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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2014 · VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 88 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY SNOW

29 22

CROSS CAMPUS Yale is back on YouTube! At this point, Yale has definitely established itself as the Ivy League for viral videos. The Yale Undergraduate Admissions Office released a video on YouTube titled “Valentine’s Day at Yale.” The video opens with the lines “Snow is on the ground, love is in the air.” Highlights include light guitar music, spoken word poetry and clips of couples talking about their relationships à la “When Harry Met Sally.”

BASKETBALL MEN UNDEFEATED OVER WEEKEND

SENATE

SOM

Sen. Blumenthal endoreses Gary HolderWinfield

EVANS HALL INTERIOR SPACES EXPLORED

PAGES B1 SPORTS

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 3 THROUGH THE LENS

STEM RECRUITMENT

Planting the seed for growth

UNIVERSITY HIRES DIRECTOR, LOOKS TO PARTNERSHIPS, RECRUITMENT BY LAVINIA BORZI AND MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS STAFF REPORTERS

Down the portal. Yale Law

School is diving into the dark and lonely world of cybercrime this week. The conference being held this week, titled “Law Enforcement and Hacking: When Cops Control Your Webcam,” will discuss creepy topics including remotely enabling webcams, downloading illegal documents and how the police are hacking into your emails. Fifteen Most. The Crimson released its annual “15 Hottest Freshmen” feature this weekend. “How hot are they? Our third degree burns will answer for us,” the piece said. Selected students include Archibald I. H. Stonehill, who said his ideal date “would be a recreation of Kanye West’s ‘Bound 2’ music video,” and Mary F. Brown, who describes “maybe a private jet to Paris with Drake, or a fancy dinner with Drake, or just a super simple, stay at home and watch a movie date with Drake.” Your move, Rumpus. Fifty Most. IvyGate covered the release of 15 Hottest with a short review that said “While Yale’s Rumpus releases a similar ‘50 Most Beautiful’ feature each year, New Haven’s idea of beauty seems to include a lot of warm and fuzzy criteria like volunteering and having wholesome extracurriculars or alternative passions. Harvard only cares about how attractive your face is.” Was that a dig or a compliment?

Africa initiative progresses

D

uring the past four years, Yale has wooed science-strong high school seniors with colorful brochures, YES-Weekend and recruitment trips. In the first of a three-part series, Rishabh Bhandhari and Jennifer Gersten investigate where those efforts are headed.

BY RISHABH BHANDARI AND JENNIFER GERSTEN STAFF REPORTERS As a senior in high school, Tim McLaughlin was a highly coveted athlete. A varsity rower with impressive times for a lightweight, McLaughlin had offers in the fall of 2010 from several rowing powerhouses including the University of Washington, as well as Stanford, Yale

and Harvard. But schools also found McLaughlin appealing for a different reason: his aptitude for computer science. While McLaughlin was attracted to Yale’s rowing team and friendly campus, he was turned off by its reputation as a school lagging behind its peers in the sciences, technology, engineering and math. “There was just a sense that Yale

When University President Peter Salovey stepped up to a podium at his inaugural address last fall and announced his intention to expand the University’s presence in Africa, many eyebrows rose. Four months after Salovey’s address, the University’s expanded commitment to the continent has come into clearer focus. But rather than using a top-down administrative push, Yale has focused this expansion as a series of independent academic efforts centered on Africa. “Yale is a very decentralized place and this thing won’t work unless it’s driven by the interest of students and faculty,” said economics professor Ian Shapiro, who is heavily involved in the University’s Africa initiative. “Top-down things don’t work here.”

NEW PLACES, NEW FACES

wasn’t very strong in computer science,” he said. Despite Yale’s promise of recruitment, McLaughlin chose not to apply. He headed to Harvard as a member of its class of 2015, citing the combination of Harvard’s liberal arts curriculum and strong track record in producing excellent programmers.

Among the most significant efforts on the part of the administration is the recent hiring of a point person for Africa initiatives. Rachel Adams, whose official title is associate director for Africa, was hired this winter by the Office of International Affairs, which reports to University Vice President for Strategic and Global Initiatives Linda Lorimer. Originally from Zimbabwe, Adams arrived at Yale in December 2013 from South Africa, where she worked as a lead-

SEE YES WEEKEND PAGE 6

SEE AFRICA INITIATIVE PAGE 4

Staff find public transport lacking

Long store hours questioned BY J.R REED STAFF REPORTER As discussions about what business will come to occupy the space at One Broadway continue, store hours might be one one of the subjects under negotiation. Extended store hours along York Street and throughout the Broadway shopping district have forced one store to move to Chapel Street, raising questions about whether the longer business days University Properties enforces for

Are you an aspiring Chief Ronnell Higgins? Because the

Citizen’s Police Academy, a training run by the Yale Police Department, just opened up for registration.

Movements in the movies.

The Yale African-American Affinity Group held a film festival this weekend spotlighting the contributions of African-Americans in film.

the Shops at Yale are supporting or stymieing business around campus. In the aftermath of the real estate crisis of the late 1980s, the University bought storefronts along Chapel Street and Broadway. During former President Richard Levin’s tenure, University Properties was established in 1996 to help manage Yale’s commercial properties including retail stores, office space and residential units in the Elm City. As part of this initiative,the department SEE EXTENDED HOURS PAGE 6

Dating in the Dark. Want to win a blind date? Enter WKND’s The Blindest Date contest, open this week to lesbian and gay singles. Email elaina.plott@yale.edu for details on how to enter. THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1942 The 150th banquet of Phi Beta Kappa is announced, to be held at the New Haven Lawn Club. For the first time in history, invitations are extended to women. The organization voices hopes that as many women will attend as possible. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE goydn.com/xcampus

ALANA THYNG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The snow blanketing the city has made transportation to work for Yale employees without cars rather difficult. BY DAVID BLUMENTHAL STAFF REPORTER Most Yale employees come in cars, some walk, but those who ride the public bus system are severely inconvenienced. The incessant snow blanketing Yale’s campus this spring semester has only made the trip from home to work for employees that ride the CT Transit public bus system more complicated. Of the 10 Yale Dining employees interviewed, only two use the pub-

lic transit system. All said walking or owning a car was a far more reliable option than the transportation that the city provides. A Durfee’s employee who asked to remain anonymous said the CT Transit bus system does not fill her needs because there are not many options when her shift ends late at night. She added that the Yale Shuttle does not serve her neighborhood. “So how am I supposed to get home after that? I don’t even know if I’m going to have money for a cab.” SEE PUBLIC TRANSIT PAGE 4

KATHRYN CRANDALL/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

University Properties has set late opening hours for shops in the Broadway shopping district, in a move to keep the street safer at night.


PAGE 2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “At your age I had yet to learn that the capriciousness of life often overyaledailynews.com/opinion

For better withdrawal policy R

ecently, Yale’s policies on mental health, specifically forced medical withdrawal, have been thrust into the spotlight. Rachel Williams ’17 bravely published an account in the News of how she was forced to leave campus against her wishes due to her mental health (“We Just Can’t Have You Here,” Jan. 24). But another aspect of Yale’s regulations on students taking time off needs to be evaluated – the cases where strict policies pressure students into staying on campus when it may make more sense for them to leave. Yale’s policies on voluntary withdrawal have been criticized repeatedly over the last fifteen years and administrative action is long overdue. According to the Yale College Programs of Study, students in good academic standing can choose to take a leave of absence up until the tenth day of the term, with a guaranteed spot in the University upon returning the following semester. After the tenth day, however, students are no longer allowed to take a single semester leave of absence. Instead, if the decision is personal or academic, they are forced to withdraw for two consecutive semesters. Only if the withdrawal is requested for explicitly medical purposes, as determined by the director of Yale Health or Mental Health, can the student be granted a one-semester withdrawal. Because the University must clear withdrawals for mental health purposes, some mental health cases may get recorded as “personal” instead of “medical.” This is especially likely if the student’s mental health problems are self-diagnosed or even entirely undiagnosed. After withdrawing, students are asked to go through a readmission process that involves taking two courses, writing essays and undergoing multiple interviews. These strict regulations on withdrawal, although likely well-intentioned, may prevent students from taking time off when it is in their best interest to do so. Taking an entire year off can be much more daunting than a single semester and being asked to go through an extensive readmission process can also be a deterrent to withdrawing. In 1999, the Yale Herald reported on the case of a student who chose not to withdraw from Yale while her father was dying because regulations would have required her to take a full-year leave. The student was not given any sort of individual consideration outside of the standard policy on withdrawal for personal reasons. Luckily, she lived close enough to campus that she was able to commute frequently between home and school. Her solution would not have worked for a student who lived across the country. She explained her thoughts on Yale’s withdrawal policy to the Herald, saying, “I

would not have missed the last few weeks of my father’s life for anything. H o w e v e r, why should I be penalized DIANA for making ROSEN that judgment?” Looking Left Ya l e ’s readmission policy has likewise been criticized. Students who went through the process have told the News that the readmmission policy is neither transparent nor responsive to students’ needs (“Going into withdrawals,” Sep. 11, 2009). Complaints cited in the article included the financial burden of paying for the two outside courses required for readmission, unsatisfactory reasons for rejection and the timing of notice on the application. One student interviewed was notified in late December that he had not been readmitted for the spring term, at which point he had already signed the lease for his off-campus apartment. Of course, Yale’s policies on withdrawal and readmission are not entirely illogical. The University does not want students to leave on a whim or to use withdrawal as a way to avoid a bad transcript. Still, blanket policies like the ones that currently exist do not take into account individual circumstances. Given that the number of withdrawals is so low, it seems reasonable to ask that students’ needs in a withdrawal be evaluated on a case-by-case basis within a set of more lenient guidelines. Harvard College seems to have a much better set of policies. A leave of absence can be granted up through the seventh Monday of the semester, as opposed to Yale’s ten-day window. Students who petition for a leave after the seventh Monday but before Thanksgiving or April 15 are allowed to return the following semester and are asked to go through a much simpler readmission process. Harvard regulations state that students who petition after Thanksgiving or April 15 ordinarily will not be allowed to register for the next term, but there is room for individual consideration. Yale should consider modifying its policies on withdrawal and readmission to look more like the ones at Harvard. By changing regulations so students are not forced to leave campus for an entire year and go through an extensive readmission process as the result of withdrawing after the tenth day of the semester, the University will allow students to make healthier, simpler decisions to take time off from Yale.

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COPYRIGHT 2014 — VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 88

'THEANTIYALE' ON 'PLANNED SPONTANEITY'

G U E S T C O L U M N I S T S A R I A N A S H A P I R O A N D J A C O B WA S S E R M A N

Our ward, our responsibility

ANNELISA LEINBACH/ILLUSTRATION EDITOR

O

n Jan. 1, as the nation rang in the new year, New Haven welcomed a new mayor and six new alders, joining Yale’s new president who had been inaugurated three months prior. There may not have been fireworks, but this transition is certainly monumental. With new leadership, New Haven and Yale are poised to evolve our 300-year-old partnership into something more collaborative and equitable than ever. But all who live here should play a part in promoting that progress. For many Yale students, New Haven feels like home. But as transitory residents, we often question our role in this city. Do we deserve to engage in the political process? Conversely, do we have a responsibility to imagine and act on the future of this city? It’s our belief that the latter is true — that we, as Yalies and New Haven residents, can and should participate in the democratic process. New Haven’s political structure uniquely facilitates our participation in city affairs. Because the political districts, or wards, are small, each voter has a considerable voice. The 4,000 or so

DIANA ROSEN is a sophomore in Pierson College. Her columns run on Mondays. Contact her at diana. rosen@yale.edu .

Editorial: (203) 432-2418 editor@yaledailynews.com Business: (203) 432-2424 business@yaledailynews.com

EDITOR IN CHIEF Julia Zorthian

takes one's 'plans.'”

registered voters in each ward are represented by one alder. This hyper-local political system fosters a lively dialogue among residents and helps make New Haven the progressive city it is. Because we believe that students have great potential to make a difference in our city, we are excited to announce our candidacy as co-chairs for the Ward 1 Democratic Committee. The role of ward co-chair offers an opportunity to ground the democratic process in conversations with individual ward residents. This position invites creativity over a range of responsibilities. The duties of the ward co-chairs include voting to endorse mayoral and alder candidates and meeting regularly with a committee of registered Democrats in the ward. In Ward 1, that committee is comprised of students. In other words, Ward 1’s co-chairs don’t just represent constituents; they directly engage students in the important decisions of our local democracy. In running for this position, we hope to build on the work done by outgoing co-chairs Ben Crosby ’14 and Nia Holston ’14.

We aim to encourage progressive groups on campus to coalesce around the issues that matter to all of us as residents of New Haven. The agenda that we set for the two years of our term will be based on what voters care about. In campaigning for Alder Sarah Eidelson ’12 this fall, we had the opportunity to identify the issues that resonate with Ward 1 residents: forging a healthier town-gown relationship, reopening the Q House and preventing youth violence, among others. As co-chairs, we are committed to engaging Yalies in these ongoing processes. We want to unite diverse voices at Yale and create a space for politically minded groups to interact and collaborate in realizing our shared goals for the city. And we also want to draw in students new to politics in the hopes that they discover their potential to play a positive role in shaping this community. Most of all, we want to encourage all Yale students — whether or not they can vote in New Haven — to consider this place their home. As co-chairs, we will use our experience with commu-

nity building and political organizing, experience that will be essential as we work to build a strong and unified ward committee. Both of us were active in Sarah Eidelson’s re-election campaign this fall, which necessitated coalition building on campus. Ariana is an organizer with Students Unite Now, where she is working on a campaign for justice in financial aid. Jacob serves as legislative coordinator of the Yale College Democrats, leading advocacy efforts for progressive change at the state and local levels. We look forward to seeing where we can take the co-chair position. Fortunately, this role requires constant communication and collaboration with students. We hope you’ll join us in our mission to connect Yale students to New Haven politics. It’s our responsibility and privilege to play a part in the development of this dynamic city that we call home. ARIANA SHAPIRO is a sophomore in Branford College. JACOB WASSERMAN is a sophomore in Saybrook College. They are candidates for Ward 1 co-chairs.

GUEST COLUMNIST JEFFREY POWELL

L

Not jocks, just one of us

ike most faculty, during my first decades at Yale, almost all the time I spent on campus was focused on research and teaching. I sporadically attended music performances, plays at the Yale Rep, went to a few hockey games and averaged one football game each year. By and large, these things were amusements, not much more meaningful than television or movies. I was simply a consumer. Largely out of curiosity, two years ago I offered to serve on the Faculty Athletic Advisory Committee. Athletics at Yale is overseen by the Department of Athletics, and the appellation, “department,” is not a random choice. It has a function and status much like other departments at Yale. This experience has opened up to me an aspect of Yale that I had only been vaguely aware of. The members of this department, starting with Director Tom Beckett, do an absolutely first-rate job of overseeing a complex operation that contributes much to the Yale community. First-hand knowledge of the functioning of this department has given me great respect

for its efforts, and working with them has afforded me the opportunity to no longer just be a consumer. I can now contribute. In addition to serving on the committee, I’ve helped in recruiting for football coach Tony Reno and serve as the faculty liaison for the hockey team. I’ve also gained a new perspective on the role of sports at universities. I served as the Director of Undergraduate Studies of Biology and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology for 15 years. During this time, I often met students with a desire — indeed, a passion — to work in a research lab. Freshmen often seemed especially reluctant to express this passion, thinking, I suspect, that they would be viewed as geeks or nerds by their fellow students. I reassured them that passion for scientific research and becoming a lab rat was really no different from fellow students with a passion for sports becoming gym rats, or musicians becoming practice room rats. I had been a lab rat as an undergraduate and loved it so much that I never left. The point is, Yale College offers its students the freedom

and opportunity to pursue a passion, be it sport, musical instrument, writing, painting or laboratory research. The best training and facilities affordable are offered. There is seldom a ceiling to what can be achieved: publishing a paper in a firstrate science or literary journal, designing an award-winning solar-powered car, performing at Carnegie Hall, designing a monument for Washington, D.C., participating in the Olympics or winning a national championship. My interaction with student-athletes has led me to regard them no differently than students working in our labs. In fact, this year, the captain of the track team is also a student researcher in our labs! From interactions with student-athletes, I’ve learned that they do not always feel that faculty or even their fellow students view them in the same vein as students pursuing other passions. For this, I see no justification. It is dangerous and foolish to try to differentiate the value of these various kinds of pursuits, thinking some more “noble” or “academic” than others. After all, chess is sometimes covered

in the sports pages of newspapers. Pursuit of these activities often requires students to miss class work — and we, the faculty, need to be equally understanding and supportive regardless of the particular endeavor in which the student is engaged. Not only should we be passively supportive, I have learned how rewarding it can be to become actively involved in these extracurricular activities that are so much part of Yale. I encourage my faculty colleagues to cease being only consumers — as I was for so long — and become contributors. There are neither geeks nor jocks at Yale. There are simply a group of energetic, talented young men and women who have the opportunity to pursue a passion for four years, while simultaneously obtaining a first-rate education. Our responsibility as a faculty is to assure the latter happens. But, if we extend ourselves a bit, we can also have a role in the former. It’s worth it. JEFFREY POWELL is a professor of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology. Contact him at jeffrey.powell@ yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“Decisions are made by those who show up.” HARRY S. TRUMAN 33RD PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

300 attend ITASA conference BY AUDREY LUO CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Nearly 300 students from 30 colleges descended on New Haven this weekend for the 2014 Intercollegiate Taiwanese-American Students Association Conference. Hosted by ITASA, a nonprofit organization that aims to connect students to build a stronger Taiwanese-American community, the conference featured workshops, keynote speakers and social events about service and activism. The theme of this year’s conference, which was codirected by Kevin Chen ’14 and Monica Chen ’15, was “Work in Progress,” and organizers said they hoped the event would inspire attendees to put ideas into action and create positive change. “Our vision for our conference was that every attendee would leave with some tangible idea of how they would make an impact in their school or community,” Monica Chen said. “We really wanted to have workshops that were engaging and let people think for themselves.” Kevin Chen said many of the speakers invited were Yale alumni or Yale affiliates. The organizers wanted to show that the Taiwanese-American community at Yale has made a lot of strides, he said. The conference was split into three sections — “Blueprint,” “Calling All Workers” and “Abstract to Concrete” — and each section featured activities pertaining to each of the steps in the creation process. One of the keynote speakers for the conference was Peggy Kuo ’85, deputy commissioner of the NYC Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings, who is known for prosecuting war crimes in the Hague and obtaining a verdict that set a historical precedent by establishing rape as a crime against humanity. In her address, Kuo spoke about how her Taiwanese-American identity and interest in activism helped shape her career.

I spent [...] years trying to develop something so that you don’t sacrifice [...] to live a compassionate life. MAI-LY HILGART Founder of vegan fashion house Andrew Yang — founder and CEO of Venture for America, a company that helps undergraduates become entrepreneurs — gave the final keynote address, urging students to be unafraid of deviating from the popular paths of graduate school and careers in finance and to pursue entrepreneurship, activism and service. In America, Yang said too many college graduates shy away from the uncertainty of startups because they yearn for financial stability. But Yang warned against putting off dreams of entrepre-

neurship for a more stable postgraduate position. “If you go to law school and practice law for some years, you become a different person,” Yang said. “If you read contracts all day, you just upgraded your contract ability. Your ability to make a million dollars goes down.” Yang recalled one point in his career when his company crashed and he owed investors hundreds of thousands of dollars. He learned through this experience that opportunities do not necessarily arise in a linear fashion, he said. Rather than following established paths, more smart people in America should build companies and create jobs, he said. “There’s a saying in Taiwan that if you throw a rock on the street, you’ll hit an entrepreneur,” Yang said. ITASA attendees engaged in workshops on Friday and Saturday, including one called “Food for Thought,” in which students learned about sustainable food from Joann Lo ’97, executive director of the Food Chain Workers Alliance, and met the first cook of Silliman dining hall, Stuart Comen. In a workshop entitled “Translating a Dream, Building a Movement,” Leanne Mai-ly Hilgart, the 26-year-old founder of a vegan fashion house, spoke about her experiences in establishing her business. Named “the Rebel of Fashion Week” by CNN in 2013, Hilgart explained her mission to take animals out of the garment industry and develop apparel that is eco- and animal-friendly. “I spent my life savings and five really long intense years trying to develop something so that you don’t need to sacrifice anything to live a compassionate life,” Hilgart said. Students interviewed who attended workshops and keynote addresses said they found the speakers inspiring and appreciated the opportunity to be exposed to careers they otherwise may not have thought to explore. Andrew Luu, a student from Johns Hopkins University, said Kuo’s keynote speech was easy to relate to because the students in attendance were all ambitious people. Kuo’s message about chipping away the noise to figure out what is most important in life resonated with him, he added. Other students said they were excited to network with speakers, workshop leaders and other students. “Bob Wu, the president of Taiwanese-American Citizens League, said that Asian Americans should step up and take a role to build a community for ourselves,” said Jessica Yeh, a student at New York University. “After going to the workshop by the Tzu Chi Foundation, I really want to join the NYU Chapter of Tzu Chi.” Next year’s ITASA conference will be held at the University of Pennsylvania.

Final days for State Senate race BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTER Democrats in New Haven and West Haven are working overtime reminding voters of a simple fact: There’s an election in eight days. If they succeed, Connecticut State Rep. Gary Holder-Winfield has a lock on Mayor Toni Harp’s old state senate seat — at least according to U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal LAW ’73, who came to town Sunday to stump for the Democrat in the race. “The only real opposition here is complacency,” Blumenthal told more than 50 supporters crowded into Holder-Winfield’s Dixwell campaign office just over a week before the state representative squares off in a Feb. 25 special election for Connecticut’s 10th district state senate seat vacated by Harp when she assumed the mayor’s office in January. Holder-Winfield faces West Haven Republican Steven Mullins. Party affiliation is strongly in Holder-Winfield’s favor. Both cities are solidly blue, with New Haven not having elected a Republican mayor in 60 years. The district comprises about 42,000 voters in the western half of New Haven and 14,000 in West Haven. Entreating supporters to sign up for canvassing shifts, Holder-Winfield echoed Blumenthal’s warning. In a special election, he said, turnout is decisive. “People say ‘Democrat — you’ll probably win.’ Not if they don’t know there’s an election,” Holder-Winfield said. “It’s exactly what Senator Blumenthal said. I don’t believe in complacency … I have to demonstrate that I want to win this race.” Still, Holder-Winfield offered a confident message: “We should win this. There’s no reason to lose unless we go to sleep.” Holder-Winfield said he

ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Sen. Richard Blumenthal LAW ’73 campaigned for Gary Holder-Winfield in West Haven on Sunday. was out traversing the district Sunday, knocking on doors in West Haven and New Haven’s Newhallville neighborhood before a soup dinner in Westville. Mullins said he completed a speaking tour at a handful of New Haven churches before making the rounds in West Haven and then heading into Westville. Both candidates said they were undeterred by the winter weather. Were he to win, Mullins would be the first West Haven resident to represent the 10th district — and he says his street address brings a fresh perspective more valuable than party affiliation. Mullins dismissed Blumenthal’s endorsement as a distraction from the single issue that he said matters in the race: taxes. “[Holder-Winfield] can have pictures with any politicians he wants,” Mullins said. “The fact of the matter is that people are still leaving Connecticut in droves right now, and my opponent hasn’t made a commitment to oppose any new tax increase.” Mullins pledged to vote against all tax hikes — specifically condemning any move to impose a statewide property tax. He said he sees his base as being in West Haven, but that

New Haven voters appear amenable to his platform as well. Holder-Winfield parried criticisms that he is out of touch with West Haven residents, saying that the municipal boundary does not create distinct interests. “My message isn’t different,” Holder-Winfield said. “We always feel like we have very different issues. But when you boil them down to what they really are, they’re about public safety, they’re about education, they’re about jobs, they’re about whether our state is going to have a viable economy. Now that’s true of everybody.” Blumenthal briefly praised Holder-Winfield’s legislative accomplishments — his leadership on the 2012 repeal of the death penalty and on education reform — before dwelling on the candidate’s character. Holder-Winfield has two qualities critical to public service, Blumenthal said: integrity and willingness to listen. “Whether you agree with him or not, you know what [Holder-Winfield] tells you is what he believes,” Blumenthal said. “More than any other quality, integrity matters today. It’s what people prize, what they want … He is someone whose integrity is unquestion-

able.” Mullins did not disagree, questioning the integrity of the New Haven City Clerk’s office instead. He cited an incident at the beginning of the month in which one of his volunteers was told he could not pick up 1,000 absentee ballot applications, as the volunteer had requested. It took a consultation with City Corporation Counsel Victor Bolden for City Clerk Michael Smart to hand over the applications, Mullins said. He cited “corruption” as one of a number of alleged wrongdoings on the part of the clerk’s office which Mullins insisted create grounds for Connecticut’s secretary of the state, Denise Merrill, to intervene. Merill responded to a letter Mullins sent to the secretary’s office, saying she could not preemptively intervene in a local election, he added. “Of course she’s not going to intervene,” Mullins said. “It’s a political office. And the people I’m talking about are Democrats.” Both candidates have qualified for public financing and are eligible for a grant of roughly $70,000. Contact ISAAC STANLEYBECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .

Calhoun hosts reunion

Contact AUDREY LUO at audrey.luo@yale.edu .

ALANA THYNG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Calhoun College hosted an alumni reunion, which marked the third residential college reunion at Yale.

BY PHOEBE KIMMELMAN STAFF REPORTER

ALANA THYNG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The Intercollegiate Taiwanese American Students Association held a conference that aimed to build a stronger Taiwanese-American community.

This past weekend, Calhoun College hosted a reunion for its alumni — the third residential college reunion ever to take place at Yale. Over 200 Calhoun alumni, with graduation years spanning more than 60 years, gathered from Friday to Sunday to reconnect with their old home. Calhoun is the third of Yale’s residential colleges to have a college-wide reunion, with Ezra Stiles College and Pierson College having hosted individual residential college reunions last year. According to Stephen Blum, senior director of strategic initiatives at the Association of Yale Alumni, the AYA plans to coordinate two residential college reunions each year in the future. Blum also said these reunions put no extra financial strain on Yale, as the costs of the entire event are covered by the existing budgets of the AYA and of the hosting residential college. Attendees were invited to

a host of workshops and panels, ranging from “Calhoun in Washington: A Panel Discussion with Calhoun Alumni Who Have Distinguished Themselves in Public Service” to a lecture titled “A Brief History of Calhoun.” According to Calhoun Master Jonathan Holloway, the event “really worked beautifully” and gave alumni from as far away as Paris and Hawaii an opportunity to remember their college days. “We wanted to [let alumni] build and rebuild the community on their own terms,” Holloway said. When planning the weekend’s activities, Holloway said he and the Association of Yale Alumni took care to organize programs that would interest the diverse group of alumni attending the event, though they also wanted to allow the alumni to have enough unscheduled time to socialize with old peers. Holloway also said he found it important to take a step back and acknowledge Calhoun’s name and identity, especially as Yale prepares to name two

new residential colleges. This interest was reflected in Saturday’s panel discussion, “What’s in a Name? A Panel Discussion of the History and Legacy of the Name Calhoun.”

We wanted to [let alumni] build and rebuild the community on their own terms. JOHNATHAN HOLLOWAY Master, Calhoun College Holloway said the death of Calhoun Dean Leslie Woodard last fall was mentioned multiple times throughout the weekend, though the weekend was not necessarily focused on her legacy. Matt Krinz ’83 described the experience of being back in the college as “déjà vu all over again,” adding that although he enjoyed seeing how much of Calhoun has remained constant, he was struck by the removal of a beloved tree in

Calhoun’s courtyard, which used to house a tire swing and be affectionately known to students as “the tree.” Leo Stevens ’05 said the best part of the event was running into people in different classes who he had not seen at University-wide class reunions. This sentiment was echoed by Barbara Burt, assistant director of strategic initiatives at the Association of Yale Alumni, who said inter-class mingling was one of the primary goals of planning college-wide reunions. Erin Johnson ’08 said her favorite part of the weekend was the “dinner-dance combo” for alumni on Friday night, which featured a dinner in Commons and an afterparty in the Calhoun dining hall. Johnson said the event was “a nice way to tie [everything] together.” Morse College will be the next residential college to hold its own reunion — an event that will take place this spring. Contact PHOEBE KIMMELMAN at phoebe.kimmelman@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“A little snow, tumbled about, soon becomes a mountain.” WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE ENGLISH PLAYWRIGHT AND POET

University hires point person for Africa Initiative AFRICA INITIATIVE FROM PAGE 1 ership program manager for the consulting firm McKinsey & Company. Before that, Adams received a masters in African studies from Oxford as a Rhodes scholar. “I’ve been here two months and I’ve spent that time building relationships with students and faculty,” Adams said. “[I’ve been] learning what Yale has been doing already in the past and I’ve been excited by the amount of energy and the speed at which we’ve started to move.” Lorimer’s office hired Adams after the staff member tasked with coordinating the University’s efforts in the Middle East and Europe left. Thus far, Adams has traveled to Nigeria with Shapiro. She also plans to travel with School of Management Associate Dean David Bach. Faculty members involved with projects in Africa, as well as Adams herself, said her role will essentially be twofold: connecting members of the Yale community to individuals and institutions in Africa and facilitating coordination between Africarelated projects within the University. According to economics professor Christopher Udry, most of the Yale-Africa connections thus far have emerged from faculty efforts, though the Yale administration has been financially and logistically supportive. Shapiro said the University is taking significant steps to expand the number of faculty interested in Africa. Currently, he said, there are searches in the English, Anthropology, and Economics Departments to replace faculty members who were interested in Africa but left their positions at Yale.

MULTIPLE SETS OF EYES ON AFRICA

RACHEL ADAMS

Rachel Adams is the new associate director for Africa at the Office of International Affairs.

Ad a m s ’ h i r i n g co m e s i n conjunction with a proliferation of partnerships between the University and African institutions. The School of Management has taken the most active role of any of Yale’s schools. The Global Network, a network of business schools spread throughout the globe founded by SOM Dean Edward Snyder in 2011, already includes two African schools — one in South Africa and another in Ghana. Shapiro said he hopes to see the expansion of similar partnerships in the future. Bach said the school is interested in expanding the network and including more schools in Africa. He will visit the Lagos Business School with Adams in March. Bach said that SOM’s involvement with Africa began independently of the recent University-wide initiative. But Salovey’s announcement that Yale will be moving more towards Africa, he said, has helped to galvanize interest both at SOM and throughout the University as a whole. “With the leadership of President

Salovey we are moving more quickly and in a coordinated fashion,” Bach said. Concrete partnerships have also emerged out of independent faculty-driven research. Udry’s research in Ghana has spurred significant collaboration with the University of Ghana. Udry has partnered with the Ghanaian university for a longitudinal survey of 5,000 households across the entire country. The survey, designed by faculty at both institutions, will help to “draw connections in the long-term between different aspects of people’s lives,” Udry said. Udry’s collaboration with the University of Ghana highlights some of the challenges facing Yale’s efforts in Africa. According to Udry, there are “huge asymmetries” between the resources and infrastructure available to each institution. But while this can be a challenge, Udry said, it is also an advantage of such partnerships. Though Yale has immense resources, the University of Ghana has a superior understanding of how to work on the ground in its home country. Still, Udry added, any current or future partnerships will need to be driven by common interest, teaching and learning. The partnerships extend beyond academic institutions. According to Udry, Adams is working on a partnership between one of the traditional rulers in Ghana and the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Science. “They’re interested in protecting natural resources within a traditional area of Ghana, so [Adams] helped spark this,” Udry said.

STUDENTS AT THE FOREFRONT

According to Shapiro, Yale students are going to be key actors in the Africa initiative. Both Udry and Shapiro pointed to expanded funding for Fox fellowships for students from the University of Ghana — which bring graduate students to Yale for a year — as a prime example of increased partnership and recruitment. The University of Ghana will be the second African university after the University of Cape Town—Adams’ alma mater—to participate in the fellowships. Udry said that beyond Adams’ hiring, the largest role of the administration in expanding efforts in Africa has come in the form of fundraising. The University has also received a major donation from an alumnus to bring more students from Africa to Yale, he said. “That will be the first concrete step we’ve seen,” Udry said of the administration’s effort. This summer, a group of students from Africa will participate in a trial launch of an education program that was already in the works this fall. They will be traveling to high schools in Ethiopia and Ghana and teaching a variety of intensive

courses, including SAT prep classes. This year’s program will only be a pilot version, Shapiro said, and Yale will search for alumni funding to possibly include more schools and more students. Adams said this initiative is designed to increase Yale’s visibility, and to raise awareness about higher education in the U.S. — but that it is not a direct recruitment effort. But although recruiting students is not a direct aim of this particular program, it is still a desirable outcome of many of the Africa outreach endeavors, she said. She added that increasing Yale’s visibility in Africa will be essential for all ongoing initiatives — building partnerships, encouraging scholarship and recruiting students — especially because Yale has lagged behind in reaching out to Africa, compared to other American institutions. “Yale has a very quiet brand and I think that’s fantastic, but I think we’re going to have to be creative about how to make ourselves more visible,” Adams said. “If we want to increase partnerships and move across regions we’re going to have to think about how our brand can be a little bit louder.” But Yale will have to be careful about the nature of its recruitment, Adams said. Although Adams wants to bring more students from Africa, she added that she does not want to completely extract them from their environment — a displacement that some experts label a “brain drain” because it removes talented students from their home countries’ social and economic communities. Adams said it is actually beneficial to a continent when students study in the U.S. for a few years and then return to work in their home country. Many are choosing this route, especially because of recent economic and political development in Africa, she said, and that growth is a major part of what is attracting a lot of attention to the continent, and not only from Yale. Bach said that in recruiting, the top priority is providing talented people with the best opportunities. If these opportunities take students out of their country for a period of time, that still benefits the country in the end, he said. For SOM in particular, attracting students to the regular MBA program and the postMBA program for advanced management will not only help African students return to their country with the capacity to make a difference, but also contribute to creating a class of globally mobile managers. “The story of Africa is changing, people are reporting about it differently and all of us are affected by these stories,” Adams said. “We all acknowledge that there is so much change and opportunity, and we all want to be part of that story.” Contact LAVINIA BORZI at lavinia.borzi@yale.edu and MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS at matthew.lloyd-thomas@yale.edu .

Public transit timing inconvenient for staff PUBLIC TRANSIT FROM PAGE 1 Any deficiency of public transit is a tremendous hazard for New Haven residents, according to the 2012 Data Haven WellBeing Survey administered by the New Haven public information nonprofit DataHaven. The survey said that 27 percent of Greater New Haven households are “zero car” households with “no reliable vehicle” and that, because of this, they are denied access to approximately half the jobs in the Greater New Haven area. Former mayoral candidate Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM ’10, advocated fusing Yale and New Haven’s public bus systems as part of his campaign. “Splitting the populations into

Americans have [… a] love affair with our cars. There’s a prejudice against public transportation. CAROL NARDINI two groups—one that has transportation and one that doesn’t — I don’t think that it’s the right way to provide services to people in the city,” he said. However, some dining hall employees do manage to take

advantage of the transportation services the City of New Haven offers. Debby Hill, who works as a cook in the Calhoun College dining hall, takes the bus daily. She said she needs to rise at around 5 a.m. in order to arrive for work on time: 6:30 a.m. Hill, a Westville resident, said that she takes greater issue with the fact that the buses do not drop people off in a safe spot than reliability. “I think they don’t let you off in a place where you can get of and go right onto a sidewalk,” she said. “Some people have got to walk around, and that’s dangerous.” However, Phillip Allen, who works in the Silliman dining hall Saturdays, Sundays and Mondays, said that the buses’ reliability is generally an issue and that he found it “kind of difficult” to get to work on time unless he plans to arrive at work 45 minutes before he is required to be there. New Haven transportation officials had varying opinions on why Yale Dining employees did not use the city’s public transit system. Carol Nardini, a retired New Haven resident who has lived in the city for years and serves on Mayor Toni Harp’s Transit Commission, agreed that there are few public transit options late at night and on the weekends. She added that one of the other obstacles public transit system’s face is an undeniable bias in American culture towards

ALANA THYNG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Oftentimes, walking is a more reliable way for employees to get to work than taking the CT Transit buses. car ownership. “All of us Americans have such a real big love affair with our cars,” she said. “There’s a prejudice against public transportation.” Nardini said she thinks the greatest problem CT Transit faces is a lack of publicity. She said the Transit Commission is trying to make the bus more “userfriendly” by distributing Bus Passes that can be used anywhere in the city, and that New Haven should view its bus system as an asset.

“As a New Haven resident, I really like having a bus system,” she said. Regardless, all dining hall employees interviewed said Yale College dining hall Managers, Deans and Masters — who will even house dining hall workers in Masters’ Apartments in order to ensure their safety — have made every effort to be accommodating. Tychelle Gibson, who works in the Timothy Dwight dining hall, said that although she lives in Bethany, Yale dining hall

managers would arrange to have her shuttled to work if need be. Gibson said Yale provides shuttle service for people who have trouble getting to work during inclement weather, but that they do not provide transportation home. Teresa Morrison said that, while the Morse dining hall was short two or three people on the day Winter Storm Pax struck, the students were “understanding.” Shamonte Payne, who also works in Morse, said that during storms, students regularly inquired about

the safety of dining hall employees. “It feels good to be appreciated,” he said. “It goes both ways. We think of them, they think of us.” According to the 2010 American Community Survey, a subsidiary of the U.S. Census, New Haven’s public transit ranks 24th nationally in terms of ridership, with 13.03 percent of residents using its buses. Contact DAVID BLUMENTHAL at david.blumenthal@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“The loveliest thing you can cook for someone who’s close to you is about as nice a valentine as you can give.” JULIA CHILD AMERICAN CHEF AND AUTHOR

Decarcerate Connecticut mobilizes BY SEBASTIAN MEDINA-TAYAC STAFF REPORTER Decarcerate CT, a new grassroots organization that formed in opposition to the transfer of 1,120 incarcerated women from Danbury federal prison to prisons across the country, is rallying faith and community groups to sign on to its four-part resolution calling for an end to mass incarceration in Connecticut. The community resolution calls for a decrease in the number of non-violent offenders who serve prison time, a reduction in the budget of the criminal justice system, an increase in resources allocated to human services and an improvement in prison conditions. At one of their biweekly meetings last Monday, members of the group discussed their strategy to

“spark a state-wide discussion” on mass incarceration by working with groups to endorse the community resolution and then hold public actions to raise its profile. “We try not to bind ourselves to specific legislation but rather work to shape legislation based on the community’s needs,” said Gregory Williams DIV ’15 a member of Seminarians for a Democratic Society. Groups that have endorsed the resolution include ANSWER CT, Dixwell United Church of Christ, Unidad Latina en Accion and the Unitarian Society of New Haven. The new organization was forged after the Bureau of Prisons announced last summer that Danbury prison, the only women’s federal prison in the Northeast, would become the 27th men’s federal prison on the Northeast. Many of the women

would be moved to a newly constructed federal prison in Alabama.

[We try to] shape legislation based on the community’s needs. GREGORY WILLIAMS DIV ’15 Member, Seminarians for a Democratic Society A majority of the women in Danbury have children under 21, and activists say that separating the families risks the children’s well-being as well as the women’s hope for a successful re-entry. Their latest public action was a rally on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day in January

which brought together around 80 people in front of City Hall to protest the human and fiscal costs of mass incarceration and kick off the community resolution. According to the Vera Institute of Justice, the cost of mass incarceration in Connecticut is over $929 million. While approximately 70 percent of Connecticut’s population is white, over two-thirds of its prisoners are of color. “Faith communities need to come together as one large group in face of such huge discrimination,” said Barbara McCormack of the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, which is voting on the resolution. “We need to form a united front with a very loud voice for this. I’m not advocating politics. I’m advocating for justice.” According to Michelle Alex-

ander’s new book on race and mass incarceration, “The New Jim Crow” — often cited by Decarcerate activists when they discuss or protest incarceration — a black man will be sentenced an average of a 20 to 50 times longer prison term than a white man convicted of the same drug crime. Barbara Fair, a Decarcerate CT organizer, said more resources must go toward youth services and prisoner re-entry programs that reduce incarceration, as well as alternatives to incarceration such as community mediation and rehabilitation. After relentless activism on the part of grass-roots organizers and pressure from 11 senators, including both Connecticut senators, the transfer was stalled. A compromise is currently being negotiated.

As it stands, the Bureau of Prisons is offering to allow the women of Danbury to remain as long as they are allowed to build an additional men’s prison in the state. “We oppose this. If they build it, they’ll find a way to fill it and that is not what we want,” Fair said. While the transfer has been stalled for the women with families in the region, Fair alleged women on the inside reported that they are being asked to renovate the facility in anticipation of the men’s arrival, and that some have been exposed to asbestos. The U.S. has the highest proportion of incarcerated people in the world. Contact SEBASTIAN MEDINATAYAC at sebastian.medina-tayac@yale.edu .

Fortnight debuts on Valentine’s Day BY RACHEL SIEGEL STAFF REPORTER

ALLIE KRAUSE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

After its success with Nom, Yale Pop-up has begun another venture with Fortnight.

On Friday night, Yale Popup’s newest culinary venture, Fortnight, made its debut, offering diners a five-course Valentine’s Day meal. Fortnight is the third project of Yale Pop-up, a student group founded in 2013 that organizes a new food-related enterprise each semester. Unlike the group’s first two projects — the Underground Noodle Collective and Nom — Fortnight will be open only every other Friday night and will serve a new prix-fixe, five-course meal each time. Approximately 60 people attended Fortnight’s opening dinner on Friday in the Davenport Dive, which had been transformed with brown paper table coverings, dimmed lights and white Christmas twinklers. In celebration of Valentine’s Day, the theme of the night’s meal was “Stages of a Relationship.” “The opening went well in general because we’d tested this menu before,” said Lucas Sin ’15, one of the founders of Yale Pop-up and head chef for Fortnight. “Our timeliness was

good. Nothing was slow.” The first course, “Love at First Sight,” featured a sweet potato and carrot soup. Cameron Yick ’17, who attended the Fortnight opening with his girlfriend, said the waiter told him the soup was poured at the table to represent falling in love. Later courses included “The Honeymoon Phase,” “Meeting the Parents” and “Breakup,” featuring a heart-shaped cake broken in half. The finale, “Make-up Sex,” was all about the chocolate. Carolina Rivera ’16, who directs Fortnight, said the Yale Pop-up team had been planning Fortnight’s opening night for several weeks. The next menu theme for Fortnight has yet to be determined, she added. Sin said the team members met to deliberate what ingredients and tastes matched the different stages of a relationship. While the “Breakup” stage, for example, required some sort of spicy kick, he said chicken and egg would be more suited to the “Meeting the Parents” stage. For the last course, Sin said he wanted something surprising yet inevitable — a chocolate pot de crème. Rivera said the only glitch of

the evening was that the team of cooks and administrators was initially short-staffed, although the staff found reinforcements. Sin said one of the highlights of the evening was when he went to deliver one of the final courses to a table and realized he was serving one of his food idols, Burkhard Bilger, a contributing writer for the New Yorker, here dining with his son. “I said something ridiculous like, ‘I’m only 20,’ and then I ran to the kitchen and I cried,” Sin said. “Bilger said he really enjoyed himself and they ate everything. I’m so happy.” Citing the raspberry ice cream, which had jalapeño in it, Yick said he was most intrigued by the inventiveness of the meal’s flavor combinations. Thomas Yabroff ’16, who also attended the opening, said the atmosphere of Fortnight was different than that of Yale Popup’s other enterprises. The setting ’s intimacy completely transformed the Davenport Dive, he said. Students can make reservations online for Fortnight’s next opening on Feb. 28. Contact RACHEL SIEGEL at rachel.siegel@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“Men love to wonder, and that is the seed of science.” RALPH WALDO EMERSON AMERICAN ESSAYIST AND POET

Students flock to YES Weekend to explore STEM

Yale has a very quiet brand. … We’re going to have to be creative about how to make ourselves more visible. RACHEL ADAMS Associate director for Africa, Office of International Affairs Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Jeremiah Quinlan said YES-W and the admissions office’s broader campaign began under the tenure of his predecessor Jeffrey Brenzel in order to attract the country’s brightest young scientists and engineers. Quinlan added that in the past, many of these students may not have realized the University’s strength in STEM fields because of Yale’s historical emphasis on the humanities, and the small size of its engineering and science departments. “I want students to realize that they sacrifice nothing by coming to Yale to study science,” Quinlan said. “[The students] are getting the best undergraduate education in terms of both opportunities and resources.”

GETTING THE WORD OUT

As a team of prefrosh swarmed around her with saws and hot glue guns in the Center for Innovation, Engineering and Design on Saturday night, Jordana Williams ’15 plucked a plush squirrel from her bandana and duct-taped it to a red Solo Cup. The group had yet to decide what they were going to do with it. “Not clear, but it may go sliding down a tube,” she said, yelling over the D.J. Williams’s high school students were among a group of over 100 highly qualified science and engineering high school seniors who were flown to campus this weekend to see Yale’s strength in the STEM fields up close. Quinlan said the students, all of whom are regular decision applicants to the class of 2018, had received likely letters from the University after the admissions office, with input from science and engineering faculty, had identified students whose credentials made them likely candidates for acceptance. “YES-W is an opportunity for us to begin a conversation with these students as to why Yale is the best fit for them,” Quinlan said. He added that likely letters can also

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attempted to revamp the streets around campus by bringing in new businesses, and establishing rules for stores under their purview, including extending the length of the typical business day by requiring many stores in the area to stay open until 9 p.m. According to School of Management professor Douglas Rae, these extended hours make Yale students and staff feel safe and comfortable walking in these areas — which was not necessarily the case 25 years ago. “They have sought to make the area something of a destination shopping area for people who don’t live right on campus,” Rae said. “They have been very successful in implementing that strategy.” But because of these long hours, Therapy Boutique moved from its previous space at 286 York St. to its current residence at 1022 Chapel St. this past November. While the manager could not be reached for comment this week, in a past

interview with the News, store manager Richard Lee said the long hours University Properties has placed on many of the shops in the area influenced the change of location. Employees interviewed said the move has not seemed to affect business in a significant way. While these long hours were one of the reasons Therapy Boutique transferred locations, the heads of other stores in the Broadway shopping district interviewed said that the long hours did not cause trouble for their businesses. Denali store manager Chris Sciarappa, whose store stays open until 9:00 p.m. on weekdays, said that though University Properties sets these hours, they have not affected his business. In fact, Sciarappa said many customers stay in the store past closing time to buy apparel. Like Rae, Scirappa added that he believes the University pursued this strategy in order to make the downtown area safer. “You can do that if everything

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Hundreds of accepted students with interest in majoring in a STEM field were invited to see the University’s science resources this past weekend. office has begun making the University’s presence felt at national science conferences and summer programs, such as FirstRobotics and Research Science Institute. Fernando said this is an effective way for the University to convey its strengths to a national audience and younger high school and middle school students. While the admissions office needed to convince skeptics in the University administration when YES-W was first piloted in 2011, Fernando said the entire University community has since been supportive and enthusiastic about the admissions office’s endeavors. He added that faculty members, current undergraduates and alumni have asked the admissions office how they can help in attracting top high school students to Yale.

SAYING YES TO YES-W

All 18 high school students interviewed at this year’s YES-W said they were impressed by what they had seen. “I’ve never thought about Yale before this,” said Christopher Wang, a high school senior. “I thought, Yale’s good at political science. But I talked to a lot of math and science majors about their professors, and everything about Yale impresses me.”

UP calls for long workday EXTENDED HOURS FROM PAGE 1

Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry

Students

McLaughlin, who took graduate courses in computer science as a freshman at Harvard, is the type of STEM-oriented student Yale is now looking to attract with outreach programs such as Yale Engineering and Science Weekend (YES-W). The three-day program, which ends Monday afternoon, allows the admissions office to highlight the opportunities and resources available to top high school seniors interested in STEM fields. YES-W is now in its fourth year, and was recently renewed for three more.

be given to students who are not invited to YES-W or do not identify as science or engineering students. In addition to tours of campus science facilities, this year’s YES-W offered numerous opportunities for students to connect with Yale’s science faculty. Seven STEM professors and faculty members, including Vince Wilczynski, the deputy dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, gave master classes for YES-W attendees. Students also attended panels featuring faculty members, students and alumni of the University and a Master’s Tea on Sunday afternoon with James Rothman ’71, the Yale professor and 2013 Nobel Prize winner in Medicine. On Monday, the last day of the program, students will meet with faculty advisors matched to them based on their academic interests over lunch in residential college dining halls. “As far as I’m aware, [YESW] is the only program of its kind among Yale and its peer network,” said Ayaska Fernando ’08, senior assistant director at the admissions office and the office’s director of STEM recruitment. He added that although the misconception still lingers that the University trails its peers in providing a world-class STEM education, programs such as YES-W have been successful in gradually raising applicants’ awareness of the University’s resources. According to Fernando, the provost’s office approved the admissions office’s request to fund YES-W for another three years after receiving positive feedback from students who attended the program. Although YES-W is the most significant part of Yale’s outreach efforts to STEM students, Quinlan said the University relies on a host of other programs and initiatives to raise student knowledge of the University’s science and technology departments, many of which have improved since former University President Richard Levin pledged $1 billion in 2001 to revamp Yale’s STEM facilities and offerings. In 2009, Fernando said, the admissions office began sending every high school student who scored a 5 on the AP Physics exam a stand-alone brochure outlining the University’s strengths and latest developments in STEM fields. That year, Fernando and a number of distinguished Yale faculty also began traveling to regions known for their strong STEM students, like northern California and New Jersey, to host “STEM forums” where professors emphasized the resources the University invests in its science students. Yale physics professor Ramamurti Shankar, who has attended recruitment trips, said the efforts make Yale’s STEM offerings more visible. Prospective students, he said, are learning that science and liberal arts can coexist well at Yale. “We have to change any perception lingering that this is not a science place,” he said. “We want to show them that liberal arts doesn’t mean you compromise science, and one of the things that shows that faculty takes this seriously is when we go on these meetings.” In recent years, the admissions

Students

YES WEEKEND FROM PAGE 1

is more well lit, and there is more foot traffic with stores being open later,” Scirappa said. “If there are more people out, then there are more eyes out.” Students interviewed also voiced support for the extended hours in the Broadway shopping district, citing the fact that athletes often spend all afternoon at practice, preventing them from shopping before evening. Jeremy Liu ’16, who often walks near the shopping district, said that he appreciates the long hours, because they allow him to purchase items when he learns lastminute that he needs to attend an event. He also likes that, when he is walking home from meetings or practices late at night, the lighting makes him feel safer. University Properties has over 85 property tenants, including 32 retail shops and pays $4 million annually in commercial real estate taxes. Contact J.R REED at jonathan.t.reed@yale.edu .

Kevin Huang, a high school senior from southern California, said in an email that most high school students have the perception that Yale’s STEM program lags behind those of Harvard, Princeton and Stanford. Huang added that although this is true, the gap is small and students should make more holistic comparisons. He added that Yale’s investment in STEM gives students opportunities such as Perspectives in Science and Engineering that other schools could not match. Dana Chaykovksy ’17, a YES-W attendee last year, said YES-W convinced her to choose Yale. Before her visit, Chaykovsky said she did not realize the ease with which undergraduates could access science resources at the University. Wilczynski said YES-W was also an opportunity for the students to meet their future classmates and bond over their shared intellectual interests. Both, he said, are trademarks of a Yale education that emphasizes collaboration and communication. Fernando echoed Wilczynski’s statement, adding that Yale looked not only for competent scientists, but also ambassadors in the field. “I made a ton of really good friends at YES Weekend, and they’re still some of my best

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friends,” said Nolan Malone ’16, another former attendee of the program. To keep in step with its peer schools and the investments President Levin made in the STEM community, the admissions office set a benchmark in 2007 for 40 percent of its incoming freshman class to intend to major in a STEM subject. The University first met this goal in the spring of 2012 for the class of 2016, as it did for the class of 2017 and the early action pool for 2018. Both Quinlan and Fernando said the admissions office is comfortable with this approximate benchmark. Quinlan added that the University did not want to compromise the intimate education and tight-knit community that characterizes a current undergraduate’s STEM experience by straining existing STEM resources. Since Yale began its targeted outreach to top science and math students in 2006, the number of STEM applicants to the University has grown by 50 percent, Quinlan said. He added that more than half of the applicants in the class of 2018 were students who expressed strong interests in STEM. “Beyond the quantity of applications we’re receiving, I’m particularly pleased at the growing quality of students who are

applying,” he said. He added that, in recent years, more STEM students are not only applying to Yale, but choosing the University over schools better known for their STEM programs, such as MIT or Stanford. In every conversation he has had with STEM faculty, Fernando said, he has heard that current freshmen and sophomores at Yale are stronger than they have ever seen before. Fernando said the ultimate success of YES-W and other outreach programs can be measured with increased yield rates of likely STEM majors. He added that Yale is getting “more than a good share” of YES-W students, many of whom would also receive acceptance letter from other top STEM schools. “If you want to get good students, you have to work for them,” Shankar said. Even if students do not ultimately chose Yale, Shankar said, he is satisfied if they make their decision knowing what the University really does offer. 42 percent of the class of 2016 and 41 percent of the class of 2017 matriculated to Yale with an intention of majoring in a STEM field. Contact RISHABH BHANDARI at rishabh.bhandari@yale.edu and JENNIFER GERSTEN at jennifer.gersten@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBUARY 17, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

NATION

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S NASDAQ 4,244.03, +0.08% S Oil $99.47, +0.14%

Verdict raises self-defense in FL

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10-yr. Bond 2.75, +0.37% Euro $1.37, +0.09%

‘Killer heroin’ causing fatalities BY KATIE ZEZIMA ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOB MACK/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Michael Dunn claims he shot 17-year-old Jordan Davis in self-defense outside a convenience store after an argument over loud music. BY TAMARA LUSH AND DEREK KINNER ASSOCIATED PRESS JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A verdict in the city of Jacksonville is again raising the issue of self-defense and race in Florida, just seven months after George Zimmerman was acquitted in the shooting of a black teenager, Trayvon Martin. Michael Dunn, a white 47-year-old software developer, could face 60 years in prison following his conviction Saturday on multiple counts of attempted murder for shooting into a car-

ful of teenagers outside a Jacksonville convenience store in 2012. Jordan Davis, a black 17-year-old, was killed in the shooting, but the jury couldn’t reach a verdict on the first-degree murder charge against Dunn. A mistrial was declared on that count. The verdict is a far cry from one delivered in the Zimmerman case, when he was acquitted in July in the shooting death of 17-year-old Martin in Sanford, about 125 miles south of Jacksonville. Like Zimmerman, Dunn said he felt his life was in dan-

ger when he fired the shots. But the verdict suggested the jury struggled to see it that way. Following an argument over loud music coming from the car that Davis was in, Dunn said he shot at the car with his 9 mm handgun — he said he was afraid and thought he saw a shotgun in the car. Legal experts say it’s likely that at least one member of the jury believed Dunn’s story — about being scared, pulling a gun in self-defense and firing the first few shots, which killed Davis. After more than

30 hours of deliberations over four days, the jury couldn’t agree on the first-degree murder charge. “Although I don’t think the evidence supports this, it is possible that the jury felt that Dunn was proper to stand his ground as to Davis, but his shooting of the others in the car was excessive,” said Kenneth Nunn, a law professor at the University of Florida. Nunn and other experts said Sunday that it’s possible the jury was confused regarding first-degree murder and the concept that it must be “premeditated.”

POINT PLEASANT, N.J. — On an icy night last month, a man entered a grocery store here, walked past the displays of cake mix and paper towels, and went into the bathroom, where he injected himself with heroin. Hours later, the man was found dead in the bathroom with a needle still in his arm, authorities said. They believe the man was one of more than 80 across the country who have died in recent weeks after injecting heroin laced with fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opiate. As the number of people who use, and fatally overdose on, heroin has skyrocketed in recent years, authorities are seeing the return of an alarming development: heroin that, often unbeknownst to the user, is spiked with fentanyl. Fentanyl is a narcotic that is typically administered to people in chronic pain, including endstage cancer patients. It is also used as an anesthetic. It is considered 80 times more powerful than morphine and can kill by inhibiting breathing. “The dealers push this as being a super high, which it is, but it’s also lethal,” said Ellen Unterwald, director of the Center for Substance Abuse Research at the Temple University School of Medicine. Users typically don’t know how much fentanyl is mixed in, and she said just a small amount can be fatal because the drug is so potent. “A very small amount can exert a very significant effect,” said Eric Strain, director of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment and Research at

Johns Hopkins University. In Maryland, at least 37 people have died from the combined drugs, according to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and in western Pennsylvania, authorities said they caused 22 deaths in recent weeks. In Rhode Island, 25 people have died from the laced heroin, and in Vermont state police have warned that pure fentanyl is being sold as heroin. After Philip Seymour Hoffman was found dead with a syringe in his arm this month, investigators in New York tested the heroin found in his apartment for fentanyl, but found that it did not include the additive. With more and more addicts turning to heroin because crackdowns on powerful prescription opiate painkillers have made them more expensive and inaccessible, there is concern that more people may be exposed to fentanyl-laced heroin during this wave than in previous ones, including in 2006 when hundreds of people from Chicago to Philadelphia died after injecting the drugs. Last month the Drug Enforcement Administration put out a bulletin warning local authorities of what it dubbed “killer heroin,” a mixture that was up to half fentanyl. It urged first responders to “exercise extreme caution” when coming into contact with any heroin because Fentanyl can be absorbed through the skin. It is unclear where the fentanyl is coming from. It is typically only distributed in hospitals. It can be administered in the form of a patch, a drip or a lollipop, which patients in pain suck on.


PAGE 8

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

WORLD Venezuelan leader to turn self in BY JOSHUA GOODMAN ASSOCIATED PRESS CARACAS, Venezuela — Opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez, the target of a Venezuelan police manhunt for allegedly inciting violence at anti-government protests that ended with three deaths, said Sunday that he will surrender himself after staging one more demonstration. In a video shot in an undisclosed location, Lopez said he didn’t fear arrest but accused authorities of trying to violate his constitutional right to protest against President Nicolas Maduro’s socialist government. He urged supporters to gather Tuesday in white shirts and march peacefully with him to the Interior Ministry, where he said he would deliver a petition demanding a full investigation of the government’s role in the deaths. He said he would turn himself over to authorities Tuesday. “I haven’t committed any crime,” said Lopez, who hasn’t been seen since a news conference Wednesday night after the bloodshed. “If there is a decision to legally throw me in jail I’ll submit myself to this persecution.” Lopez’s comments came after security forces raided his home and that of his parents late Saturday, seeking to serve an arrest order on charges ranging from vandalism of public property to terrorism and homicide. Lopez wasn’t at either residence in Caracas’ leafy eastern district when national guardsmen and military intelligence officials arrived. Aides said neighbors banged on pots and pans to protest what they considered an arbitrary detention order. The raids capped another night of protests during which security forces fired tear gas and rubber bullets to break up a group of about 500 students who vowed to remain on the streets until all arrested anti-government demonstrators are released. Authorities said 23 people were being

treated for injuries, none of them life-threatening. More protests were held Sunday without incident by late afternoon. Lopez, a Harvard-educated former mayor, is the most prominent of a group of opposition hard-liners who are challenging two-time presidential candidate Henrique Capriles for leadership of anti-Maduro movement. Maduro accuses the 42-yearold Lopez of leading a U.S.backed “fascist” plot to oust him from power just two months after the ruling party’s candidates won mayoral elections by a landslide. Lopez “ordered all these violent kids, who he trained, to destroy the prosecutor’s office and half of Caracas and then goes into hiding,” Maduro told thousands of supporters at a pro-government rally Saturday. “Turn yourself in coward.” Lopez has vowed to press ahead with demonstrations calling for Maduro to give up power. The opposition blames the socialist president for Venezuela’s rampant crime, 50 percent inflation and worsening shortages of basic goods. Lopez has called on Venezuelans to avoid violence. He says he had nothing to do with Wednesday’s clashes between activists and police and pro-government militias after the peaceful conclusion of a rally he helped organized against Maduro’s 10-month-old government. U.S. officials have denied any plotting to oust Maduro. Secretary of State John Kerry on Saturday expressed concern over the rising tensions and violence surrounding the protests. “We are particularly alarmed by reports that the Venezuelan government has arrested or detained scores of anti-government protesters and issued an arrest warrant for opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez,” Kerry said in a statement. “These actions have a chilling effect on citizens’ rights to express their grievances peacefully.”

“A film is a petrified fountain of thought.” JEAN COCTEAU FRENCH ARTIST AND FILMMAKER

Miners refuse to be rescued

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A trapped illegal miner is bought to the surface at a disused gold mine shaft near, Benoni, South Africa, Feb. 16, 2014. BY CHRISTOPHER TORCHIA ASSOCIATED PRESS JOHANNESBURG — They refused to be rescued. Emergency workers in South Africa cleared a mine shaft entrance of debris on Sunday, allowing miners who had been trapped below the chance to escape. The only problem was that the miners were working illegally at the abandoned mine, and some stayed underground because they feared arrest if they came out, according to officials. At least 11 miners were escorted to safety at the mine in Benoni, on the outskirts of Johannesburg, but an undetermined number of their

“12 Years” named best film in UK BY JILL LAWLESS ASSOCIATED PRESS LONDON — The force of “Gravity” was strong at the British Academy Film Awards on Sunday — but it was unflinching drama “12 Years a Slave” that took the top prize. Steve McQueen’s visceral, violent story of a free black man kidnapped into servitude in the 19thcentury U.S. South was named best picture. Its star, Chiwetel Ejiofor, took the male acting trophy. Ejiofor thanked McQueen, a visual artist who turned to filmmaking with “Hunger” and “Shame,” for bringing the story to the screen. Holding the trophy, the Brit-

Interested in illustrating for the Yale Daily News?

CONTACT ANNELISA LEINBACH AT annelisa. leinbach@yale.edu

ish actor told McQueen: “This is yours. I’m going to keep it — that’s the kind of guy I am — but it’s yours.” McQueen reminded the ceremony’s black-tie audience that, in some parts of the world, slavery is not a thing of the past. “There are 21 million people in slavery as we sit here,” he said. “I just hope 150 years from now our ambivalence will not allow another filmmaker to make this film.” The prizes, coming two weeks before Hollywood’s Academy Awards, are watched as an indicator of likely Oscars success. It was a good night for lost-inspace thriller “Gravity,” which won six prizes, including best director for Alfonso Cuaron.

The 3-D special effects extravaganza also took the awards for sound, music, cinematography and visual effects. And despite its mixed parentage — made in Britain by a Mexican director and starring American actors — it was named best British film. Cuaron paid tribute to star Sandra Bullock, who is alone onscreen for much of the film. “Without her performance, everything would have been nonsense,” he said. Con-artist caper “American Hustle” charmed its way to three prizes, including original screenplay and supporting actress for Jennifer Lawrence. Its spectacular 70s stylings took the hair and makeup award.

comrades were still in the gold mine, emergency responder Kobus Du Plooy said by telephone late Sunday. Police were preparing to question those who came out about anyone left underground, local media reported. After nightfall, some mine security officials remained at the site, but rescue workers had packed up and left, leaving behind a ladder in the shaft for those still below. “Should they have a change of heart and mind, they then have at least some access to get out of the shaft,” Du Plooy said. He said he didn’t know how many people were still in the shaft. Earlier, reports said

more than 200 miners had been trapped. But the ones who emerged were tightlipped about the colleagues they left behind, apparently concerned about trouble with the police. “They don’t want to give away too much information,” Du Plooy said. It was unclear how long the holdouts, who seemed to have few options, planned to prolong their stay in the mine. Some of the 11 who came out were dehydrated but otherwise in good health. They were believed to have been trapped since Saturday morning and police patrolling in the area heard their screams for help, the South

African Press Association reported. Rescue vehicles and equipment were brought to the site to stabilize the ground before the removal of the rubble began. Illegal mining is common in South Africa, a major producer of gold and platinum. Workers brave unsafe conditions below ground amid reports of the involvement of organized crime and even clashes between rival groups seeking to extract precious metal from the shafts. Authorities suspect the miners in Benoni were robbed by a rival group that blocked the mine exit, reported Eyewitness News, a South African media outlet.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TOMORROW

Sunny, with a high near 29. Northwest wind 9 to 14 mph.

WHICH DAY?

High of 37, low of 28.

High of 45, low of 45.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

ON CAMPUS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17 9:15 PM Yale Undergraduate Choral Society Rehearsal. The Yale Undergraduate Choral Society, Yale’s only non-audition singing group, sings all genres of music and is open to all repertoire suggestions. Open to all students, regardless of past singing experience. Snacks immediately following every rehearsal. Hendrie Hall (165 Elm St.), Rm. 201.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18 7:00 PM Sacred Harp Singing. Join in singing from “The Sacred Harp,” and American shape-note songbook published in 1844. Its eclectic repertoire includes tunes inherited from the folk tradition and other forms of hymnody, as well as songs of Colonial New England and tuneful melodies from the Great Depression. No previous singing experience necessary. Stoeckel Hall (96 Wall St.), Rm. B01.

LORENZO’S TALE BY CHARLES MARGOSSIAN

7:30 PM The Yale Political Union Debates with Jeffrey Sachs. Join the Yale Political Union and Harvard economics professor Jeffrey Sachs to debate “Resolved: Fight Global Poverty with Substantial Foreign Aid.” Dr. Sachs has been a leader in sustainable development and a senior advisor to the U.N. in working to achieve the Millennium Development Goals. Linsly-Chittenden Hall (63 High St.), Rm. 102.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19 9:00 PM Evening Prayer Service. A beautiful, quiet Christian worship service of song and prayer, with a student reflection and an “active reflection,” putting the theme into practice. Dwight Hall (67 High St.), Dwight Memorial Chapel.

XKCD BY RANDALL MUNROE

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit To reach us: E-mail editor@yaledailynews.com Advertisements 2-2424 (before 5 p.m.) 2-2400 (after 5 p.m.) Mailing address Yale Daily News P.O. Box 209007 New Haven, CT 06520

Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Editor in Chief Julia Zorthian at (203) 4322418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

To visit us in person 202 York St. New Haven, Conn. (Opposite JE) FOR RELEASE FEBRUARY 17, 2014

Interested in drawing cartoons for the Yale Daily News? CONTACT ANNELISA LEINBACH AT annelisa.leinbach@yale.edu

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 Tubers rich in beta carotene 5 Wasn’t indecisive 10 Bouillabaisse, e.g. 14 Taken by mouth, as medication 15 Mrs. Gorbachev 16 Dancer-turnedspy Mata 17 Favorite Hall of Famer of the 39th U.S. president? 19 Tablet with a “mini” version 20 Tummy muscles 21 Egyptian cross with a top loop 22 Black belt activity 24 Favorite Hall of Famer of the 7th U.S. president? 27 Opposite of vain 28 “How awful!” 29 Greets with a hand gesture 30 Hook’s sidekick 31 ChapStick target 34 Forewarning 35 Visits the mall 37 Computer support person 38 “__ and Peace” 39 Spring melt 40 Acted without speaking 41 British rule in India 42 “The Bachelorette” contestant, e.g. 44 Favorite Hall of Famer of the 17th and 36th U.S. presidents? 49 Catching some z’s 50 Shed skin 51 Tackle a slope 54 Celebrity 55 Favorite Hall of Famer of the 38th U.S. president? 58 Fill-in worker 59 Greek i’s 60 Revered one 61 Historic times 62 Midterms and finals 63 Tour de France, e.g.

Want to place a classified ad? CALL (203) 432-2424 OR E-MAIL BUSINESS@ YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

2/17/14

By C.C. Burnikel

DOWN 1 Discipline using mats 2 Many an Egyptian 3 Red Planet explorer 4 Shifty 5 Borneo primates 6 “Sit!” 7 10 percent church donation 8 Opposite of WNW 9 Period before the Renaissance 10 Avoid, as duty 11 Spanish finger food 12 Verse writer’s muse 13 Add a lane to, as a highway 18 Animal houses 23 Back woe 25 Paradise lost 26 Leap 27 Mother, to baby 29 Bowl over 30 Female pig 31 Bubbly citrus drink 32 Cake decorator 33 Scholar’s deg.

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

SUDOKU EASIEST

3 9 1

(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

35 Tina Fey attribute 36 Journey to Mecca 37 Longtime Yugoslav president 39 Shade provider 40 Hazy 42 Tried to hit in paintball 43 Except if 44 What haste makes

2/17/14

45 Fall bloomer 46 Andean alpaca kin 47 U. of Maryland team 48 Leaves out 52 Fast food tycoon Ray 53 Vegging out 56 Weed killer 57 39-Down with cones

7 5 4 8 6 1 5

2 2 4

3 2

2

1 3 6 9 4

7


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 10

THROUGH THE LENS

T

he recent opening of the new School of Management building, Edwards P. Evans Hall, will offer students the opportunity to expand their business expertise in an impressive architectural space. Staff photographer BLAIR SEIDEMAN takes a look behind its glass doors and gives us a picture of Yalies inhabiting their state of the art new building. SOM — which recently broke into the 2014 Top 10 Financial Times Business Schools— is visibly enjoying an exciting year.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

OLY HOCKEY (M) United States 5

Slovenia 1 OLY HOCKEY (M)

SPORTS QUICK HITS

Austria 3 Norway 1 NCAAM

62

MONDAY

RON DESANTIS ’01 BASEBALL DeSantis, the congressman from Florida’s 6th district, was honored at the Yale Baseball Leadoff Dinner with the Yale Baseball Man of the Year Award on Saturday. Originally from Jacksonville, FL, DeSantis served as captain of the Yale baseball squad during his senior year.

PHOEBE STAENZ ’17 WOMEN’S HOCKEY Staenz, who plays forward for the Yale women’s ice hockey team, advanced to the semifinals of the Olympic women’s ice hockey tournament with Switzerland’s 2-0 victory over Russia in the semifinals on Saturday. The Zurich native recorded four shots on goal.

No. 21 Wisconsin 75 No. 15 Michigan

“There is lots of basketball still to play and we get to be home for a while.” HEAD COACH CHRIS GOBRECHT WOMEN’S BASKETBALL YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

Yale tops Tigers in OT thriller BY JAMES BADAS STAFF REPORTER With a newly emblazoned target on its back, the Yale men’s basketball team survived another weekend doubleheader, sweeping Penn and Princeton at home to extend the Bulldogs’ winning streak to six. In knocking off Penn (6–15, 3–4 Ivy) 69–54 on Friday night and barely outlasting Princeton (14–7, 2–5) the following evening, the Bulldogs (13–9, 7–1) secured their best start in conference play since the 20012002 season. With the tumultuous weekend slate now complete, point guard Javier Duren ’15 said the team is beginning to realize its potential. “We’re finally believing in our team and the things we are capable of doing,” Duren said. Despite trailing 30–19 at the half, the Bulldogs came back to force overtime before beating Princeton 66–65 to maintain a tie with Harvard for first place atop the Ivy League. Besides the obvious difficulties of sealing the deal in an overtime conference thriller, Yale was also without the services of its point guard for the final 2:25 of regulation and the entirety of overtime. In a scramble for a loose ball with just under five minutes left to play and Yale up by one, a Tiger fell on Duren, and the playmaker appeared to suffer a possible high ankle sprain. “It was a great effort by the guys,” head coach James Jones said. “It says a lot that when Javier [Duren] goes out, and doesn’t play a second in overtime [that] we’re still able to win the game.” Jones soon opted to sub in guard Isaiah Salafia ’14 who per-

formed admirably in the final minutes of the game. As Duren exited, he appeared to be fighting off tears, with the injury and emotions taking their collective tolls. “I’d say [the tears were] a combination of both, knowing I couldn’t help my team and coming out of the game,” Duren said. “Sitting out in O.T. was more painful than the injury itself honestly, but I’m very proud of my guys to bounce back from a not-so-good first half to pull out the win.” Yale forced overtime after appearing to be in jeopardy of losing its spot at the head of the Ancient Eight. The Bulldogs outshot the Tigers, but uncharacteristically turned the ball over 13 times in the first half, while Princeton committed just four turnovers before the break. The Tigers used a 10–0 run to take an 11-point lead into the half, but that lead proved not to be big enough for Princeton. Making up for a first half in which he played just six minutes due to foul trouble, forward Justin Sears ’16 immediately opened the second half with a jumper from the corner to cut the lead to single digits. Sears would go on to score 11 in the second half. He was helped by Duren, who scored 10 in the second before being forced to exit with his injury. The lead went back and forth after Yale’s comeback, and the game was tied at 56 when Yale got a chance to win in regulation with the shot clock turned off. Yale got two looks at the basket thanks to an offensive rebound, but both attempts were heavily contested. The Elis would have to win the game in overtime despite the absence of Duren. What Yale SEE M. BASKETBALL PAGE B3

MEN’S BASKETBALL

WILLIAM FREEDBERG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Justin Sears ’16 (No. 22) scored the go-ahead basket with 4.4 seconds remaining in overtime against Princeton.

Elis make playoffs BY GREG CAMERON STAFF REPORTER

single-handedly one-upped the entire Princeton roster.

The Tigers tallied three goals against the Yale women’s ice hockey team on Saturday night, but forward Jackie Raines ’15

WOMEN’S HOCKEY Raines netted four goals in the game, and an additional goal

GREG CAMERON/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Jackie Raines ’15 (No. 5) scored four goals as Yale beat Princeton 5–3 on Saturday.

by forward Krista Yip-Chuck ’17 propelled the Bulldogs to a 5–3 victory over Princeton (13–10– 4, 9–8–3 ECAC). The win was part of a threepoint weekend for the Bulldogs (8–13–6, 6–8–6) on the road, as they rallied from a 2–0 deficit to tie No. 10 Quinnipiac 3–3 the night before. “[Raines] just proved how dangerous she can be and what an offensive talent she is,” said goaltender Jaimie Leonoff ’15. “She stepped up for us in a game that was really important for us to win, and a game that we really stole from Princeton. It was great for her.” With the three points, Yale clinched a berth in the ECAC playoffs for the first time since 2008. The Bulldogs have secured a seventh-place spot in the standings, but can move up to sixth place if they can eliminate the three-point gap between them and Princeton in the final two games of the season. Leonoff said that securing the playoff berth was particularly satisfying for the Elis because preseason polls had projected them to finish 10th in the 12-team ECAC. Friday night at Quinnipiac (18–5–9, 9–4–7), the Bulldogs found themselves down 2–0 midway through the game after

STAT OF THE DAY 69

SEE W. HOCKEY PAGE B3

Third is the best for M. squash BY ERICA PANDEY CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The men’s squash team ended an intense season with a third-place national finish behind Harvard and Trinity.

MEN’S SQUASH This past weekend, the Bulldogs (16–3,

6–1 Ivy) competed in the College Squash Association’s (CSA) National Championships at Harvard. The men played in the Potter Division of the CSA, which consists of the top eight teams. Yale advanced to the semifinals, but was bested 8–1 by Trinity. “All in all it was a successful weekend,” said captain Eric Caine ’14. “We didn’t SEE SQUASH PAGE B3

KEN YANAGISAWA/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s squash team finished third at the CSA Team Championships this past weekend.

MORE FREE-ATTEMPTS BY THE YALE MEN’S BASKETBALL TEAM THAN ANY OTHER IVY LEAGUE TEAM. The Bulldogs have attempted 267 free throws in conference play, making 182. Harvard has the next-most attempts, going 137-198 from the line.


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBUARY 17, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

The Eastern Conference triumphs The All-Stars from the Eastern Conference defeated their opponents from the Western Conference 163–155 in the NBA All-Star Game. The contest, held at the Smoothie King Center in New Orleans, Louis, saw a record 313 combined points scored between the two teams. The 163 points scored by the East was also a record for most points scored by one team in the All-Star Game.

Yale splits weekend M. HOCKEY FROM PAGE B4 defense can be brought into question,” defenseman Rob O’Gara ’16 said in an email. “We worked a lot in practice [yesterday] on positioning and knowing responsibilities in the zone, so hopefully this leads to stronger defensive zone play and communication in the coming weeks leading into playoffs.” The Bulldogs’ two special teams units experienced vastly different outcomes over the weekend. The powerplay unit struggled, going 0–9 over the two games, a goose egg that especially mattered in the contest against Quinnipiac. Yale failed to take advantage of a four-on-three opportunity as well as two other power plays in the second period. Meanwhile, the penalty kill shut Quinnipiac down completely in four chances and limited Princeton to a pair of goals on five opportunities. Most importantly, however, the Bulldogs scored three shorthanded goals on Saturday, bringing their season total up to five. The goals came at important moments in the game, two of them after Princeton had pulled within a single score. “The penalty kill has been great for the past couple of weeks,” Root said. “It was nice to get the goals [on Saturday], but we also let up two goals … It’s good to see us execute when we get the chance, but we also have to keep the puck out of the net.” With only four regular season games

MEN’S BASKETBALL IVY SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Yale

7

1

0.875

13

9

0.591

Harvard

7

1

0.875

20

4

0.833

3

Brown

5

3

0.625

13

9

0.591

4

Columbia

4

4

0.500

15

10

0.600

5

Penn

3

4

0.429

6

15

0.286

6

Princeton

2

5

0.286

14

7

0.667

7

Dartmouth

2

6

0.250

9

13

0.409

8

Cornell

1

7

0.125

2

20

0.091

1

and the ECAC tournament remaining before the NCAA tournament, every contest will be crucial as the Elis’ margin for error is dwindling. Yale fell from tied for 16th to 20th in the PairWise rankings, which determine the final bracket for the NCAA tournament. But the Bulldogs have two road games remaining, and wins on the road are weighted to count more than home games in the PairWise formula, as well as a date with No. 3 Union on the horizon. “Our goals don’t change in the last four games,” Root said. “We need to renew our focus and make sure that we get two points in each and every game.” Yale takes its final regular-season road trip this weekend, playing a game each against Harvard and Dartmouth.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL IVY

Contact GRANT BRONSDON at grant.bronsdon@yale.edu .

1

2

1

4

YALE

0

0

0

0

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Harvard

7

1

0.875

17

5

0.773

2

Penn

6

1

0.857

16

5

0.762

Princeton

6

1

0.857

15

6

0.714

Yale

4

4

0.500

10

12

0.455

Cornell

4

4

0.500

12

10

0.545

Brown

2

6

0.250

8

14

0.364

Columbia

2

6

0.250

5

17

0.227

Dartmouth

0

8

0.000

3

19

0.136

6 8

YALE 7, PRIN. 5 YALE

2

2

3

7

PRIN.

0

3

2

5

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

MENS ICE HOCKEY

The Elis will travel to Harvard and Dartmouth next weekend.

Staenz ’17 scores for the Swiss

ECAC

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

T

PTS

W L

T

%

1

Union

14

3

1

29

20

6

4

0.733

2

Quinnipiac

11

4

3

25

21

6

5

0.734

3

Colgate

10

5

3

23

14

11

5

0.550

4

Cornell

8

6

4

20

12

7

5

0.604

Clarkson

10

8

0

20

17

13

2

0.563

6

Yale

8

7

3

19

13

8

4

0.600

7

Rensselaer

7

7

4

18

13

12

5

0.517

8

Brown

7

10

1

15

10

12

3

0.460

9

St. Lawrence

5

9

4

14

11

15

4

0.433

Harvard

5

9

4

14

9

12

4

0.440

11

Dartmouth

5

12

1

11

6

16

3

0.300

12

Princeton

4

14

0

8

5

20

0

0.200

OLYMPICS FROM PAGE B4 team. Switzerland will square off against Canada at noon today with a spot in the gold medal game on the line. The winner will face the victor of this morning’s game between the United States and Sweden, which beat Finland in the quarterfinals to advance. Staenz was not the only Ivy athlete competing in the women’s hockey tournament in Sochi this past week. Nine different Ivy athletes participated in Wednesday’s contest between the United States and Canada, which Canada won 3–2. Team USA is coached by current Harvard head coach Katey Stone. The Ivy League sent more than just athletes and coaches to Sochi, however. Harvard alumna A.J. Mieczko has provided commentary for the women’s ice hockey broadcasts on NBC. Mieczko helped the Crimson to a national title in 1999 and was named the USA Hockey Women’s Player of the Year Award in the same year. She won a gold medal with Team USA at the Nagano Olympics in 1998 and captured a silver medalwith the squad at the 2002 Olympics at home in Salt Lake City. She has called the last three Winter Games. Athletes will compete in 14 disciplines this week before Sunday’s closing ceremonies.

OVERALL

SCHOOL

4

QPAC 4, YALE 0 QPAC

OVERALL

WOMENS ICE HOCKEY ECAC

GREG CAMERON/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Phoebe Staenz (no. 88) scored a goal for Switzerland at the Winter Olympics in Sochi.

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

T

PTS

W L

T

%

1

Cornell

15

2

3

33

20

3

4

0.815

2

Clarkson

14

2

4

32

23

4

5

0.797

Harvard

15

3

2

32

20

4

3

0.796

4

Quinnipiac

9

4

7

25

18

5

9

0.703

5

St. Lawrence

10

7

3

23

11

17

3

0.403

6

Princeton

9

8

3

21

13

10

4

0.556

7

Yale

6

8

6

18

8

13

6

0.407

8

Rensselaer

6

12

2

14

10

18

3

0.371

9

Dartmouth

6

13

1

13

7

18

1

0.288

10

Colgate

6

14

0

12

9

21

2

0.313

11

Brown

3

14

3

9

4

18

5

0.241

12

Union

4

16

0

8

9

22

1

0.297

Women’s basketball falls to Killer P’s W. BASKETBALL FROM PAGE B4 record its largest lead of the game at 15 points. Yale struggled to score against Penn, tallying only 50 points compared to its season average of 66.8 points per game. The second half was especially difficult, as the Bulldogs shot 20.0 percent from the field compared to Penn’s 43.5 percent.

This week in practice we are all going to work on bringing intensity defensively. MEREDITH BOARDMAN ’16 Forward, Women’s basketball team The Elis’ inability to overcome a poor shooting night overshadowed their otherwise solid play. The Bulldogs held the advantage in rebounds, 43–41, and forced Penn into 17 turnovers while committing just 12. The Eli bench also outscored the Quaker

reserves, 19–15. Yale fell into an early deficit against Princeton (15–6, 5–1) on Saturday night and was never able to fully recover, leading to a 96–75 defeat. The Tigers scored a season-high 96 points on 59.7 percent shooting while the Elis shot 41.5 percent from the field, above their season average of 38.2 percent. The Bulldogs trailed 49–33 at the end of the first period. Blake Dietrich led the tigers, scoring 25 of her game-high 28 points in the first half. Yale would rally to cut into the lead, trailing by nine, 58–49, with 15:36 remaining in the game. The Elis lost steam as the Tigers went on a 13–0 run to increase their lead to 77–51. Princeton continued to extend its advantage, and its largest lead of the night came with 7:29 left in the game, when the Bulldogs trailed by 34 points, 87–53. Only a strong push by Yale could ameliorate the final score, 96–75. The biggest discrepancy between the two teams came in the rebounds category. Normally a Yale strong suit, the Elis were able to grab only 27 boards com-

pared to the Tigers’ 46 rebounds. “This week in practice we are all going to work on bringing intensity defensively,” forward Meredith Boardman ’16 said. “This next week we’re focusing on getting better everyday and ultimately coming away from next weekend with two wins.” Yale returns home to face Cornell, who handed the Bulldogs’ their first conference loss of the year, and Columbia next weekend. Contact ASHLEY WU at ashley.e.wu@yale.edu .

PRIN. 96, YALE 75 PRIN.

49

47

96

YALE

33

42

75

PENN 62, YALE 50 PENN

32

30

62

YALE

29

21

50

KATHRYN CRANDALL/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The women’s basketball team will face Cornell and Columbia at home this weekend.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBUARY 17, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE B3

SPORTS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS KYRIE IRVING The point guard from the Cleveland Cavaliers was named the M.V.P. of the NBA All-Star Game after scoring 31 points and dishing out 14 assists for the Easter Conference All-Stars. Irving scored 15 points in the fourth quarter to seal the victory for the East.

Elis off to best start since ’02 M. BASKETBALL FROM PAGE B1 did have was a definite home-court advantage. The John J. Lee Amphitheater was rocking for much of the second half and in overtime, with the crowd’s passion and raucousness building as the game progressed. The highintensity atmosphere may have induced some carelessness on the part of the potentially nerve-stricken Tigers. Princeton guard T.J. Bray, the Ivy League’s leading scorer, was able to net a game-high 20 points, but he also committed seven of the Tiger’s 10 total turnovers. One of those turnovers gave Yale the ball back and a chance to take the final shot in overtime, trailing by one. The Bulldogs were unable to find an opening, forcing Jones to call a timeout with 17 seconds to play. Yale drew up a play for guard Armani Cotton ’15 to drive to the basket. When he drove, Cotton was met by a stifling defense that nearly caused him to cough up the ball. Instead, he found Salafia, who swung it to guard Jesse Pritchard ’14, a three-point specialist, in the corner. Pritchard’s shot was deflected and did not hit rim. “[Pritchard] gets the brick award for the game because his shot touched nothing,” Jones said jokingly after the game. “But we do what we do and that’s rebound the ball.” Sure enough, Sears was there to clean it up. After appearing to get hacked on his first put-back attempt, Sears secured another offensive rebound and got the layup to go with just 4.4 ticks remaining on the clock. Those final two points gave Sears 17 points despite registering a goose egg in the first half. After the game, Sears gave credit to a former coach for his rebounding prowess. “My coach in eighth grade always said that a lot of last-second shots are offensive rebounds. Every time someone puts the ball up, I just go to the basket,” Sears said. “I boxed my man out, got the ball and thought I got hit. I didn’t get the call so I went back up and the ball went in, fortunately.” Having to take the ball the entire length of the court, the Tigers

Squash finishes third at CSAs

WILLIAM FREEDBERG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Guard Armani Cotton ’15 (No. 12) recorded his third straight double-double on Saturday night. entrusted Bray, but the guard committed his final turnover of the game, sealing Yale’s victory. The night before, Yale opened the weekend with a prototypical Eli effort against the Quakers. The Bulldogs combined stout defense, rebounding and interior offense en route to a 15-point victory. Though Penn did outshoot Yale 39.6 percent to 34.6 percent from the floor, the Bulldogs forced the Quakers to commit 20 turnovers. Yale’s ability to capitalize on Penn’s miscues more than made up for the Bulldogs’ shooting struggles. Yale also edged Penn substantially on the glass, out-rebounding the Quakers 41-30, with guard Armani Cotton ’15 leading the way with 11 boards. He ended the night with a double-double, as he also poured in 17 points. Ten of Cotton’s points came from the charity stripe, another staple for the Yale offense. In fact, Yale more than doubled Penn’s production from the foul line, hitting 30 free throws compared to Penn’s 14. In addition to making 11 free throws, Sears compiled perhaps his most impressive stat line of the season, with seven rebounds, four blocks and three steals in addition to his game-high 25 points. The Bulldogs managed to take a 25–22 lead into the half despite shooting just 31 percent from the floor, but soon extended the lead after action resumed. At one point, the Elis led by 17 points before Penn cut the deficit down to just six with 4:41 left to play.

Sears answered with six unanswered points, and the trio of Sears, Cotton and Duren combined to score Yale’s final 23 points. After the trying weekend against Penn and Princeton, the Bulldogs have ensured themselves at least one more week at the head of the Ancient Eight. “We’ve got to be able to win the close ones,” Jones said. “[Friday night] I guess Harvard won a close one and [Saturday night], with a lot of grit, gut and effort we were able to pull it out.” The Crimson nearly fell out of the top spot Friday night, but the Crimson prevailed in a double-overtime thriller against Columbia. The Elis will hit the road next weekend to protect their top standing when they play at Cornell (2–19, 1–6) on Friday and at Columbia (14– 10, 3–4) on Sunday. Contact JAMES BADAS at james.badas@yale.edu .

YALE 66, PRINCETON 65 (OT) YALE

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37

10

66

PRINCETON

30

26

9

65

YALE 69, PENN 54 YALE

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69

PENN

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KEN YANAGISAWA/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The men beat Franklin & Marshall 7–2 in the third-place match at the CSA Team Championships. SQUASH FROM PAGE B1 accomplish our ultimate goal of winning a national championship, but we surprised a lot of people with a strong third-place finish.” Yale beat out Rochester 5–4 in the first round of play to advance to face Trinity in the second round. The Bulldogs had fallen to Trinity 5–4 earlier this season, and the Bantams were able to defeat Yale once again to make it to the final round. Trinity went on to meet Harvard in the finals and lost, giving up the national title to the Crimson. Kah Wah Cheong ’17 had Yale’s only win against Trinity at the fifth spot. Cheong lost his first game but won the next three to take the match. “I was really focused and tried to play the best I could,” Cheong said. “I knew my opponent was a good player. It turned out I was really in the rhythm.” After the loss to Trinity, the Eli men were matched with Franklin & Marshall College for the third-place title. Yale won 7–2, with the only two

losses coming at the first and eighth spots. Still, Franklin & Marshall fought hard, pushing four matches to five games. “The win over Franklin & Marshall to end the weekend is a positive foundation to build on heading into next season,” Caine said. Caine and Neil Martin ’14, who played at the first position for the Bulldogs, are the only two players the Bulldogs will lose to graduation. Martin said the men’s team should be proud of what it has accomplished this season. “I know that the guys returning for next year will come back ready and able to become Ivy and national champions,” Martin said. The men will compete in the CSA Individual Championships at Penn at the end of the month. The women’s squash team will travel south to Princeton to play in the Howe Cup this weekend. Contact ERICA PANDEY at erica.pandey@yale.edu .

Three-point weekend for women’s hockey W. HOCKEY FROM PAGE B1 the Bobcats scored at the very end of the first period and again in the middle of the second. Yale’s offense was stagnant for most of the game, having put just 10 shots on net with two minutes remaining in the second period. But Quinnipiac committed an interference penalty to give Yale a power play at the end of the period, and the Bulldogs grabbed at the opportunity. Yip-Chuck scored top right, assisted by Raines and defender Aurora Kennedy ’14, to put the Bulldogs on the scoreboard. Yip-Chuck’s goal created momentum for the Elis, as four minutes later, defender Kate Martini ’16 fired one of her signature slapshots past Bobcat goalie Chelsea Laden. Neither Yale nor Quinnipiac could take advantage of power plays in the middle of the third period, but the Bulldogs took their first lead of the game with four minutes remaining when forward Stephanie Mock ’15 assisted a goal by forward Hanna Astrom ’16. After going scoreless in the first 38 minutes of play, the Bulldogs had scored three times in an 18-minute span. “We just came out with a lot more energy and intensity,” Raines said. “The whole game, but more so in the first, we struggled positionally and doing our system. We did a better job towards the end of the game.” Yale needed to hold its lead for just three and a half minutes to secure the win, but Quinnipiac’s Kelly Babstock, the No.7 point scorer in the country, would not let her team falter. Babstock scored with 1:05 left on the clock to bring the score back to even. The Bulldogs put just one shot on net in overtime, and Leonoff saved four as the game ended in a 3–3 tie. Leonoff made 27 saves in total during the game. At Princeton the follow-

ing night, Yale again fell into a 2–0 deficit early on. The Tigers scored three minutes into the game with an unassisted goal, and forward Fiona McKenna scored with 33 seconds remaining in the first period on the Tigers’ third power play of the game. But Yip-Chuck won the ensuing faceoff and, eight seconds later, assisted Raines on her first goal of the night. The shorthanded goal put Yale within one heading into the first intermission.

We just came out with a lot more energy and intensity. JACKIE RAINES ’15 Forward, Women’s ice hockey team After the first period, Princeton was outshooting Yale 25–5 but only led by a goal. “They caught us a little by surprise with how good they were offensively,” Leonoff said. “They definitely cycled the puck well and gave us a hard time defending against them, but we went into the second period knowing what to expect, and adjusted from there.” Seven minutes into the second, the same sequence of events occurred. McKenna scored for Princeton, but Raines responded 14 seconds later, assisted by forward Janelle Ferrara ’16 and defender Tara Tomimoto ’14, to make the score 3–2. Later in the period, YipChuck was on the forecheck when she stole the puck from a Princeton defender, skated in and netted a goal to even the score. Raines then took control of the game with two goals in the third period, giving the Bulldogs their fourth unanswered goal. When asked about her offensive performance, Raines credited her linemates during the game, Ferrara and Yip-Chuck. “Putting the puck in net is

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Krista Yip-Chuck ’17 (No. 95) had two goals and two assists this weekend for the Bulldogs.

YALE 5, PRINCETON 3 always a good feeling,” Raines said. “My linemates gave me some great feeds and opportunities to score. Janelle [Ferrara] and Krista [Yip-Chuck] have tremendous vision on the ice and patience with the puck.” The game ended with the score 5–3 in Yale’s favor, despite Princeton having the advantage in shots 50–16. Four of Raines’s

six shots went in. Yale committed just four penalties in the game, and only three against Quinnipiac the night before. Leonoff said that after serving 26 minutes in the penalty box the weekend before, the Bulldogs have been focusing on playing with more discipline. “We’re realizing that if we

want to truly be a playoff-contending team, we have to stay out of the penalty box,” Leonoff said. Yale will face off against Harvard and Dartmouth at home next weekend in the team’s final games of the regular season. Contact GREG CAMERON at greg.cameron@yale.edu .

YALE

1

2

2

5

PRINCETON

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1

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3

YALE 3, QUINNIPIAC 3 (OT) YALE

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1

2

0

3

QUINNIPIAC

1

1

1

0

3


PAGE B4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBUARY 17, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

“The new dance out is the NaeNae, so I decided to do the NaeNae.” JOHN WALL GUARD, WASHINGTON WIZARDS

Defense struggles as Bulldogs split

KATHERINE GARVEY/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s hockey team dropped a 4–0 contest against Quinnipiac before beating Princeton 7–5 this weekend. BY GRANT BRONSDON STAFF REPORTER In a crucial home weekend for the No. 13 Yale men’s ice hockey team, the defense failed to step up as the Elis lost 4–0 to archrival No. 4 Quinnipiac before barely holding on against ECAC doormat Princeton, 7–5.

MEN’S HOCKEY The two-point weekend, combined with a pair of losses by both No. 11 Cornell and No. 14 Clark-

son, brought the Elis (13–8–4, 8–7–3 ECAC) to within a point of fourth place in the conference. “We need to tighten up our defense,” said captain Jesse Root ’14. “That’s the most important step. It’s going to imperative to play tighter defense, [as a] fiveman unit rather than individual players.” The final score from Friday’s game against the Bobcats (21–6– 5, 11–4–3) belies the true nature of the contest. With the arena sold out and rocking, the Bulldogs came out strong. The only

tally of the first period came following a face-off and a lightningquick shot from Quinnipiac forward Cory Hibbeler. But in the second period, it took just 18 seconds for the game to get away from the Bulldogs. A Yale turnover in its own defensive zone set up the Bobcats, and forward Sam Anas continued his stellar season by slotting the puck past Yale goaltender Alex Lyon ’17 at 7:33. Before the Elis could recover, Quinnipiac forward Connor Clifton launched a shot from deep that Lyon could

not reach to extend the Bobcat lead to 3–0 at the 7:51 mark of the second period. “It took the wind out of our sails a little bit,” said defenseman Ryan Obuchowski ’16. “When you get scored on, the next shift is always a big shift coming out, and we just kind of fell apart in that shift after. Those two shifts were a big momentum changer.” Compared to the rivals’ first matchup of the season, Yale improved its shot differential, although it managed a tie in the earlier game. After being out-

shot 51–20 in early November, the Bulldogs mustered 33 shots of their own and held Quinnipiac to 36. But goaltender Michael Garteig was brilliant for the Bobcats, stopping every Eli shot en route to his fifth shutout of the season. His five shutouts are the second most in the country. Saturday’s game against Princeton (5–20–0, 4–14–0) marked a polar opposite from Friday’s match. Just 7:41 into the first period, the Bulldogs put a tally on the board. They ended up scoring seven total goals, the

Losses drop Elis to .500

most by a Yale team since March 4, 2012, also against Princeton. After taking a three-goal lead, however, the Elis failed to close the Tigers out, with Princeton drawing within a single goal on two different occasions. It was not until a shorthanded, emptynet goal by forward Kenny Agostino ’14 with 1:31 remaining in the game that the Bulldogs pulled away for good. “Certainly, any time your team gives up five goals the team SEE M. HOCKEY PAGE B2

Ivy League Olympic update BY YALE DAILY NEWS

the second period, but that would be the closest the Bulldogs would get the rest of the game. A little over two minutes later, the Quakers would extend the lead to double digits again. With 4:07 remaining in the game, Penn would

This past week, the second of these Olympic Games, a number of Ivy League athletes represented their countries in Sochi — and one even medaled. Competing yesterday in the Super-G, Dartmouth graduate Andrew Weibrecht earned a silver medal by completing the course at Rosa Khutor in 1:18.44. Weibrecht, who captured a bronze medal at the Vancouver Olympics in 2010, missed out on gold to Norway’s Kjetil Jansrud by 0.30 seconds. American favorite Bode Miller split the bronze medal with Jan Hudec of Canada. With the silver medal, Weibrecht led a number of Dartmouth performers this week. On Valentine’s Day, Big Green graduate Tucker Murphy competed in the men’s cross-country 15 km classic style. In the women’s classic style biathlon, Dartmouth alumnae Susan Dunklee, Sara Studebaker and Hannah Dreissigacker all competed, although none finished above 23rd. Dunklee and Studebaker also took part in the 10 km pursuit biathlon last Tuesday, failing to finish above 18th. On Thursday, two more Big Green graduates were in action, as Sophie Caldwell and Ida Sargent competed in the women’s cross-country 10 km classic style. A Bulldog athlete was also in action this past week. Women’s ice hockey forward Phoebe Staenz, who is competing for the Swiss national team, advanced to the semifinals of the tournament in Sochi when the Swiss defeated the Russian national team 2–0 on Saturday. The more notable personal accomplishment, however, came on Wednesday, when she notched a power play goal in the Swiss’ 4–3 overtime loss to the Finnish national

SEE W. BASKETBALL PAGE B2

SEE OLYMPICS PAGE B2

MARIA ZEPEDA/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

The women’s basketball team dropped contests on the road to Penn and Princeton this past weekend. BY ASHLEY WU STAFF REPORTER The women’s basketball team suffered its first weekend sweep with losses to Penn and Princeton on the road.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

“We had a brutal stretch of games there; we nearly beat Harvard [last Saturday], we could have beaten Penn, and we ran out of gas against Princeton,” said head coach Chris Gobrecht. “We are not discouraged — there is lots of basketball still to play and we get to be home for a while.”

The Bulldogs (10–12, 4–4 Ivy) struggled to drain their baskets against Penn (16–5, 6–1) on Friday night, shooting only 28.2 percent from the field en route to a 62–50 loss. The first half featured four ties and six lead changes between the two teams and heading into the locker room

at the half, the Elis trailed the Quakers 32–29. Yale was able to score first in the second half, but Penn, sparked by a 13–0 run over a six-minute period early in the half, left the Bulldogs in a 45–33 hole. The Elis were able to close the deficit to four points with 7 minutes, 57 seconds left in


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