will be released. “Although Police have leads in this crime, Detectives are interested in any information from the public who may have witnessed the incident,” Hartman also said in the release. “Updates on this investigation — should there be any, will be released on Monday.” Glasper, the resident who observed the bullet holes in Augusta Lewis Troup school, lives on Elm St. near the scene of the crime. Although he did not know the victim, he said this incident does have an effect on the local community. Glasper was playing football with children from the neighborhood on the school’s playground Sunday morning, an activity he said he hopes serves to preserve morale in the community and to keep the children safe and out of trouble. “It’s a good community. You just have bad apples everywhere,” Glasper said. “People talk about it, but I just keep moving because I don’t have time to dwell on anything like this … you just have to stay positive and keep hoping,” Glasper said. In 2012 there were 1,870 violent crimes committed in New Haven. Contact MAREK RAMILO at marek.ramilo@yale.edu .

JENNIFER CHEUNG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

With the dropout of Maureen Gardner from the Ward 19 election, union affliation is no longer an element involved in the aldermanic race.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“If you don’t try to win you might as well hold the Olympics in somebody’s back yard.” JESSE OWENS

Senator speaks to conservatives

High schoolers duel at Physics Olympics BY JENNIFER GERSTEN STAFF REPORTER

DAVID WHIPPLE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Sen. John Barrasso of Wyoming addressed hundreds of students and alumni at this year’s William F. Buckley Jr. Conference. BY DAVID WHIPPLE CONTRIBUTING REPORTER He was only in town for a day — but Sen. John Barrasso of Wyoming could not resist a quick foray into New Haven politics. The keynote speaker for this year’s William F. Buckley Jr. Conference, Barrasso spoke at a dinner at the Omni Hotel Friday night to hundreds of students and alumni. Barrasso touched on the future of political conservatism and even included a shout-out to Paul Chandler ’14, the Republican candidate for Ward 1 alderman, who was seated in the back of the room. “He’ll accept campaign contributions from anyone in this room,” Barrasso joked. Barrasso — a conservative member of the U.S. Senate — capped off the day-long program, which also included a series of panels with topics ranging from conservative stances on social issues to the enduring legacy of William F. Buckley Jr. ’50. The third annual conference drew 245 attendees, many of whom were donors to the program. According to co-director Harry Graver ’14, who organized the affair with the help of program founder Lauren Noble ’11, the conference aims to encourage open political discussion on a campus noted for its liberal climate. Graver said the conference aims to nurture intellectual curiosity amongst students and alumni — which he said “has grown a bit damp at Yale” — by generating conversation about political conservatism. “I’m for equal opportunity, not equal outcome, and I think that’s a conservative message,” Barrasso said in an inter-

view with the News before his speech. Barrasso, who has served as a senator since 2007, was joined at the conference by James Buckley ’43, brother of Buckley Jr. and a former New York senator and federal judge. The program also featured panels from figures such as National Review editor Rich Lowry and Michael Barone LAW ’69, senior political analyst for the Washington Examiner. Panelist Jonah Goldberg, a conservative author and columnist for the Los Angeles Times and USA Today, spoke about the conservative movement’s recent lack of direction. Goldberg’s comparison of liberal college students to “lemmings” drew chuckles from the audience. Despite the conference’s uniformly conservative speakers, its organizers and attendees said that their goal was to promote debates about conservative ideology. “The point isn’t necessarily advocacy. What we’re trying to encourage is a discourse of ideas,” Graver said. Conference attendee Jack Zakrzewski ’16 echoed Graver, adding that different perspectives exist even within the sphere of conservatism. Even Barrasso, a devout Republican who opposes tighter gun laws and gay marriage, emphasized that dialogue within the party is necessary. Barrasso said he believes the conference is a good way for people to get together and share their diverse ideas. Graver said he was happy to continue the string of conservative speakers at the conference, which has previously attracted figures such as former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and former Gov. Mitch Daniels of Indiana. He

added that Barrasso is an individual that does not “run for the spotlight,” but is very conscious of his own principles. During the dinner, after remarks from William McGurn, a former speechwriter for George W. Bush ’68, Barrasso shared his optimism for the future of the conservative movement, adding that he believes conservatism resonates with the majority of Americans. Barrasso lambasted the 2011 Occupy Wall Street movement and emphasized the broad split between liberalism and conservatism. “If there was one word to define conservatism, it’s freedom — and if there’s one word that defines liberalism, it’s government,” Barrasso said in his speech. Possibly the loudest applause of the evening was reserved for Barrasso’s mention of Chandler, who said he was “completely surprised” to be pointed out. Despite receiving Barrasso’s support, the aldermanic candidate said that he attended the conference as a conservative rather than a candidate, and that he saw the goals of the conference as intellectual rather than electoral. Other attendees similarly enjoyed the conference as a political forum. “I don’t think there was, in my day, a place where conservatives could go to feel at home,” said attendee Austin Hoyt ’59. Bill Leyden ’67 said he appreciated the nuanced conversations that served as a discussion, not a “political pep rally.” Outside of his political position in Washington, D.C., Barrasso is also an orthopedic surgeon who conducted his residency at the Yale School of Medicine from 1978 to 1983. Contact DAVID WHIPPLE at david.whipple@yale.edu .

At the 16th annual Yale Physics Olympics, pure momentum carried team “Riemann” of the Taft School to a forceful victory. On Saturday at the Sloane Physics Laboratory, 50 teams of four students from 48 different high schools participated in the Olympics. Students had 45 minutes to complete each of five events, the details of which were kept secret until the day of the competition. Yale physics lecturer Stephen Irons, who has run the event since 2004 and delivered the opening address, said the event gives students a taste of the science they can pursue in college and beyond. Each year, staff members create new events from scratch. In honor of the 2013 Nobel Prizewinning discovery of the Higgs boson, professor of physics Sarah Demers created the event “A Nobel Pursuit,” in which students were challenged to find the Yale-themed “Yiggs boson” by analyzing graphs generated by a particle detector.

[The events] allow you to be creative because you’re not following procedures in a lab. FRANK LENOX Teacher, East Greenwich High School Irons’s own event, which he called “Vector Sedition,” took place outside of the Sloane laboratories. Students were asked to travel at certain speeds around a four-leg relay course without access to timing devices in order to demonstrate the principle of vector addition. Frank Lenox, a teacher from East Greenwich High School in Rhode Island and coach of the “Schrödinger’s Cat” team, said the Olympics highlight the impromptu nature of science problem-solving. “[The events] allow you to be creative because you’re not following procedures in a lab,” Lenox said. “You have to create

your own procedures, like in real science.” Irons said that the event is a way for Yale to connect to the local community. Like other science outreach initiatives at Yale, he said, the Olympics are meant to show students that a career in science might be fun and within reach. The event was created in 1998 by professor Con Beausang, now at the University of Richmond, with participation from approximately 15 to 20 schools. He said it has since expanded, and that many of this year’s schools are returnees. “Seeing the excitement from schools who come back year after year really tells me the teachers see it as something positive,” Irons said. Yale graduate students in physics were invited to volunteer and oversee students at work. Manuel Mai GRD ’17, while proctoring the event “Horseshoes, Hand Grenades and Golf Balls,” said he was pleased to see students devising solutions after struggling at the start. After the competition, the Higgs discovery was honored again in a special lecture by professor Keith Baker called “Yale and the Higgs.” J.T. Schemm, a teacher at Joel Barlow High School and coach of the “Feynman Falcons” team, said he tells his students the Olympics is “the geekiest day they’ll ever have.” “Physics is everywhere,” he said. “You need to know it because you live in the world. I always ask my kids, ‘Any physics this weekend?’ After a while, they start to get it.” At the opening ceremony, Nicholas Ogilvie-Thompson, a student at the Milbrook School, joked to his friends about there being so many “nerds.” But, when asked if he planned on pursuing physics in the future, Ogilvie-Thompson said it was a possibility. “Maybe aeronautical engineering, making fighter jets,” he said, after a moment. “Those things are rad as hell.” “I-Squared Rangers,” of Masuk High School, came in second place at the Olympics. Contact JENNIFER GERSTEN at jennifer.gersten@yale.edu .

Chandler rolls out platform BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTER Republican Ward 1 Candidate Paul Chandler ’14 unveiled his policy platform over the weekend, pitching his vision for the Elm City just over two weeks before he squares off at the polls with Democratic incumbent Sarah Eidelson ’12. The platform focuses on three broad issues: education, fiscal responsibility, and an assortment of quality of life issues in the ward, including transportation, bike safety and a revitalization of the New Haven Green. Chandler said he will hold a series of events following the October recess to engage students about his policy agenda before Election Day on Nov. 5. “Even the broad issues affect Ward 1,” Chandler said. “The things that you see across the city are also being seen in Ward 1. Education is universally an important issue; sustainable and responsible government affects students when they’re paying for things at stores or paying their rent.” Chandler said his plans for basic service improvements in the ward would be most immediately actionable. He advocates placing a crosswalk between Phelps gate and the New Haven Green in order to make the green more accessible to Old Campus. In addition, he said he will explore filling the green with stand-up shops and businesses. He also said he would work to improve street lighting on campus and in the downtown area to reduce crime and make campus more walkable at night. One of his more innovative ideas, he said, is to provide an accessible public transit option connecting

downtown and Union Station. The Yale shuttle is often not reliable on weekends and on breaks, Chandler Campaign spokesperson Amalia Halikias ’15 said. Chandler focused an entire section of his platform on education policy, which he said is largely an expression of his personal beliefs about education reform. Though most issues related to education fall under the jurisdiction of the Board of Education rather than the Board of Aldermen, he said, city lawmakers have a role to play when it comes to budgeting education programs and setting up services that complement the New Haven Public Schools. He also said he supports increasing Spanish-speaking resources to accommodate parents who speak English as their second language and enhancing afterschool programs to provide supervision for the city’s young people at the end of the school day. Another section of his platform — one that Chandler has already made a focus of his campaign — is sustainable and responsible government. He said he will advocate for a transition to a defined contribution pension plan to avoid the problem of underfunded pensions in the future. He also said changing the city’s assumed rate of return from 8 percent to between 4-5 percent would more accurately represent the returns the city gets on its pension investments and therefore elucidate the extent of the city’s pension crisis. He said merging departments and commissions with similar tasks would ensure budget savings and that further sharing of resources with neighboring towns would improve efficiency

JACOB GEIGER/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Republic Ward 1 Candidate Paul Chandler ’14 focused on education, fiscal responsibility and quality of life in his recently unveiled platorm. and help allocate resources according to need. Chandler said the policy ideas are not partisan but “very common sense.” He said the platform represents his broad ideals and gives Ward 1 residents a sample of the proposals he would back as alderman. Ben Mallet ’16, Chandler’s campaign manager, said the platform is the product of weeks of research and meetings with groups across campus, including the Yale Student Environmental Coalition. He said the campaign

will continue to reach out to cultural houses and other campus organizations to solicit ideas for Ward 1. While the election presents Chandler his first opportunity to showcase his ideas for the ward, Eidelson’s re-election campaign platform is largely an extension of the work she has pursued on the Board. She said she is focused on continuing the agenda she pursued in her first term: youth services. She said the inventory of servives for young people in the city that she

initiated last year just concluded and that the Board is moving forward with a proposal to create a “youth map initiative” that will allow city residents to browse existing youth services online. “One of the goals of the comprehensive youth agenda is to expand and increase the services and programs that exist, but there also are a lot of wonderful programs that are already in operation,” Eidelson said. “I think youth and families don’t have access to information to

know what’s out there, so first making that accessible is important.” She said she is also committed to further enhancing the city’s return to robust community policing. Engaging students in the process of city governance is another one of her main commitments, she added. Eidelson chairs the Board’s youth services committee. Contact ISAAC STANLEYBECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“It’s upsetting to me that you have to be a millionaire to invest in your friend’s start-up.” FRED WILSON VENTURE CAPITALIST AND BLOGGER

Beinecke reflects on fifty years BEINECKE FROM PAGE 1 has become a defining part of Yale, as inextricably linked with the university as Harkness Tower or Sterling Memorial Library. It has grown from an architectural anomaly to a postcard-worthy landmark, from a repository of medieval manuscripts to a rapidly growing collection that incorporates modern culture — a library that straddles the divide between past and present. “Beinecke is the library that will always need more space,” said Guido Calabresi ’53, LAW ’58, who was a professor at the law school when construction began on Beinecke. “Rare books don’t disappear, because there will always be new ones to collect.”

A CONTROVERSIAL CONSTRUCTION

In 1959, the three Beinecke brothers — Edwin (1907), Frederick (1909) and Walter (1910) — and then University librarian James T. Babb ’25 approached the Yale administration with a proposal to fund a new rare book library. The old Rare Book Room in Sterling was out of space, and the brothers, regular donors to the University library, had long wanted to create a separate library. The University consented — but only on the condition that the brothers pay for the entire construction and ongoing maintenance themselves, said Beinecke Director E.C. Schroeder. The brothers personally selected the location and architect — Gordon Bunshaft, a modern architect from the architectural firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill — and construction began in 1960. Not everyone was happy about the new library, however. The site that the Beineckes had chosen had been promised to the law school for expansion, Calabresi said. When he found out that the land was being taken away, Calabresi said he approached Babb to ask how this had happened. “He smiled and said, ‘I have been dining with the Beineckes for 15 years.’” Calabresi said. “In other words, ‘I have been courting them, they’re willing to give the money, they wanted it in this place, and that’s why it’s there.’” The library’s location was not the only source of controversy. Its distinctive appearance caused some disagreement between librarians and the architect as well. The librarians, Schroeder said, simply wanted a reading room and stacks to hold the books; they weren’t looking for a “great architectural monument.” “But that’s why [Bunshaft] was an architect, and the librarians were librarians,” Schroeder said. Some aspects of the building, though, were praised from the beginning. The library’s dramatic inner core — a six-story glass box which houses the books — as well as the sunken courtyard outside, were popular all along, Calabresi said. Also popular were the thin marble panels that line the building in place of windows, protecting the books by filtering sunlight and keeping the interior of the library dim, he added. “The inner core was wonderful, the [panels’] translucence was wonderful, but the building itself people said looked like a bonbonniere, a candy box,” Calabresi said. “That was something

that was especially criticized by architects. But in time I think it came to be much appreciated.” In fact, the building’s distinct design is precisely what appeals to many people today; though it does not necessarily match the surrounding architecture, it adds its own character to the plaza, according to Aaron Pratt GRD ’16. “I’m rather keen on the Beinecke — it’s my favorite building on campus,” Pratt said. “Certainly the Bunshaft design is a different sort of thing than the neo-Gothic and neo-Classical buildings around it, but in a rather basic and probably unsophisticated way, I appreciate it for this very reason.”

y

Check out the Yale Daily News website for additional multimedia content on Beinecke Library. yaledailynews.com

FROM GUTENBERG TO THE DIGITAL AGE

When Beinecke was founded, people were delighted with the idea of a rare book library that would reflect the University’s mission and focus, Calabresi said. It was a time when, “if you looked at Yale, you thought of English, history, literature, French and so on,” he said. H istorically, Beinecke’s strengths have lain in its Western European and American pre-20th century collections, with treasures like the Gutenberg Bible and John J. Audubon’s “Birds of America” on permanent exhibition. But in the last decade or so, the library’s curators have made an effort to expand into more modern and post-modern material, Schroeder said. In addition to acquiring more recent collections, such as post-World War II counterculture pieces, curators have also brought in previously unrepresented writers. One notable addition, for example, has been the recent acquisitions of Native American literature, said Melissa Barton, curator of the American Literature colection. She has also recently added pieces ranging from photographs of dance marathons and roller derbies to African American and lesbian pulp fiction. “Since we have a mandate to develop the library’s holdings for the entire history of American literature, we are constantly looking to acquire material that, while modern now, will some day be viewed as historically significant,” Barton said. “We see all of these materials as important parts of the historical record and, therefore, worthy of being housed at the Beinecke.”

The building itself people said looked like a bonbonnier, a candy box. GUIDO CALABRESI ’53 LAW ’58 Prefessor, Yale Law School On the European side, Kevin Repp, curator of Modern European Books and Manuscripts, said the library has amassed a significant collection of counterculture material — from correspondence by Richard Neville, founder of a London underground magazine, to concrete, visual and sound poetry by French and Italian artists. “It really brings our modernist holdings into the second half of the twentieth century, which is much less explored, since we are often still too close to it to appreciate it,” Repp said. “That period has continuities with the prewar period that Beinecke tra-

JOYCE XI/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

ditionally has strengths in, but it’s also very distinct and had a remarkable impact on the culture around us today.” The material is nontraditional both in its subject matter — for example, transgender issues are addressed in the recently acquired Laura Bailey papers — and its format, catalog librarian Tom Bolze said. Beinecke has begun to move away from pure books and towards more personal correspondence, drafts, and other unpublished material. The format of Beinecke’s collections, Schroeder said, has also begun to shift in a radically different way — digitally. On the one hand, the library is redefining what the definition of an archive is, he said: Rather than just paper and ink, curators are now collecting emails and hard drives so that in the future entire collections may be contained in a single digital file. On the other, Beinecke has a digital studio, with three photographers scanning existing print material daily to make it freely available through the library’s website. “You could be anywhere in the world, and if you wanted to see a manuscript we had, you could do that,” Schroeder said.

OPENING UP BEINECKE

While the library’s website

opens the Beinecke’s collection to the world, the staff has tried to increase its appeal to people on campus as well, in an attempt to combat what some students see as Beinecke’s inaccessible nature. “The fact that there are only certain areas of Beinecke that you can go in, and that you can’t take books out, and that there’s limited study room, has meant that I haven’t really seen Beinecke as a place where you can study or touch books,” Ifeanyi Awachie ’14 said. “It’s just surrounded for me by this atmosphere of restrictedness. It’s pretty, and the books are so cool, but I’ll think about it and decide that I’m not going to Beinecke. I’m going to Bass [Library].” This sentiment was echoed by six of seven students interviewed by the News around campus; students said they had not visited Beinecke either because they had no reason to, were more familiar with other libraries, or felt that Beinecke was not a welcoming environment for studying. The only student who had visited, Ishan Kumar ’15, was a history major whose research had necessitated the trip. For Basie Bales Gitlin ’10, an avid book collector and historian of Yale, this is not necessarily a problem: The nature of the library’s contents and the work that goes on inside fits its isola-

tion, he said. “I think it’s designed to be inaccessible,” Gitlin said. “The best space in the library — the open exhibition area on the second floor — is far removed from books or research. The research area is, by design, exclusive. It’s not a welcoming space.” But the Beinecke staff is determined to change this perception by hosting various open houses throughout the year and encouraging undergraduates to take tours. The library’s staff also wants students to see how easily they can engage in research, Schroeder said. To this end, he emphasized the four classrooms within Beinecke in which professors can teach from the collections and students can interact directly with the materials. There was only one, infrequently used, classroom when Beinecke was first built, he said. But last year over 400 courses engaged with the Beinecke in some way, and renovations are planned for 2015 to add two more classrooms. “The opportunity to teach at the Beinecke was a large part of my decision to leave Columbia [University], which I loved,” said David Kastan, who has taught a class at the library every year since he came to Yale in 2008. Kastan’s graduate course this semester, “Making Shakespeare,”

focuses on how Shakespeare’s texts have been printed and presented since their original publication in the 16th century. With Beinecke’s collections, students in the class have the opportunity to engage with the texts in their original formats. “I should emphasize just how rare of an opportunity it is to work directly with the remarkably wide range of Shakespearean texts at the Beinecke,” said Andrew Brown GRD ’19, a student in Kastan’s class. “Graduate students can undertake research projects at the Beinecke that wouldn’t be possible at almost any other research library in North America.” In the past fifty years, Beinecke has adapted to new developments in academia and technology, establishing itself as one of the foremost college libraries in the world. But while bringing in new materials and expanding its scope, it is still remaining true to its roots as a center for the humanities, Schroeder said. “Because the Beinecke is an architectural monument in the center of campus, it’s basically reaffirming the importance of the humanities and books and manuscripts to a liberal arts education,” Schroeder said. Contact VIVIAN WANG at vivian.y.wang@yale.edu .

Yale startup catches Zuckerberg’s eye PANORAMA FROM PAGE 1 performance. “Priscilla and I are excited to support Panorama Education and its mission,” Zuckerberg said in a statement. “Their company is an exciting example of the way technology can help teachers, parents and students make their voices heard.” Other investors echoed Zuckerberg’s remarks, citing their enthusiasm about Panorama Education’s potential to improve K-12 education. Geoff Ralston, creator of Yahoo! Mail said he was impressed by the group’s ability to quickly provide schools with useful data.

Jeff Clavier, Managing Partner of SoftTech VC, said the founders are capitalizing on a huge market opportunity in data analysis and education. “The service they have built in a few short months has generated a level of early traction that is very unusual in the [Education Technology] category,” Clavier said in a Sunday email. “In short, we thought Panorama Education was an opportunity too good to pass on in one of our favorite sectors.” Panorama Education has come a long way over the past two years, said Feuer, who is the company’s chief executive officer. He recalled being a junior

in Bass Library, brainstorming names for the startup company. Today, he said the company is studying over one million students in 250 school districts. Feuer said the $4 million will help the company expand and hire additional staff. Geoffrey Litt ’14, who works for Panorama Education as a software engineer, said the company had many ideas for the future but was limited by the number of employees and the resources of such a small startup. The money gives Panorama Education the freedom to move as fast as it can towards its goals. “The dream is that we’re

helping every school with feedback and data analytics,” Tanner said. “We are so far from that, but that’s we’re trying to do.” Based in Boston, Mass., Panorama Education works with schools to distribute detailed surveys, analyze the results and report findings back to the institutions. Michael DiScala ’14, another software engineer for the company, said not many companies generate and analyze the kind of data that Panorama Education does. Litt added that the company seeks to dig deeper into the data and use algorithms to find patterns, and then tell schools what the numbers mean.

In one school, survey results indicated a bullying problem among 9th grade boys, Feuer said. Using this data, in combination with other results, helps schools identify the problem and move toward a solution, said Feuer. “If you look at almost everything in the world, there’s a really strong feedback loop,” he said. “Schools can’t improve unless they’re measuring things.” All of the employees interviewed said the $4 million felt like a validation of their hard work and success. Though the intersection of education and technology is a

popular subject of discussion, Feuer said Panorama Education is actually integrating the two to improve schools. “It’s really exciting for us because the people who invested in us are basically the leaders of Silicon Valley,” Feuer said. “Everyone’s talking about technology in schools, but no one’s actually figured out how to use technology to fundamentally improve schools.” Panorama currently has seven employees. Contact ADRIAN RODRIGUES at adrian.rodrigues@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

NATION

PAGE 7

T

Dow Jones 15,399.65, +0.18%

S NASDAQ 3,914.28, +1.32% S

Oil $100.79, -0.02%

Health care rollout frustrates Obama

S S&P 500 1,744.50, +0.65% T 10-yr. Bond 2.59, -0.19% T Euro $1.37, +0.08%

Unions look to clean energy jobs BY KEVIN BEGOS KEVIN BEGOS PITTSBURGH — The nation’s largest labor unions are ready and willing to help fight global warming, but are cautioning environmentalists that workers need new clean-energy jobs before existing industries are shut down. The four-day Power Shift conference in Pittsburgh is training young people to stop coal mining, fracking for oil and gas, and nuclear power, but organizers also want workers to join the battle against climate change. Union leaders say their workers want to help build a new, green economy.

JACQUELYN MARTIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Barack Obama speaks in the White House State Dining Room after lawmakers voted to end the federal government shutdown. BY JULIE PACE ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — Last week, President Barack Obama gathered some of his top advisers in the Oval Office to discuss the problem-plagued rollout of his health care legislation. He told his team the administration had to own up to the fact that there were no excuses for not having the health care website ready to operate on Day One. The admonition from a frustrated president came amid the embarrassing start to sign-ups for the health care insurance exchanges. The president is expected to address the cascade of computer problems Monday during an event at the White House.

Administration officials say more than 476,000 health insurance applications have been filed through federal and state exchanges. The figures mark the most detailed measure yet of the problemplagued rollout of the insurance market place. However, the officials continue to refuse to say how many people have actually enrolled in the insurance markets. And without enrollment figures, it’s unclear whether the program is on track to reach the 7 million people projected by the Congressional Budget Office to gain coverage during the six-month sign-up period. The first three weeks of sign-ups have been marred by a cascade of computer problems, which the administration says

NJ couples plan weddings BY KATIE ZEZIMA AND GEOFF MULVIHILL ASSOCIATED PRESS TRENTON, N.J. — With the advent of same-sex marriage in New Jersey, couples are thrilled and, in many cases, confused about how to proceed. Advocates and others are claiming that the state of New Jersey did not give ample instructions to town clerks and others on how to administer marriage licenses to same-sex couples. Same-sex marriages were scheduled to begin Monday at 12:01 a.m. The New Jersey Supreme Court last week refused to delay a lower court order for the state to start recognizing marriages. The case, however, is still on appeal. Several couples planned to marry minutes after the state began recognizing the unions. Yet other said they had not been able to get a license. New Jersey law requires that couples wait three days between obtaining a license and getting married. “There’s a lot of mass confusion and it boils down to the fact that the state should have issued guidance a week ago,” said Troy Stevenson, executive director of Garden State Equality. Stevenson said he has 15 volunteer lawyers who are scrambling to find judges who are willing to waive the three-day

requirement for couples. “We’re hoping to make miracles happen, but I wish we didn’t have to,” he said. Karen and Marcye NicholsonMcFadden, two plaintiffs in the lawsuit that brought same-sex marriage to the state, said they have not been able to get a license to wed. The couple said the clerk in their hometown of Aberdeen told them Friday that she could not issue them a marriage license without further instruction from the state. Gov. Chris Christie had instructed the Department of Health to cooperate with municipalities to issue licenses. The clerk did not immediately return a call to comment Sunday. A Christie spokesman did not return an email seeking comment. “It’s just very frustrating after being made to wait for so many years. The state had an order from a judge. It’s clear they did nothing to prepare and to communicate,” Karen NicholsonMcFadden said. “It’s terrible. It sucks some of the joy out of Friday,” when the court made its ruling. The couple plans to try again for a license Monday and get married as soon as they can. They’ve been together for 24 years and have two children.

JOE EPSTEIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Troy Stevenson, executive director of Garden State Equity, addresses a crowd in front of their office Oct. 18, 2013, in Montclair, N.J.

it is working around the clock to correct. The rough rollout has been a black eye for Obama, who invested significant time and political capital in getting the law passed during his first term. The officials said technology experts from inside and outside the government are being brought in to work on the glitches, though they did not say how many workers were being added. Officials did say staffing has been increased at call centers by about 50 percent. As problems persist on the federally run website, the administration is encouraging more people to sign up for insurance over the phone. The officials would not discuss the health insurance rollout by name and were granted anonymity.

We’re talking about a massive transition, with millions of people who will be affected. MICHAEL BRUNE Executive director, Sierra Club “Global warming is here, and we can work and get it fixed together,” United Steel Workers president Leo Gerard said in a Friday night address at Power Shift. But other labor groups note that while they share the same long-term clean energy goals with environmentalists, there are challenges. “It’s not just as simple as ‘No Fracking’” or other bans, said Tahir Duckett, an AFL/CIO representative who spoke at a Saturday Power Shift panel that sought to promote dialogue between environmentalists and

workers. Duckett said workers need new jobs to make a transition to clean energy, noting that shutting down industries such as coal “can turn entire communities into a ghost town. We cannot bury our heads in the sand and pretend like people aren’t fighting for their very survival.” Richard Fowler, a Power Shift moderator, said that instead of talking about a “ban” on a particular industry, environmentalists should talk about solutions that provide jobs. “That’s what is missing,” said Fowler, a radio host and member of Generational Alliance, a Washington, D.C. based coalition of community youth groups. “It’s always a ban, or a fix, or a cap, or a trade” instead of just straight-up campaigns to build cleaner energy sources like wind and solar. The overwhelming consensus among top scientists from around the world is that they’re about as certain global warming is a real, man-made threat as they are that cigarettes kill, and pollution from fossil fuels is the biggest problem. The organizers of Power Shift say a green economy is the only way to head off catastrophic global warming and build a healthier future for everyone, including workers and their families. Pittsburgh was chosen for the biannual conference partly because it’s at the crossroads of old and new energy. The city itself has banned fracking, yet the surrounding county recently signed a huge drilling lease for land under the Pittsburgh International Airport. Western Pennsylvania is also the birthplace of the oil and steel industries, but tech firms are attracted by students from Carnegie Mellon University and other schools.


PAGE 8

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

WORLD

23

Bombing kills 35 in Iraq

The number of Indian children who died in the pesticide-tainted school lunch outbreak in July. The children died after eating a free meal of rice, potatoes and soy thought to contain pesticide poisoning.

Child abduction case worries gypsies BY COSTAS KANTOURIS COSTAS KANTOURIS FARSALA, Greece — Gypsies stroll about prefabricated homes in their camp, many of them smiling and seemingly carefree. But there is worry and resentment here. Their community is at the center of a child abduction case, with a Gypsy, or Roma, couple accused of abducting a blonde, blue-eyed girl who is thought to be about 4 years old. The Roma, a poor people in a country devastated by an economic crisis, try to make a living in the camp on the outskirts of the central town of Farsala by selling fruits, carpets, blankets, baskets and shoes at local markets. They say they are already considered by some to be social outcasts, thieves and beggars.

HADI MIZBAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS

A woman grieves for her sister at the scene of a car bomb attack in Baghdad, Iraq, Oct. 19, 2013. BY SAMEER N. YACOUB ASSOCIATED PRESS BAGHDAD — A suicide bomber slammed his explosive-laden car Sunday night into a busy cafe in Iraq’s capital, part of a day of violence across the country that killed 45 people, authorities said. The bombing at the cafe in Baghdad’s primarily Shiite Amil neighborhood happened as it was full of customers. The cafe and a nearby juice shop is a favorite hang out in the neighborhood for young people, who filled the area at the time of the explosions. The blast killed 35 people and wounded 45, Iraqi officials said. Violence has been on the rise in Iraq

following a deadly crackdown by security forces on a Sunni protest camp in the northern town of Hawijah in April. At least 385 have died in attacks in Iraq so far this month, according to an Associated Press count. In a village north of Baghdad, a car bomb targeted a police officer’s house, killing his father, brother and five nephews, officials said. Six others were wounded in the blast, which happened when the officer was not at home. Security forces meanwhile foiled an attack on the local council of the western town of Rawah by five would-be suicide bombers disguised in police uniforms, said Muthana Ismail, head of the local security committee. Ismail said two attackers were shot

while the rest blew up themselves up outside. Two police officers and an official were killed, while 20 people were wounded, he said. Rawha is about 200 miles northwest of Baghdad. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for Sunday’s attacks, though car bombings and gun assaults are favorite tactics of al-Qaida’s local branch. It frequently targets Shiites, whom it considers heretics, and those seen as closely allied to the Shiite-led government in Baghdad. Hospital officials confirmed the casualty figures for all attacks. All officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to journalists.

Health, agrochemicals linked BY MICHAEL WARREN AND NATACHA PISARENKO ASSOCIATED PRESS BASAVILBASO, Argentina (AP) — Argentine farmworker Fabian Tomasi was never trained to handle pesticides. His job was to keep the crop-dusters flying by filling their tanks as quickly as possible, although it often meant getting drenched in poison. Now, at 47, he’s a living skeleton, so weak he can hardly leave his house in Entre Rios province. Schoolteacher Andrea Druetta lives in Santa Fe Province, the heart of Argentina’s soy country, where agrochemical spraying is banned within 550 yards of populated areas. But soy is planted just 33 yards from her back door. Her boys were showered in chemicals recently while swimming in the backyard pool. After Sofia Gatica lost her newborn to kidney failure, she filed a complaint that led to Argentina’s first criminal convictions for illegal spraying. But last year’s verdict came too late for many of her 5,300 neighbors in Ituzaingo Annex. A government study there found alarming levels of agrochemical contamination in the soil and drinking water,

and 80 percent of the children surveyed carried traces of pesticide in their blood. American biotechnology has turned Argentina into the world’s third-largest soybean producer, but the chemicals powering the boom aren’t confined to soy and cotton and corn fields. The Associated Press documented dozens of cases around the country where poisons are applied in ways unanticipated by regulatory science or specifically banned by existing law. The spray drifts into schools and homes and settles over water sources; farmworkers mix poisons with no protective gear; villagers store water in pesticide containers that should have been destroyed. Now doctors are warning that uncontrolled pesticide applications could be the cause of growing health problems among the 12 million people who live in the South American nation’s vast farm belt. In Santa Fe, cancer rates are two times to four times higher than the national average. In Chaco, birth defects quadrupled in the decade after biotechnology dramatically expanded farming in Argentina. “The change in how agriculture is produced has brought, frankly, a change in the profile of diseases,” says Dr. Medardo

Avila Vazquez, a pediatrician and neonatologist who co-founded Doctors of Fumigated Towns, part of a growing movement demanding enforcement of agricultural safety rules. “We’ve gone from a pretty healthy population to one with a high rate of cancer, birth defects, and illnesses seldom seen before.” A nation once known for its grass-fed beef has undergone a remarkable transformation since 1996, when the St. Louisbased Monsanto Co. promised that adopting its patented seeds and chemicals would increase crop yields and lower pesticide use. Today, Argentina’s entire soy crop and nearly all its corn and cotton are genetically modified, with soy cultivation alone tripling to 47 million acres. Agrochemical use did decline at first, then it bounced back, increasing ninefold from 9 million gallons in 1990 to more than 84 million gallons today as farmers squeezed in more harvests and pests became resistant to the poisons. Overall, Argentine farmers apply an estimated 4.3 pounds of agrochemical concentrate per acre, more than twice what U.S. farmers use, according to an AP analysis of government and pesticide industry data.

There is no buying and selling of children here … The other Roma are not to blame. CHRISTOS LIOUPIS Now, they fear they will be stigmatized as child traffickers. The president of the local Roma community, Babis Dimitriou, hopes there is no backlash against the 2,000 Roma living in the community. The case “doesn’t reflect on all of us,” he told The Associated Press on Sunday. A 40-year-old woman and 39-year-old man have been charged with abducting a minor after police raided the camp Wednesday looking for drugs and weapons. A suspicious prosecutor who accompanied police on the raid thought it was odd that the girl looked nothing like her parents. DNA tests proved the couple isn’t the girl’s biological parents. The man and woman will appear in a court Monday. Police have launched an international appeal to find the biological parents of the girl, who is known as Maria in the camp. She is being cared for in Athens by a charity. Many Gypsies are wary of

media attention and resentful of what they say is neglect by the state. The only thing authorities have provided, they say, is the prefab houses that replaced the tents they were living in eight years ago. What the local Roma seem keen to convey is that their community is not involved in either child abductions or trafficking. But regional police chief Lt. Gen. Vassilis Halatsis said authorities have found “dozens” of child trafficking cases involving Bulgarian Roma in Greece. “We know these cases exist, but they involve Bulgarians, not Greeks like us. There are no transactions involving children here,” Dimitriou insists, adding that the 40-year-old woman, who had registered Maria as her own child, “cared for her even better than for her own children.” Another resident of the community, who lives with the Roma but is not one of them, takes their side. “There is no buying and selling of children here … The other Roma are not to blame. These are family people. After this event, the police have been searching everyone. Isn’t this racist?” 42-year-old Christos Lioupis said. But Halatsis said people take advantage of a flawed birth registration system to declare multiple children to receive state handouts. The couple accused of abducting the girl had used multiple identities to register 14 children in three different cities, of whom only four have been identified, Halatsis said. An examination of the birthdates of the children shows that the woman, at one point, was giving birth every four months, he said. Overall, the couple received 2,500 euros (about $3,420) per month in state assistance. “We are dealing with a very unusual case. Usually, parents report a child’s disappearance and we look for the children. In this case, we have the child and we are looking for its (her) parents,” Halatsis said. “So far, we have had calls from France, Poland, even the United States. We are looking at each case, to see if the ages match, and if there are similar features.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Greek authorities have requested international assistance to identify the four-year-old girl found living in a Gypsy camp.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TOMORROW

Sunny, with a high near 64. Partly cloudy at night, with a low around 48.

WEDNESDAY

High of 67, low of 41.

High of 54, low of 37.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

ON CAMPUS MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 6:15 p.m. “The U.N. Special Procedures and Human Rights in Iran: A Conversation with U.N. Special Rapporteur Dr. Ahmed Shaheed.” Join for a talk by Dr. Ahmed Shaheed, an internationally recognized expert on foreign policy, international diplomacy, democratization and human rights reform, especially in Muslim states. Sterling Law Buildings (127 Wall St.), Rm. 129. 7:00 p.m. CEAS China Film Series: “Woman Demon Human.” Directed by Huang Shuqin, this film is part of the Retrospective of Chinese Women Directors (1950s-Present) Series. This film series will present the works of four remarkable women directors, each negotiating a perspective or commentary alternative to the mainstream cinema of the time. This film will be in Chinese with English subtitles. Luce Hall (34 Hillhouse Ave.), Aud.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY SPENCER KATZ

6:00 p.m. “Crisis and Opportunities: Have Financial Crises Led to a Reshaping of the Financial Landscape.” This lecture will be given by Yousseff Cassis, a professor of economic history at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, and a visiting research fellow in business history at the London School of Economics. His research focuses on 19th- and 20th-century international financial centers and 20th-century European businesses. Luce Hall (34 Hillhouse Ave.), Rm. 202. 7:00 p.m. Sacred Harp Singing. The Sacred Harp is an American shape-note songbook first published in 1844. Its eclectic repertoire, updated in each edition, includes tunes inherited from the folk tradition and other forms of hymnody, as well as music written especially for the shape-note singing practice. Stoeckel Hall (496 College St.), Rm. B01.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

12:30 p.m. “Ruckus Paris: Picasso According to Red Grooms.” In this gallery talk, Susan Greenberg Fisher, a curator of modern and contemporary art at the Yale University Art Gallery, will discuss Red Grooms’ depiction of Picasso in his work. Yale University Art Gallery (111 Chapel St.).

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10/21/13

By Erik Agard

DOWN 1 Big name in vermouth 2 A second time 3 Vary irregularly, as prices 4 Koppel and Knight 5 __ Lanka 6 Teeth-and-gums protector 7 Conductor Previn 8 “Star Wars” princess 9 “Piece of cake!” 10 Out-of-tune string instruments? 11 Like Jack 43Across’s diet 12 Does as directed 13 Curtain call acknowledgments 18 Part of YMCA: Abbr. 22 How-__: instruction books 24 Feel lousy 27 Neato water sources? 28 Insult comic who was a frequent Johnny Carson guest 29 Crumb-carrying insect

FOR SALE COMPLETE  WHITE   DINETTE  SET  AND  RUG.   2  NEW  46  INCH  HDTV”s.   NEW  SOFA  BED.  LARGE   OVERSIZE    ORIENTAL   AREA  RUGS.  NIGHTABLES,   COFFEE  TABLE  AND  END   TABLES.  FLOOR  LAMPS.   ASSORTED  FRAMED  AND   MATTED  ARTPRINTS. 203  778  8077

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

SUDOKU LITERALLY SO EASY

5 7 3

8 4 3 5

4 (c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

30 Relaxation center 31 Put a curse on 33 Dessert with a crust 35 Financial planner’s concern 36 Handheld computer, briefly 37 Go down in the west 39 “The X-Files” gp. 43 Ninth mo.

10/21/13

45 Pop the question 47 Ploy 48 Work really hard 49 Spooky 50 Reeves of “Speed” 52 Dancer Astaire 53 Homes for chicks 54 Future flower 55 J.D.-to-be’s exam 56 __ A Sketch 57 Trig or calc 60 Prof.’s helpers

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7 1 2 7

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PAGE 10

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

THROUGH THE LENS

P

hotographers capture artists performing in Saybrook’s underground coffeehouse, aptly named the Underbrook Coffeehouse. The UC features Yale artists, writers, and musicians in a casual, yet intimate, setting. Performances this year have ranged from hard rock to acustic ukelele, with artists showcasing everything from photography to prose. KATHRYN CRANDALL, CHARLOTTE WEINER AND LAKSHMAN SOMASUNDARAM report.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NFL Redskins 45 Bears 41

NFL Colts 39 Broncos 33

SPORTS QUICK HITS

CRAIG BRESLOW ’02 PITCHER, BOSTON RED SOX Breslow has shined for the Red Sox in seven games of relief in the 2013 MLB postseason. The southpaw has struck out six while giving up just three hits and no runs in seven innings. Boston will play the St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series starting this Wednesday.

NFL NY Jets 30 (OT) Patriots 27

NFL Cowboys 17 Eagles 3

EPL Tottenham 2 Aston Villa 0

MONDAY

JAIMIE LEONOFF ’15 WOMEN’S HOCKEY The junior goalie turned away 43 shots as Yale almost opened its season with an upset over No. 2 Boston College. A goal by forward Krista Yip-Chuck ’17 tied the game 3–3 halfway through the third period before the Eagles went ahead for good 4–3 with five minutes to play.

“We were pretty pissed at ourselves for not doing our job. They were making plays and we didn’t.” BEAU PALIN ’14 FOOTBALL YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

Elis fumble away opportunities FOOTBALL

BY GRANT BRONSDON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The undefeated No. 8 Fordham Rams figured to pose a significant obstacle to the Yale football team entering Saturday’s matchup at the Yale Bowl. In a 52-31 shellacking of the Bulldogs, the Rams continued to live up to their lofty ranking. But the Elis also contributed to their undoing. Three first half fumbles inside the Fordham 25-yard line hamstrung the offense, and the secondary had no answers for the Rams’ passing game, yielding 457 yards through the air. Injuries to starting quarterback Hank Furman ’14 and preseason All-American candidate Tyler Varga ’15 hurt the Bulldogs’ comeback chances as well. “We were pretty pissed at ourSEE FOOTBALL PAGE B3

GRANT BRONDSON/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Quarterback Morgan Roberts ’16 (No. 19) went 6–13 passing for two touchdowns backing up injured starter Hank Furman ’14 against Fordham on Saturday.

Volleyball sweeps

Yale stays undefeated BY FREDERICK FRANK STAFF REPORTER In a game void of the Bulldogs’ typical Ivy League late-game heroics, a tough Cornell defense kept the men’s soccer team off the scoreboard all the way through two overtimes to keep the game a tie, denying the Elis a chance to gain sole possession of first place in the conference standings.

MEN’S SOCCER Big Red goalkeeper Zach Zagorski had seven saves against the Bulldogs (3–7– 1, 2–0–1 Ivy), including an 82nd minute penalty stop against defender Nick Alers ’14. “Obviously we were going for the win, but we still control our own destiny after the tie,” captain Max McKiernan ’14 said. “We’re really optimistic about our situation [in the Ivy League].” While the team extended its shutout streak to two games, Yale missed its chance to establish itself as the clear leader in the Ancient Eight, as Penn and Princeton etched key victories to move into a tie with the Elis for the top spot. Cornell came into Reese Stadium with the best defense in the Ivy League, having conceded only eight goals on the season. The Big Red picked up its first point in the Ivy League so far but has remained winless in its past five games.

MARIA ZEPEDA/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Jenner Fox ‘14 (No. 10) fired off three shots to lead the Elis in Saturday’s match with Cornell. The game’s first scoring chance fell to forward Henry Albrecht ’17, who saw his 12th minute effort saved by Zagorski. Cornell had two of its first-half shots blocked and had its only shot on target saved by goalkeeper Blake Brown ’15 in the 41st minute. McKiernan and midfielder Scott Armbrust ’14 could not convert their

chances in the last five minutes of the half. “We’re playing good soccer on the defensive side of the ball and it’s showing on the stat sheet after each game,” Brown said. The second half started with a flurry SEE MEN’S SOCCER PAGE B3

Bulldogs topple Big Red WILL FREEDBERG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Setter Kelly Johnson ‘16 (No. 11) led the Bulldogs with 12 kills on Friday night and three aces on Saturday night. BY DIONIS JAHJAGA STAFF REPORTER For the Yale volleyball team, it does not seem to matter if the game is at home or away. For the past two years, the Elis have been piling up wins to remain undefeated in the conference since 2011.

VOLLEYBALL The Elis (13–3, 7–0 Ivy) extended their winning streak last weekend, beating Cornell

(6–11, 2–5) and Columbia (5–11, 3–4) by scores of 3–0 and 3–1, respectively. In their first road trip of the season, the Bulldogs overcame the challenge of facing Ivy competitors and their opposing crowds. “I think the team stayed really focused,” outside hitter Brittani Steinberg ’17 said. “We brought our own energy. I think that’s what helped us be so successful.” On Friday, Yale went largely unopposed in the first two sets, SEE VOLLEYBALL PAGE B3

STAT OF THE DAY 21

BY JAMES BADAS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER In a critical must-win matchup, the women’s soccer team did just enough to secure a home victory against Cornell, with a final tally of 1–0 Saturday night.

WOMEN’S SOCCER Yale (7–5–0, 2–2–0 Ivy) built off a strong performance against Marist last Monday night, earning its second shutout in a row. Cornell (7–5–1, 1–3–0), meanwhile, had any hopes of an Ivy title dashed: The team now finds itself sixth in the eight-team conference. The Bulldogs now find them-

selves fourth in the league, but the squad may just be getting on track. Head coach Rudy Meredith has stressed the importance of the team’s first-half play, in addition to sharpening up its defense. “When we don’t give up a goal early, we don’t lose,” Meredith said. Meredith has the statistics to back him up. In each of the five games in which the Bulldogs have shut out their opponent in the first half, Yale has won. The first half of the action on Saturday night saw a relatively balanced and uneventful game unfold, as the teams entered halftime in a scoreless stalemate. Though the Bulldogs did not yet SEE WOMEN’S SOCCER PAGE B3

JAMES BADAS/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Juliann Jeffrey ’14 (No. 10) scored in the second half.

CONSECUTIVE IVY LEAGUE MATCHES THAT THE VOLLEYBALL TEAM HAS WON, DATING BACK TO THE START OF LAST SEASON. THE BULLDOGS HAVE DROPPED JUST NINE SETS COMBINED IN THE PAST TWO YEARS AND HAVE NOT LOST SINCE A 3–2 LOSS AT DARTMOUTH NOV. 12, 2011.


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS MARK ARCOBELLO ’10 The left wing for the Edmonton Oilers had two assists in eight seconds in Thursday’s 3–2 loss to the New York Islanders.

FOOTBALL

’Dogs trounce ’Backs MEN’S HOCKEY FROM PAGE # both the power play and at even strength, while consistent defense from a veterandominated back line kept the puck out of Yale’s net for most of the night. The Bulldogs jumped out to an early lead when forward Charles Orzetti ’16 hammered home a backhand rebound just under the crossbar at 7:41 in the first period. Ontario Tech bounce right back, however, to tie the game 1–1 when Mitch Bennett scored on an assist from Cameron Yuill just 12 seconds later. Despite evening the score quickly, Ontario did not stay in the game long. Just over two minutes later, Hayden scored his first collegiate goal on a pass from linemate Frankie DiChiara ’17. “It felt really good,” Hayden said. “I had a huge smile on my face and it’s a great atmosphere here so putting the first one in is a great feeling.” Before the end of the first period, Yale widened its lead to two when captain Jesse Root ’14 knocked his first goal of the season past goaltender Colin Dzijacky. When the teams returned to the ice

for the second period of action, Ontario came out a step quicker than they had in the first. As a result, Brendan Wise scored a goal in tight on Alex Lyon ’17 just two minutes into the second period. After a 10-minute dead period with little action from either team, the Yale offense came alive and scored six unanswered goals to make the final score 9–2. Yale’s scoring spree began with a powerplay goal from Kenny Agostino ’14. Linemate Clinton Bourbonais ’14 fed Agostino a flat pass in between the hash marks and Agostino one-timed it past Dzijacky to make it 4–2. Before the period ended, Bourbonais struck again on the attack. This time he put away a short-handed goal for the Elis. Yale’s conditioning showed in the third period as they wore down Ontario Tech and ran away with the game, shutting out the Ridgebacks while simultaneously putting four goals past Dzijacky. A total of six penalties were called on the Ridgebacks in the third period, including a game misconduct. Two of these penalties overlapped, resulting in a fiveon-three situation midway through the

IVY

period. Hayden capitalized on the twoman advantage to score his second goal of the night. “We weren’t perfect by any stretch but I really like the fact that we got better as the game went on,” said head coach Keith Allain. “Our focus and discipline [were] great in the third period so all in all we got out of the game what we needed.” Ruffolo tipped a shot from Nico Weberg ’15, DiChiara blasted in a rebound and Stu Wilson ’16 knocked in a clean powerplay goal for the final result. The Bulldogs will play their season opener in the Ivy League Shootout tournament at the Prudential Center in Newark, NJ, this Friday, Oct. 25.

Leonoff attempted to cover the puck in the middle of a scram in front of the net, but the puck was eventually pushed in. “As much as it sounds horrible to blame a ref, the puck was covered and the ref didn’t blow the whistle,” Leonoff said. “If the goalie gets pushed in the net and they call it a goal, is it really a goal?” Motivated to make up for the goal a minute later, Yip-Chuck ripped a shot on net, got the puck back on the rebound and finished the goal. Forward Janelle Ferrara ’16 and Staenz assisted the goal, giving Staenz her second point of the game. The Eagles responded with four minutes left in the game, scoring a shorthanded goal of their own to take another one-goal lead. The score would hold steady for the remainder of the game, and Yale returned home with a 4–3 loss. The Bulldogs finished with 28 shots, less than the Eagles’ 47 but significantly more than the 17 they had against BC last year. “We’ve gotten a lot better at controlling the puck in the offensive zone and making quick decisions with the puck and moving the puck quickly,” Leonoff said. “We’ve been using our speed in the offensive zone to set the pace of the game.” Both Haddad and Leonoff said that

the freshman class, including Staenz and Yip-Chuck, will help to create a more successful season than last year’s 5–21–3 performance.

It was definitely disappointing to lose, knowing that we had come so close. JAMIE HADDAD ‘16 Women’s ice hockey This weekend was especially encouraging for the Bulldogs because BC and other non-Ivy teams are able to begin official practices and games much earlier in the year. Saturday was Yale’s first game, but BC began its season two weeks earlier and has already played six games. “I’m actually really excited that we

BOSTON COLLEGE 4, YALE 3

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Harvard

2

0

1.000

5

0

1.000

1

Penn

2

0

1.000

4

1

0.800

1

Princeton

2

0

1.000

3

2

0.600

4

Yale

1

1

0.500

3

2

0.600

4

Dartmouth

1

1

0.500

2

3

0.400

6

Brown

0

2

0.000

3

2

0.600

6

Cornell

0

2

0.000

1

4

0.200

6

Columbia

0

2

0.000

0

5

0.000

VOLLEYBALL IVY

Contact ASHTON WACKYM at ashton.wackym@yale.edu .

YALE 9, UOIT 2

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Yale

7

0

1.000

13

3

0.812

2

Harvard

5

2

0.714

10

6

0.625

3

Brown

4

3

0.571

8

10

0.444

YALE

3

2

4

9

4

Penn

3

4

0.429

9

9

.500

UOIT

1

1

0

2

4

Columbia

3

4

0.429

5

11

0.312

6

Dartmouth

2

5

0.286

9

10

0.474

6

Cornell

2

5

0.286

6

11

0.353

6

Princeton

2

5

0.286

6

11

0.353

Yale splits weekend games WOMEN’S HOCKEY FROM PAGE B4

OVERALL

played BC this early in the season,” Haddad said. “I didn’t know how it was going to go. … Even being this fresh and still a little bit underprepared, I think we did really well.” The Bulldogs are already seeing the benefits of their new strength and conditioning coach Emil Johnson, who also serves as director of strength and conditioning at Yale. “The one thing that we really took away from our off-ice training this season has been that you can always do better,” Haddad said. “We were faster than [BC] the entire game, which tires them out more than us. We’re in better condition than a lot of [our opponents].” The Bulldogs will test themselves against another tough Hockey East opponent as they travel to No. 7/8 Boston University (2–1–1, 0–0–0 Hockey East) on Saturday.

MEN’S SOCCER IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

1

Penn

2

0

1

0.833

5

6

1

0.458

1

Princeton

2

0

1

0.833

5

6

1

0.458

1

Yale

2

0

1

0.833

3

7

1

0.318

4

Harvard

2

1

0

0.667

3

6

2

0.364

5

Columbia

0

1

2

0.333

5

4

2

0.545

5

Brown

0

1

2

0.333

3

6

3

0.375

7

Cornell

0

2

1

0.167

6

3

4

0.615

8

Dartmouth

0

3

0

0.000

4

3

4

0.545

WOMEN’S SOCCER IVY

Contact GREG CAMERON at greg.cameron@yale.edu .

YALE 6, SACRED HEART 0

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

1

Harvard

4

0

0

1.000

8

3

2

0.692

2

Penn

3

1

0

0.750

9

1

3

0.808

3

Brown

2

1

1

0.625

7

3

1

0.682

4

Yale

2

2

0

0.500

7

5

0

0.583

4

Dartmouth

2

2

0

0.500

5

5

3

0.500

BC

1

0

3

4

YALE

0

3

3

6

6

Cornell

1

3

0

0.250

7

5

1

0.577

YALE

1

1

1

3

SH

0

0

0

0

7

Columbia

0

2

2

0.250

7

4

3

0.607

8

Princeton

0

3

1

0.125

5

4

4

0.538

Scrimmage

Elis find success at major regatta

YDN

The Head of the Charles regatta marked the end of the fall season for the men’s heavyweight crew team, while the lightweight squad will compete next week. MEN’S CREW FROM PAGE B4 and shows that we will be among the nation’s fastest crews come next spring.” The lightweight Elis finished in third behind rivals Harvard and Princeton in the Lightweight Eights event. Though they placed second in the 2013 IRA championships last spring, lightweight captain Matthew O’Donoghue ’14 said that this weekend’s performance was strong. Yale’s lightweight boat bolted off the starting line and reached

the first split with the fastest time in the field. The Bulldogs’ start may have been too fast, however, as Harvard and Princeton finished the second split seven seconds faster than Yale. Both squads would go on to maintain their lead over the Elis for the remaining two splits. “Every piece we do we learn a lot about the crew,” O’Donoghue said in an email to the News. “This experience will be good come spring season.” Both the lightweight and heavyweight teams raced boats

in fours events, also on Sunday. Yale’s two lightweight fours showed dominance with second and fifth place finishes. The heavyweight four finished the course in 17:28.418 for 13th place. Lightweight rower Eric Esposito ’17 entered the Club Singles event with the Narragansett Boat Club, having qualified through the club last year before starting school at Yale. Esposito earned a fifth place finish with a time of 19:31.413 to represent his club and school well. A heavyweight Eli boat also

rowed in the Club Eights event on Saturday and raced to a 10th place finish in 15:15.146.

The atmosphere at the Charles is always fun. It’s an enormous event. Zach Johnson ’14 Held annually for the past 49 years, the Head of the Charles is

the biggest two-day regatta in the world. It hosts over 9,000 athletes and 300,000 spectators, according to its website. “The atmosphere at the Charles is always fun,” Johnson said. “It’s an enormous event, with thousands of competitors, so it more or less serves as a reunion for the entire rowing community.” The heavyweight Bulldogs concluded their fall season with the Head of the Charles and now enter a five-month long offseason before they begin their spring

season at the end of March. The lightweights, meanwhile, are preparing for the Princeton Chase this Sunday, another event that will host every IRA team. “Such a strong performance through the whole team is exciting,” O’Donoghue said. “We’ll go back to work in search of more boat speed this week and test ourselves again next Sunday.” The lightweight varsity eight will start at 10:30 a.m. in Princeton, N.J. Contact GREG CAMERON at


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE B3

SPORTS

2

The number of former Yale wide receivers on the Vanderbilt coaching staff

Defensive coordinator Bob Shoop ’88 and offensive graduate assistant coach Chandler Hendley ’06 helped Vanderbilt upset No. 15 Georgia 31-27 on Saturday.

Yale spikes opponents

Rams butt Bulldogs FOOTBALL FROM PAGE B1 selves for not doing our job,” said captain Beau Palin ’14. “They were making plays and we didn’t.” Fordham (8—0, 2—0 Patriot) set the tone from the get-go during the first quarter. On the second play from scrimmage, quarterback Michael Nebrich hit wide receiver Sam Ajala on a deep bomb down the left sideline for a 68-yard touchdown. Despite Robert Clemons III ’17 returning the ensuing kickoff 64 yards, the Elis (3—2, 1—1 Ivy) came away empty-handed when Varga fumbled on a swing pass. After forcing a quick three-and-out, Yale marched right back down the field. Varga and Furman rushed for 62 yards down to the Fordham 1-yard line, but Ram linebacker Stephen Hodge got a helmet on the ball and forced Varga’s second lost fumble of the day. “We have to make sure we finish our drives off with at least field goal attempts,” said head coach Tony Reno. The next two defensive stands by Yale were perhaps the defense’s finest moments all game. After a defensive holding penalty on fourth down bailed out the Rams in Yale territory, defensive tackle Jeff Schmittgens ’15 picked off Nebrich and returned the ball to the Yale 36. During Fordham’s next drive, Yale’s defensive line continued to harass Nebrich and the entire Ram offense. After a pair of tackles for loss, Nebrich’s next pass was bobbled by his receiver and intercepted by Cole Champion ’16, giving the Bulldogs possession at the Fordham 32-yard line. Yale took advantage of the gift when Furman kept the ball on an option keeper and sprinted 17 yards for the touchdown, tying the game 7-7. It was Furman’s sixth rushing score of the season. Before the first quarter ended, however, Nebrich connected with Ajala in what would become a recurring theme of the afternoon. After a pump fake opened a seam downfield, Ajala hauled in a 29-yard catch for his second touchdown. “As a defense, the biggest thing is that we play each snap.” Reno said. After Fordham made a field goal to extend its lead to 10, Yale shot itself in the foot yet again at the end of a long drive. Ten plays in, Furman was hit in the backfield and fumbled — the third fumble of the first half for the Elis — and Fordham recovered at its own 18. “When you [make those fumbles] against a very good team, you’re going to put yourself behind the eight ball,” Reno

VOLLEYBALL FROM PAGE B1

GRANT BRONDSON/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

No. 32 Candler Rich amassed 159 rushing yards and a score on just 11 carries. said. A Fordham punt gave it back to Yale just before halftime, and Furman turned to Grant Wallace ’15, with the two connecting on three consecutive plays. After three more plays lost the Elis 3 yards, a field goal attempt from Kyle Cazzetta ’15 sailed wide left, and the Bulldogs headed to the locker rooms down 17-7 at the half. The initial drive of the second half for the Rams was a repeat of their first drive of the game. Nebrich hit Ajala downfield again for another 68-yard touchdown, their third touchdown connection of the afternoon. Furman, who was sacked to end the Bulldogs’ previous possession, left the game after the drive, and was replaced by back-up Morgan Roberts ’16. In a drive aided by a 15-yard targeting penalty, Cazzetta nailed an 18-yard attempt to cut the lead to 24-10. “Morgan deserved the opportunity to play,” Reno said. “Hank was banged up … and we chose to go with Morgan.” A failed Yale surprise onside kick attempt gave the Rams a short field to work with, and they soon punched in a touchdown run. But the Bulldogs quickly bit back. Candler Rich ’17, coming in after Varga limped off the field on the previous drive, announced his presence with a bang, breaking a 58-yard run into the Fordham red zone. Roberts squeezed a pass between defenders and hit wideout Deon Randall ’15 for a touchdown, narrowing the gap to 31-17. Two quick Ram touchdowns effectively iced the game for Fordham. A five-play drive culminated in a QB draw by Nebrich

Elis tie Cornell at home MEN’S SOCCER FROM PAGE B1 of chances for the Big Red. In the 52nd minute, Cornell had an effort go wide before Brown was forced into a save just 30 seconds later. Yale responded through defender Attila Yaman ’15 in the 72nd minute. In the sophomore’s second game for the Bulldogs since walking onto the team last spring, he forced Zagorski into a save to keep the score level. The Big Red had a great chance to break the deadlock in the 80th minute when Cornell forward Benjamin Williams got behind the Yale defense and blasted a shot that Brown parried down before recovering to smother the ball. The best chance of the game, however, came to Alers two minutes later. After a Cornell foul in the box, the defender stepped up and hit the resulting penalty kick to Zagorski’s left. The goalkeeper was up to the test and guessed correctly to save Alers’ effort. The rebound came to Alers for another chance, but again Cornell’s man between the sticks got up to deny him. While Albrecht had another shot before the end of regulation, the game remained scoreless and the contest went into overtime for the second straight time for both teams. Cornell had a good chance just 30 seconds into the first overtime, but again Brown closed the door on the Big Red. Winger Jenner Fox ’14 saw one of his team-high three shots saved by Zagorski in the 98th minute. The chance came during a spell of Eli pressure on Cornell’s net that included four corner kicks in the last three minutes. Yale would start the second overtime period with a great chance to open the scoring. With just under eight minutes left in the game, winger Cody Wilkins ’14 found free space and met forward Cameron Kirdzik’s ’17 cross with a header that bounced in front of Zagorski and over the crossbar. The Bulldogs had two more shots but could not manage to find the back of the net. Brown remained solid in goal for the Bulldogs in another stout performance

for a score, and Ajala caught a 33-yard touchdown on the next possession after a Yale punt. Ajala finished the day with 10 catches for 282 yards, a new school record for the Rams. “They have very talented receivers and their play action game was good,” Reno said. Rich burst through a hole down the middle of the field on Yale’s next possession, racing 48 yards for his first career touchdown. The freshman finished the game with 11 carries for 159 yards and a score. Though the Elis stopped Fordham on its next drive thanks to the Rams bringing in their backup quarterback, Roberts threw an interception to set the Rams up inside the 20, and they converted to make it 52-24. It was the most points allowed by Yale since 2003 when the Elis yielded 55 against Brown. Randall found the end zone on the next drive, as Roberts hit him for a 23-yard touchdown toss to limit the lead to 52-31, where it would stay. Yale returns to the road next Saturday against Penn. The game kicks off at 1 p.m. Contact GRANT BRONSDON at grant.bronsdon@yale.edu .

CORNELL 52, YALE 31

winning 25–12 and 25–18, before Cornell came out swinging in the third. The Big Red led by as much as five midway through the game, but an 8–3 run by the Elis tied the set at 22. Yale kept calm under the pressure and a kill by outside hitter Mollie Rogers ’15, sandwiched in between a pair of errors by Cornell, clinched the win. “It’s very important to have confidence in yourself [in late game situations] and not let the score get into your head,” captain Kendall Polan ’14 said. “We just had to perform at a higher level than we had been playing.” Polan dominated the assists category to lead both teams with 32 to go along with her 11 digs. Setter Kelly Johnson ’16 led the team in kills with 12, while outside hitters Steinberg and Mollie Rogers ’15 each produced 11. Steinberg’s kills came on an impressive 0.500 hitting percentage. The Bulldogs found more competition when they went down to the big city to face the Tigers on Saturday. After pulling away early to lead 7–0, Yale withstood a late assault by Columbia to take the first set 25–21. The Elis would carry that momentum into the second set to win 25–12. But Columbia came back strong for the third set and scored a pair of kills to break a 23-all tie. The Tigers forced a fourth set, causing Yale to regroup. “We needed to focus more on what we were doing instead of on what they were doing,” Poland said. “We just needed to play our game.” The Elis wasted no time building a 20–11 lead in the final round. The Tigers never recovered and eventually succumbed

to a 25–15 loss. Middle blocker Maya Midzik ’16 and libero Tori Shepherd ’17 recorded season highs with 10 kills and 10 digs, respectively. In total, the Elis had four players record kills in the double digits and four with at least 10 digs.

We brought our own energy. I think that’s what helped us be so successful. BRITTANI STEINBERG ’17

“It goes to show the depth in our team,” Polan said. “Anyone who isn’t playing could easily be starting on our team and would really be a big contributor.” Polan once again made her mark by setting up her teammates with 48 of the team’s 61 assists, but it was Steinberg’s 20 kills on a 0.514 hitting percentage that stole the day. Steinberg said the team’s passing was particularly strong on Saturday and helped set her up for several oneon-one plays. With the coming of fall break, the Elis will now have time to recuperate before heading to Providence, R.I. to face Brown on Saturday. “It’ll be nice not to have to worry about school,” Johnson said. “It’ll be a mental break for us, but physically we’ll still be practicing every day getting ready for Brown. It’ll be a great match.” The Elis will play Brown 5 p.m. on Saturday. Contact DIONIS JAHJAGA at dionis.jahjaja@yale.edu .

YALE 3, COLUMBIA 1

YALE 3, CORNELL 0

CORNELL

14

3

21

14

52

YALE

25

25

23

25

YALE

25

25

25

YALE

7

0

10

14

31

COL.

21

12

25

16

CORNELL

12

18

22

Bulldogs top Big Red WOMEN’S SOCCER FROM PAGE B1

and again denied Cornell with a save in the 108th minute. “Blake has been rock solid for us back there,” McKiernan said. “We have really talented young guys playing in our back line, not to mention the best defender in the league in [Alers]. We’re definitely happy getting those shutouts, and I think those guys are good enough to extend that streak moving forward.” The Elis extended their shutout streak to two games, their best so far this season. While the Bulldogs did not score late in the game to win, as they did against Harvard and Dartmouth, the tie keeps Yale in the mix at the top of the conference table with Princeton and Penn. McKiernan mentioned that the in-league success has always been the most important part of the team’s season and the positive results so far in the Ancient Eight mitigate the Elis’ nonconference woes. “The team confidence this year has been tested but never wavered,” Brown said. “We have a belief in what we are doing and the pieces are falling together at the right time. Our offense has been penetrating the box and finishing at crucial times and our defense has provided great protection. We still have most of the Ivy League to play, and it will be important to keep the momentum going on the road this weekend.” Yale’s next two conference games will be on the road as it will face leagueleading Penn and Columbia. Between those contests, the Bulldogs will play their last two nonconference games against local Connecticut rivals. The Bulldogs take on UConn at Reese Stadium on Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. Contact FREDERICK FRANK at frederick.frank@yale.edu.

YALE 0, CORNELL 0 YALE

0

0

0

0

0

CORNELL

0

0

0

0

0

break through, Meredith was satisfied. “I was happy with the first-half play since we did meet one of our goals in not giving up a goal,” Meredith said. “That was a big time boost.” The Yale fans in attendance at Reese Stadium did not have to wait much longer for a reason to cheer. Three minutes and 41 seconds into the second half, midfielder Juliann Jeffrey ’14 capitalized on a virtually empty net, notching her second goal of the season. Her first score came in the Marist matchup. Midfielder Geny Decker ’17 fired a shot at Cornell goalkeeper Kelsey Tierney, who managed to deflect but not corral the ball. The rebound landed at Jeffrey’s right foot, and she effortlessly found the back of the net. Jeffrey has seen increased playing time these past few games as midfielder Frannie Coxe ’15 is day-today with a back injury. Jeffrey has not wasted the opportunity. “Frannie’s working on coming back, and it’s been great to be able to play more minutes and contribute by scoring early in the Marist game on Monday and then again tonight,” Jeffrey said after the game. “[Coxe] is a huge part of the team, and hopefully she’ll be back next weekend.” The Bulldogs kept up the pressure, and very nearly earned another goal or two. One Yale corner kick in the 56th minute was especially promising, as some indecisiveness by Tierney allowed the ball to bounce around the box. Multiple Bulldogs got a foot on the ball, but no one was able to capitalize and direct it into the net. The defensive front, led by captain Shannon McSweeney ’14, played a clean game and has shown notable improvement over the course of the season. Especially encouraging has been the performance of goalkeeper Elise Wilcox ’15, as she has been in net for each of the past two shutouts. “A shutout is a shutout,” Meredith said. “I can’t even remember the last time we had an Ivy League shutout so that’s huge.” Incidentally, Yale’s last conference shutout came against Cornell

JAMES BADAS/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Goalkeeper Elise Wilcox ’15 (No. 1) saved five shots and recorded her second shutlast season. The Elis did not allow a goal against Brown in the final game of last season, but that was considered a non-league game since the teams played twice last year. Wilcox’s fellow keeper Rachel Ames ’16 is currently out of the picture as she recovers from a concussion she suffered last week. Before the injury, the competition for the spot in net did not discourage the goalies, but instead pushed the duo. “Rachel and I have to support each other the best we can because if you’re on the bench, you need to be helping the goalie who’s in play their best,” Wilcox said in an email. “If you’re not going to win the race, make the person in front of you break the record.” With a two-game shutout streak

under Wilcox’s belt, it would be surprising if she did not continue to start. Either way, Yale will be rolling as it enters this weekend, when it faces off against Penn (9–1–3, 3–1–0) with the most momentum the Bulldogs have had all season. Yale is scheduled to kick off at Penn on Saturday at 5 p.m. Contact JAMES BADAS at james.badas@yale.edu .

YALE 1, CORNELL 0 YALE

0

1

1

CORNELL

0

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0


PAGE B4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

“If you put a baseball and other toys in front of a baby, he’ll pick up a baseball in preference to the others.” TRIS SPEAKER HALL OF FAME OUTFIELDER

Yale competes at Head of Charles BY GREG CAMERON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER This weekend, the men’s heavyweight and lightweight crew teams emerged satisfied with their performance at the Head of the Charles in Boston, the most important event of the fall season.

MEN’S CREW The heavyweight varsity eight placed 11th out of 32 boats in the Championship Eights event, but more importantly, they were sixth out of Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) crews after placing seventh in the 2013 IRA championships last spring. “Although there were certainly parts of our race that could have been improved, we are pleased with our finish,” heavyweight captain Zach Johnson ’14 said in an email to the News. “The result reflects the excellent work that the guys put in over the summer ALLIE KRAUSE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

SEE MEN’S CREW PAGE B2

The men’s heavyweight and lightweight crew teams produced strong showings at the Head of the Charles regatta in Cambridge, MA.

Elis narrowly defeated in season opener

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Jamie Haddad ’16 scored in the first period to give Yale a 1–0 lead over Boston College. BY GREG CAMERON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Last season, No. 2 Boston College beat the Yale women’s hockey team in a 5–0 shutout. History did not repeat itself in the Bulldogs’ season opener last Saturday.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY After crushing Sacred Heart 6–0 in a scrimmage on Friday

night, the Elis (0–1–0, 0–0–0 ECAC) narrowly succumbed 4–3 to the Eagles (5–1–0, 1–1–0 Hockey East) on BC’s home ice in Newton, Mass. Yale held a 2–1 lead after the second period, but BC ramped up its offense in the third to come away with the victory. Freshman forwards Phoebe Staenz ’17 and Krista YipChuck ’17 both scored in their first game for Yale, and forward Jamie Haddad ’16, last season’s

top scorer, also tacked on her first goal of the season. “It was definitely disappointing to lose, knowing that we had come so close,” Haddad said. “But I think the main feeling was just excitement. … It sends a message to all the other teams in the league that we’re a different team this year.” Goaltender Jaimie Leonoff ’15, who ranked fourth nationally in saves last season, stopped 43 of the 47 shots fired at her.

Midway through the first period, Haddad scored to take an early lead off assists by forward Hanna Åström ’16 and defender Aurora Kennedy ’14. Just a few minutes later, an Eagle forward shot the puck from behind the net, deflecting it off Leonoff’s back and into the goal. For the next one and a half periods of play, both defenses held strong and the game remained tied. Facing a penalty kill with just over a minute

left in the second period, Staenz broke the tie with a shorthanded goal, assisted by defenseman Kate Martini ’16. After the second frame, the Bulldogs entered the locker room excited to hold a 2–1 lead. The Eagles, however, would not let them get away with a win. “I don’t think we came out in the third period with the same intensity that we had in the first two because we were winning and didn’t really expect that to

happen as easily as it did,” Haddad said. “We relaxed, and BC was still going full throttle as hard as they could.” Yale allowed a power-play goal five minutes into the third and another just four minutes later. With 10 minutes left in the period, the Elis were facing their first deficit of the game. The goal that gave the Eagles the lead was controversial; SEE WOMEN’S HOCKEY PAGE B2

Bulldogs sharpen skates against Ontario Tech BY ASHTON WACKYM STAFF REPORTER In their first action since winning the national championship in April, the Yale men’s ice hockey team skated and shot as if they had never left the ice.

MEN’S HOCKEY The Bulldogs came out victorious in their first scrimmage of the 2013–’14 season on Saturday night against the University of Ontario Institute of Technology at Ingalls rink. In a 9–2 performance from Yale, freshman gained experience and contributed on both offense and defense. Yale’s three goaltenders split time in the net. Each one played a period and combined to face a total of 18 shots. The Elis, on the other hand, put 51 shots on goal. “I thought all five lines played great and everybody contributed,” captain Jesse Root ’14 said. “Overall it was a great team win.” An impressive two-goal performance from forward John Hayden ’17 helped the Elis on SEE MEN’S HOCKEY PAGE B2

KEN YANAGISAWA/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

John Hayden ’17 scored two goals in his debut with the Bulldogs, a 9–2 win for Yale in a scrimmage against Ontario Tech on Saturday.

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