Issuu on Google+

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 · VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 103 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY CLOUDY

34 19

CROSS CAMPUS Green eggs and ham. Over

break, emu eggs that were part of a Peabody Museum exhibit about dinosaurs started to hatch. The large green eggs, which were about the size of a human hand, had been incubating in the exhibit since early February. The first cracks began March 12. A live stream of the Peabody babies is available online.

Can your professor do this?

Yale psychology professor Gregory Samanez-Larkin has gained some notoriety for defying the odds. While lecturing for Statistics (PSYC 200), Samanez-Larkin presented the class with a problem about the probability that a statistics professor could walk on his hands. To make a lasting impression, he then got up on the desk at the front of the massive Dunham Lab lecture hall and walked back and forth across the table on his hands to wild applause from the audience.

Free trees. New Haven residents may be entitled to a free tree. Residents can submit an online request for a tree, which will be planted on their curb strip or front yard for no charge. The project is part of a partnership between the New Haven Urban Resources Initiative, a nonprofit affiliated with the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and the city’s Parks, Recreation and Trees Department. Unfortunately, dorm rooms are not eligible. “What is a Whiffenpoof?”

was the headline of a recent article from KBTX.com, a news site affiliated with Bryan and College Station, Texas. The piece reported on a visit from the Yale a cappella group. The suited-up seniors had sung at Arbor Oaks at Crestview retirement community. One big feathery family. A diagram created by a team of scientists at Yale displaying the connections between all living bird species has been selected for exhibition by the British Library. The infographic is the “most comprehensive family tree for birds to date,” according to Yale News. The evolutionary history of almost 10,000 species of birds is displayed on the chart. At the British Library, it will make up part of an exhibit titled “Beautiful Science: Picturing Data, Inspiring Insight.” A win for J. Swift. Leo Damrosch’s ’63 book “Jonathan Swift: His Life and His World,” published by Yale University Press, has been awarded in the biography category of the National Book Critics Circle Awards. The winners were announced March 13. THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1955 A report from a hired engineering firm recommends replacing chandeliers in Sterling Memorial Library with ceiling spotlights. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE goydn.com/xcampus

BASKETBALL YALE IN TOP 8 OF CIT TOURNAMENT

A NEW FRONTIER

SPRING BREAK

Lab renovations herald new direction for Physics department

PHOTOGRAPHERS CAPTURE TRAVEL SCENES

PAGE B1 SPORTS

PAGE 3 SCITECH

PAGE 10 THROUGH THE LENS

Endowments to grow in 2014

Tuition increases again

ENDOWMENT GROWTH PREDICTIONS COMPARISON Predicted endowment growth

Change in predictions from 2013 to 2014

Over

1

2013

2014

7.6%

7.3%

2013

2014

7.3%

7.5%

2013

2014

7.4%

7.7%

year Over

3

years Over

5

years

BY ADRIAN RODRIGUES STAFF REPORTER Endowments nationwide are predicted to grow around 7 percent in fiscal 2014. Several hundred nonprofit institutional investors predicted their portfo-

lios to grow by an average of 7.3 percent in fiscal 2014, down from 7.6 percent in fiscal 2013, according to a Commonfund Investor Outlook survey released March 12. The survey estimates that over five years, university endowments, pension funds and public charities will grow by an average of 7.7 percent.

Students research for People’s Caucus BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTER Addressing a pack of city residents lingering in the auditorium of the Hooker Middle School after a public hearing on the mayor’s proposed budget, Ward 19 Alder Michael Stratton said the People’s Caucus — a breakaway group of alders he helped organize in Janu-

ary — had a secret weapon in its legislative arsenal: Yalies. “We’ve got about eight Yale kids working on these ideas for us,” Stratton said, as he described a 10-point plan he claimed could save city taxpayers anywhere between $38 and $105 million and avert a proposed SEE CAUCUS PAGE 4

- 0.3

percentage points

0.2

percentage points

0.3

percentage points

BY RISHABH BHANDARI STAFF REPORTER

“The data indicates a level of realistic optimism that’s both refreshing and important,” said Verne Sedlacek, president and CEO of Commonfund, in the report. According to the press release, mar-

For the second consecutive year, the cost of attending Yale will increase by roughly 4 percent. The University announced a $59,800 undergraduate bill for the 2014-’15 academic year on Thursday, up from this year’s $57,500. The cost of room and board will rise from $13,500 to $14,000 and tuition will increase from $44,000 to $45,800. The University’s financial aid budget is expected to dip slightly for the second consecutive year from $119.1 million for the 2013–’14 academic year to $117 million next year. Still, according to a University press release accompanying the announcement, students receiving financial aid will not be affected by the rise in Yale’s cost unless there is a change in their family’s financial circumstances that reduces their need for financial aid. Fifty-two percent of Yale students currently receive financial aid, with the average student on financial aid receiving $41,000 in grants. “Our goals of providing the highest quality education and making it affordable for everyone determine both the term bill and the

SEE INVESTORS PAGE 4

SEE TUITION PAGE 6

Former postdoc files suit BY MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS STAFF REPORTER A former postdoctoral researcher at the Yale Medical School has filed a suit against the University, her supervisor and a former postdoctoral fellow over what she alleges was deliberate tampering with her research. Magdalena Koziol, who was a postdoc researcher at the Yale School of Medicine from June 2011 to March 2013, filed the suit in early February. Koziol claims that the University and Koziol’s supervisor acted improperly

upon discovering that another postdoctoral fellow had poisoned the fish Koziol was studying, destroying more than nine months’ worth of research. Koziol’s suit targets the University, former postdoctoral fellow Polloneal Ocbina — who was found guilty by the University of tampering with Koziol’s research — and Koziol’s supervisor, genetics professor Antonio Giraldez, who the suit says created a hostile work environment for Koziol after Ocbina left the University. In the suit, Koziol claims that

Giraldez and Yale breached their contracts with Koziol for postdoctoral work in a range of ways, including “willfully, intentionally and recklessly failing to properly investigate the scientific misconduct, threatening [her] with termination, … intimidating her … denying her any written confirmation of the incident, threatening to destroy her [and] failing to carry out the grievance procedure in a reasonable period of time.” University Spokesman Tom SEE POSTDOC SUIT PAGE 6

SAE reforms pledging process nationally BY WESLEY YIIN STAFF REPORTER Sigma Alpha Epsilon, one of the nation’s largest fraternities, has eliminated the pledging and initiation processes for new members. The national fraternity announced in a press release that it has removed these new-membership programs partly because the organization has received bad publicity associated with “a number of incidents and deaths,” as well as chapters closing due tow hazing related problems. According to Bloomberg, at least 10 deaths have been linked to hazing, alcohol and drug use at SAE events — a sizable portion of the 60 fraternity-related deaths documented since 2005. A new program called “The True Gentleman Experience” will replace SAE’s pledging process. According to the national fraternity, the program will be a period of holistic education during which members will learn more about the fraternity and its principles. The fraternity’s statement acknowledges that the transition from traditional pledging procedures will be a difficult one, but emphasizes its overall positive effects. SEE SAE PAGE 4

ELENA MALLOY/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOWGRAPHER

Sigma Alpha Epsilon has eliminated the pledging and initiation processes for new members.


PAGE 2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “Yale is a great place because of the intellectual capacities of the people yaledailynews.com/opinion

Yale’s rising cost

D

uring spring break, while most students were busy volunteering, writing theses, vacationing or relaxing, Yale announced a 4 percent increase in cost of attendance for the second year in a row. Last year, the announcement came in the form of a Yale News article. This year, University Spokesman Tom Conroy sent a press release to the Yale Daily News, and the News put an article online immediately. In both instances, the articles went live at a time when few students were likely to be reading Yale publications. Not a single email was sent to the campus or greater Yale community. The cost of attendance for the 2014-'15 year has been set at $63,250, up $2,350 from the term bill for 2013-'14. Yale’s cost of attendance has been steadily increasing for the past decade — the cost of attendance for the 2007-'08 year was $45,000. The cost of attending Yale College has increased by nearly $20,000 in an eight-year period. This is a problem for students across the socioeconomic spectrum. Families not receiving financial aid are forced to pay thousands more each year without many tangible changes in the product received. And although the University claims, “the cost of Yale next year for parents of current students receiving financial aid will not increase,” the student portions of the financial aid package have increased once again.

LET'S CALL ON YALE TO STOP RAISING OUR TUITION This year’s press release noted that students receiving financial aid would be asked to contribute $50 more to the “self-help” portion of their package next year, a portion typically paid for with a term-time job. Although this $50 increase may seem negligible, it follows a $300 increase in self-help payments over the past two years. During the 2008-2009 year, the selfhelp contribution was $2,500. Next year, it will be $3,350 for upperclassmen and $2,850 for freshmen. And campus minimum wage has risen by a mere 70 cents since 2008. In an interview with the News, Director of Student Financial Services Caesar Storlazzi said there are no plans to raise the minimum wage in the upcoming year. Another key piece of information was left out of the press release: The student income contribution, the portion contributed from summer earnings, has also risen once again. Financial aid recipients will be asked to contribute $3,050 this

summer, up from $2,400 in 2008. To summarize, upperclassmen on financial aid will be asked to contribDIANA ute $6,400 ROSEN towards their educaLooking Left tion, while their counterparts in 2008 paid $4,900. Yet Yale continues to claim that they meet full demonstrated need, as the family portion of the financial aid package has not changed. Rising costs of attendance force students to either work longer hours, take out loans or financially squeeze their families. This trend is particularly strange given Yale’s recent attempts to recruit more lowincome students and improve their college experience through programs like Freshman Scholars at Yale. Costs of attendance have been rising steadily at schools across the country. According to the College Board, the average cost of attendance at private, non-profit four-year colleges has increased 14 percent beyond the rate of inflation since 2008. At public four-year institutions, costs have risen by 27 percent. Rising college costs each year have become the standard in the United States, yet the situation could not be more dramatically different just across our northern border. College students in Quebec went on strike and protested for 100 days straight in 2012 in response to a government plan to raise tuition by $1,625 over five years. The student unions refused to accept the compromise of a seven-year plan, eventually forcing the education minister to resign. That fall, the tuition hikes were eliminated, and it was announced that tuition would be indexed to cost of living. The proposed rise in Quebec college tuition would have resulted in total costs far lower than American college costs, but those students chose to take to the streets and force their government to back down. Yet, American students have watched costs rise dramatically for years, exhibiting little to no resistance. It is time for American students, including us at Yale, to take a cue from up north and demand an end to rising college costs. At the very least, the Yale administration owes undergraduates a transparent, wellpublicized explanation as to why costs have risen nearly $20,000 in just eight years — not a short press release announcement while campus is empty. DIANA ROSEN is a sophomore in Pierson College. Her columns run on alternate Mondays. Contact her at diana.rosen@yale.edu .

YALE DAILY NEWS PUBLISHING CO., INC. 202 York Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (203) 432-2400 Editorial: (203) 432-2418 editor@yaledailynews.com Business: (203) 432-2424 business@yaledailynews.com

EDITOR IN CHIEF Julia Zorthian MANAGING EDITORS Anya Grenier Jane Darby Menton ONLINE EDITOR Cynthia Hua OPINION Emma Goldberg Geng Ngarmboonanant NEWS Sophie Gould Amy Wang CITY Monica Disare Michelle Hackman FEATURES Lorenzo Ligato CULTURE Aleksandra Gjorgievska

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY Daniel Weiner SPORTS Charles Condro Alexander Eppler ARTS & LIVING Jackson McHenry Elaina Plott Yanan Wang YTV Madison Alworth Raleigh Cavero Kevin Kucharski MAGAZINE Sarah Maslin Joy Shan COPY Adrian Chiem Ian Gonzalez Elizabeth Malchione Douglas Plume

PRODUCTION & DESIGN Emma Hammarlund Leon Jiang Jason Kim Jennifer Lu Daniel Roza Mohan Yin PHOTOGRAPHY Kathryn Crandall Henry Ehrenberg Brianna Loo Sara Miller

PUBLISHER Julie Leong DIR. FINANCE Joyce Xi DIR. OPERATIONS Yumehiko Hoshijima ONL. BUSINESS MANAGER Gonzalo Gallardo

COMM. MANAGER Abdullah Hanif MARKETING MANAGER Yuanling Yuan ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE MANAGERS Vivian Wang Shannon Zhang

ILLUSTRATIONS Annelisa Leinbach DIRECTORS OF TECHNOLOGY Vincent Hu Soham Sankaran ASSOCIATE MANAGING EDITOR Clinton Wang

THIS ISSUE COPY STAFF: Adam Mahler, Isabel Sperry PRODUCTION STAFF: Renee Bollier, Carter Levin, Marisa Lowe

EDITORIALS & ADS

The News’ View represents the opinion of the majority of the members of the Yale Daily News Managing Board of 2015. Other content on this page with bylines represents the opinions of those authors and not necessarily those of the Managing Board. Opinions set forth in ads do not necessarily reflect the views of the Managing Board. We reserve the right to refuse any ad for any reason and to delete or change any copy we consider objectionable, false or in poor taste. We do not verify the contents of any ad. The Yale Daily News Publishing Co., Inc. and its officers, employees and agents disclaim any responsibility for all liabilities, injuries or damages arising from any ad. The Yale Daily News Publishing Co. ISSN 0890-2240

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT

SUBMISSIONS

All letters submitted for publication must include the author’s name, phone number and description of Yale University affiliation. Please limit letters to 250 words and guest columns to 750. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit letters and columns before publication. E-mail is the preferred method of submission. Direct all letters, columns, artwork and inquiries to: Emma Goldberg and Geng Ngarmboonanant Opinion Editors Yale Daily News opinion@yaledailynews.com

COPYRIGHT 2014 — VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 103

in it.”

'LDFFLY' ON 'PRIVACY IN STERLING'

Don’t judge finance F

inance — that evil industry responsible for the wealth gap that so many Yalies go into after graduation. When professor Robert Shiller claimed at a debate hosted by The Economist that those with moral purpose should work in finance, his response was met with hordes of criticism. The criticism resembled much of the argument that his debate opponent, Vivek Wadhwa, advanced. “Would you rather have your children going and cooking up the financial system, engineering the financial system, and creating more bubbles for us … or would you rather have them saving the world?” he asked. Even as a measly freshman, I’ve gotten whiffs of the general attitude towards economics majors and bankers. That the finance industry is cold and heartless, that it is for those who only value money, that it is selling your soul. This view has gained traction to the point where professors have publicly commented on this trend, with criticism of those going into finance taking up quite some space in discussion. Maybe it’s because the path is so popular that some feel the need to criticize it. Yet, this isn’t done without collateral damage.

No, I’m not an economics major. I’d much rather write an essay in one of my philosophy classes than take an ecoLEO KIM nomics midterm any day. On Us And no, I’m not someone currently going to Goldman Sachs meetings and trying to network for a future job. I also recognize the reasons finance has received criticism. The wealth disparity in America is no laughing matter, with the top 0.01 percent of Americans making more than 4 percent of the national total income — the highest in nearly 100 years. Heads of banks are receiving higher bonuses than ever. Plus, many going into finance now do so because they’re not sure what they want to do, and banking promises a healthy paycheck. But what has happened at Yale, the demonization of those going into the industry, isn’t fair for many people that are taking jobs in finance. After interviews with several people who are going into finance, I realized that what critics had said to be the case — that

a person went into finance solely for the money and self-gain — was not true at all. This says nothing about the morality of the overall industry. That’s a different topic entirely. What I am saying is that as Yalies, we often fight tooth and nail against discrimination. We will do anything in our power to prevent ourselves from attributing characteristics to individuals on the basis of their status as a member of a certain group. There’s no reason that attitude should stop short of those going into finance. When I asked a Yalie about his future in finance, he responded by saying that “I would love to go and do Teach for America or join the Peace Corps, but I need money to pay off my student debt and doing what I love is the way I can do it.” And this is something we often forget. I have certainly been guilty of subconsciously eliminating the possibility that those going into finance truly enjoy what they’re doing, and that it interests them as much as poetry, physics or philosophy interest others. And often, it isn’t a case of the rich getting richer, but rather, those who didn’t have money in the past who know its value doing what they love to support themselves and their family.

It is unfair to lump these people under the “finance” umbrella. It isn’t fair that we assume things about them and guilt them for “cooking up the financial system” and being harmful to the rest of the hard working people out there. Just as we try not to assume things about a person based on stereotypes, we should not assume things about people going into finance. Because their chosen profession doesn’t say anything about their characters; it doesn’t say anything about where they’re from or who they are. It seems like whenever someone tells me that they are going into consulting or hedge-fund work, they often add in the phrase “which I guess is pretty common” — as if they have to apologize for what they’re doing. This attitude towards finance is deeply ingrained in our culture at Yale. Whether this is with reason or not doesn’t matter. What does matter is that we take the attitude of acceptance and nonjudgment that we hold for decisions such as religious affiliation and extend it to all facets of our life. LEO KIM is a freshman in Trumbull College. Contact him at leo.kim@yale.edu .

I L LU ST R AT I O N S E D I T O R A N N E L I SA L E I N B AC H

Mad about March

G U E ST C O LU M N I ST JAC KS O N B E C K

Mobilize for juvenile justice reform O

n March 10, HB 5221 cleared the Judiciary Committee of the Connecticut General Assembly, marking an important step forward for juvenile justice reform in the state; but the bill still has a ways to go before being implemented as law. HB 5221 prohibits mandatory life sentences without the possibility of parole for juvenile offenders — sentences that have already been declared unconstitutional by a Supreme Court that recognizes the developmental difference between children and adults. There’s plenty of scientific evidence that demonstrates that difference, but most of us can intuitively recognize how much we have changed in the years since we were in high school. Most of us recognize the injustice of binding people to the mistakes they made as teenagers for the rest of their lives. To be sure, juveniles who commit serious crimes ought to face serious consequences. In Connecticut, however, these consequences are simply too severe, and the United States is currently the only country that sentences juvenile offenders to life without parole. Passing the juvenile jus-

tice reform bill would show the rest of the world that Connecticut rejects this outdated practice. Juvenile offenders would become eligible for a parole hearing after serving in prison for 12 years or 60 percent of their sentence, whichever is longer. This amounts to a sizable improvement in the law, acknowledging the special consideration juveniles deserve within the criminal justice system. With its decision to move HB 5221 forward, the Judiciary Committee helped bring Connecticut a small step closer to improving its criminal justice system, but juvenile justice reform in Connecticut has been in this position before. Last year, the Connecticut House of Representatives passed a similar bill in a resounding 137-4 vote, reflecting bipartisan support for reform. It was a staggering level of consensus that seemed to guarantee successful passage through the General Assembly. But the bill ultimately died in the Senate, where it was never called to a vote. Juvenile justice reform had support, but it wasn’t made the priority it needed to be to make it into law. That can change this year.

Given the legislature’s stunning failure to pass reform amidst widespread approval last year, it would be easy to sit back, sulk over governmental dysfunction and wait for progress to take shape on its own. But with the lives of young people at stake — people convicted when they were just below our age — it is more important than ever for us to set aside our political disillusionment and speak out for what is right. With a bill already in place supported by Democrats, Republicans and the nonpartisan Connecticut Sentencing Commission, the voice of the people may stand as the single most important factor in securing the successful passage of juvenile justice reform through both houses of the General Assembly. Passive support will not be enough. Connecticut is ready to pass reform, but legislators need to know we are watching. We need to keep the issue on legislators’ minds to make reform the priority it never was in the last legislative session, and we can accomplish this by reaching out to state representatives and senators. More specifically, we need to thank members of the Judiciary Committee for supporting

the bill, and we need to express our expectation that they follow through with their support and demand that reform be called to a vote in both houses. Groups on campus like the Yale College Democrats and the Yale Undergraduate Prison Project have been working to connect students to state officials, but anyone can find contact information for legislators on the website of the Connecticut General Assembly. As college students, we claim a special familiarity with what it means to be a juvenile, which puts us in an important position as advocates for juvenile justice reform. Most of us can’t imagine spending our lives dealing with the consequences of the mistakes we made as adolescents. Nor can we imagine what other mistakes we might have made had we come from backgrounds of violence and abuse, as so many juvenile offenders do. As the Connecticut General Assembly considers reform for a second time, we all have a role to play in offering juvenile offenders a second chance. JACKSON BECK is a freshman in Branford College. Contact him at jackson.beck@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“A lean compromise is better than a fat lawsuit.” GEORGE HERBERT ENGLISH POET

CORRECTIONS FRIDAY, MARCH 7

The article “CT students call for DREAM” misspelled the name of Irina Anta LAW ’15. OCT. 16, 2012

The article “Yale plays rare collegiate cricket match against Harvard” incorrectly implied that Yale’s cricket program was created around 1991. The article and its former headline also incorrectly stated that 2012 was the first time Yale had ever played Harvard in cricket.

Yale moves to dismiss Bagley lawsuit BY LAVINIA BORZI AND MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS STAFF REPORTERS Three months after a School of Management professor filed suit against Yale alleging gender and age discrimination, the University has responded by moving to dismiss the case. The motion, filed by the University on Thursday, is the University’s first formal legal response to a suit filed on Dec. 20 by SOM professor Constance Bagley. In the suit, Bagley — who teaches the practice of law and management at SOM — claimed that she was not reappointed to her professorship in May 2012 because of her gender and age. She also accused her colleague and professor Douglas Rae, who co-taught a course with her, of repeated acts of discrimination. But the University filed a memorandum claiming that Bagley’s suit falls short in several aspects, also alleging that Bagley did not exhaust all possible options of handling her complaint through the University before filing suit.

I continue to believe in the validity of the claims set forth in the complaint. CONSTANCE BAGLEY Professor in the practice of law and management, Yale School of Management “I continue to believe in the validity of the claims set forth in the complaint, and look forward to putting the procedural posturing behind us so we can let a jury decide the merits of the case,” Bagley said Sunday. Bagley and her lawyer plan to file a response to Yale’s motion to dismiss in late April, Bagley added. Oral arguments in the case are scheduled to take place on June 25 — which will mark the first time parties will testify in court. Bagley’s December complaint — which was filed against the University, SOM Dean Edward Snyder, SOM Deputy Dean Andrew Metrick and Rae — lists 18 counts of discrimination and seeks monetary compensation for Bagley. In the complaint, Bagley also claims that the gender animus she experienced was symptomatic of a generally hostile environment for women at

SOM. Snyder, Metrick and Rae all declined to comment. In conjunction with its motion to dismiss, the University filed a 99-page memorandum laying out its arguments against Bagley’s claims. The memorandum’s three fundamental arguments were that Bagley’s state and federal discrimination claims should be dismissed, that the United States District Court should not exercise “supplemental judgement” over claims made under state laws and that five of Bagley’s 18 initial alleged counts of discrimination “fail to state a claim upon which relief can be granted.” The University said the suit should be dismissed because Bagley had not exhausted all possible options to handle her complaint through internal University procedures before filing. The memorandum further asserted that Bagley’s initial complaint to the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities — a staterun office that works to eliminate discrimination through civil and human rights law enforcement — as well as her complaints under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act were not filed within the time frames required under the respective laws. The University also stated that Bagley’s complaint against Rae was based on alleged expressions of opinion and were not sufficiently specific. The defendants had asked for an extension on the original due date for their response to the lawsuit, Bagley said. Bagley’s attorney gave them half of the time they requested — until March 3. On this date, the respondents obtained another extension to March 20. Bagley said she thinks the lawsuit is not only relevant to her, but to Yale itself as well. “I believe that the complaint raises very serious and totally verifiable allegations of misconduct,” she said. “I don’t think the University is served by having things like this going on — it’s not just me.” Bagley was initially recruited to teach at Yale by then-SOM Dean Joel Podolny in July 2007. Contact LAVINIA BORZI at lavinia.borzi@yale.edu and MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS at matthew.lloyd-thomas@yale.edu .

BLAIR SEIDEMAN/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

SOM professor Constance Bagley filed her lawsuit in December, and oral arguments are scheduled for June, but the University has moved to have the suit dismissed.

Nuclear lab undergoing renovation BY JENNIFER GERSTEN STAFF REPORTER When it finishes taking down its accelerator, Yale’s Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory will have sped into a modern research frontier. The three-phase renovation will establish a new research emphasis for the Yale Physics Department: neutrinos and dark matter, both of which have become increasingly important to the field over the past two decades. Yale’s particle accelerator, no longer necessary for the new research, is now in the process of being taken down to create the new facility. “I think it’s fair to say that Yale is trying to position the Wright Lab to be a leading entity again,” said Karsten Heeger, director of the Wright Lab and Yale physics professor. “It was a player, but [now] we hope it will be able to have an impact that goes beyond what normal universities can do.” Heeger’s selection as director and the hiring of Yale physics professor Reina Maruyama last year were the final pieces the department needed to shift the renovations into gear, said Paul Tipton, chair of the Yale Physics Department. Tipton added that while neutrinos and dark matter research is not new to Yale, the appointments of Heeger and Maruyama, who specialize in those fields, signal the department’s commitment to the new research direction. Heeger said the new Wright Lab will include a machine shop, electronics shop and cryogenic lab for testing equipment at extremely low temperatures. In the lab’s underground portion, researchers will be able to test sensitive detectors in large “clean rooms,” highly regulated spaces that are free from above-ground interference caused by cosmic radiation. Renovations of the lab’s eastern wing began last year, and will be open to undergraduates, graduate students and faculty members starting this July or August. In the meantime, Heeger said, researchers are continuing their work in temporary labs located in the lab’s older spaces. The second phase will likely begin later this year, and the final phase is set to begin in 2015. Like the workspaces proposed for the Yale Biology Building and Sterling Chemistry Laboratories, Heeger said the renovated Wright labs will be transparent, open spaces that encourage collaboration between researchers and increase interactions with undergraduates. He added that Wright’s location near the middle of campus will also lend itself to attracting undergraduate involvement, unlike similar facilities at other universities that are many miles removed. “To succeed in our research, you have to have excellent people [and] an excellent

YDN

The particular accelerator at the Wright Laboratory is being dismantled, to make room for new research technologies. infrastructure,” Heeger said. “I think now we have all the ingredients to be a place that can lead.” Established in 1966 under the direction of D. Allen Bromley, the Wright Lab was recognized as a leading national center for accelerator-based research, Heeger said. In 1987, it replaced its original accelerator with a stronger tandem Van der Graaf accelerator with funding from the Department of Energy.

It’s fair to say that Yale is trying to position the Wright Lab to be a leading entity again. KARSTEN HEEGER Physics professor, Yale University Most accelerators have been closed over the past 20 years as technology has advanced and physicists have begun exploring new avenues of study, Tipton said. Yale’s accelerator shut down in 2011, and it is now in the process of being removed to make way for the new building. “The ‘easy,’ small stuff has been done,” Tipton said. “Now we’re doing secondgeneration experiments where things are getting up to a more industrial scale. We’re scaling everything up in complexity and size.” Yale physicists requiring accelerators for their research are doing their studies elsewhere, joining a growing community of researchers who are traveling to con-

duct accelerator research, said Yale physics professor Dan McKinsey. He added that it has become standard practice for physicists to travel to large, national facilities, such as Fermilab in Illinois or the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, to conduct their experiments. As a result, McKinsey said physics research has become an increasingly collaborative effort. “More and more, physics is a global enterprise,” McKinsey said. Heeger said he hopes the renovated Wright Lab will aid collaboration by strengthening Yale physicists’ ties to both each other and the international physics community. In addition to being a site for on-campus research, the lab will also be used for developing experiments that will be conducted abroad. Heeger said he is also working to develop a collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratories in Long Island, whose proximity will provide an opportunity for University members to benefit from the national lab’s expertise and resources. Half the Wright might be underground and out of view, Heeger said, but the lab intends for the redesign to make the facility more visible and appealing to the public, and plans to keep the community informed with talks and presentations on current research. Heeger is also in talks with the Peabody Museum to develop an exhibit about the Wright and current research on neutrinos and dark matter. The Wright Lab is located at the back of Science Hill near Whitney Avenue. Contact JENNIFER GERSTEN at jennifer.gersten@yale.edu .

PILOT proposals multiply BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTER When it comes to Payment in Lieu of Taxes, or PILOT, Connecticut legislators can now take their pick. Three distinct proposals have emerged out of municipal discontent with diminishing state compensation for nontaxable property. The proposed changes come amid mounting debate over the state’s tax system, which makes property taxes the chief source of revenue for Connecticut municipalities. The most recent proposed change, introduced by State Senate Majority Leader Martin Looney of New Haven, represents a more limited overhaul than the one envisioned by House Speaker Brendan Sharkey of Hamden. Sharkey’s plan would eliminate statutory tax exemptions and force colleges and hospitals, rather than towns and cities, to lobby the state for grants. The most modest proposal is Gov. Dannel Malloy’s — to increase total PILOT funding by $8 million, which would be shared among the more than 150 Connecticut towns and cities currently receiving reimbursements. Looney’s bill, referred to the Finance, Revenue and Bonding Committee, would combine the sum cities receive for taxexempt colleges and hospitals and the sum for nontaxable state properties. They currently represent two separate formulas: 77 cents on the dollar for colleges and hospitals and 45 cents on the dollar for state property. In recent years, the state has fallen drastically short of meeting those levels. The bill would also give proportionally greater aid to cities with more nontaxable properties. The 20 municipalities with the greatest concentration of nontaxable land would get back 50 percent of the lost taxes. The next 20 municipalities would get 45 percent back, and the remaining towns would receive 40 percent. “The bill that I introduced takes account of the fact that many of the communities that rely on PILOT are not equal: Some only have a small number of properties off the tax rolls and others have an immense number,” Looney said. He has

represented New Haven, where roughly 47 percent of property is nontaxable, for two decades. Looney’s legislation would make the altered reimbursement rates statutory. Currently, they depend on the “good will” of the legislature, Looney said. The new formula would be phased in over five years starting in 2016, he added. A handful of New Haven lawmakers keen on capturing more PILOT funds for the city said they support Looney’s legislation, though they say it does not go far enough. Michael Stratton, an alder for Newhallville and Prospect Hill who has been one of the city’s strongest voices for more robust PILOT payments, traveled to Hartford last week with East Rock Alder Anna Festa and a cadre of other residents to testify in support of the bill at a public hearing. Stratton said he is in favor of a “hybrid” between Looney’s tiered system of reimbursements and Sharkey’s plan to reverse PILOT. Under his envisioned combination of the two changes, municipalities would be compensated at Looney’s proposed levels for nonprofits still immune to taxes, Stratton said. That would likely include Yale University, whose taxexempt status is protected by the state constitution. Yale-New Haven Hospital, on the other hand, whose exemption is more recent than the University’s, would owe the city roughly $31 million in property taxes should PILOT reversal become law — a figure based on property value determined by the city’s Department of Assessment. Dana Marnane, director of public relations and communications for YaleNew Haven Hospital, said the hospital is opposed to Sharkey’s bill, and favors Malloy’s $8-million boost to overall PILOT instead. She did not return request for further comment. From Yale’s perspective, PILOT has been effective and should not be reversed, Michael Morand ’87 DIV ’93, Yale’s deputy chief communications officer, told the News last month. Ron Thomas, director of public policy and advocacy for the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities, said his orga-

nization supports both bills, which he said recognize that many Connecticut cities are in “dire shape.” In response to colleges’ and universities’ opposition to the bill, Thomas called Sharkey’s PILOT reversal “very fair.” Sharkey’s bill has been referred to the Planning and Development Committee, which held a public hearing on the proposed change on Friday morning. Speaking two days earlier at a legislative leadership breakfast, Sharkey said his bill includes a provision that would allow nonprofits to negotiate an appropriate tax rate with their host communities. “The idea of the ‘Reverse PILOT’ is that … towns, in theory, would be able to collect 100 percent of the taxes that would otherwise be owed by those institutions,” Sharkey said. Committees will decide on the various PILOT plans over the next two weeks. If approved, they will go to the full assembly for a vote. Representative Pat Widlitz, the House chair of the Finance, Revenue and Bonding Committee, said Looney’s bill is still a “work in progress.” A Democrat representing the towns of Branford and Guilford, she said it will be hard to gauge the bill’s effects until its fiscal impact becomes clear. “It will certainly have a budgetary impact. That’s the first problem,” Widlitz said. “A major addition like this is very difficult in the second year of the budget.” State Rep. Toni Boucher, a Republican member of the committee and a gubernatorial candidate, said she is worried not just about the bill’s budget impact but about the way in which the tiered system might “advantage certain communities over others.” She added that she is “totally opposed” to Sharkey’s “Reverse PILOT” — a bill that will likely encounter stiff opposition, according to both Boucher and Republican colleague State Sen. Len Fasano ’81. Connecticut levies income and sales taxes in addition to the property taxes collected by municipalities. Contact ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“Wide diversification is only required when investors do not understand what they are doing.” WARREN BUFFET AMERICAN BUSINESS MAGNATE

Student research team advises People’s Caucus

ISAAC STANLEY BECKER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

A growing number of Yale students are working as policy assistants to Alders in the so-called People’s Caucus, a breakaway faction of Alders looking to create policy dialog with the union-backed majority on the Board of Alders. CAUCUS FROM PAGE 1 tax hike that has property owners in a frenzy. Actually, the number of Yale students is closer to 10, according to Rafi Bildner ’16, who is heading up the fledgling New Haven Legislative Analysts Program, a part-resurrection, part-replacement of the defunct New Haven Policy Assistants Program. The Analysts Program debuted this semester along with the People’s Caucus. Bildner, together with the program’s other leaders, volunteered during last year’s mayor’s race for Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM ’10, a petitioning Independent candidate who lost to Mayor Toni Harp in the general election. After witnessing the students’ work on the Elicker campaign, Stratton said he contacted them about staying involved — not by knocking on doors for a candidate but by grinding out research to back up ideas the People’s Caucus wants to put before the Board of Alders. Though the program got its start through work for one particular faction

on the Board, Bildner said its intent is nonpartisan. The research group hopes to be of service to a range of alders of diverse affiliations. “I would love for other members of the Board to reach out to us,” he said. Bildner said he plans to contact Ward 1 Alder Sarah Eidelson about working with her once classes resume Monday. Eidelson, whose constituents are primarily Yale students, said that she is “always excited to hear from student groups that want to engage in the legislative process.” The program has its roots in a similar Policy Assistants Program that began during the tenure of Ward 1 Alder Mike Jones ’11, who served from 2009 to 2011. First funded by Yale’s Office of New Haven and State Affairs and then through Dwight Hall, the program initially assigned students to particular alders and then pivoted to particular Board committees. The program faltered during the Board’s last term when “there was a decrease in the volume of legislation being pushed,” according to Drew Mor-

rison ’14, who helped in the founding both of the People’s Caucus and the student research group.

It’s about making sure there is a movement of ideas on the Board. DREW MORRISON ’14 Student research group member The mayor’s proposed budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1 has provided the group with an abundance of initial research opportunities, Morrison said. “They’re looking at taking some of the People’s Caucus’ budget proposals and making them more practical and actionable,” Morrison said. Those ideas include proposals to trim certain city departments and outsource a number of city functions, while growing the tax base and boosting revenue. “It’s about making sure there is a movement of ideas on the Board.” But Bildner said the program will out-

SAE looks to reduce hazing SAE FROM PAGE 1 “This change will strengthen our Fraternity, create highly positive opportunities to redefine membership, attract prospective members who otherwise might not join and lead the way among Greekletter organizations as we recommit ourselves to our Founding Fathers’ original concepts,” the statement reads. Yale SAE President Samir Sama ’15 said in an email he is still unsure of how the Yale chapter will modify its current procedure to fit the national organization’s new guidelines. In the upcoming weeks, he said he plans to meet with the chapter’s executive board in order to determine how the change will affect SAE at Yale. He added that he supports the national fraternity’s decision. “I believe that any measures taken to reduce the harmful effects of hazing and increase the safety of new SAE members across the country is a positive change,” Sama said. Seven members of SAE did not respond to request for comment. Douglas Fierberg, a lawyer who specializes in Greek organization and hazing law and has previously sued SAE, said that though the fraternity’s recent action is a step in the right direction, he believes it is not the “magic bullet” for resolving the issues of hazing and frater-

nity-related incidents and crimes. The problems that SAE and other fraternities face, he said, extend far beyond the injuries and deaths that have received media attention.

This change will strengthen our Fraternity [and] create highly positive opportunities to redefine membership. SIGMA ALPHA EPSILAN NATIONAL C HAPTER Fierberg referred to a chart on the national fraternity’s website titled “Chapter Health and Safety History,” which he said accurately depicts the sheer number of health and safety incidents that occurred at fraternity-related events over the past five years. Fierberg said the chart — which was created as a result of a settlement he helped reach — shows that violations of fraternity policy have created a widespread, national issue that the public is generally not aware of. SAE’s recent policy change is a motion to reduce the frequency of these infractions, Fierberg said. Though Fierberg said he does not

know if other fraternities are in the process of implementing similar changes, he said it would be “wholly irresponsible” for fraternities not to change their pledging and initiating processes. The national fraternity organizations for Sigma Phi Epsilon, which abolished its pledge process in 1991, and Chi Psi did not respond to requests for comment. Sigma Chi Fraternity Grand Consul Michael Greenberg said in an email that while his fraternity supports SAE’s new “courageous stance,” Sig Chi will not be eliminating its New Member Education Programs. “[W]e believe that New Member Education Programs, as long as they are aligned to our values and devoid of all hazing or irresponsible activities, will continue to serve a purpose of providing a period of education, evaluation, and reflection for all potential Sigma Chis to have the opportunity to understand the importance of a lifelong commitment and the process of lifelong learning,” Greenberg said in an email, adding that his fraternity and SAE are taking “different route[s] to the same end.” Sig Chi adopted a zero tolerance policy with regard to hazing in 2013. Contact WESLEY YIIN at wesley.yiin@yale.edu .

last the budget season. His goal is to create an enduring resource for the Board, he said, with the capacity to research innovative projects and not get bogged down in the “nitty gritty details of one year’s budget or another.” Group members said, the effort represents an attempt to make a meaningful contribution to the city. “We have time on our hands as students,” said Rachel Miller ’15, another one of the program’s organizers. “The Yale connection is a convenient way for us to organize ourselves but really everyone is just an interested citizen, and this is one really clear way for citizens to stay involved.” Miller said the group is looking to other cities to find best-practices solutions to New Haven’s problems. So far that has included issues of workers’ compensation and a tax rebate program to encourage workers in New Haven to live within city limits. Other policy issues the Caucus has asked the students to research include the propriety of gag orders — such as to the ban City Clerk Michael Smart put on

employees of the clerk’s office speaking to the media — and the feasibility of the city’s taking over the transport functions of the American Medical Response company within the city, Stratton said. Stratton cited student involvement as model civic activism. One of the People’s Caucus’ main goals is to open up avenues for greater citizen input, he said. Policy suggestions trickle up from constituents to the alders, who then enlist the students to hone the ideas and gather evidence to make them defensible. “It’s bottom up. We’re not going to the elite of Yale — the professors or the president — we’re going to the brain trust and saying ‘go out and investigate,’” Stratton said. “Here we have the number one university in the world, and we haven’t been using them to find out what the best practices are for our city.” The group selected its members based on competitive application prior to the spring recess. Contact ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .

Institutional investors optimistic INVESTORS FROM PAGE 1 ket volatility remains the primary concern of institutional investors. The predictions acknowledge the “strong headwinds that are present,” including tough economic conditions in Europe and the possibility of rising inflation, said Commonfund Institute Executive Director John S. Griswold. While the average college endowment grew by 11.7 percent in fiscal 2013, he said managers are not expecting that level of growth to continue. Griswold added that high single-digit returns are not disappointing, but that a 7 percent growth rate is probably insufficient to recover spending from the endowment and long-term inflation. “There’s a need to bolster endowments longer term,” he said. “This isn’t disappointing, but realistically it’s not quite enough to cover your spending plus inflation.” Griswold said a 7 percent return will cover most of the needs of higher education institutions, but

emphasized the importance of fundraising during this time. Still, the data is unsurprising because predicted growth between fiscal 2013 and fiscal 2014 shifted by only 0.3 percent, said William Jarvis ’77, managing director of the Commonfund Institute. According to Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Jonathan Parker ’88, a riskfree nominal rate of return over five years is about 1.5 percent per year. By predicting a much higher return, institutions’ growth rate remains strong. “Performance over longer horizons demonstrates the strength of Yale’s investment program,” the report said. “Although the endowment produced painful losses in fiscal 2009, the results of any oneyear period tell very little about the efficacy of a long-term investment strategy.” David Swensen is the University’s chief investment officer. Contact ADRIAN RODRIGUES at adrian.rodrigues@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“I never travel without my diary. One should always have something sensational to read in the train.” OSCAR WILDE IRISH WRITER AND POET

Report shows decreased crime statewide BY MAREK RAMILO STAFF REPORTER Despite New Haven’s reputation as a dangerous city, the overall crime rates in Connecticut have decreased in the past several years, a report issued Friday by the governor’s office showed. Undersecretary Mike Lawlor, Gov. Dannel Malloy’s criminal justice advisor, published “Trends in the Criminal Justice System” on Friday, releasing updated official data that accounted for arrest numbers, prison populations, drug violations and shootings. Lawlor said the information — which shows where resources have been successful in the past and make suggestions for their future allocation — is important for both policymakers and Connecticut residents to see and understand. The report highlighted reductions of 23.7 percent in criminal arrests from 2009 to 2013, 8.1 per-

cent in prison population since 2010 and 11.2 percent in index crimes, eight dangerous crimes specified by the FBI such as willful homicide and forcible rape— from 2008 to 2012, among other metrics. “The legislators are debating the pros and cons of different approaches,” Lawlor said. “Gun control is a hot topic, so are diversionary programs and intervention in prisons. [They’re debating] where to spend the money, where to focus efforts — it’s better that people understand what’s really happening.” Lawlor said he views the drop in arrests as the most promising trend in the report. In the last 10 years, statewide arrests peaked at 124,249 in 2009, slowed to 101,065 in 2012 and then to 94,856 in 2013. He added that the “significant” reduction will have major implications for prison policy. New Haven Police Department spokesman David Hartman

agreed that the numbers in the report are generally encouraging, but was hesitant to say that fewer arrests indicate reduced crime, citing police involvement at this year’s Greater New Haven St. Patrick’s Day Parade where arrest numbers, about 20, were unusually high. Still, he said the situation remained relatively calm and passed without major incident. “We’re appreciative that the numbers have stayed down,” Hartman said. “That said, we don’t generally like calling them successes because we fully realize that you can have a couple good years followed by a couple less productive years. We’ll move ahead and do what we’re supposed to do to keep this crime rate dropping.” The report also featured a section on urban homicides and shootings in Bridgeport, Hartford and New Haven, which accounted for around half of all Connecticut homicides in the past three

NHPS gets smart

years. Since 2011, shooting incidents have decreased each year in all three cities. New Haven saw only 66 in 2013, compared to 133 in 2011. Homicides, though varying by city, have also dropped overall in the three cities since 2011. Hartman attributed the downward trends to a number of factors, including the relocation of probation and parole agencies to the department’s Union Avenue offices and the activation of programs like Project Longevity, which uses social network analysis to curb crime, and a shooting task force, which focuses on nonhomicidal gun violence in New Haven. “There’s a better understanding now that shootings, in general, are the problem,” Hartman said. “Whether or not a shooting ends up in a homicide doesn’t lessen its impact — it still poses a danger to the public.” City Hall spokesman Laurence Grotheer said he was very encour-

aged by what he saw in the report, naming NHPD Chief Dean Esserman’s community-based policing model as the principal reason for the success in the eyes of Mayor Toni Harp. He added that the most important function served by reports like Lawlor’s is keeping the public informed about life in New Haven. Grotheer called sharing this information a “quality of life issue.” Mark Abraham ’04, the executive director of DataHaven, reacted positively to some patterns seen in the report, like lower recidivism rates, but urged careful inspection of the data before drawing definitive conclusions. “Most of the report seems to show that statewide criminal justice figures are fairly flat over the long term,” Abraham said. “I think that it will do little to please advocates who believe that our state spends too much on prisons, or placate those who continue to be concerned about gun violence, for

A new smartphone app will help parents with children in New Haven Public Schools stay connected. BY POOJA SALHOTRA STAFF REPORTER In an effort to improve communication with parents across the school district, New Haven Public Schools launched a new smartphone app on Friday. The app allows parents to receive district-wide notifications about snow days and upcoming events, and features an idea box where parents can submit their thoughts about ways to improve schools. Superintendent Garth Harries ’95 and Mayor Toni Harp met with parents at East Rock Community Magnet School last week to announce the app and other new communications tools for parents. The app came as a response to parents’ calls for better communication from NHPS. In addition to the app, Harries promoted a website for parents launched in September and a “welcome team” that will help parents navigate the complex student enrollment process. Harp embraced the new communication tools and said that they will increase parent engagement. “It is my sense that students respond favorably when loved ones keep current with activities and events at school — it increases participation in those activities and provides concrete evidence that the whole family is engaged in the student’s educa-

tion,” Harp said at the press conference. Harries said that during his recent “listening tour” — a project to gather feedback about school progress — he heard many requests from parents and community members to improve access to information. The app addresses this problem by allowing parents to receive district notifications, as well as providing ready access to other relevant links to websites such as New Haven Promise, Parent University, school lunch menus and the NHPS Facebook and Twitter pages. Board of Education member and president of East Rock’s parent teacher organization Daisy Gonzalez said that she hopes the app will encourage parents to become more involved in their children’s education. “The more parents become familiar with the app, the more they are going to realize this is really simple to get in touch with the schools, and that’s going to get them to open up more,” she said. “I think [parents] didn’t realize that NHPS wants them to be involved.” Jennifer Ricker, a member of the Citywide Parent Leadership Team, said the new app will compliment the parent website already in place. Last September, the Citywide Parent Leadership Team launched a website that, like the app, notifies parents about important events and offer

resources. The website includes information about upcoming workshops and allows parents to connect with each other on an online portal. Ricker said the app will help her stay on top of district announcements she might otherwise miss. “The district didn’t always leave a phone message when there were important announcements, and my husband didn’t even get the calls, so if I missed the call we would have no idea what was going on,” she said. “This app allows us to both be connected and access information if we missed something.” Another way the district is trying to improve communication is by creating a welcome team of staff members from different departments who will help answer parents’ questions during busy times like registration and the School Choice lottery. Harries piloted the program on a smaller scale when he first became Superintendent last year, and he decided to expand it after receiving positive feedback, said NHPS Director of Communications Abbe Smith. The welcome team will be available during the School Choice lottery from April 9 until April 24 in Central Office at 54 Meadow St. Contact POOJA SALHOTRA at pooja.salhotra@yale.edu .

Contact MAREK RAMILO at marek.ramilo@yale.edu .

Probe finds Metro-North safety practices inadequate BY DAVID BLUMENTHAL STAFF REPORTER

RAYMOND NOONAN/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

example.” When accounting for instances of small sample size, limited context and missing data points, some trends appear to be overstated, Abraham said. At worst, however, it is the magnitude, not the direction of these patterns that would be affected. Despite the fact that the report deck does not highlight any climbing crime rates, Lawlor insisted on its completeness and significance. “There aren’t many [increasing trends in state crime],” Lawlor said. “We didn’t leave anything out because it’s a bad indication. Across the board, everything is headed in the right direction.” The report shows the state rearrest rate among adult probationers to have fallen consistently from 2007, 47 percent, to 2013, 42 percent.

A federal report released Friday blasted the Metro-North Railroad’s self-oversight, saying that the organization has built a culture of not making its passengers’ safety its first priority. The 28-page report, the result of a systematic evaluation known as “Operation Deep Dive,” took 60 days’ worth of investigations by the Federal Railroad Administration and was prompted by a fatal December derailment on the Hudson line portion of Metro-North, the commuter railroad serving Connecticut, New York and New Jersey. The report cited an overemphasis on punctuality, an “ineffective Safety Department and safety culture” and insufficient training for engineers as reasons for administering the audit. “The findings of Operation Deep Dive demonstrate that Metro-North has emphasized on-time performance to the detriment of safe operations and adequate maintenance of its infrastructure,” it said. “This is a severe assessment and it is intended as an urgent call to action to Metro-North’s leadership.” Based on interviews and observation, FRA investigators found that railway employees felt pressure to “rush when responding to signal failures.” Track department employees said they were not allotted sufficient time to make track repairs, and testing officers said they lacked time to conduct routine speed tests. In the wake of the Dec. 1 derailment at Spuyten Duyvil that killed four and injured 63, the FRA issued emergency measures designed to prevent trains from going at dangerous speeds by “identifying and prioritizing high-risk areas,” and mandating more emergency training for railroad workers. On Dec. 16, the FRA decided to launch the audit that would become Operation Deep Dive. In a statement, newly installed MetroNorth President Joseph Giuletti said the railroad “is taking aggressive actions to affirm that safety is the most important factor in railroad operations, and we welcome the FRA’s continued involvement to help establish a consistent safety-first culture throughout the railroad.” Connecticut Department of Transportation spokesman Kevin Nursick declined to comment when reached. Connecticut Commuter Rail Council member David Hendricks said he found the report “somewhat damning” and added that it will be a cause for “reflection” for MetroNorth. Hendricks said that members of the Commuter Rail Council, a volunteer noncompensated body chartered by the State of Connecticut and unaffiliated with MetroNorth, will meet with legislators in Hartford next Wednesday. John Hartwell, the Council’s vice chair,

agreed that the situation was “more serious” than he and the other members of the Connecticut Commuter Rail Council had anticipated, and said the recent onslaught of problems in Metro-North’s management was due to a massive departure of the railroad’s senior staff, a challenge for which Metro-North did not appropriately prepare. Hartwell added that the state has not always made sufficient efforts to maintain its railroads. “There’s been a huge effort in the last couple of years, but we’re playing catchup,” he said. “Some of the infrastructure is over 100 years old.” The report follows a March newsletter from Metro-North itself, admitting that the railroad offered worse service in January 2014 than it did for all of 2013 according to Hearst Media. The federal audit that Operation Deep Dive precipitated even included a series of “Comprehensive Directed Actions” for Metro-North — notably, submitting a plan to reevaluate the organization’s structure and distribution of responsibilities as well as a new training program within 60 days. New Haven and state lawmakers reacted to the report’s release with disgust and concern. U.S. Rep. Elizabeth Esty LAW ’85 called the report a “serious condemnation of MetroNorth’s safety culture” in a Friday statement. She added that the “unacceptable” conditions are indicative of “a dramatic systematic failure on the part of lawmakers to prioritize investments in our infrastructure.” State Senator Martin Looney, D-New Haven, said Metro-North will have to have “more exacting standards in terms of safety, performance and rider satisfaction,” but disputed the notion that the Legislature bears responsibility for not adequately funding the state’s railroad infrastructure. “We’ve been in a budget crisis for the past five years and every area had to be constrained in its funding,” he said. “Given the economy we’ve done what we could reasonably expect to do. I think more issues had to do with poor management rather than funding.” Looney also demurred on the question of what specific policies Metro-North should implement in the wake of the report, saying that it will be up to the Legislature’s Transportation Committee to file the appropriate legislation — and up to Metro-North to take the steps necessary to remedy its current problems. According to the MTA, the Metro-North Railroad is in the second-largest commuter railway in the nation with an annual ridership of 83 million people. Contact DAVID BLUMENTHAL at david.blumenthal@yale.edu .

WILLIAM FREEDBERG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

A damning federal report found that safety was a major issue on the Metro-North Railroad, where some track infrastructure is over 100 years old.


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“They thought I was a success as soon as I started paying the bills.” MAHALIA JACKSON AMERICAN GOSPEL SINGER

Term bill increases by 4 percent TOTAL

$60,000 $50,000

Tuition

$40,000 $30,000 $20,000 $10,000

Room & Board 2009-’10

TUITION FROM PAGE 1 great breadth of our financial aid commitment,” Provost Benjamin Polak said in the statement. Polak added that the true cost of a Yale education exceeds even the full tuition of $59,800. All students are being subsidized by the University’s endowment returns, he said. Improving Yale’s accessibility to high-achieving low-income students has been a core priority of University President Peter Salovey and other Yale administrators for the past several years, said Mark Kantrowitz, vice president of Edvisors Network, a financial aid and higher education consulting firm. He added that the University’s robust financial aid and considerable endowment mean prospective students should not be worried by Yale’s hefty price. Director of Student Financial

2010-’11

Services Caesar Storlazzi said he is proud of the fact that students do not need to borrow money in order to attend Yale. Although 50 percent of students nationwide borrow money to attend college, only 15 percent of Yale students borrow money to pay for their education, according to the statement. The amount borrowed is also lower — the average student in America borrows about $26,000 to attend college, whereas the average loan debt for Yale graduates is $13,000. Storlazzi said his office makes budget projections based on the previous incoming classes’ financial data, adding that the projected financial aid budget is lower for next year because of shifts in the demographics of the University’s student body. “This year’s senior class was relatively more expensive than the other three classes, in that they as a whole require more financial

2011-’12

assistance,” Storlazzi said. “Since they are graduating, we are anticipating they will be replaced by an incoming freshman class more in line with the norm.” Although the financial aid budget may fluctuate from year to year, Storlazzi said the long-term trends all indicate that the University’s financial aid budget will gradually increase as the admissions office continues to diversify Yale’s student body. But all recipients of financial aid at Yale are expected to contribute to the cost of their education. In line with the growth in tuition, the University’s “selfhelp” expectations for each student on financial aid will also rise for the upcoming academic year. Next year’s freshmen will need to contribute $2,850 to their education and upperclassmen will need to contribute $3,350 — both increases of $50. Students on financial aid will

2012-’13

2013-’14

also see the amount they are expected to contribute through summer earnings rise from $1,600 to $1,625 for freshmen and $3,000 to $3,050 for upperclassmen. “The most frequent complaints [Yale College Council] hears from students center around the selfhelp portion of financial aid packages,” said Sara Samuel, the University services chair for Yale College Council. She added that many students feel constrained in making summer plans because of the need to have a sufficient income or get a comprehensive fellowship. Storlazzi said he often has conversations with other University administrators about whether the expectations for student income contributions are too high. Although he said requiring students on financial aid to earn money throughout the year is “objectively unfair,” he added that on-campus jobs at Yale are paid

2014-’15

well and hold many other career and extracurricular benefits for students. Storlazzi said he does not anticipate any changes to the student contribution level or to the minimum wage for on-campus jobs in the near future. Yale’s expectations for student contributions are in line with those of Yale’s peer institutions, Storlazzi said. He added that his office routinely examines the numbers at Stanford, Princeton and Harvard in particular to ensure that Yale’s figures are in the same ballpark. In January, Salovey attended a conference at the White House with more than 80 other university leaders to emphasize the importance of expanding lowincome students’ access to higher education. At the summit, Yale pledged a series of initiatives including increasing the number of QuestBridge scholars Yale will accept each year. Salovey also

promised to continue the Freshman Scholars program — which brings approximately 30 accepted students to campus for five weeks of summer preparation for freshman year — and to conduct joint outreach efforts with Harvard and Princeton in parts of the country where students do not typically apply to Ivy League institutions. Last year, the Office of Undergraduate Admissions began an outreach program to inform lowincome families about the affordability of attending Yale. The office sent mailings emphasizing Yale’s strong financial aid program to a select group of 16,000 high-achieving students from low-income communities that do not typically send students to selective colleges. The financial aid budget peaked at $120 million in 2012–’13. Contact RISHABH BHANDARI at rishabh.bhandari@yale.edu .

Postdoc sues University over lab sabotage POSTDOC SUIT FROM PAGE 1 Conroy said Yale is not guilty of any wrongdoing. “Dr. Koziol’s claims against Yale and professor Giraldez are factually distorted and legally baseless, and the University will mount a vigorous defense,” Conroy said. According to Conroy, Giraldez and Yale Security took the tampering with Koziol’s research “very seriously.” Giraldez and Medical School Dean Robert Alpern both declined to comment on the suit. Koziol and Ocbina could not be reached for comment last week. Yale made its first court appearance pertaining to the suit in late February. Ocbina first appeared in court on March 10 in New Haven. The complaint lays out a complex series of events involving emails and personal conversations that Koziol claims constitute wrongdoing on the part of all three defendants. According to the complaint, Koziol first noticed that her experiments were failing, inexplicably, in July 2011, only one month into her tenure at Yale. In particular, batches of fish she was attempting to raise as part of her experiment repeatedly died. Sometime after August 2011, Koziol divided her fish into two groups. One set was labeled with her initials, while the other was not. The fish in the box with her initials died, while those left unmarked did not, according to the suit. After a hidden camera was installed in the lab with Alpern’s approval, it was discovered that Ocbina had poisoned the fish. Upon being confronted with the evidence, Ocbina admitted to tampering with Koziol’s research and was either terminated or resigned from Yale on March 8, 2012, the complaint states. This, according to the complaint, is when Giraldez and the

University’s wrongdoing began: Giraldez did not permit members of his laboratory to discuss the incident, threatening “legal consequences” if they did. Furthermore, the complaint claims, Giraldez began treating Koziol “in a harsh, critical and abusive manner.” Conroy said Giraldez asked members of his lab not to discuss the information surrounding Ocbina’s departure because of Connecticut laws protecting the confidentiality of certain employment information. Before filing the suit, Koziol brought the matter before an internal Yale grievance board as well as the Office of Research Integrity, a branch of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. Neither body found any culpability on the part of Giraldez or Yale, according to Conroy. Koziol claims she never received the grievance committee’s final report, or any documentation from Yale regarding Ocbina’s sabotage of her research. Koziol is now conducting research at the Gurdon Institute — a lab run by Nobel laureate John Gurdon — at the University of Cambridge, where she completed her doctoral work. According to a March 7 article in the journal Science detailing Koziol’s case, publicly known incidents of sabotage in scientific research are few and far between. According to Science, the most recent disclosed incident in the United States of such tampering occurred in 2010 at the University of Michigan, when a postdoc killed the cultured cells of another researcher. While at Yale, Koziol’s research focused on molecular changes at the earliest stages of life. Contact MATTHEW LLOYDTHOMAS at matthew.lloyd-thomas@yale.edu .

VICTOR KANG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

A former postdoc researcher has filed suit against the Yale School of Medicine, but the University denies any wrongdoing in the case.


YALE DAILY NEWS 路 MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 路 yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7


PAGE 8

PRODUCTION & DESIGN We’re the best-looking desk at the YDN. Come make us look even better. design@yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2012 · yaledailynews.com


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TOMORROW

Sunny, with a high near 34. Low of 19.

WEDNESDAY

High of 36, low of 26.

High of 40, low of 19.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

ON CAMPUS MONDAY, MARCH 24 4:30 p.m. CEAS China Colloquium: “Lyric Truth or Poetic Persona: Reading Wang Zhaoming.” Poetry and history tell two, sometimes rivaling, truths. Wang Zhaoming (1883–1944) had many polar opposite historical roles, first a martyr and last a Japan collaborator and traitor of the nation. In contrast, his lofty poetic persona underwent little change throughout his life. In this lecture Zhiyi Yang will address the question: What does Wang Zhaoming as a classical poet tell us about his engagement in history? Luce Hall (34 Hillhouse Ave.), Rm. 202. 6:45 p.m. “How Size Matters: Equipment, Labor Skill, Employment, Ecosystem Care, and Community Vitality in Forests.” This symposium will discuss whether the use of smaller equipment in forestry can lead to greater employment of a more highly trained workforce, while at the same time providing better care of the environment — a comparison with the carpenters union. Kroon Hall (195 Prospect St.).

XKCD BY RANDALL MUNROE

Fill this space here.

TUESDAY, MARCH 25 12:30 p.m. Art in Context: “Some Considerations in Postwar British Figurative Art.” Eric Stryker, assistant professor of art history at Southern Methodist University, will deliver this talk. Yale Center for British Art (1080 Chapel St.).

JOIN@YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

5:30 p.m. “On Sovereignty and Other Political Delusions.” Joan Cocks studies the ways that people understand (and fight over) essentially contested concepts as freedom, power, justice, property, community, and individuality. Over the course of her career, she has focused on the role of ideals in the political struggles of women, ethnic minorities and colonized cultures. William L. Harkness Hall (100 Wall St.) Rm. 309.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26 12:30 p.m. Gallery Talk: “Entranced by the Past: Homage and Fakery in Colonial Revival Furniture.” Join John Stuart Gordon, the Benjamin Attmore Hewitt associate curator of American decorative arts, for a visit to the Furniture Study. Yale University Art Gallery (1111 Chapel St.).

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

To reach us: E-mail editor@yaledailynews.com Advertisements 2-2424 (before 5 p.m.) 2-2400 (after 5 p.m.) Mailing address Yale Daily News P.O. Box 209007 New Haven, CT 06520

Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Editor in Chief Julia Zorthian at (203) 4322418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

To visit us in person 202 York St. New Haven, Conn. (Opposite JE) FOR RELEASE MARCH 24, 2014

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 Injury reminder 5 Pet adoption gp. 10 Environs 14 Nobel Peace Prize winner Wiesel 15 U.S.-Canada defense letters 16 Having a hard time deciding 17 Hard to find, to Caesar 18 __ Gay: WWII bomber 19 Thom __ shoes 20 Original Ice Follies slapstick skating duo 23 “Just one darn minute!” 24 Amazed reactions 27 Three in a deck 28 Retaliatory equivalent 32 Found really groovy 34 Bud 35 Challenge 36 Part of WWII 39 Happy heartbeat sound 42 Like veggies on a veggie platter 43 Expected landing hrs. 45 Prohibition 46 Opposite of post48 Knickknacky stuff 51 Bible bk. with a sea crossing 54 Trite 55 Opie Taylor’s caretaker 58 Small, irregular amounts 62 List-ending abbr. 64 11th-century Spanish hero 65 Give off 66 Low-cal 67 It divides the Left and Right Banks 68 Pal at the barbie 69 Run into 70 More quirky 71 Being, to Ovid

Want to place a classified ad? CALL (203) 432-2424 OR E-MAIL BUSINESS@ YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

3/24/14

By Marti DuGuay-Carpenter

DOWN 1 Feudal farmers 2 Red wine from Bordeaux 3 Better ventilated 4 Got through to 5 Lend __: listen 6 14-line verse 7 Cattle poker 8 Ranch newborn 9 Purim month 10 Use of one requires a PIN 11 Groupie’s idol 12 Significant period 13 Raggedy doll 21 Make excited 22 Gone by 25 Prefix with legal 26 Ladled-out meal 29 Bucky Beaver’s toothpaste brand 30 Pub spigot 31 Envelope part 33 Bee Gees family name 36 “Dragnet” star Jack 37 Gillette razor brand 38 Bad weather contingency 40 Paving goo

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

41 Sales manager’s concern 44 Like the “A” in a Hawthorne classic 47 At the outer edges of the normal curve 49 “Sting like a bee” boxer 50 Bloodhound or boxer 52 White House family

SUDOKU MEDIUM

3/24/14

53 Ledger entries 56 8-Down’s milk source 57 Cosmetician Lauder 59 Spanish kiss 60 Iditarod transport 61 Battery fluid 62 Good name for a tree-lined street 63 Dead heat

7 4 8

3 5 1 4 8

2 1 2 3 6 9

5 2 7 3 5 4 6 5 7


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

THROUGH THE LENS P

hotographers ventured across the globe from Iceland’s frozen terrain to the rooftops of Brazil over spring break. Others remained in the country to capture scenes on the streets of the Big Easy and the Big Apple. ANNELISA LEINBACH, WA LIU, ALEX SCHMELING and BLAIR SEIDEMAN report.

PAGE 10


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NCAAM 10 Stanford 60 2 Kansas 57

NCAAM 6 Baylor 85 3 Creighton 55

SPORTS QUICK HITS

JAMES JONES MEN’S BASKETBALL HEAD COACH With the Bulldogs’ second-round win in the CIT, Jones, who has coached the Eli squad for the past 15 years, became the winningest head basketball coach in Yale history. His 207 wins are one more than the total from legendary Yale head coach Joe Vancisin.

NCAAM 8 Kentucky 78 Wichita St. 76

NCAAM 3 Iowa St. 85 U.N.C. 83

NCAAM 11 Tennessee 83 14 Mercer 63

MONDAY

PHOEBE STAENZ ’17 WOMEN’S ICE HOCKEY TEAM Over spring break, the freshman forward from Zurich earned a smattering of conference honors. Staenz, who led the Bulldogs in points and represented Switzerland at the Olympics, earned the ECAC rookie of the year award and a place on the all-ECAC third team.

“It was great for the team to play in Florida in warmer weather.” CHELSEY DUNHAM ’14 SOFTBALL YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

Sears shocks Bobcats MEN’S BASKETBALL

Men’s lax tops Tigers

JASON LIU/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Justin Sears ’16 (No. 22) hit a game-winning three-pointer to beat Quinnipiac 69–68 last Wednesday. BY GRANT BRONSDON STAFF REPORTER The NCAA tournament may only be in the Sweet 16, but the Collegeinsider.com tournament is almost down to eight teams — and after a pair of down-to-the-wire victories, the Yale men’s basketball team is among that select

crowd. The Bulldogs (17–13, 9–5 Ivy) pulled off a miracle in their first round game against local rival Quinnipiac (20–12, 14–6 Metro Atlantic) when all-Ivy first team member Justin Sears ’16 banked home a game-winning three-pointer to beat the Bobcats 69–68. Just three days later, the Elis

knocked off Holy Cross (20– 14, 12–6 Patriot) 71–66 thanks to some late game heroics from Sears and forwards Armani Cotton ’15 and Brandon Sherrod ’15. “Players make plays and, as a coach, you try to put your guys in positions to be successful,” head coach James Jones said. “Sometimes they

do what you ask them to do, sometimes they don’t. Sometimes it works out, sometimes it doesn’t. Tonight it worked out.” Wednesday’s game concluded in thrilling fashion. Though students were off campus on spring break, the SEE M. BASKETBALL PAGE B3

Baseball strong over break

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

First baseman Jacob Hunter ’14 (No. 8) is hitting 0.317 with a team-high eight extra-base hits. BY GREG CAMERON STAFF REPORTER The weather in New Haven might indicate otherwise, but spring began four days ago. And that means that the Yale baseball team’s season is in full swing.

BASEBALL During the Bulldogs’ annual spring break schedule, Yale (7–9, 0–0 Ivy) won six of the 13 games it played, its best record during the vacation in three years. The break included a three-game series at Stetson in

Florida and a four-game homeand-home series against Holy Cross this past weekend. Yale won two games against Stetson, but could only take one from the Crusaders. “Coming back from Florida 5–5 was an awesome feeling,” captain Cale Hanson ’14

STAT OF THE DAY 207

said. “I think it’s the first time we’ve come back without a losing record in my four years. But it would’ve been much better to have a better week this [past] week.” With 16 games finished, Yale SEE BASEBALL PAGE B3

IHNA MANGUNDAYAO/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s lacrosse team will face Providence on the road tomorrow. BY FREDERICK FRANK STAFF REPORTER Despite a 10-goal performance from Tigers midfielder Jake Froccaro, the No. 16 men’s lacrosse team held off No. 10 Princeton thanks to a last-minute save by goaltender Eric Natale ’15 and a tally by midfielder Mark Glicini ’16 with 38 seconds left in the game.

MEN’S LACROSSE With the 16–15 victory on Saturday, the Elis (4–2, 1–1 Ivy) handed the Tigers (4–3, 1–1) their first conference loss and rebounded from a loss to No. 3 Cornell the Saturday before. “Offensively, I think this was one of our best performances in a while,” midfielder Michael Bonacci ‘16 said. “Our coach all week had been telling us to value possessions and I think we really played patiently and continuously made the easy play against this Princeton defense. We knew that if we didn’t try to do too much and we got deeper into possessions we were going to get high percentage shots and we finished them when we got them.” Yale scored the first four goals of the game and dominated Princeton, holding them without an offensive touch for the first five minutes of play. The Tigers, however, came roaring back into the game, adding six of the next nine goals in the contest to go into halftime up 7–6. The Bulldogs matched Princeton’s offensive talent, piling on six goals in the third quarter and five goals in the final frame to win a 31-goal shootout at Reese Stadium on Alumni Day. The game featured three lead changes and six ties, including

a late 15–15 tie after Princeton scored with just over a minute and a half to play. Yale’s defense, which had previously given up just 7.8 goals per game, held Princeton’s highpowered duo of attackman Mike MacDonald and midfielder Tom Schreiber to just one goal and four assists between the two. The Tigers, however, found their offense through Froccaro. The midfielder was covered by one of Yale’s short stick defensive midfielders throughout the game and took advantage of the matchup, tying the Princeton record for most goals in a game set back in 1951. The junior scored five straight unanswered goals spanning a 12-minute period encompassing the second and third quarters. “We knew it was going to be tough to stop Princeton’s offense, but we were confident in our ability to limit them to low percentage shots and minimize our own mistakes,” defenseman Michael Quinn ’16 said. “Froccaro definitely had a good game but I think we were happy with how we stayed together as a unit and did not get frustrated with his success.” A f te r s e v e ra l quiet performances, star Eli attackman Brandon Mangan ’14 broke out on Saturday afternoon, hitting the back of the net five times. Mangan scored twice in the first quarter and added three unanswered in the third period during a two minute span to lead the Elis to victory. The senior’s hat trick in the middle of the third frame first tied the game at 9–9, then expanded the Bulldogs’ lead, ensuring the Elis would never again trail in the contest. The Tewaaraton Award SEE M. LACROSSE PAGE B3

CAREER WINS FOR MEN’S BASKETBALL HEAD COACH JAMES JONES. With his 207th win, earned on Saturday night, Jones became the winningest head coach in Yale basketball history.


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

“I regard golf as an expensive way of playing marbles.” GILBERT K. CHESTERTON ENGLISH WRITER

Elis host Yale Invitational SOFTBALL FROM PAGE reverse the results, losing to Boston University 13–2 and Bryant 6–4. Yale will have a double header at Fairfield on Wednesday before opening its Ivy League slate. According to Glass, the team is excited to begin conference play and face Harvard and Penn, especially. “They’re consistently top performing teams in the league [Penn won Ivies and competed in the NCAA tournament last season], and beating

MEN’S LACROSSE IVY 1

them would be fantastic,” Glass said in an email to the News. Onorato concurred, noting that Harvard will be a big game for the team, and that she believes that the squad is good enough to compete with any team in the league. The Elis will begin conference play at Penn, the defending Ivy League champions, on Friday and will face Columbia on Saturday.

3 5

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Cornell

2

0

1.000

8

0

1.000

Harvard

2

0

1.000

5

3

0.625

Yale

1

1

0.500

4

2

0.667

Princeton

1

1

0.500

4

3

0.571

Brown

0

1

0.000

4

3

0.571

Dartmouth

0

1

0.000

1

4

0.200

Penn

0

2

0.000

3

3

0.500

WOMEN’S LACROSSE IVY

Contact ASHLEY WU at ashley.e.wu@yale.edu .

1

YALE 4, BRYANT 6

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Brown

2

0

1.000

7

0

1.000

Penn

2

0

1.000

5

2

0.714

YALE

0

1

0

0

2

0

1

4

3

Harvard

2

1

0.667

4

3

0.571

BRYANT

4

0

0

0

0

0

2

6

4

Cornell

1

1

0.500

4

3

0.571

Dartmouth

1

1

0.500

4

3

0.571

6

Yale

1

2

0.333

5

2

0.714

7

Princeton

0

1

0.000

3

3

0.500

Columbia

0

3

0.000

2

4

0.333

BOSTON U. 13, YALE 2 B.U.

0

1

3

2

1

1

5

13

YALE

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

2

BRIANNA LOO/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The softball team will face Fairfield on Wednesday before opening Ivy play against Penn on Friday.

Golf spring season in full swing GOLF FROM PAGE B4 couldn’t play on the last day,” women’s team captain Sun Park ’14 said. “I think the organizers of the tournament learned from that experience. Obviously it was tough for us to play 36 holes in one day coming out of spring training, but we had been doing our winter workouts and were prepared physically.”

I was pretty proud of my mental game and ability to bounce back. MARIA ZEPEDA/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

WILL DAVENPORT ’15 Men’s golf team

In Williamsburg, the Elis scored 305 and 311 in the first day of competition on March 16 to clinch the first place spot above Longwood. Two freshman led the pack for the Elis at the end of day one, with Sandy Wongwaiwate ’17 coming in fourth with scores of 76 and 75 and Elisabeth Bernabe ’17 taking fifth with 77 and 75 strokes. The Yale men’s golf team will next compete in The Met Intercollegiate hosted at Century Country Club and Old Oaks Country Club in Purchase, N.Y. on April 5. The women’s team will compete in the Hoya Invitational hosted at the Members Club at Four Streams in Beallsville, Md. March 31 and April 1. Contact ASHTON WACKYM at ashton.wackym@yale.edu .

The men’s golf team played in the Linger Longer Invitational in Greensboro, Ga. over break.

Hockey ends with loss to Quinnipiac M. HOCKEY FROM PAGE B4 really stepped up,” Weberg said. “I think he has an even brighter future ahead of him. We are excited to see him as well as our two other goalies develop.” While goaltending was a question mark for Yale coming into the season, no one doubted who would lead the Bulldogs on offense. The senior duo of Agostino and Root, who finished last season with a total of 64 points, led the Elis this season with 32 and 37 points, respectively. Agostino, who was a third team allECAC pick, finished 12th on Yale’s all-time scoring list and 9th on the all-time points list. Root, recently named the ECAC’s best defensive forward, tied with his linemate for a teamhigh 14 goals while leading the team with 23 assists. He also had a team-high four game-winning goals and finished the season on a five game point streak. Yale’s captain had the night of his career earlier this season, picking up five assists in a 6–0 trouncing of Brown on Jan. 25. Root, named second team all-ECAC this past week, signed a tryout deal with the AHL Bridgeport Sound Tigers. Agostino, who passed up the opportunity to play in the NHL last season, signed a deal with the Calgary Flames and made his debut in ‘the show’ on April 21, playing over 12 minutes in the Flames’ 6–5 loss against the Nashville Predators. Agostino also featured in the Flames’ Saturday night 8–1 victory against the Edmonton Oilers with four shots in over 13 and a half minutes of ice time. Yale’s only senior defenseman, Gus Young ’14, went out on a high note. The usually defensiveminded blueliner shattered his career highs in scoring this season, posting 7 goals and 11 assists. Young emerged as a starter his

sophomore year and went on to play 110 games for the Bulldogs. Yale defensemen, including Young, proved vital to the Bulldogs’ scoring this year, contributing over a quarter of the team offense. Last year’s all ECAC rookie team selection, Obuchowski, led the unit with 20 points, while perennial pointproducer Fallen finished tied with Young with seven goals. All three aforementioned defenseman finished inside the top six point getters for Yale this season. “I think the experience that we have lets us be comfortable on the ice,” Obuchowski said. “We know that we can jump up ice and make a play and have our partner there to back us up.” Despite a disappointing end to the season, the Bulldog faithful should take solace in knowing that the Elis will return boatloads of talent for the 2014–’15 season. In addition to Lyon, several freshman forwards impressed on the ice this season. Despite missing six games due to injury, winger Mike Doherty ’17 posted 18 points in his inaugural campaign including nine goals, good for third highest on the team. The highlight of the rookie’s season came on Feb. 7, when he scored the overtime winner against Rensselaer. Winger Frankie DiChiara ’17 emerged as a top power forward for Yale, tallying 14 points and playing on a number of different lines for the Bulldogs this season. Center Chris Izmirlian ’17 played 26 games and scored a gamewinner in overtime against Merrimack on Nov. 30. After missing almost the entire season, forward Tim Bonner ’17 played in each of the Bulldogs’ last five games, including the four ECAC tournament games. Forward John Hayden ’17, a Chicago Blackhawks third round draft pick, played on Yale’s top

line with Agostino and Root for the second half of the season and finished with eight points in nine games for a season total of 16. The highly regarded winger scored two goals and added an assist versus St. Lawrence on Jan. 18, picking up ECAC player and rookie of the week honors for his efforts.

Inconsistency is the right word to describe our season.

with his speed and toughness on the ice. The diminutive playmaker posted 11 points on the season, including a two-goal performance in Yale’s 5-1 trouncing of Harvard in the teams’ Rivalry on Ice matchup at Madison Square Garden on Jan. 11. The performance earned Learned the game’s MVP award. Despite not returning to the NCAA tournament to defend their national title, the Bulldogs again helped inflate the standing and stature of the ECAC con-

ference in the eyes of national critics. After placing two teams in last year’s Frozen Four finals, the league featured as many as six nationally ranked teams at one time this season. The top six teams posted a 59–24–11 record against nonconference foes while just five points separated second from fifth in the league, highlighting both the national emergence of ECAC teams and parity within the league. “I think top to bottom the ECAC is one of the strongest

leagues in the nation,” Obuchowski said. “This year we may have three teams that make the national tournament. Its a testament to the hard work we put in day in and day out and the hard fought battles that occur each weekend that makes every team better and better.” Union won the ECAC regular season and conference tournament titles. Contact FREDERICK FRANK at frederick.frank@yale.edu .

NICHOLAS WEBERG ’15 Forward, Men’s hockey team This season also saw the emergence of several veteran players, highlighted by the scoring output of winger Anthony Day ’15. The junior from Buffalo, N.Y. had an injury-riddled campaign but started the year with 10 points in 12 games, including two goals against nationally ranked Clarkson back on Nov. 2. While a recurring knee issue kept the sniper out of 10 games this year, fans should watch for the rising senior to have an explosive 2014–’15 campaign. “It’s always great to see guys have success and it’s important for the team to have players develop during the season.” Weberg said. “I think we have only scratched the surface with how good this freshman class can be so it will be exciting to see them next season.” Sophomore skaters Carson Cooper ’16 and Cody Learned ’16 also found increased ice time this season. Cooper, who missed 12 games with a shoulder injury, emerged as one of Yale’s top two-way forwards and was proficient at the faceoff dot all season. Learned, after playing just eight games last year, featured in 27 contests and surprised many

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s hockey team failed to make the NCAA tournament field after winning the national championship last year.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE B3

SPORTS

“Baseball is ninety percent mental and the other half is physical.” YOGI BERRA AMERICAN BASEBALL PLAYER

Triumph in the C.I.T.

Strong spring for baseball

M. BASKETBALL FROM PAGE B1 John J. Lee Amphitheater was rocking, and the Bulldogs looked hungry to exact revenge upon Quinnipiac for ending the hockey team’s season the week before. After a back-and-forth first half, the teams were all square at 32 apiece. In the second half, a barrage of timely shots from long range kept the Bulldogs in the game despite a 44–34 rebounding disadvantage to the ’Cats. Following a 10–0 run for Quinnipiac, a pair of threes by guards Jack Montague ’16 and Jesse Pritchard ’14 sandwiched around a Bobcat layup cut the Yale deficit to a single point. And at the 3:30 mark, after Quinnipiac opened up its largest lead of the game at 63–57, guards Javier Duren ’15 and Montague each contributed buckets from downtown to tie it up at 63–63. But no score was as important as Yale’s final three of the game. After a missed free throw by Sears and a missed layup by Cotton on the rebound, Quinnipiac guard Kasim Chandler came down with the board and was promptly fouled. He made just one of two free throws with eight seconds remaining, putting the Bobcats up two. Then came Sears’ big moment: With a help defender in the paint, he stepped back and nailed the three with 0.7 seconds on the clock, and he intercepted the ensuing Quinnipiac inbounds pass. “The gods were looking down upon me and it went in,” Sears said. The bucket, just Sears’ fourth made three-pointer of his entire career, could be a harbinger of the future, according to Jones, who said that becoming a good shooter from long range is the next step for Sears. On Saturday, a strong second half propelled the Elis past Holy Cross. An 11–2 run just after intermission put Yale up 42–36, but the Crusaders fought back, keeping the game close and taking the lead on numerous occasions. With 1:43 remaining, a pair of free throws made it 66–65 Holy Cross. But just over two weeks after the Bulldogs finished without a threepointer against Harvard, it was Cotton to the rescue, nailing a shot from downtown at the 1:13 mark to take the lead for good. Blocks from Sears and Sherrod down the stretch helped seal the deal. Yale’s next opponent on Wednesday is a familiar foe: Columbia, which beat Valparaiso and Eastern Michigan on its way to the quarterfinals. The Bulldogs and Lions split their two matchups on the year, with Yale winning 69–59 in January before losing 62–46 in New York in February. That loss was part of four losses in the Elis’ last five regular season

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Yale (7–9, 0–0 Ivy) won six of the 13 games it played over spring break. BASEBALL FROM PAGE B1

JASON LIU/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Guard Armani Cotton ’15 hit a go-ahead basket with 1:13 remaining to beat Holy Cross 71–66 on Saturday.

has now completed almost 40 percent of its schedule, despite playing only three of those games at Yale Field. But the team’s main focus, the Ivy League season, does not begin until this Saturday at Penn. Though the team was nearly 0.500 over the two-week span, the pitching staff showed some inconsistency, as Yale allowed four or fewer runs in five games, but also allowed double digits in four. Starting pitcher Chris Lanham ’16 said that he is not worried about the team’s pitching going forward. “We have a lot of talent in our pitching staff,” Lanham said. “Everyone on the team has confidence in our pitchers. We hit a couple bumps in the road, but that shouldn’t be a problem going forward.” Yale saw several promising performances from its new crop of freshmen throughout the break. Designated hitter Harrison White ’17 played in 10 of the team’s 13 games and finished the vacation boasting a four-game hitting streak. White holds a team-high .423 batting average and .531 on-base percentage so far this season. Starting pitcher Chasen Ford ’17, meanwhile, recorded two wins, his first victories as a Bulldog, against Bucknell and Holy Cross. Ford currently leads the team in innings pitched with 26.2, and his 4.39 ERA through five appearances is best among starters on the team. “[Ford]’s been having some great outings,” Hanson said. “I’m just impressed with his poise. He’s not walking a lot of guys and he’s letting his defense do the work. That’s a big deal out of a freshman.” Hanson also highlighted the performance of relief pitcher Chris Moates ’16, whose 3.14 ERA is best on the team overall. Ford’s win over Bucknell two weeks ago came the day after a narrow Eli loss to Long Island University, a team that Yale had sought revenge against since falling to LIU by one run last year. This time, the Bulldogs held a 7–6 advantage into the ninth inning, but the Blackbirds got four runs off of Ford in the top of the inning and fin-

games, a skid that was halted by the victory over Quinnipiac. With the victory over Holy Cross, Jones became Yale’s alltime winningest coach, surpassing Joe Vancisin who piled up 206 wins from 1956 to 1975. The win also marked Yale’s third all-time postseason victory, with the sole

win other than this year coming in the 2002 NIT against Rutgers. Wednesday’s game tips off in New York City at 7 p.m.

YALE 69, QUINNIPIAC 68

YALE 71, HOLY CROSS 66

YALE 6, HOLY CROSS 16

James Badas contributed reporting. Contact GRANT BRONSDON at grant.bronsdon@yale.edu .

ished with a 10–7 win. Yale’s response to the loss came in the form of a decisive 13–5 win against Bucknell. The next day, however, the Bulldogs took a step backwards with a 5–4 loss to Bowling Green, again dropping the game in the final innings. The Bulldogs followed with a 3–1 win over Ave Maria University, with winning pitcher Michael Coleman ’14 allowing just three hits and one run in his 7.1 innings pitched. The back-and-forth inconsistency continued in the Elis’ series at Stetson, as the teams took turns dominating each other both at the plate and on the mound. Yale finished with the advantage, however, with 10–2 and 15–4 victories, while Stetson won 11–1 in the middle game of the series. “From an offensive standpoint, when my team’s way ahead, I feel way more relaxed at the plate, and I hit the ball a lot better,” Hanson said. “That sort of thing happened that entire weekend. One team got ahead early and then kept pouring it on.” After the Stetson series, Yale headed back up north for the second week of the break. The Bulldogs beat UMass-Lowell in a 1–0 pitcher’s duel that Lanham, Ford and Moates pieced together for the shutout. Lanham picked up the win, his third of the season. The Elis then fell to Hartford 8–6 before beginning their four-game home-and-home series against Holy Cross this past weekend. Yale came out on top 4–3 in the first game, largely thanks to a three-RBI performance by first baseman Jacob Hunter ’14. Ford earned the win with six innings pitched. The second game of that day, and the next two at Holy Cross, did not go as well for the Bulldogs, as they fell 10–3, 16–6 and 8–3. “[Holy Cross] can definitely hit,” Hanson said. “I’m very confident in our pitching staff… but really you just have to tip your hat to [Holy Cross].” Yale will continue its pre-Ivy season this Wednesday at Quinnipiac before beginning conference play at Penn this weekend. Contact GREG CAMERON at greg.cameron@yale.edu .

YALE 3, HOLY CROSS 8

YALE

32

37

69

YALE

31

40

71

YALE

0

0

1

0

0

5

0

QUINNIPIAC

32

36

68

HOLY CROSS

34

32

66

HOLY CROSS

0

5

1

3

0

7

X

0

6

YALE

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

0

3

16

HOLY CROSS

2

0

0

0

3

1

0

2

X

8

Bulldogs beat No. 10 Princeton M. LACROSSE FROM PAGE B1

IHNA MANGUNDAYAO/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s lacrosse team beat No. 10 Princeton 16–15 on Saturday.

watchlist nominee added two assists for a career-high afternoon with seven points. Attackman Conrad Oberbeck ’15, who has posted hat tricks or better in four of the last five games, assisted on three of Mangan’s goals and scored his own treble to finish the game with six points. The Bulldogs had several other players to thank on offense, including midfielders Glicini and Bonacci and attackman J.W. McGovern ’16. In addition to scoring the game-winning goal, Glicini assisted on Mangan’s goal that tied the game at eight. Glicini made a strong, heads-up play to scoop up a groundball after a faceoff, run behind the cage and initiate a dodge and feed to a wide-open Mangan for the score. The sophomore, who has been used primarily as a shortstick defensive midfielder, had a career-high day with two goals and two assists. Bonacci showed his breakaway quickness, scoring goals from tight angles late in the third and early in the fourth quarters. McGovern, who has been Yale’s fourth attackman for most of the season, played most of the game for the Bulldogs. He came up with two assists, including one on the game-winning goal, to go along with his goal in the third quarter. After several underwhelming performances, faceoff specialist Dylan Levings ’14 trounced every man the Tigers put at the X. The Tewaaraton Award watchlist

nominee won 25 of 35 restarts and picked up 14 ground balls, a category Yale dominated 35–21. The senior was crucial to the Bulldogs’ success, scoring in the first half and winning the faceoff that led to Glicini’s gamewinning goal. “Dylan’s performance was absolutely integral to our win,” midfielder Colin Flaherty ‘15 said. “Just like in the Ivy League Championship last season, Dylan was able to control almost all of the faceoffs which gave us may more possessions.” Natale had double digit saves for the third time this season, stopping 10 shots including the crucial final shot when Princeton had a manadvantage for the last 21 seconds of the game. The Tigers had scored on four of their previous six advantages, but the second-year starter denied attackman Kip Orban’s rip from the top of the box. The win gave the Elis a 2–2 record over break. Yale’s first game, back on March 8, was a 12–11 OT loss to Fairfield. The Stags scored the first goal of the game, and the Bulldogs had to battle back throughout the first three quarters, needing four straight unanswered goals to send the game to overtime. But in the extra period, Fairfield scored with just under a minute and a half remaining to complete the upset. Midfielder Shane Thorton ’15 had two goals and two assists while Oberbeck led the team with four tallies and one helper. Just three days later, the Bulldogs had an emphatic 10–2 victory over

No. 12 Lehigh, holding the Mountain Cats to just three shots on target. Midfielders Flaherty and Eric Scott ’17 and Mangan had two goals apiece. The highlight of the game came at the beginning of the fourth quarter when defenseman and captain Jimmy Craft ’14 saw Lehigh’s goaltender out of net and hurled the ball from his own restraining box into the unguarded net for the Bulldogs ninth goal. On April 15 the Elis opened their Ivy League campaign with an 11–9 loss to the Big Red. The Elis trailed by as many as five goals and saw their late comeback attempt fall short. Midfielder Sean Shakespeare ’15 had a career-high four points, with three goals and an assist, and was named to the Ivy League honor roll for his performance. “I think over spring break we dropped a couple that we shouldn’t have to a good Cornell team and Fairfield team but I think we learned a lot about ourselves and had very fixable mistakes that hopefully we can improve on and build off of,” Bonacci said. The Bulldogs take on Penn at Reese stadium next Friday at 1 p.m. Contact FREDERICK FRANK at frederick.frank@yale.edu .

YALE 16, PRINCETON 15 YALE

5

1

6

4

16

PRINCETON

3

4

4

4

15


PAGE B4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS Elis fail to make NCAAs

Softball struggles in Florida

BRIANNA LOO/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The softball team finished with record of 2–11 over spring break this season. BY ASHLEY WU STAFF REPORTER The softball team had a busy spring break, playing in two tournaments that featured games against top tier teams in preparation for the upcoming Ivy League season.

SOFTBALL The Elis (3–13, 0–0 Ivy) traveled to Florida during the first week of spring break to face a difficult slate of opponents including Central Michigan — who advanced to the NCAA tournament last season. The Bulldogs faced many teams that were well into their seasons; Yale’s first two adversaries on March 11, Central Michigan and South Florida, had played a combined 47 games while the Elis were playing in only their fourth and fifth games of the season. The Bulldogs struggled over the break, posting a record of 2–11. Playing at South Florida in their first games of the break, the Bulldogs certainly held their own against their more seasoned opponents with a strong effort from their pitching staff, which held South Florida to just two runs over the seven inning game. In the end, however, Yale was unable to put runs on the board, losing to Central Michigan 7–0 and South Florida 2–0. Yale headed to Orlando the next day to face nationally prominent opponents Florida Atlantic and Central Florida. The team scored against Florida Atlantic in the first inning, but was limited to four hits in the game, eventually falling 10–1. Against Central Florida, the team again was held to four hits, losing 4–0 after stranding six runners on base. The team then participated in the Michele Smith Spring Break Tournament, which ran from March 14 to 16 in Clearwater. The Bulldogs picked up their first win of the trip on March 14, defeat-

ing Butler 4–2 behind a two-hitter from pitcher Chelsey Dunham ’14. The game also featured a double from designated hitter Carolyn McGuire ’17 and a triple from catcher Sarah Onorato ’15, each plating two runs. Earlier in the day, the Bulldogs had lost to Wisconsin-Green Bay 2–0 even though pitcher Lindsay Efflandt ’17 had another solid outing, allowing no earned runs. The next day, the Elis picked up their second win of the trip and third win of the season, defeating Seton Hall 5–2. After trailing 2–0 heading into the bottom of the sixth inning, Yale came alive to score five runs. Pitcher Rhydian Glass ’16 picked up her first win of the season, yielding four hits in her complete game effort. In the second game of the day the Bulldogs’ bats were stifled, and Penn State pitcher Christy von Pusch took a no-hitter into the seventh inning. Yale finished the game with only one hit, losing 5–0. In its final Florida game, Yale faced Central Michigan again, which pounded out 13 hits en route to a 6–1 victory. “It was great for the team to play in Florida in warmer weather,” Dunham said. “The girls were able to start to get their swings going and the defense was finally able to play on a dirt field.” The Bulldogs then returned home for their home opener against Providence, which was set to occur on March 19. But the double header was cancelled due to field conditions, and the Elis began to prepare for the Yale Invitational, which featured games against Bryant and Boston University. The Elis, hosting the tournament at Pioneer Park at Sacred Heart, fell to Bryant in a 15–6 loss on the morning of March 22 before showing resilience against Boston University, falling 3–2 in eight innings. The next day, facing the same opponents, the Bulldogs were unable to SEE SOFTBALL PAGE B2

JENNIFER CHEUNG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s hockey team’s season ended over spring break with a series loss to Quinnipiac in the ECAC tournament quarterfinals. BY FREDERICK FRANK STAFF REPORTER The No. 20 men’s hockey team’s season came to an end two weekends ago after back-to-back losses in its ECAC tournament quarterfinals series against No. 5 Quinnipiac.

MEN’S HOCKEY The Bobcats (24–8–6, 12–6–4 ECAC) beat Yale (17–11–5, 10–8–4) 6–2 on March 14 and 5–3 the subsequent day, scoring a total of four goals and conceding just one in final frames of the two games. The Elis, who finished sixth in the ECAC, went into postseason ECAC play knowing that they would have to make a deep run in order to return to the NCAA tournament for the fifth time in seven years. “Inconsistency is the right word to describe our season,” forward Nicholas Weberg ’15 said. “Our league is so good right now where every night you are playing a tough opponent so consistency is key. The whole team is disappointed with ending the season this early. Every year our goal is to be playing in April so not achieving that is obviously disappointing.” Inconsistency was the Bulldogs’ Achilles’ heel this season, as the Bulldogs never won two games in a week-

end. Their best unbeaten streak numbered just seven games, including two ties, and came at the beginning of the season, between Oct. 26 and Nov. 22. The Elis won back-to-back games just twice during the second half of the season before the start of the ECAC tournament. After winning the Ivy League four of the last five years, the Bulldogs wound up in third while going just 6–7–3 against opponents that were nationally ranked at some point during the season. Coming off a national championship in 2013, expectations in New Haven were high for a Yale team that had continued to grow under head coach Keith Allain’s ’80 tutelage. The Bulldogs, picked to finish first in the ECAC preseason poll, entered the 2013–’14 season as a legitimate contender to return to the Frozen Four. Despite losing key forwards Andrew Miller ’13 and Antoine Laganiere ’13 along with starting goaltender Jeff Malcom ’13, the Bulldogs returned star power in the form of captain Jesse Root ’14 and forward Kenny Agostino ’14 while adding notable talent in the 2017 freshman class. Many predicted further success due to the fact that Yale returned six experienced defenseman including its top four blueliners: Gus Young ’14,

Tommy Fallen ’15, Ryan Obuchowski ’16 and Rob O’Gara ’16. The largest uncertainty for the team coming into the season surrounded who would replace Malcom in net. The Bulldogs returned Connor Wilson ’15 and added Alex Lyon ’17 and Patrick Spano ’17. The two freshmen netminders split the season’s first seven games before Lyon emerged as the starter after an impressive 48 save performance in Yale’s 3–3 tie with Quinnipiac on Nov. 9. Lyon went on to play in 30 games and log 1746 minutes and 19 seconds of game time, the most of any freshman in the ECAC. His three shutouts, including two in back-to-back performances against Rensselaer and Harvard, were tied for 12th most in Division 1 hockey. The Baudette, Minn. native was named conference goaltender of the week on March 10 and rookie of the week for Jan. 1. Lyon finished second in the ECAC with 796 saves while posting a 0.918 save percentage. The freshman impressed throughout the season and looks set to remain a force for the Bulldogs between the pipes over his next three years. “Lyon had a great year for us and SEE MEN’S HOCKEY PAGE B2

Golf tees off on spring season BY ASHTON WACKYM STAFF REPORTER Neither the men’s nor women’s golf teams finished lower than third place in any tournament they competed in during the fall season. With that success in their past, the men’s and women’s golf programs competed in their first few meets of the spring season over spring break.

GOLF The men’s golf program traveled south to Greensboro, Ga. to compete in the Linger Longer Invitational, co-hosted by Kennesaw State and Mercer, March 22–23 against national powerhouses such as Alabama, Georgia, Oklahoma and Clemson. Meanwhile, the women’s team made its way to the Middleburg Bank Invitational in Williamsburg, Va. hosted by William & Mary after practicing at courses around Naples, Fla. during the first week of spring break. The men’s program took 10th place out of the 15 teams invited

with 886 strokes, while the women’s team clinched a firstplace victory in Williamsburg with 617 total strokes. “The weekend went pretty well,” said men’s team captain Sam Bernstein ’14. “We beat two solid teams and we came close to beating two others, but that was a little disappointing. It was a great finish considering we’ve only had a week of practice and we were playing some of the best teams in college golf that have been practicing all winter.” The Bulldogs finished the first round of day one at the Linger Longer Invitational in 13th place with a score of 295. During the second round, however, the Elis made up ground and made their way to 10th with 285 strokes and an overall score of +4. Joe Willis ’16 and Will Davenport ’15 came in 25th and 29th, respectively, after day one and led the team with combined scores of 143 and 144. Davenport continued his consistent performance into day two, firing a score of 72 for a final score of 216 — which put him at par for the weekend

— and earned him a 15th-place overall finish in the tournament. “I played pretty well this week, and I drove the ball extremely well,” Davenport said. “I only missed two fairways in 54 holes, which set me up for very consistent golf. I also had the unluckiest break of my life on the first hole of the tournament and played the rest of the weekend under par, so I was pretty proud of my mental game and ability to bounce back.” Bernstein finished the tournament as Yale’s second-best performer with a final score of 224 and Willis ended the tournament just behind Bernstein with a score of 225. Due to unfavorable weather coming through Williamsburg March 17–18, play on Monday and Tuesday was cancelled for the women, but an extra round was added to Sunday. This made the Middleburg Bank Invitational a 36-hole competition as opposed to the traditional 54. “Last year we played in the same tournament and the weather was similar. We SEE GOLF PAGE B2

JENNIFER CHEUNG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s golf team finished in 10th place over spring break at the Linger Longer Invitational.


Today's Paper