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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 · VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 34 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

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PETER SALOVEY INAUGURATION SPEECH FULL TEXT

CAMPAIGN

GRAFFITI

SECURITY

Elicker nearly closes finance margin with Harp, draws Yale donors

CALL FOR ‘RACE WAR’ FOUND IN BATHROOM

Campus, New Haven security combine forces for weekend

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Salovey inaugurated as 23rd president of Yale

HENRY EHRENBERG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

BY MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS STAFF REPORTER On Sunday afternoon — nearly 312 years to the day after a small group of men signed The Collegiate School, later Yale University, into existence in 1701 — Peter Salovey was installed as the University’s first new leader in 20 years. The ceremony officially placed

Salovey at the helm of an institution that has grown radically in diversity and scope since his predecessor Richard Levin ascended to the presidency two decades ago. Though steeped in tradition and formality, Salovey’s inauguration in Woolsey Hall followed a week of celebratory events that took a more casual tone — and Salovey maintained this same informal approach in his inaugural address.

In laying out his vision for the University, the new president emphasized the importance of expanding access to a Yale education and of maintaining the University’s vitality through high-quality teaching. “Our task — even while we grow in size, even while we commit to being a more diverse faculty, staff and student body, more crossdisciplinary, and more global, is to retain Yale’s focus on the ties that

Inauguration merges town and gown

BRIANNA LOO/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The University opened its campus to members of the New Haven community to celebrate the inauguration. Saturday’s festivities kicked off on Cross Campus with a dog show. BY POOJA SALHOTRA CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The boundary between town and gown blurred this weekend as members of the Yale and New Haven community joined to celebrate the inauguration of Yale’s 23rd president. At Saturday’s campus-wide open house event, the public was invited to explore Yale campus — including residential colleges and the Hall of Graduate Studies, which are usually restricted spaces. The openness of the event was both a testimony to former University President Richard Levin’s positive relationship with the city and a symbol of how President Salovey wants to strengthen that tradition, University spokesman and event organizer Michael Morand ’87 DIV ’93 said.

“This event is a way to celebrate where we are today and where we plan to go in the future,” he said. At the Canine Kickoff on Saturday morning, Bryce Wiatrack ’14 sang the New Haven Hymn — also sung during Yale’s Commencement — as a testament to Yale’s ties with the city. Before the canine procession, President Salovey gave a brief welcome, in which he said that Yale and New Haven are “in an eternal partnership.” The afternoon festivities continued with opportunities to tour campus spaces including the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, residential colleges and the Yale University Art Gallery. Morand estimated that over 1000 people attended the Peabody Museum’s Fiesta SEE TOWN/GOWN PAGE 8

bind us together,” Salovey said in his address. Although Salovey stepped into the role of president on July 1, it was not until Sunday that Yale Corporation Senior Fellow Margaret Marshall LAW ’76 presented him with the University’s symbols of authority — its charter, the official Seal of the University and four keys to historical spaces across central campus.

The afternoon ceremony began with Yale faculty and delegates from other universities marching across Cross Campus from Yale Law School into Woolsey Hall. Inside Woolsey, Marshall presented the symbols, along with the official president’s collar, following a series of introductions and speeches — from herself, University Chaplain Sharon Kugler, Harvard President Drew Gilpin Faust,

National University of Singapore President Tan Chorh Chaun and poet Elizabeth Alexander ’84. Following his formal installation, Salovey delivered the traditional inaugural address, emphasizing the value of Yale’s traditional values while suggesting ways Yale can innovate as it moves into the 21st century. SEE INAUGURATION PAGE 4

Festivities benefit businesses BY J.R. REED STAFF REPORTER As elaborate events unfolded across campus during the inauguration of Yale’s 23rd President this past weekend, local businesses experienced a significant influx of customers. To mark the inauguration, many New Haven restaurants offered dining deals pegged to the number 23, while retail stores offered 23 percent off discounts between Oct. 11 and 13. Most local business owners, especially those with locations in the Broadway Shopping District, said the high volume of weekend tourists significantly increased foot traffic in their stores. Some stores, including Tyco

and the clothing store Denali, saw so much of an increase that they declined to talk to the News on the grounds that their staff did not have time. Restaurants and retailers alike found that the event-inspired discounts greatly benefitted their businesses. Ordinary for example, provided customers with a $23 cheese and charcuterie platter, and Miya’s Sushi served up a $23 “President Salovey Sushi Especial,” a dish featuring 10 different sample pieces. Blue State Coffee also offered 23-cent small coffees, and the art supplies and framing store Hull’s offered 23 percent off any single-item purchases. Thali Too restaurant manager Rattan Kaul said that his restau-

rant chose to participate in the presidential-themed discount because the restaurant is so visible on Yale’s campus — located in the Broadway Shopping District, nestled between Ezra Stiles College and the Yale Bookstore. Kaul hopes this promotion, like others in the past, will attract returning customers going forward. “This is a celebration that we wanted to be a part of,” Kaul said. “We and the other participating restaurants under the same ownership are a part of the campus, and a lot of our clients are Yale students.” When the News spoke with Kaul on Saturday afternoon, he said he had already seen more customers SEE BUSINESS PAGE 8

Salovey spotlights education BY RISHABH BHANDARI STAFF REPORTER On Sunday afternoon, after months of listening to faculty, students, alumni and New Haven residents during his tour as presidentelect, University President Peter Salovey finally had the chance to speak to the community about his vision for Yale’s future. In an inaugural address that lasted just under half an hour, Salovey spoke of the central importance of education to both his own life and the identity of Yale as a whole. “Today, I am reminded of all those who have nurtured and sup-

ported me — my teachers along the way,” Salovey said in his opening remarks, adding that he especially valued the guidance of his “friend and teacher” former President Rick Levin, who expanded Yale’s global footprint and built a partnership with New Haven that became a “model for our nation” in towngown relations. In his speech, Salovey defended the value of a liberal arts education. Though he said the University’s emphasis on liberal arts has been challenged by a poor economy and elected officials in Washington, D.C. who do not see the benefits of such an education, Salovey argued that Yale’s liberal arts curriculum

cultivates critical thinking skills and instills a love of learning for its own sake. Salovey also highlighted the importance of focusing on the University’s students. Though Yale should strive to maintain its impressive resources, facilities and high standards of research, Salovey said, the University should still prioritize teaching and remain at the forefront of education. “We have found our distinct place in the great constellation of excellence, and we should embrace it,” he said. Quoting former University PresSEE ADDRESS PAGE 8


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “This is not a democracy, it's a Yaleocracy” yaledailynews.com/opinion

Poopetrator's media circus T

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he “poopetrator” may strike again soon. It’s been several weeks since the brown bandit’s last dungbomb-shell hit — just enough time to lull us into a false sense of security. And if it happens, you’ll know. Don’t worry: The national media’s got your back. Yes, the national media luxuriated in the case of the Saybrook squatter like pigs in poop. Papers across the country and around the world raced to get the scoop in this all-important story. If you’ve read the Associated Press, ABC, CBS, Fox, the Huffington Post, the Washington Post or literally dozens of other news sources in the last couple weeks, you’d have noticed how they all salivated over a juvenile college prank. This coverage was troubling, to say the least. Is this really so important a story? Probably not. But it’s not just their coverage that’s troubling. It’s their tone. One of the first media sources outside of New Haven to cover the poopetrator was Time Magazine. On Oct. 3, an article on Time’s Newsfeed lamented the troubles of the “bright young things at Yale.” It continued in the same vein, noting that the poopetrator was ruining “students’ Polo shirts and pleated khakis.” Finally, it reached the climax: “Pray for Yalies, for this is the first bit of suffering they’ve ever endured.” Time Magazine was, in fact, founded by two Yalies. In the original proposal, the magazine’s name was “Facts.” Clearly it has strayed far. Professionalism and humor aside, a majority of Yalies receives need-based financial aid, and to assume that none of us have experienced suffering is simply foolish. Time’s remarkably petty article might seem surprising in isolation, but its tone was quickly mirrored by other papers and websites. A day later, the Associated Press wrote about the “case of whodungit” at “the elite Ivy League school.” The Daily Caller added, “Not to be outdone by the disgusting living conditions reported at other, inferior universities, Yale University has now claimed the odious distinction of least livable dormitories.” New York Magazine informed readers that “one of the world’s finest institutions of higher learning [was] on high alert.” There’s apparently something about Yale — the reputation, the spawn of the rich and famous — that make it ripe for the mocking. None of these newspapers wrote about the poopetrator without some reference to Yale’s prestige or prominence. It seems this perceived privilege entirely defines Yale to most journalists. These newspapers apparently forgot what Yale is: a school. A school full of kids. Kids who sometimes do stupid

things for a t te n t i o n , for spite or for no reason at all — like pooping in laundry machines. The pooSCOTT p e t r a t o r ’s STERN actions are not excusA Stern able, but, Perspective with thousands of hormonal young people living in close proximity, they are hardly shocking. Sure, the poopetrator is a funny story — but it is not one about which people across the world need to be kept updated. It’s just another one of these stories in which Yalies come off looking entitled and out of touch, like the ones about squirrel death or Sex Week. But there’s something else at play too: many Yalies do seem to be entitled and out of touch. “The fact that this could happen at Yale is shocking to me,” one of the poopetrator’s original victims told the News. Regardless of the student’s intent, this quotation certainly sounds like the shock was not the crime itself, but more that it happened at Yale. Had it happened elsewhere — perhaps in a non-Ivy League school — this student seems to suggest that it would have been less shocking. Yalies are enamored with their school’s selectivity and prominence, and, when something dissatisfies them, they react with indignation and betrayal by Yale. When the dining halls aren’t up to snuff or certain luxuries aren’t provided, students respond with a palpable sense of entitlement. This is Yale. We deserve better. And this is the context in which the outside world viewed Yale’s reaction to the poopetrator. The poopetrator became a national story because administrators, the Council of Masters and even those writing about it treated it as a grave threat to Yale’s Yale-itude. A prank, albeit a disgusting one, apparently merited daily coverage in Yale’s publications, repeated comments by administrators and increased security (whatever that means). If the reaction had not been so overblown, there would have been no copycats and no pundits’ prank. These national press stories didn’t start until after the copycats, after the pundits, after all the outrage. This was an infantile prank that barely deserved any coverage in the first place. Had the uproar not been so fierce, so indignant, there would have been no copycats and no national media bonanza.

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COPYRIGHT 2013 — VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 34

SALOVEY'S COURT'

TFA fails minorities

each for America will be co-hosting a discussion at Yale's Afro-American Cultural Center on Thursday. The Facebook event says: “Join us for an honest discussion around the pressure to move yourself forward vs. paying it forward. Does it have to be a choice?” The fact that TFA is hosting this event is puzzling given the program’s practices and impact on racial minorities. Teach for America is a highly selective program that recruits college graduates to teach for two years without going through a traditional certification program. In recent years, TFA has greatly expanded in urban areas that do not exhibit teacher shortages. These areas tend to have large minority populations, including African Americans, yet the 2012 members of TFA are 62 percent white and only 13 percent African American. As the program expands in cities, laidoff veteran teachers are replaced by TFA members. In many cases, the laid-off teachers are black. For example, the number of black teachers in Chicago has declined by at least 43 percent since 1995. In 2000, TFA had 34 members in Chicago. This past year there were over 500. To summarize, TFA is helping replace experienced black teachers with young white teachers, many of whom will leave the profession after two years. One Yale graduate, who asked to remain anonymous because of his current employment with a related

organization, was recruited by TFA at Yale and accepted to the program. He went on to quit following the intense summer trainDIANA ing out of frusROSEN tration with the program and Looking Left its ideology. He was assigned to Chicago, a city where over 1,000 teachers lost their jobs this summer, and many of his colleagues had zero interest in remaining in teaching after TFA. I had the opportunity to speak to some of them. They talked about how much they loved their Southside Chicago students. They also talked about how much they wanted to go to business school or become professors. TFA takes jobs from minority teachers, but it also has detrimental effects on minority students. TFA members are trained in a mere five weeks, a practice that has been criticized by many. Studies conducted have generated conflicting conclusions about the performance of TFA members, but one thing that almost all studies conclude is that teachers with more experience produce higher performing students. Members of TFA are far less likely to remain in the profession after their two-year commitment than their counterparts from tra-

ditional college teacher education programs. In New York City, 85 percent of TFA members had left the school district after four years while only 37 percent of the traditionally educated ones did. Many TFA members view the program as a stepping-stone to graduate school or careers outside of teaching. Fliers for the program at Fordham University even advertise, “Learn how joining TFA can help you gain admission to Stanford Business School.” Another contributing factor may be the tendency of teachers to “burn out” after two years of intense working conditions with little preparation. These young, mostly-white TFA teachers are placed in minority-filled classrooms in the place of better-trained, more experienced teachers. The losers here are not only the teachers who no longer are employed, but also the students who will be taught by these less qualified TFA members. A humorous, but sad article in The Onion this summer satirically discussed TFA from the perspective of a student: “Just once, it would be nice to walk into a classroom and see a teacher who has a real, honest-toGod degree in education and not a twentysomething English graduate trying to bolster a middling GPA and a sparse law school application.” It is very well possible that TFA was a well-intentioned program in its beginnings. In places where there are true shortages of teachers,

bringing in college graduates to fill the gaps makes sense, even if they are less effective than traditionally trained teachers. But the reality today is that TFA is operating in many urban school districts that are laying off teachers by the hundreds and thousands. I don’t think that students entering the program intend to create damage in minority communities — but with the recent media attention given to critics of TFA, these realities are becoming more and more difficult to ignore. TFA has a very large presence at Yale. Eighteen percent of graduating seniors in 2010 applied to the program. By junior year, students begin receiving emails from TFA recruiters inviting them to various events. Given the elimination of Yale’s teacher certification program two years ago, Yale should actively encourage students to go into teaching — but Teach for America is not the right venue. Why not have a traditional teacher from a New Haven public school host this week’s discussion at the Af-Am House instead of a TFA representative? The discussion topic implies that TFA members “pay it forward” by teaching in low-income communities. It ignores the fact that many of these members do far more harm than good. DIANA ROSEN is a sophomore in Pierson College. Contact her at diana. rosen@yale.edu .

GUEST COLUMNIST DINÉE DORAME

The fight for Native space F

ive hundred twenty-one years ago, Christopher Columbus made his first voyage across the Atlantic Ocean in search of a water route to Asia. His trip marked the beginning of European expansion and colonization. I think it’s pretty safe to say that most people are aware that Columbus did not, in fact, “discover” this new land. Instead, we now have the opportunity to look back at this pivotal piece of history and wonder how it affects us as Yale students. History cannot be reversed, but it can be recognized. So today, we recognize Indigenous Peoples’ Day as an alternative to Columbus Day. Here at Yale, Indigenous Peoples’ Day stirs conversation each year. While most people are willing to acknowledge the fault lines in American history, what goes unnoticed is the rich tribal history of the land that these neo-Gothic buildings sit atop and the longtime Native presence on Yale’s campus. This semester, the conversation has centered on the new Native American Cultural Center. Until

SCOTT STERN is a junior in Branford College. Contact him at scott.stern@yale.edu .

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this August, Native students occupied a few rooms on the third floor of the Asian-American Cultural Center. Since the recent acquisition of the Cultural Center on 26 High St., many people have asked us: “Why do Native students get your own space on campus?” Although Native students make up less than one percent of the Yale College population, this is the only place on campus where we can practice our unique cultural traditions — and educate Yalies about them. Yale’s Western-oriented curriculum does not always recognize the spiritual and cultural aspects at the root of our tribes. Many times, Native stories are underrepresented in classes that cover African-American, Latino, white and Asian-American histories. With only a handful of Native professors on campus, Yale is generally unable to teach from an indigenous perspective. The Cultural Center provides an additional outlet for Native students to advocate for indigenous studies and prompt discussion between Native and non-Native students.

The Cultural Center also provides a dean and spiritual adviser that would not otherwise be available to us. Sweats, a cleansing ceremony, requires off-campus transportation, and we would not be able to attend without Cultural Center funding. Smudging, the burning of sage that cleanses an individual or space, is against University policy due to smoke hazards, and the Cultural Center provides a safe place in which these regulations do not apply. The fight for our own house is not new. In November 1989, the Association of Native Americans at Yale held their first organizational meeting. There were eight students present. Having been previously lumped together with what was then called the Chicano Cultural Center, the students made a list of demands, which included their own space and their own dean. Four years later, the newly founded group took hold of the unused third floor of a Crown Street building and called it the Native American Cultural Center. Well before the ivy-covered,

hallowed halls of this university were here, the Quinnipiac tribe inhabited the land and the town of New Haven was instead known as Quinnipiac. In 1638, the tribe was the first to be displaced to “reserve” land in what would later become the United States. It wasn’t until 1910, that Henry Roe Cloud, a Ho-Chuck from the Winnebago Reservation, became the first American-Indian graduate of Yale College. Today of all days, it’s important to note that the Native community has been fighting for this space for decades. I invite people to celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day as an alternative to Columbus Day and the next time you stroll through Cross Campus to class, remember the roots of the land. In the 17th century, Native people were here. In 2013, Native students at Yale continue to fight for recognition and use today to honor the resilience of our ancestors. DINÉE DORAME is a junior in Ezra Stiles College. Contact her at dinee.dorame@yale.edu .

Don't depend on America

A

round the world, people are counting. It’s been 14 days, and the United States government is still not open for business. Chinese tourists, stopped beyond the locked gates of Yellowstone National Park, are grappling with a concept they don’t quite understand: “How could the government ever shut down?” Meanwhile, investors in London, Tokyo and Singapore anxiously await the Thursday deadline for raising the debt ceiling, which if not met, would send shockwaves through the world economy. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid called the government shutdown “an embarrassment to the nation.” Who is the audience to America’s embarrassment? One might presumably answer: the world, in particular those countries that do not share America’s political values. When John Kerry asserted that “the world is watching us” during the House hearing on Syria, he was channeling JFK, who famously invoked the “city on a hill” imagery in a speech in 1961, at the height of the Cold War. The idea that America must serve as an example to the world, that its political system and democratic institutions are models for all to emulate, is a centuries-old concept. In this day and age, perhaps we should reconsider the con-

cept of American exceptionalism. Is America, despite its military strength and financial influence, still suited for the XIUYI responsibilZHENG ity of being the shining city Properupon a hill? In light of gandist the recent political crises on Capitol Hill, the international supporters of liberal democracy have found themselves in an awkward position. They have long dealt with the criticism that the United States is hypocritical — that it touts the values of liberalism but practices political realism. They must now explain another, more troubling problem: American democracy is simply not performing up to par. The critics have been loud and conspicuous. For example, a commentary piece published by Xinhua, China’s official news agency, quipped: “As U.S. politicians of both political parties are still shuffling back and forth … without striking a viable deal to bring normality to the body politic they brag about, it is perhaps a good time for the befuddled world to start con-

sidering building a de-Americanized world.” The fact of the matter is that, America's political system has failed, demonstrating in the process certain structural weaknesses that have never seemed more threatening. Mired by partisanship and ideological polarization, Congress has failed to pass common sense legislation such as immigration reform, and is now holding the international economy hostage by threatening to default on the nation’s debts. If we subscribe to the belief that American democracy is the most perfect, or least flawed model, then every time it fails, the opponents of democracy score a resounding victory. Authoritarian states point to America’s missteps, where they find excuses with which to push off democratic reforms. American politicians should try to get their act together, but what if they don’t? Would the detractors of democracy have proved their point then? With rampant gerrymandering, America’s electoral districts will not become more balanced anytime soon. In the foreseeable future, the nation will continue on the path of ideological divergence. If we are to continue to promote the values of democracy and freedom internationally, then we must first debunk the myth of America

as a city on a hill and seek to disentangle American democracy with the concept of democracy itself. The American political system is far from perfect, and it has a long ways to go before it can claim to embody all of the great ideals that it bears under its name. The equating of democracy with the American political system is a legacy of the Cold War that must be corrected. In 1945, there were few truly democratic states; today many flourishing democracies abound. Although American democracy is experiencing structural challenges, those difficulties do not underwrite the superiority of democratic systems as a whole, and cannot validate the legitimacy of authoritarian regimes. Instead of depending on America to inspire the world and throwing our hands up when it fails to do so, perhaps we should seek to criticize each political system for what they are, America’s included. For if we continue to equate American politics with democracy as a whole, then we will be placing the fate of the international democratic experiment in the hands of Ted Cruz. And that is truly a frightening thought. XIUYI ZHENG is a senior in Davenport College. His columns run on alternate Mondays. Contact him at xiuyi. zheng@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

INAUGURAL ADDRESS UNIVERSITY PRE SDIENT PETER SALOVEY

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“Our Educational Mission”

his Sunday, Peter Salovey was inaugurated as Yale University’s 23rd president. In 1993, former President Richard Levin delivered an inaugural address that became the roadmap for his 20-year presidency. Salovey has similarly outlined his vision for the campus, town-gown relations and Yale abroad. The text of his inaugural address, delivered in Woolsey Hall, is printed in full below.

INAUGURATION ADDRESS BY PRESIDENT PETER SALOVEY, WOOLSEY HALL, OCT. 13, 2013 With great joy, excitement and hope, I accept the leadership of this university. I am honored to be granted the stewardship of this venerable institution; grateful for the trust of the Yale Corporation, faculty and community; optimistic for our shared future. Today I am reminded of all those who have nurtured and supported me — my teachers along the way. That is why the anthem that will be sung later focuses on the words of the scholar Shimon ben Zoma: “Who is wise?” ben Zoma asks, “The one who learns from all … I have gained understanding from all my teachers.” I especially want to recognize my teacher and my friend Richard Levin who led the rebuilding of our campus, extended its reach to all corners of the globe and simultaneously strengthened the collaboration with our host city. I salute my fellow presidents and the other delegates who have graciously joined us, bringing their wisdom and support and demonstrating by their presence the bond that connects all of us in higher education. I appreciate that so many of my former teachers and mentors are here today: from high school, college and graduate school. And, of course, my friends and family from whom I have not just “gained understanding” but also who helped me develop whatever emotional intelligence I might have. There are friends who have joined us today who have known me for fifty years. My colleagues here at Yale, the hundreds of faculty, staff, students and alumni who have spoken to me or written since my appointment: You, too, have been my teachers, especially these last few months. Thank you for your encouragement and support.

THE CHALLENGE AHEAD

In the 312 years since its founding as The Collegiate School, Yale has advanced despite challenges along the way. The present moment of transition arrives at a time of uncertainty for all our country’s colleges and universities, including Yale. The recent recession has constrained the resources available to support the discovery of new knowledge. Some in public office have forgotten the indispensable role of higher education in the pursuit of the American dream. Others overlook the ways that university research promotes economic growth through path-breaking discoveries. Students who would seek reasonable ways to finance an education or who would eagerly embrace citizenship in our country find themselves too often in the political crossfire. It is a sorrow to those of us who believe so deeply in it that some in our country can neither see nor accept the transformative power of a liberal education — how it teaches critical thinking, instills the joy of learning for learning’s own sake, exposes students to cultural and artistic experiences, transforms an individual’s identity, nurtures aspirations to give back and enriches life. We are living in a world that will test our university, and we must remain rooted in our principles and focused on our founding mission. We must be cleareyed about our strengths and weaknesses and ambitious in fulfilling our promise.

CENTRALITY OF STUDENTS

Among the many treasures of this university — from the most ancient manuscripts to the most contemporary scientific discoveries — it is our students who are the greatest treasure of all. So today let me reaffirm that we are a research university that proudly and unapologetically focuses on our students. This is who we are and what we aspire to be. Professor Jim Rothman, who

was awarded the Nobel Prize earlier this week, embodies this identity and aspiration. On Monday, he departed swiftly from the press conference, where he was extolled for his groundbreaking work unlocking the secrets of cells, to teach two seminars. A future Nobel laureate may have been sitting in a classroom with him that very afternoon. This is Yale’s calling as a research university, exemplified every day by faculty and students in our classrooms, laboratories and studios. As we move forward, Yale must remain an institution of worldrenowned research and scholarship and of uplifting arts; of inspiring galleries, museums and library collections. But above all, Yale University should always be celebrated for our commitment to teaching at every level, in every classroom — in our undergraduate college, in graduate education and in each of our professional schools. We have found our distinct place in the great constellation of excellence, and we should embrace it. But even as our mission remains clear, our work is unfinished. We have new problems to solve, new research to conduct, new students to teach, new challenges to meet. Make no mistake: As president, I will support, expand and celebrate basic and problem-driven research in the fields of today, and those of tomorrow, from Science Hill to Hillhouse Avenue, to Cross Campus, to the Medical School, to the West Campus. However, I focus this afternoon on our mission of teaching and learning, and the ways our students use their learning when they leave this place.

EMBRACING A REVOLUTION IN TEACHING AND LEARNING

I emphasize our educational mission because we are in the midst of a teaching and learning revolution. How we respond — how we stay true to our best traditions while pioneering new frontiers — this is the challenge before us. Some principles have endured since our founding in 1701 and will continue to remain central to this university’s success: the place of the university in the discovery, transmission and preservation of knowledge; the free and passionate exchange of ideas between minds young and old; the exhilaration of sharing new insights; the study of the past and of the great and beautiful works that stand as monuments to human thought and expression; the opportunity to instill in students the experience of true learning, of losing themselves in a book, experiment, or performance; the power of the individual teacher or mentor to influence thinking and transform lives. But, just as the composition of our faculty and the diversity of our student body have changed, our approach to teaching must continue to evolve as well. Yale must be exemplary, distinctive and forward-looking. Throughout our history, Yale has been at the forefront of educational innovation. The same is true today. The School of Management has introduced a novel and interdisciplinary first-year curriculum; the Law School continues to educate more students for academia and judgeships than any of its sister institutions; the School of Medicine is redesigning medical education to break down barriers among basic science, clinical science and patient care; the Department of Athletics aspires to turn our prized varsity teams into laboratories for the cultivation of leadership skills. Some of the best teaching in Yale College has emphasized active learning, engagement with our unmatched collections and field experiences. Because of this, Yale College students — whether they major in the social sciences, humanities, or arts; in science, mathematics, or engineer-

ing — all graduate with a thirst for learning, a greater appreciation for creativity, and a respect for education that they bring to positions of leadership and civic life. The following quotation recently caught my eye: “If modern technology fulfills its promise, we are on the threshold of a revolution … lectures can be taped and stored and selected for viewing on demand … it behooves us to take the lead in adapting our ways to any arrangement which will make our resources publicly available as long as it does not dilute, distort, or distract us from our first mission.” This is not a surprising observation until one realizes that these words were spoken nearly fifty years ago by Yale President Kingman Brewster at his inauguration. Those words were wise and visionary then. They remain so today. As new technologies and opportunities stimulate pedagogical change, we can use them to advance our mission. By continuing to harness technology, we can amplify the words of Yale’s great teachers so that our lectures and lessons can enlighten and inspire more people in more places. However, the most significant impact on our mission is likely to come from the use of digital resources that can improve teaching and stimulate learning here on campus. We need to develop courses that adapt in real time to the learning patterns of our students and liberate faculty members to engage in spirited intellectual interactions with them. In the College and elsewhere, the faculty will continue to chart Yale’s course, pursuing online efforts that are consistent with our commitment to develop the habits of mind associated with a liberal education without — as President Brewster said — diluting, distorting, or distracting us from our mission.

ACCESS TO A YALE EDUCATION

Throughout our history, Yale has endeavored to be accessible to deserving students, no matter their backgrounds. Our admissions and financial aid policies have long reflected this commitment. But our college is among the smallest of our peer schools, and I believe we must expand access to undergraduate education by building two new residential colleges. The tradition of students living in small communities distinguishes and animates the Yale College experience. This arrangement allows our students to bring their educational lives into their homes: into the dining halls, common rooms, kitchens, libraries, theaters and galleries within each of our twelve colleges, where teaching and learning also flourish. We must reaffirm the mean-

ingful role of the residential colleges within our undergraduate program and explore how they can encourage the full development of the individual — intellectually, socially and culturally. We must ask ourselves: Can life in our residential colleges — all of them — become even more extraordinary as we change and grow? The education and way of life we offer to Yale College students for four years is a precious gift, but today it is available to few. We are turning away brilliant, hardworking and committed applicants who would invigorate our campus and improve our world through lives of leadership and service. Today we have the opportunity to extend Yale’s reach to more outstanding young people in our country and abroad. Yale has never had a stronger faculty; we have invested billions of dollars in our facilities; and we are fortunate to have remarkably generous alumni, parents and friends. There are so many students reaching out for the opportunity of a Yale College education, applicants who now only can tour our campus as visitors, peering through the gates at beautiful courtyards and humbled by the vastness of Yale’s library and gallery collections. We can offer some of them a life-changing experience, and we should.

YALE AND NEW HAVEN

Beyond our beautiful courtyards is another part of what makes Yale a special place for teaching and learning: the city of New Haven. Our city and university are forever coupled; our destiny is shared. Yale’s collaboration with our host city in the last twenty years is an innovative model that has inspired other urban colleges and universities. We have built a genuine partnership by creating a vibrant downtown surrounding campus. We have encouraged home ownership among our employees. We have forged new relationships with our unions. We have developed outreach programs with our unmatched array of professional schools, galleries and museums, and we have worked closely with the New Haven Public Schools. We are grateful for the twenty-year partnership with Mayor DeStefano, and I look forward to collaborating with his successor. I want us to imagine how seeking new ways to teach and learn can lead to new directions in our alliance with New Haven. We must bolster economic development and create employment opportunities here in New Haven by putting our innovative, entrepreneurial inclinations to work. Already we are seeing the results of this intellectual entrepreneurship in the form of new businesses, technology, public policy ideas and services imagined by

Yale faculty, staff and students, and pursued collaboratively with partners here in New Haven and throughout our state. We will continue these pursuits, but we will also do more to nurture student entrepreneurs from every school and department and encourage them to contribute to the local idea economy. After graduation, they can remain in New Haven and play active roles as civic, arts and business leaders. And we need to ensure that our faculty members feel the same encouragement. We must ask: How can we better support interested faculty to develop and apply findings from their research? How can we create a local ecosystem that supports entrepreneurs? How would a one-hour train between New York and New Haven change the intellectual and educational biosphere of our campus and city? We must ask these and other questions. But whatever we do, our innovative partnership with New Haven should continue to be a model for the nation.

ability, to research on emerging democracies, to theater projects with Tanzanian artists. For many years, my laboratory collaborated on HIV/AIDS prevention research in South Africa, and Marta is helping with an environmental and public health project involving the Masai. A greater focus on Africa is just one example of how we aspire to unite research with teaching and learning, how in our research laboratories and our classrooms we can effect change beyond them, and how we can bring the world to Yale and Yale to the world. I challenge our faculty and students to imagine other programs that will make the most of Yale’s strengths, creating links between scholars and students in integrated, campus-wide initiatives. As we write the next chapter in Yale’s great history, our goals are clear and achievable: a more unified Yale that pioneers innovative teaching; a more accessible Yale; a Yale that is more deeply rooted in New Haven and shares its innovations with its host city; an altogether excellent Yale.

A GLOBAL AND MORE UNIFIED UNIVERSITY

AN INTERDEPENDENT COMMUNITY

As we deepen our partnership here in New Haven, we must also look beyond the city limits. Over nine hundred faculty members are pursuing research and scholarship overseas. It is impossible to state how profoundly this has changed what they teach and what our students learn here at home. Yale-NUS College is providing opportunities to develop novel approaches to liberal education in an international context. And, the growing numbers of international students on our campus and the interactions among international and domestic students studying and living together have enriched the educational experience here. We have created the foundation for Yale as a truly global university. Looking forward, I can imagine another way to engage many of our students and faculty while creating a more unified Yale. Eleven of the world’s twenty fastest-growing economies are African. With the growing influence of the African continent on the world economy, as well as increased migration to, from and within Africa, this is the moment to bring scholarship and teaching about Africa at Yale into sharper focus. Working collaboratively, we can foster new directions in research on Africa, identify new partnerships with those on the continent and strengthen our recruitment efforts, all while emphasizing teaching and learning. Our current scholarship on Africa already draws on many disciplines throughout the university — from African language, history and cultural traditions to global health research, to field experiments in development economics, to issues of sustain-

Our task — even while we grow in size, even while we commit to being a more diverse faculty, staff and student body; more crossdisciplinary; and more global — is to retain Yale’s focus on the ties that bind us together, the sense of being a small, interdependent community, but one with an impressively broad scope. This intimacy and shared sense of purpose is what generates Yale’s distinctive spirit. It also allows us to aspire to make the university even more unified. As President Charles Seymour said on the day of his inauguration, “We are a university; that is, we are all members of a body dedicated to a single cause. There must be among us distinctions of function, but there can be no division of purpose.” I wish each of you could stand here and take in the incredible view from this podium. I see all of you — Yale faculty, alumni, parents, staff, students and friends — and I feel grateful and privileged to have such partners charting the future with me. The spirit of Yale connects those of us gathered in this hall with our vast community of alumni and friends across this campus, this city, this nation and the world. You have bestowed on me the greatest honor that a Yale faculty member and alumnus could possibly receive: the opportunity to serve as the university’s president. I cherish this trust, and I acknowledge my need for your help to fill my years as president with urim v’thummim, lux et veritas, light and truth. PETER SALOVEY is the president of Yale University. Contact him at president@yale.edu .

HENRY EHRENBERG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR


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FROM THE FRONT

“If you’re not in the parade, you watch the parade. That’s life.” MIKE DITKA FOOTBALL COACH

Inauguration festivities sweep campus INAUGURATION FROM PAGE 1 Salovey stressed the centrality of students, teaching, expanding access to Yale and collaborating with New Haven and the world in his vision for the University. He spoke of the new residential colleges and the efforts to expand online access to Yale’s classes while also underscoring his belief that any expansion must not be “diluting, distorting or distracting” to Yale’s mission. Looking to the University’s relationship with New Haven, he noted that Yale could not regard itself as separate from the surrounding city. Saying that the “city and University are forever coupled,” Salovey emphasized that the University must work to keep Yale students in New Haven after graduation and continue to encourage economic development and entrepreneurship within the Elm City. Salovey also pointed to Africa as the next location for Yale’s continued globalization. Salovey said that he plans to identify partnerships, strengthen recruitment and build scholarship on a continent that has been frequently overlooked. “I think that’s a great theme, teaching and learning and expanding Yale,” Provost Benjamin Polak said of the address. “It gave the people in my office marching orders.” Yale Police Chief Ronnell Higgins said that Salovey’s inauguration excited him and his coworkers to work alongside new president, and former Yale Alumni Fund chair William Folbreth ’66 called Salovey’s push to expand Yale “the wave of the future.” Yale College Dean Mary Miller expressed excitement over Salovey’s emphasis on the fundamentals of teaching and research. And mayoral candidate Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM ’10 said that Salovey’s focus on innovation bodes well for the Yale-New Haven relationship.

Despite the enthusiasm amongst those in Woolsey, though, the speech seemed to reach only a modest audience outside of the auditorium. Although the ceremony was streamed in multiple locations — Battell Chapel, Burke Auditorium and Hillhouse Ave., as well as being broadcast live online — few students on campus watched Salovey lay out his vision for the University. Of 37 students interviewed on Sunday evening, only one watched the address. The block party that followed the address, however, saw higher interest. After Salovey’s formal inauguration, the new president and other Yale leaders streamed out of Woolsey Hall and made their way to Hillhouse Ave. On the street that Charles Dickens and Mark Twain both called the most beautiful in America, some 5,000 members of the Yale and New Haven communities gathered to celebrate.

I think that’s a great theme, teaching and learning and expanding Yale. It gave the people in my office marching orders. BENJAMIN POLAK Provost, Yale University The block party invited all members of the public to enjoy free fried dough and ice cream, listen to a cappella performances and mingle with Yale’s top administrators. Polak chased his children as they ran through the crowd while students and alumni mixed with dignitaries and faculty members, many of whom remained in their colorful robes. Seeking study breaks in the midst of midterms, students listened to bluegrass

music and took photographs with Salovey. “It’s a lot of fun,” Salovey said at the party. “It’s great to see the Yale community and New Haven community coming together to eat this extremely healthy food.” Salovey said he hoped the inauguration would foster a spirit of unity across campus, suggesting that every 20 years “is not enough” for events with the whole community. In a Sunday email to the News, he said he hopes to “sustain the spirit” of the weekend with future events that bring together the Yale and New Haven communities. Sunday’s formal inauguration came after a week of festivities. The celebrations begin with 27 departmental “drop-ins” in which Salovey visited Yale faculty and staff in their workplaces. Then, starting on Friday, alumni and distinguished visitors — university presidents, donors to Yale and others — arrived on campus in droves. On Saturday, the University opened its doors with a campuswide open house. All members of the public were invited to tour the residential colleges, pet Handsome Dan and Salovey’s dog Portia and stroll through the University’s vast library and gallery collections. After the open house, dignitaries and donors gathered for a formal reception in Beinecke Plaza, while undergraduates enjoyed their own formal dinners in the residential colleges. Later that evening, Old Campus and the courtyard of the Hall of Graduate Studies roared with the sounds of bluegrass at two inaugural balls. Salovey’s band, The Professors of Bluegrass, performed at both. Larry Milstein contributed reporting. Contact MATTHEW LLOYDTHOMAS at matthew.lloyd-thomas@yale.edu . KATHRYN CRANDALL/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

LEFT: HENRY EHERENBERG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR, RIGHT: KEN YENIGASAWA/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Left: University administrators and Yale Corporation Senior Fellow Margaret Marshall process before the inauguration. Right: Students dance at the Inaugural Ball on Old Campus.


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Number of countries participating in Coursera, a massive online open course platform.

Leaders talk globalization

A previous version of the WEEKEND article “Speaking by the numbers” incorrectly stated that one in three black children in New Haven die in infancy, compared to the national average of one in eight. In fact, about 3.2% of black children die in infancy compared to 1.2% nationally.

Inflammatory graffiti found BY WESLEY YIIN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Last week, the words “Race War Now” appeared on a wall in the African American Studies department. Thursday afternoon, Lisa Monroe, senior administrator of the African American Studies department, received a complaint about graffiti discovered in a second floor bathroom of the department’s building at 81 Wall St. Yale Police began an investigation, and department chair Jonathan Holloway GRD ’95 issued a statement to the department explaining the situation and reassuring professors and staff that the offense was likely a “one-time act of stupidity.” Students interviewed said the incident serves as a reminder to the Yale community that issues of racial prejudice are far from resolved. “This is important. This is a real thing, [but] we want to keep it in scale,” Holloway told the News on Saturday. “This was a stupid and small act, [not a] stupid and big act.” Yale Police did not respond to requests for comment about the status of the investigation. On Friday morning, University President Salovey and Holloway sent a joint email to the department condemning the act, especially in the context of the upcoming inauguration festivities, which they said aimed to celebrate “all of Yale in its great diversity.” Holloway told the News that he and his department were thankful that Salovey took the time to issue this statement during this busy weekend and to express zero tolerance for this kind of crime. She added the graffiti may have been placed overnight. There had been a problem with the building’s lock system, and students and custodians had reported on a few occasions that the building’s card reader remained green-lit past the building’s 5 p.m. closing time, he said. Moving forward, the main goal is “to make sure the building is secure when it’s supposed to be secure” so that those who have access to the building after hours can be tracked by the card reading system, Holloway said. “The world in which we live isn’t free of this stuff, no matter what people like to say, and those who work in African American Studies understand this,” Holloway said. “There are too many examples of this kind

of stuff, [although] refreshingly few on this campus.” Although incidents of racially charged graffiti have occurred on campus before — most recently in May when the Slifka Center was threatened with arson — Holloway only recalled one other incident that directly involved him. Years ago, he said, before the University had installed card-activated lock systems, a window at the former African American Studies building was smashed with a snowball. Holloway said he did not perceive the incident to be racially motivated, but Yale Police investigated the possibility.

This is important. This is a real thing, [but] we want to keep it in scale. This was a stupid and small act. JONATHAN HOLLOWAY GRD ’95 Department chair, African American Studies Nia Holston ’14, an African American Studies major, called the recent episode of graffiti “deplorable” and disappointing. Still, she said this is not the first incident of racially motivated graffiti that she has heard about at Yale. She cited the appearance of the words “Nigger School” in 2007 on the York Street gate to Pierson College as another and perhaps more severe instance of racial hatred. Holston said she appreciated Yale’s immediate yet measured responses to the situation, and added that she and her fellow students and faculty within the African American Studies department are committed to ensuring that incidents like these happen with decreasing frequency in the future. “I hope that something good can come out of this,” Holston said. Davynn Brown ’14, another African American Studies major, said that she was not surprised by the incident, as she is aware that racism exists on campus. But she said the use of the word “war” was jarring, since it reflected a very active sentiment. There are 23 professors in the African American Studies department. Contact WESLEY YIIN at wesley.yiin@yale.edu .

LAVINIA BORZI/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

University administrators from around the world gathered during the Inauguration celebrations to discuss international education. BY LAVINIA BORZI STAFF REPORTER Five top university administrators, hailing from institutions across the world, gathered during the inauguration celebrations to discuss expanding educational opportunities in a globalized world. The panel, entitled “The University of the Future: Next Steps in Internationalization,” took place Saturday afternoon at Sprague Hall. Conversation between the participants focused on the need for more internationalization to help prepare students for a world in which they will be expected to communicate and collaborate with people from different backgrounds and cultures. Though some of the university administrators advised against certain methods of internationalization, such as the establishment of “branch campuses,” the panelists all emphasized the importance of international engagement and expressed enthusiasm about the role technology can play in making education more accessible. Catherine Bond Hill, president of Vassar College and a Yale Corporation fellow, told the crowd that globalization brings both new advantages and new challenges to the world of academia. “With globalization, we’ve evolved to thinking more globally, to educating students to make a difference in the world,” she said. But several panelists cautioned against approaching internationalization with the wrong mindset. Casper said he is “incredibly skeptical” of the trend of universities opening satellite campuses, which are additional campuses that are physically detached from the main university. “There’s no natural law that says that universities should have [them,]” he said. Hill said one of the problems with

branch campuses is that they attempt to emulate the student experience of the main university in a completely different setting. The location of a university largely determines the student experience, she added. “I don’t think you could recreate the Oxford experience in Cleveland,” Hill said. Tan Chorh Chuan, president of the National University of Singapore and member of the Yale-NUS college board of Trustees, said the liberal arts college Yale-NUS does not qualify as a “branch campus” because it is more of a collaboration than an implantation.

We were trying to take the traditional model and copy it into the online model. CARLOS ENRIQUE CRUZ LIMÓN Vice president, Tecnólogico de Monterrey Other panelists agreed that the YaleNUS initiative intends to unite the educational philosophies and cultures of two universities to create a hybrid institution. Andrew Hamilton, a former Yale provost and current vice-chancellor of Oxford University, said Yale is one of the few institutions that is “getting rid of the colonization mission” in its efforts abroad. Still, Chuan said merging the cultures of Yale and NUS is an ongoing process. Though the panelists spoke of YaleNUS in a positive light, many Yale professors have expressed concerns about the project since it was launched in 2011. Some professors asserted that they were not adequately consulted before the project went forward and questioned the use of Yale’s teaching

resources abroad, while other professors objected to Yale’s working with a government that restricts freedom of speech and bans homosexuality. In an April 4, 2012 opinion piece in the News, political science and philosophy professor Seyla Benhabib also referenced the “naïve missionary sentiment” of the venture. Panelists at Saturday’s event also discussed the impact of technology on internationalization. Carlos Enrique Cruz Limón, vice president of the Tecnólogico de Monterrey, a university in Mexico, said that online education has the potential to bring ideas together from around the world, but he added that there is still a lot of progress to be made. He said that he participated in a large initiative to use online education at his university, but that in the beginning it was difficult to adapt the traditional techniques of teaching to the online format. “We were trying to take the traditional model and copy it into the online model,” Cruz said. “It’s like having an astronaut ride a horse!” Hamilton said he is not at all concerned that online learning presents a threat to traditional universities. Technology will make education from the “great cathedrals of learning” like Oxford and Yale more widely accessible, Hamilton said. Three of five audience members interviewed said that they appreciated the emphasis the panelists placed on the accessibility of education in a global context. Eddie De Leon, SECCHP University Chaplain, said that discussions of this kind are fascinating because they “bring together pieces of culture and learning.” Yale-NUS opened in September 2013. Contact LAVINIA BORZI at lavinia.borzi@yale.edu .

Yale donors flock to Elicker BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTER Updated campaign finance reports show that the two candidates competing to become New Haven’s next mayor are neckand-neck in fundraising heading into the final three weeks before the election. In the month of September, Connecticut State Sen. Toni Harp ARC ’78 and Ward 10 Alderman Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM ’10 both amassed just over $100,000. Though the two candidates raised approximately equal sums of money, their sources of revenue differed. Lists of individual donors who contributed $370 or more reveal that affiliates of Yale have shelled out considerable resources for Elicker, while only a handful of Harp’s top individual donors are employed by the University. Between Sept. 3 and Oct. 3, Harp raked in a total of $103,955,

receiving $85,155 from individuals and $17,500 from committees, including the Connecticut State Council of Machinists, the Connecticut Association of Optometrists and a number of union locals. Elicker took in $100,353, receiving $96,823 from individuals and $3,530 from the Democracy Fund, New Haven’s public campaign finance system that prohibits special interest money and limits contributions to $370. As a petitioning Independent candidate in the general election, Elicker lost access to the Fund following his loss in the Sept. 10 primary, though he has said he will continue to abide by its rules. Harp has abstained from the Democracy Fund throughout the election. Of 159 people who gave $370 or more to the Elicker campaign, 43 are affiliated with Yale — students, professors, staff members, administrators and physicians at Yale-New Haven Hospital. Elicker

received $60,811 from donations of $370 or more. Nearly one-third of that total — $16,570 — came from Yale affiliates. Harp received only three donations of $370 or more from Yale affiliates, accounting for just $1,500 of the $49,890 she raised from high-contributing individuals. Eight Yale students and professors interviewed said they donated to Elicker’s campaign because of his responsiveness as an East Rock alderman, his participation in the Democracy Fund and a number of his policy commitments. “Justin Elicker has been a fantastic ward alderman, sensitive to the issues facing residents and to the complex challenges facing the city,” said psychology professor Karen Wynn, who donated the maximum to Elicker’s campaign. She also cited Elicker’s clean fundraising promises as an alternative to the “business as usual”

approach that she said has “surrounded other candidates.” David Crosson ’14 also said Elicker’s participation in the Democracy Fund moved him to donate $370. Crosson added that he thinks Elicker will be a better advocate for New Haven’s interests in negotiations with Yale because the candidate is more willing to “push back on Yale for having too much leverage in the town-gown relationship.” Sean Hundtofte GRD ’17 said he donated to Elicker because he trusts him to crack down on slumlords, while School of Management professor Barry Nalebuff said he was moved to donate because of Elicker’s commitment to reforming the city’s zoning regulation. Elicker said he did not specifically target Yale donors but said the high concentration of University affiliates among his top contributors reflects his broader fundraising strategy of raising money

from people within the city. “The point is that I’ve been receiving my donations from people within the city. Harp doesn’t have a lot of donors from New Haven, period,” he said. Harp Campaign Manager Jason Bartlett attributed Elicker’s high proportion of Yale donors to his work as an alderman, stating that a strong base of funding support for Elicker were Yale professors residing in East Rock. By contrast, he said, Harp sought donations from supporters from across the city and state. “Senator Harp is a statewide entity. People have known her as a state senator for 20 years,” he said. School of Forestry and Environmental Studies professor Marian Chertow SOM ’81 FES ’00 cited Harp’s chairmanship of the state senate’s appropriations committee as a principal reason for her donation, saying in a Sunday email that Harp is “on excellent terms with the current

state administration which will undoubtedly be important over the next couple of years.” She added that Harp “sees the University as a key employer and innovator” but also speaks to the broader interests of the city, noting Harp’s victory in a vast majority of the city’s 30 wards in the Democratic primary. Gordon Geballe GRD ’81, associate dean of student and alumni affairs for the Forestry School, and School of Architecture Professor Kent Bloomer ’59 ART ’61 also donated to Harp’s campaign. Though Harp eked out only a small fundraising lead over her opponent, she vastly outspent him in September. Harp spent $139,730 over the course of the month, compared to Elicker’s $55,082 in expenditures. Contact ISAAC STANLEYBECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .


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“Leaders of the Church have often been Narcissus, flattered and sickeningly excited by their courtiers. The court is the leprosy of the papcy.” POPE FRANCIS I

Campus stays safe while drawing crowd

BRIANNA LOO/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

A large wave of campus visitors and a number of unlocked buildings caused the Yale and New Haven Police Departments to step up security efforts during the weekend’s inaugural events. BY MAREK RAMILO STAFF REPORTER A large wave of campus visitors and a number of unlocked buildings caused the Yale and New Haven Police Departments to step up security efforts during the weekend’s inaugural events. YPD officers were dispatched throughout the University to monitor on-campus activity, while NHPD forces were on hand to reinforce large-scale events like the Hillhouse Ave. block party that took place on Sunday after the inauguration ceremony. Police presence was stationed around campus throughout the weekend, watching prominent cam-

pus buildings and event sites. Despite the increased crowds on campus this weekend, Janet Lindner, the University’s associate vice president for administration, said that there were no major incidents of crime reported. The YPD made forces available for all events, not only for the events that drew the biggest crowds. “No single event was of the highest priority, as we plan for these large scale events holistically, seeing each event as part of the whole weekend,” Lindner said. “We organize for the entire weekend when we develop an operational plan.” Though the NHPD’s forces were on campus to support YPD

efforts, the weekend’s security was mainly a YPD issue, department spokesman David Hartman said. For most of Saturday afternoon, several campus gates were left unlocked to allow outside visitors to attend tours and open house events through the University’s laboratories, libraries and other facilities. This meant that individuals without card access could freely enter normally restricted areas, so Yale security and YPD officers were on hand to prevent theft and trespassing. One of Saturday’s featured events was the Residential College Open House for which common spaces — but not entryways — were left open to guests.

The open house caused some masters to warn students to take extra precaution. “The college will have extra security during the open house, but it is incumbent on you to keep the doors that should be locked, locked,” Amy Hungerford, the master of Morse College, said in an email to Morse students in anticipation of the event. Even though campus has not been open for an inauguration in 20 years, the weekend’s schedule proceeded “smoothly,” according to Lindner. Lindner added that though the events of the weekend encouraged New Haven residents and visitors to tour campus, Yale is well equipped to

handle large-scale events. “Yale and New Haven police worked in close concert this weekend, as they do at Commencement and all other major events on campus,” Lindner said. “We regularly plan for delegations, large and small, to visit campus.” Unlike the activities for nonYale visitors, some events like Saturday night’s inauguration ball required students to show Yale identification before they could gain entry onto Old Campus for the dance. Four students interviewed said that they felt safe and that the added security presence did not affect their enjoyment of the weekend. “I didn’t feel threatened at

all. I didn’t actually think about security, but I did remember seeing that there were police officers everywhere,” Kenneth Gunasekera BK ’15 said. Chihiro Isokazi TC ’15 said that she was very careful not to leave valuables like her laptop laying around in public areas, but acknowledged that doing so should be standard even when campus is less busy. Isokazi also said that having New Haven residents on campus this weekend was a positive addition to the inauguration. Lindner is responsible for operational areas including police, security and parking. Contact MAREK RAMILO at marek.ramilo@yale.edu .

At inauguration, Salovey dons traditional regalia

HENRY EHRENBERG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Yesterday’s ceremony also featured the Yale University mace and the Presidential collar — both of which were on display at the Yale University Art Gallery from Sept. 24 through this past Saturday. BY HELEN ROUNER STAFF REPORTER Yesterday afternoon, the Yale community inaugurated University President Peter Salovey using the ancient symbols of his new office. Salovey’s official induction into the Yale presidency took place the moment Senior Fellow of the Yale Corporation Margaret Marshall LAW ’76 presented him with “the symbols of authority,” explained Martha Highsmith, senior advisor to the president. These symbols include the 1701 University Charter, the University Seal and the keys to four campus buildings: Connecticut Hall, Dwight Hall, Sterling Memorial Library and the Hark-

ness Tower gateway. Each symbol represents a presidential duty — the charter to ensure the institution’s prosperity, the seal to transact business on the University’s behalf and the building keys to safeguard the University’s campus. The objects were bestowed on Salovey right before he gave his inaugural address in Woolsey Hall on Sunday. “It’s important to honor the past that has created the foundation for the present,” Highsmith said. Yesterday’s ceremony also featured the Yale University mace and the Presidential collar — both of which were on display at the Yale University Art Gallery from Sept. 24 through this past Saturday. In his description of

the exhibit, curator John Stuart Gordon called the mace and collar “two of the most potent symbols of the University,” adding that they “embody the authority of the president and the University’s officers.” During yesterday’s procession, the silver gilt mace — which, according to the website for the inauguration, is 47 inches long and weighs 24 pounds — was carried by University librarian Susan Gibbons. According to the description of the object available at the exhibit, its makers based the mace on the regal scepter and the medieval battle mace. The mace bears sprigs of laurel, ivy and oak, symbolizing achievement, knowledge and fortitude, as well as four-winged

figures representing art, science, law and theology. Each Yale President’s name is engraved on the object’s shaft. The University commissioned American enamel artist William Harper to create the current presidential collar after the original collar mysteriously disappeared in 1979. The discs on the collar represent Yale College and the graduate and professional schools. The central pendant, made out of rock crystal, bears the University shield in gold and reads “Light and Truth” in both Hebrew and Latin. The Inauguration Committee proposed the idea for the mace and collar exhibit to the YUAG, whose senior staff deemed it “an ideal contribution to the cam-

pus-wide festivities,” said Maura Scanlon, director of public relations at the gallery. Robin Hirsch, associate costume shop manager at the Yale School of Drama and Yale Repertory Theater, designed and sewed the president’s new robe. She said she modeled the robe after President Levin’s, which in turn was modeled after his predecessor’s. Hirsh said that based on historical evidence, the robe may have changed little during the past 300 years. While the last presidential robe was commissioned from a New Yorkbased company, Highsmith said, it was important that Salovey’s be “homegrown.” The garment, consisting mostly of silk and velvet, took Hirsch three weeks to

finish, she said, adding that she sewed most of it by hand. “It’s a very specific Yale model,” Hirsch said. “It has nothing to do with any other academic robe.” Highsmith explained that Yale’s academic robes have their roots in the traditions of medieval European universities. “They wore their robes all the time because the buildings were cold and drafty,” she said. “We don’t have to do that anymore.” Salovey’s inauguration ceremony was preceded by a procession that started at Yale Law School and ended at Woolsey Hall. Contact HELEN ROUNER at

helen.rouner@yale.edu .


PAGE 8

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“In the first place, God made idiots. That was for practice. Then he made school boards.” MARK TWAIN NOVELIST

Inauguration merges town and gown TOWN/GOWN FROM PAGE 1 Latina and that at least 200 people were at the event’s closing ceremonies on Cross Campus. New Haven resident Elsie Chapman, who went on the Harkness Tower tour and attended the closing ceremony, said she came to the open house both to explore Yale and to celebrate a growing relationship between the University and the city.

I like Yale, I have no problem with Yale. But they could be giving something back. ZELDA MOYE New Haven resident “I’ve only been living here for 10 years, but I’ve heard the stories … there was all of this division,” Chapman said. “So it is heartening to see that Peter Salovey is continuing the tradition that Rick Levin and Bruce Alexander started, to make the institution more welcoming to New Haven.” Not all New Haven residents in attendance expressed satisfaction with town-gown relations, though. Former nurse at Yale-New Haven Hospital and a New Haven resident Wendy Hamilton used the open house as an opportunity to stage a protest against the Yale Corporation. A self-proclaimed anarchist, Hamilton hired three New Haven residents to stand outside of Woodbridge Hall

during the Canine Kickoff and hold up signs with statements like “Boola Boola share the moola” and “Light + truth or greed + denial.” Meanwhile, she garnered public attention by saying “tax Yale or tax you” through a megaphone. “I was overworked and underpaid,” said Hamilton of her experience at Yale-New Haven hospital, where she worked from 1984 until 2009. “Yale has so much, but they aren’t sharing with the city.” Zelda Moye, one of the three New Haven residents whom Chapman hired, said she was sitting on the New Haven Green on Saturday morning when Chapman approached her, asking her to participate in the protest in exchange for $25. Moye said she was not aware of what Chapman was protesting against. Two of the residents hired by Chapman said that Yale could be sharing more of its money with New Haven. “I like Yale, I have no problem with Yale,” Moye said. “But they could be giving something back.” Sunday’s block party immediately following President Salovey’s inauguration attracted even more local residents than the open house event. Six New Haven residents who were interviewed said they liked the inclusiveness of the weekend’s festivities and felt that President Salovey would be a leader who would foster a positive relationship between Yale and New Haven. The open house event offered Yale’s first ever Instagram Photo Challenge, judged by a team from the Yale Office of Public Affairs and Communications. Contact POOJA SALHOTRA at pooja.salhotra@yale.edu .

BRIANNA LOO/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Inauguration events such as Saturday’s open house opened the celebrations to the broader New Haven community.

Salovey’s address spotlights education

Businesses benefit from inauguration BUSINESS FROM PAGE 1

HENRY EHRENBERG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

President Salovey’s inaugural address touched upon many issues such as international outreach and the response to the digital revolution. ADDRESS FROM PAGE 1 ident Kingman Brewster’s inaugural address in 1964, Salovey said that modern technology has brought the University to the cusp of a revolution that will change the nature of teaching and learning. By harnessing digital technology, he said, Yale will be able to spread its faculty’s ideas to a broader and more global audience without compromising its foremost mission of educating its own students. Salovey also spoke of how the addition of the two new residential colleges will allow the University to offer the “precious gift” of a Yale education to a larger number of deserving applications, adding that many of these students will “invigorate our campus and improve our world through lives of leadership and service.” Over a dozen students, alumni and fac-

ulty interviewed said they were happy with Salovey’s address, with many citing his friendly tone and demeanor as evidence of Salovey’s “approachability.” “What impressed me most was his enthusiasm,” said Ian Gilchrist ’72, a former member of Yale’s Development Board. Gilchrist added that the speech “was a testament to his humility.” Sophia Jia ’14, a former director of advertising for the News, said the speech’s emphasis on education demonstrates the difference between Salovey and Levin — whereas Levin seemed to be focused on “lofty administrative goals,” she said, Salovey “is still closer to his role as a teacher.” David Bach ’98, the senior associate dean for global programs at the School of Management, said he was pleased with the attention Salovey gave to the ways in

which technology is changing education, as SOM continues to study and integrate the field of educational technology. During the speech, Salovey also mentioned how Yale could build stronger ties with Africa, home of 11 of the 20 fastestgrowing international economies. Charles Kwenin ’14, an international student from Ghana, said he was happy to see Salovey talk at length about Africa. Kwenin said that while Levin “has done a great job reaching out to Asia,” he felt that African countries had been neglected from Yale’s international outreach. Salovey’s address, which was part of a larger two-day inaugural ceremony, was broadcast live on a Yale website created specifically for the inauguration. Contact RISHABH BHANDARI at rishabh.bhandari@yale.edu .

coming through the door compared with typical weekends. Still, he noted that because of the promotion he was forced to increase the number of staffers working the weekend shift. Restaurants weren’t the only businesses experiencing success this past weekend. The outdoor clothing stores Denali and Trailblazer, sister stores both located in the Broadway Shopping District, saw a much higher volume of customers come through than during typical weekends. Although some stores did not offer inauguration-themed specials, the uptake in customers drawn to shopping districts benefited their sales, anyway. Kimberly Pedrick, the owner of the clothing and accessories boutique Idiom on Chapel St., said she saw an increase in foot traffic over the course of the weekend, which added a “positive atmosphere” to the store and a “positive vibe” downtown. “This time of year we don’t break sale yet, so it didn’t seem imperative to do anything particular,” Pedrick said. “We put up balloons and celebratory decorations, but we didn’t have an actual sale going on. That being said, we definitely noticed an increase in activity, and a lot

more people up and about coming into our store.” While these restaurants and retailers benefited from the Inauguration, some stores, including jewelry shop Alex and Ani and the Boutique Therapy, did not experience as much success. Despite offering 23 percent off purchases, Therapy Boutique did not see a greater influx of customers during the weekend. Store Manager Richard Lee attributed the store’s location, just off of the Broadway Shopping District on York St., as one of several possible reasons why the store did not benefit from the increase in visitors to the area. Managers at some stores, including Alex and Ani, a jewelry shop right next to Therapy Boutique on York Street, were unaware that the inauguration was taking place and did not offer sales specific to the event. Employees interviewed at the jewelry shop added that their customers had failed to mention the event was happening. Thirty-three total businesses participated in the Inauguration-themed specials. Contact J.R. REED at jonathan.t.reed@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

NATION

“The world is too much with us; late and soon, getting and spending, we lay waste to our powers.” WILLIAM WORDSWORTH ENGLISH POET

Social security raise to be low BY STEPHEN OHLEMACHER ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — For the second straight year, millions of Social Security recipients, disabled veterans and federal retirees can expect historically small increases in their benefits come January. Preliminary figures suggest a benefit increase of roughly 1.5 percent, which would be among the smallest since automatic increases were adopted in 1975, according to an analysis by The Associated Press. Next year’s raise will be small because consumer prices, as measured by the government, haven’t gone up much in the past year. The exact size of the costof-living adjustment, or COLA, won’t be known until the Labor Department releases the inflation report for September. That was supposed to happen Wednesday, but the report was delayed indefinitely because of the partial government shutdown. The COLA is usually announced in October to give

Social Security and other benefit programs time to adjust January payments. The Social Security Administration has given no indication that raises would be delayed because of the shutdown, but advocates for seniors said the uncertainty was unwelcome. Social Security benefits have continued during the shutdown. More than one-fifth of the country is waiting for the news. Nearly 58 million retirees, disabled workers, spouses and children get Social Security benefits. The average monthly payment is $1,162. A 1.5 percent raise would increase the typical monthly payment by about $17. The COLA also affects benefits for more than 3 million disabled veterans, about 2.5 million federal retirees and their survivors, and more than 8 million people who get Supplemental Security Income, the disability program for the poor. Automatic COLAs were adopted so that benefits for people on fixed incomes would keep up with rising prices. Many seniors, however, complain that the COLA sometimes falls short,

BRADLEY C. BOWER/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this Feb. 11, 2005 file photo, printed social security checks wait to be mailed from the U.S. Treasury’s Financial Management services facility.

leaving them little wiggle room. David Waugh of Bethesda, Md., said he can handle one small COLA but several in a row make it hard to plan for unexpected expenses. “I’m not one of those folks that’s going to fall into poverty, but it is going to make a difference in my standard of living as time goes by,” said Waugh, 83, who retired from the United Nations. “I live in a small apartment and I have an old car, and it’s going to break down. And no doubt when it does, I’ll have to fix it or get a new one.” Since 1975, annual Social Security raises have averaged 4.1 percent. Only six times have they been less than 2 percent, including this year, when the increase was 1.7 percent. There was no COLA in 2010 or 2011 because inflation was too low. By law, the cost-of-living adjustment is based on the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers, or CPI-W, a broad measure of consumer prices generated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. It measures price changes for food, housing, clothing, transportation, energy, medical care, recreation and education. The COLA is calculated by comparing consumer prices in July, August and September each year to prices in the same three months from the previous year. If prices go up over the course of the year, benefits go up, starting with payments delivered in January. This year, average prices for July and August were 1.4 percent higher than they were a year ago, according to the CPI-W. Once the September report, the final piece of the puzzle, is released, the COLA can be announced officially. If prices continued to slowly inch up in September, that would put the COLA at roughly 1.5 percent.

Spending pending stumbling block

EVAN VUCCI/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, talks with reporters following a meeting between Republican senators and President Obama at the White House on the ongoing budget battle. BY DONNA CASSATA ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — Senate Republicans and Democrats hit an impasse Sunday over spending in their last-ditch struggle to avoid an economy-jarring default in just four days and end a partial government shutdown that’s entering its third week. After inconclusive talks between President Barack Obama and House Republicans, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., took charge in trying to end the crises, although a conversation Sunday afternoon failed to break the stalemate. “I’m optimistic about the prospects for a positive conclusion to the issues before this country today,” Reid said as the Senate wrapped up a rare Sunday session. The two cagy negotiators are at loggerheads over Democratic demands to undo or change the automatic, across-the-board spending cuts to domestic and defense programs that the GOP see as crucial to reducing the nation’s deficit. McConnell insisted a solution was readily available in the proposal from a bipartisan group of 12 senators, led by Sens. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., that would re-open the government and fund it at current levels for six months while raising the debt limit through Jan. 31. “It’s time for Democrat leaders to take `yes’ for an answer,” McConnell said in a statement. But six Democrats in the group and a spokesman for Collins said that while negotiations continued this weekend, there was no agreement. The latest snag comes as 350,000 federal workers remain idle, hundreds of thousands more work without pay and an array of government services, from home loan applications to environmental inspections, were on hold on the 13th day of the shutdown. Many parks and monuments remain closed, drawing a protest at the National World War II Memorial on Sunday that included tea partybacked lawmakers who had unsuccessfully demanded defunding of Obama’s 3-year-old health care law in exchange for keeping the government open. Unnerving to world economies is the prospect of the United States defaulting on its financial obligations on Thursday if Congress fails to raise the borrowing authority above the $16.7 trillion debt limit. Christine Lagarde, the International Monetary Fund’s managing director, spoke fearfully about the disruption and uncertainty, warning of a “risk of tipping, yet again, into recession” after the fitful recovery from 2008. The reaction of world financial markets and the Dow Jones on Monday will influence any congressional talks. Congress is racing the clock to get a deal done, faced with time-consuming Senate procedures that could slow legislation, likely opposition from tea partyers and certain resistance in the Republican-led House before a bill gets to Obama. Politically, Republicans are reeling, bearing a substantial amount of the blame for the government shutdown and stalemate. “We’re in a free-fall as Republicans, but Democrats are not far behind,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., in warning Democrats about seizing on the GOP’s bruised brand as leverage to extract more concessions. McConnell and Republicans want to continue current spending at $986.7 billion and leave untouched the new round of cuts in January, commonly known as sequester, that would reduce the amount to $967 billion. Democrats want to figure out a way to undo the reductions, plus a long-term extension of the debt limit increase and a short-term spending bill to

reopen the government. “Republicans want to do it with entitlement cuts,” said Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. “Democrats want to do it with a mix of mandatory cuts, some entitlements and revenues. And so how do you overcome that dilemma? We’re not going to overcome it in the next day or two.” He suggested keeping the government running through mid-January. Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois, the No. 2 Democrat in the Senate, told reporters the two sides are roughly $70 billion apart, the difference between the $1.058 trillion Senate budget amount and the $988 billion envisioned by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis. “We haven’t picked a number, but clearly we need to negotiate between those two,” Durbin said. Republicans dismiss the latest request as Reid moving the goalposts in negotiations as they were getting closer to resolving the stalemate that has paralyzed Washington. They also argue that it is disingenuous for Democrats to resist any changes in the 3-year-old health care law while trying to undo the 2011 budget law that put the cuts on track. “I think the Democrats are on the verge of being one tick too cute as they see the House possibly in disarray — they now are overreaching, and I think that what we’ve got to do is get this back in the middle of the road, act like adults,” said Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn.

I think the Democrats are on the verge of being one tick too cute as they see the House possibly in disarray. BOB CORKER U.S. Senator, Tenn. Graham and Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., said they would not support any deal that upends the spending limits imposed by the 2011 law, and predicted that their Senate GOP colleagues would oppose it as well. Out of play, for now, was the Republican-led House, where Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, told GOP lawmakers early Saturday that his talks with the president had ground to a halt. Obama telephoned House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi on Sunday, focusing on the need for any increase in the debt limit without concessions. Also sidelined, at least for now, was the plan forged by Collins and a bipartisan coalition to briefly fund the government and extend the $16.7 trillion debt limit, in exchange for steps like temporarily delaying the medical device tax that helps fund the health care law. Democrats said Collins’ plan curbed spending too tightly, and Reid announced Saturday it was going nowhere. Collins said Sunday that both Democrats and Republicans continue to offer ideas and say they want to be part of the group working to reopen the government and address the debt ceiling before Thursday’s deadline. “We’re going to keep working, offering our suggestions to the leadership on both sides of the aisle in an attempt to be constructive and bring this impasse to an end. Surely we owe that to the American people,” Collins said. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., a participant in Collins’ talks, said Reid wouldn’t accept everything in the Collins proposal, but he “knows there are some positive things in that plan,” such as opening the government in a “smart timeframe,” not defaulting on debt and doing something in the long term on the budget.


PAGE 10

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

WORLD

500,000

43 dead in Mali boat sinking BY BABA AHMED ASSOCIATED PRESS KOUBI, Mali — Mahmoudou Ibrahim combed the waters frantically for his family after they and hundreds of other passengers were catapulted into the Niger River when their boat capsized. Amid the cries for help in the darkness of night, he listened in vain for the sound of their voices. On Sunday morning, crews pulled the bloated bodies of three of his children from the river: 1-year-old Ahmadou, 3-year-old Salamata and 4-year-old Fatouma. There is still no sign of his wife, Zeinabou, or their 5-year-old twin girls, who were last seen curled up on mats aboard the ship. “The pain that I feel today is beyond excruciating,” he said from the village cemetery where he buried the remains of his three children Sunday in the sandy dirt. By nightfall, a total of 43 corpses had been recovered from the river since the accident Friday night, said Hamadoun Cisse, a local official in charge of tracking casualty figures. Passengers on the capsized boat said they believed hundreds of people were on the overladen vessel when it sank Friday. But the ship’s owner did not have a full list of who was on board, making it impossible to determine the actual number of people missing. The boat was headed from the central port of Mopti to the northern desert city of Timbuktu, packed full of people traveling ahead of the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha this week. Many Malians choose to travel by river even though the journey takes several days and nights because it is easier than traversing the region’s poor desert roads. The accident took place near the village of Koubi, about four miles from Konna. Authorities said 210 survivors had been registered, leaving dozens missing. The boat disaster comes as Mali has been gripped by more than a year of crisis, starting with a rebellion in early 2012 and a subsequent coup, followed by the seizure of the country’s vast north by Tuareg separatists and Islamic extrem-

BEIRUT — Gunmen abducted six Red Cross workers and a Syrian Red Crescent volunteer after stopping their convoy early Sunday in northwestern Syria, a spokesman said, in the latest high-profile kidnapping in the country’s civil war. Simon Schorno, a spokesman for the International Committee of the Red Cross in Damascus, said the assailants snatched the seven aid workers from their convoy near the town of Saraqeb in Idlib province around 11:30 a.m. local time (0830 GMT) as the team was returning to Damascus. He declined to provide the nationalities of the six ICRC employees, and said it was not clear who was behind the attack Syria’s state news agency, quoting an anonymous official, said the gunmen opened fire on the ICRC team’s four vehicles before seizing the Red Cross workers. The news agency blamed “terrorists,” a term the government uses to refer to those opposed to President Bashar Assad. Schorno said the team of seven had been in the field since Oct. 10 to assess the medical situation in the area and to look

Evacuation before cyclone limited toll BY KAY JOHNSON ASSOCIATED PRESS

BABA AHMED/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ibrahim Yattara, whose pregnant wife remains missing, explains how he survived the sinking of a passenger boat late Friday on the Niger River, near the village of Koubi, Mali. ists. The French army intervened in January, pushing the militants out of the cities, but violent attacks still take place.

This morning I am alive, but part of me is dead inside because part of me is still in that water. NIAMOYE TOURE Survivors of the Friday boat sinking described a chaotic scene, as scores of people awakened by the jolt of the boat’s collapse tried to make their way to shore. Niamoye Toure, a 22-year-old housekeeper, was bringing her infant son home to Timbuktu to meet his grandparents. After the boat sank, she tried to swim with one hand and hold her baby with the other. “There was a man who didn’t know how to swim who took my son’s hand,” she recalled. “This man was very heavy and he kept hanging on to my son so I was forced to let him go or risk drowning myself. “This morning I am alive, but part of

me is dead inside because part of me is still in that water,” she said. She insisted she would wait by the river’s shore until her son’s body was found. Ibrahim Yattara, 29, also awaited each body retrieved from the river for any sign of his wife. The two were traveling to see family in Dire and to share the good news that she was pregnant. With each passing hour he became more fearful she was gone. On Sunday afternoon, they found her body and buried her in the village on shore. “She was the only woman I had ever loved since childhood,” he said. “We were so happy to know that she was pregnant. Today I am sick of life. It has no meaning for me.” Many of those traveling to Timbuktu by boat were schoolchildren returning to class and who were unable to swim. Abouri Djittey drove through the night from the capital of Bamako — a distance of 435 miles — after learning that his 7-year-old daughter Ramata had drowned. Now he thinks often about a dream he had days before the accident, in which Ramata was on a boat and fell into the water.

Gunmen kindap 7 in Syria BY BY RYAN LUCAS ASSOCIATED PRESS

At least 500,000 people have been evacuated from eastern India in response to last weekend’s cyclone.

at how to provide medical aid. He said the part of northern Syria where they were seized “by definition is a difficult area to go in,” and the team was traveling with armed guards. Much of the countryside in Idlib province, as well as the rest of northern Syria, has fallen over the past year into the hands of rebels, many of them Islamic extremists, and kidnappings have become rife, particularly of aid workers and foreign journalists. Press freedom advocate Reporters without Borders calls Syria “the most dangerous country in the world” for journalists, with 25 reporters killed and at least 33 imprisoned since the anti-Assad uprising began in March 2011. The conflict also has taken a toll on the aid community. The ICRC said in August that 22 Syrian Red Crescent volunteers have been killed in the country since the conflict began. Some were deliberately targeted, while others killed in crossfire, the group said. Syria’s bloody conflict has killed more than 100,000 people, forced more than 2 million Syrians to flee the country and caused untold suffering — psychologi-

cal, emotional and physical — across the nation. Outside Damascus, hundreds of civilians, some carried on stretchers, fled the besieged rebel-held suburb of Moadamiyeh on Saturday and Sunday following a temporary cease-fire in the area, activists and officials said. It was not immediately clear who brokered the halt in fighting between rebels and government forces, but the temporary truce marked a rare case of coordination between the opposing sides in Syria’s civil war. “It’s (been) an area of military operations for months, so to see this halt of fire, and to see this exodus of people, means there’s a high level cooperation — not regular cooperation,” said Rami Abdul-Rahman, the director of the British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. Neither Syrian officials nor activists close to rebels would discuss the coordination. Syria’s state news agency SANA said Saturday that 2,000 women and children left the suburb for temporary housing in the nearby suburb of Qudsaya.

BEHRAMPUR, India — Mass evacuations spared India the widespread deaths many had feared from a powerful weekend cyclone, officials said, as people picked up belongings and started repairing flooded towns, tangled power lines and tens of thousands of destroyed thatch homes. Cyclone Phailin, the strongest tropical storm to hit India in more than a decade, destroyed hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of crops, but a day after it made landfall in Orissa state on the country’s east coast, authorities said they knew of only 17 fatalities. The final toll is expected to climb as officials reach areas of the cyclone-battered coast that remain isolated by downed communication links and blocked roads, but the evacuation of nearly 1 million people appeared to have saved many lives. “Damage to property is extensive,” said Amitabh Thakur, the top police officer in the Orissa district worst-hit by the cyclone. “But few lives have been lost,” he said Sunday, crediting the mass evacuations. On the highway to the seaside city of Gopalpur, where the storm made landfall early Saturday night, two tractor-trailers with shattered windshields were lying on their sides, while a hotel nearby was in tatters, with tables and chairs strewn about. “We were terrified,” A-1 Hotel owner Mihar Ranjan said of himself and 14 other people who had been huddling inside when the wind ripped the tin roof off the building. On Sunday, Gopalpur’s power lines sagged nearly to the ground and a strong surf churned off the coast. But some shops were opened, doing brisk business selling bottled drinks and snacks, and locals expressed relief that the damage wasn’t worse. A mermaid statue remained standing on Gopalpur’s boardwalk, where most decorative street lamps still stood along with most of the city’s buildings.

“Everyone feels very lucky,” said Prabhati Das, a 40-year-old woman who came from the town of Behrampur, about 7 miles inland, to see the aftermath at the coast. A cargo ship carrying iron ore, the MV Bingo, sank Saturday as the cyclone barreled through the Bay of Bengal. Its crew of 17 Chinese and one Indonesian were being rescued Sunday evening after their lifeboat was found about 115 miles off the Indian coast, coast guard Commandant Sharad Matri said.

Damage to property is extensive, but few lives have been lost. AMITABH THAKUR Police officer, Orissa district Phailin weakened significantly after making landfall as a Category 4 storm, with sustained winds of up to 130 miles per hour, according to Indian meteorologists. Those numbers were slightly lower than the last advisory issued by the U.S. Navy’s Hawaii-based Joint Typhoon Warning Center, which reported maximum sustained winds of about 138 mph and gusts up to 167 mph four hours before the storm hit land. Midday on Sunday, some areas reported little more than breezy drizzles, with winds in some areas blowing at 100 mph. Meteorologists warned that Orissa and other states in the storm’s path would face heavy rains, strong winds and rough seas for several more hours. “Its intensity is still strong, but after crossing the coast it has weakened considerably,” Sharat Sahu, a top official with the Indian Meteorological Dept. in Orissa, told reporters. Indian officials spoke dismissively of American forecasters who earlier had warned of a record-breaking cyclone that would drive a massive wall of water — perhaps as large as 30 feet high — into the coastline.

BISWARANJAN ROUT/ASSOCIATED PRESS

An Indian villager carries drinking water as she arrives at the cyclone-hit Arjipalli village on the Bay of Bengal coast in India, Oct. 13, 2013.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST Mostly sunny, with a high near 67. Low of 49.

TOMORROW High of 70, low of 52.

WEDNESDAY High of 72, low of 54.

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

ON CAMPUS MONDAY, OCTOBER 14 4:30 p.m. “A Market of Distrust and Obligation: The Micropolitics of Unofficial Payments for Hospital Care in China.” This talk will examine the institutional and cultural factors behind the practice of unofficial payments for hospital care in urban China. Cheris Shun-ching Chan, a sociology professor at the University of Hong Kong, is the featured speaker. Luce Hall (34 Hillhouse Ave.), Rm. 203. 4:30 p.m. Irish, Scottish and German Folksongs. Come hear undergraduates in Richard Lalli’s “Vocal Music” seminar perform folksongs from a variety of traditions. Sara Kohane will accompany on piano. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Aud.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

3:30 p.m. “The Letters of Mary Breckinridge.” Professor Karen Foster will discuss her latest book about the American woman who found the Frontier Nursing Services and helped as a nursemidwife in post-WWI France. Sterling Memorial Library (120 High St.), International Room. 7:00 p.m. CEAS China Film Series: “Sha’ou.” This film screening is part of the Retrospective of Chinese Women Directors (1950s-present) Series. The film series will present the works of four remarkable women directors, each negotiating a perspective or commentary alternative to the mainstream cinema of the time. Luce Hall (34 Hillhouse Ave.), Aud.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16 5:15 p.m. Collegium Musicum: “Mellon Chansonnier.” Join for a performance of a collection of medieval songs featuring works of Guillaume Dufay, Johannes Okeghem, Robert Morton and other 15th-century composers, accompanied by lute, vielle and Renaissance winds. Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library (121 Wall St.).

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

7:30 p.m. Yale Jazz Ensemble: Fall Concert. The program will feature pieces by Irving Berlin, Gordon Goodwin, Bob Florence and Samuel Adams. Sprague Memorial Hall, Morse Recital Hall.

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Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 Trot or gallop 5 Home with a domed roof 10 Stylish 14 Earth Day sci. 15 Playground chute 16 Avatar of Vishnu 17 Four-to-midnight production overseer, say 20 Bill of Rights amendment count 21 “Les Misérables” author Victor 22 Parisian love 23 “What __ the odds?” 24 In liberal amounts 26 Dead battery hookup 31 Get hitched in a hurry 32 Without warning 37 Unload for cash 38 Colorado ski city 39 Secure in the harbor 40 Mind readers 42 Luxurious bedding material 43 Encased dagger 45 Popular restaurant fish 49 18-Down, on a sundial 50 Shoreline feature 51 Stare at impolitely 53 Time Warner “Superstation” 56 Dry runs, and a hint to the starts of 17-, 26- and 43-Across 60 Clumsy one 61 Mail for King Arthur 62 Wrinkle remover 63 MDs for otitis sufferers 64 With tongue in cheek 65 Maddens with reminders DOWN 1 Bothersome insect 2 Exercise woe 3 Nickel or dime 4 Tiny toymaker

Want to place a classified ad? CALL (203) 432-2424 OR E-MAIL BUSINESS@ YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

10/15/12

By Nancy Kavanaugh

5 Periodical publisher 6 Sound from a water cooler 7 Fat-reducing procedure, briefly 8 Poem of praise 9 “__ the ramparts ...” 10 Punishment’s partner 11 Is wearing 12 Poker concession 13 Have in stock 18 Midafternoon hour 19 __ parking 23 Winesap, e.g. 24 Most capable 25 Draw up a schedule for 26 Kid around 27 Oscar-nominated Peter Fonda role 28 “__ Flanders”: Defoe novel 29 Social divisions 30 Wolf pack leader 33 Muscat resident 34 “Surely you don’t mean me” 35 Hairdo 36 Seaside swooper

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

38 Contented sounds 41 Exams for sophs or jrs. 42 Winter Olympics entrant 44 Swank of “Amelia” 45 Move furtively 46 Scandalous newsmaker of 2001-’02 47 Alaskan native

SUDOKU EASY

10/15/12

48 Outplays 51 “Goodness gracious!” 52 Earth sci. 53 O’Hara homestead 54 Opinion website 55 IRS form entries 57 Inexperienced, as recruits 58 Go wrong 59 Moral wrong

1 9 5 4 5 9 8 6 1 7 6 8 3 7 6 4 6 1 1 3 9 5

3 7


PAGE 12

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

THROUGH THE LENS

T

wenty-three. The number of Yale presidents is dwarfed next to 312, the number of years since Yale’s founding, or 100, roughly the number of events that took place over the Inauguration. But this weekend, 23 was a reason for the Yale community — people and dogs alike — to celebrate University President Peter Salovey all around campus. KATHRYN CRANDALL, NICK DEFIESTA, HENRY EHRENBERG, SARA MILLER AND KEN YANAGISAWA report.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NFL Lions 31 Browns 17

NFL Chiefs 24 Raiders 7

SPORTS QUICK HITS

SOFTBALL CITY SERIES CHAMPS The Bulldogs came back from being down two runs in the bottom of the seventh to beat the University of New Haven 4–3 on Saturday, then overpowered Southern Connecticut State University 12–5 on Sunday to establish themselves as the best in the Elm City.

NFL Packers 19 Ravens 17

NFL Steelers 19 Jets 6

NFL Broncos 35 Jaguars 19

MONDAY

ELISABETH BERNABE ’17 WOMEN’S GOLF The freshman golfer won the two-day Borsodi Invitational tournament at the Course at Yale this weekend by carding back-to-back 74’s. Fellow rookie Sandy Wongwaiwate ’17 finished two strokes behind Bernabe in second place in the inter-squad scrimmage.

“Every time we come off the water we want to feel like we’ve gotten a bit better.” ZACHARY JOHNSON ’15 HEAVYWEIGHT CREW YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

Inaugural weekend, inaugural loss FOOTBALL

BY GRANT BRONSDON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER One week ago, the Yale football team was flying high after a big road-win over No. 19 Cal Poly. Now, after a sobering 20–13 loss to the Dartmouth Big Green, the Bulldogs have fallen back to Earth. “We didn’t control the situations today at all,” head coach Tony Reno said on Saturday. “At the end of the day we didn’t get off the field on some of the key third downs we should have.” Yale (3–1, 1–1 Ivy) was unable to stop Dartmouth’s two-headed running attack made up of sophomore quarterback Dalyn Williams and senior running back Dominick Pierre. Williams scrambled time and time again to pick up important first downs and Pierre finished with 167 rushing yards. The Big Green (2-3, 1-1 Ivy) dominated the time of possession battle, controlling the ball for 35:35 compared to the Bulldogs’ 24:25. “We absolutely didn’t underestimate them, we just didn’t do our job,” captain and defensive end Beau Palin ’14 said. SEE FOOTBALL PAGE B3

GRANT BRONDSON/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Yale football dropped its first game of the season at Dartmouth on Saturday. The Big Green capitalized on three Yale turnovers and won 20–13.

Bulldogs thrill again BY FREDERICK FRANK STAFF REPORTER Needing another dose of late-game heroics following last weekend’s comeback victory over Harvard, the men’s soccer team scored in double overtime on Saturday night to beat Dartmouth and remain undefeated in the Ivy League. Freshman forward Cameron Kirdzik ’17 scored for Yale (3–7–0, 2–0 Ivy) in the 107th minute of play to defeat the Big Green (4–2– 4, 0–2 Ivy), handing them their second straight loss.

MEN’S SOCCER “We’ve been confident all year about the Ivy League season,” captain Max McKiernan ’14 said. “Our record doesn’t reflect the quality of the product that we put out on the field, so it’s been awesome to finally put it all together when it matters most. We definitely feel confident moving

forward after getting these first two wins, but there’s still a lot of work to be done.” The Elis attacked right from the first whistle and dominated most of the first half, forcing Dartmouth goalkeeper James Hickok to make three stops on eight shots during the opening period. Kirdzik recorded three shots, while Peter Jacobson ’14 and Henos Musie ’16 also saw their efforts saved. The Big Green could only muster one shot in the first half, and neither team found a breakthrough before the halftime whistle blew. The second half started in a much different fashion as Dartmouth finally broke out of its shell and forced Yale goalkeeper Blake Brown ’15 into two smart saves within the first five minutes. Yet the Bulldogs began to assert their dominance shortly afterwards, holding Dartmouth to just two more shots. The Elis also drew a further nine fouls, while Dartmouth was whistled for two yellow cards.

Big Green keeper Hickok, who has two shutouts on the season, matched Brown throughout regulation, denying three Elis in a 10-minute stretch. In the last 20 minutes of the game, the Bulldogs peppered the Dartmouth net with nine shots. Forward Henry Albrecht ’17 and Kirdzik each had two shots. Kirdzik also set up a beautiful opportunity for fellow striker Avery Schwartz ’16 in the 82nd minute. The freshman played a long ball to the feet of Schwartz, who hammered a shot towards the net that Hickok was able to corral. Both Dartmouth and Yale have a tendency to play close games, as each has featured in at least seven contests decided by one or fewer goals. Still, no one at Reese Stadium could have predicted this game would become such a defensive struggle. The Bulldogs finished with 18 shots in regulation, forcing Hickok into seven saves,

Volleyball remains undefeated

SEE MEN’S SOCCER PAGE B3

WILLIAM FREEDBERG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

After this weekend’s wins, the Bulldogs are undefeated in the Ivy League with a record of 5–0. BY DIONIS JAHJAGA STAFF REPORTER Last weekend, the Yale women’s volleyball team helped usher in the reign of newly inaugurated President Salovey with two home wins over conference rivals.

VOLLEYBALL MARISA LOWE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The Elis pulled off another stunner at home on Saturday night, dropping Dartmouth in overtime.

STAT OF THE DAY 3

In the team’s last home games until November, the Bulldogs (11–3, 5–0

Ivy) took on perennial conference rivals Penn (8–8, 2–3) and Princeton (6–9, 2–3). The Elis extended their winning streak, defeating both schools three sets to one. On Friday as they faced off against Penn, the Elis controlled the first two sets and held the Quakers to just 15 total kills on negative hitting percentages. But Penn overcame its slow start in the third set and gained SEE VOLLEYBALL PAGE B3

TURNOVERS BY THE FOOTBALL TEAM IN SATURDAY’S 20–13 LOSS AT DARTMOUTH. The Big Green defense recovered two fumbles and intercepted a pass from quarterback Hank Furman ’14. The Bulldogs had turned the ball over a total of just three times through their first three games.


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

1965

Elis split in California

The first Head of the Charles race takes place in Cambridge, Mass.

FOOTBALL IVY

LEAGUE

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Harvard

2

0

1.000

4

0

1.000

2

Princeton

1

0

1.000

3

1

0.750

2

Penn

1

0

1.000

2

2

0.500

4

Yale

1

1

0.500

3

1

0.750

4

Dartmouth

1

1

0.500

2

2

0.500

6

Brown

0

1

0.000

3

1

0.750

6

Columbia

0

1

0.000

0

4

0.000

6

Cornell

0

2

0.000

1

3

0.250

VOLLEYBALL IVY

SAM GARDNER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Yale

5

0

1.000

11

3

0.786

2

Harvard

3

2

0.600

8

6

0.571

2

Brown

3

2

0.600

7

9

0.438

4

Penn

2

3

0.400

8

8

0.500

4

Princeton

2

3

0.400

6

9

0.400

4

Cornell

2

3

0.400

5

9

0.357

4

Columbia

2

3

0.400

4

10

0.286

8

Dartmouth

1

4

0.200

8

9

0.471

MEN’S SOCCER IVY

No. 13 Stanford scored on all three of its penalty corners Sunday to beat Yale 4–0 in Palo Alto, Calif. FIELD HOCKEY FROM PAGE B4 attack in the second half, getting a goal from forward/midfielder Erica Borgo ’14. The defense shut down the Golden Bears’ offense for almost 60 minutes until California broke through at the 59:46 mark. Forward Lara Kruggel scored both goals for the Golden Bears in the second half, with the second goal coming off a penalty stroke with less than five minutes to play. Goalkeeper Heather Schlesier ’15 was in goal for a majority of the game, saving two shots while allowing just one goal. Goalkeeper Emily Cain ’14 replaced her and closed out the final 6:56 of the game. Overall, the Elis outshot the Golden Bears 13–10 and earned more penalty corners 9–4. Yale battled against Stanford (10–3, 3–1 NorPac) but was unable to pull out a win, losing 4–0. Stanford, one of the top teams in the nation, has made four consecutive NCAA tournament appearances. The Cardinals had three players represent their respective nations at the Junior World Cup this past summer; defender Kelsey Harbin, NorPac defensive player of the year last year, was teammates with Holland on Team USA. Four different players scored for Stanford. Harbin scored in the 27th minute, followed by attacker Lauren Becker two minutes before the end of the half. The

second half featured goals from midfielder Elise Ogle and midfielder Kasey Quon. Stanford took advantage of their three penalty corners, scoring a goal on each one. “Stanford had strong skills and could execute corners well,” midfielder Kelsey Nolan ’17 said.

Exposure to different teams and different styles will help us improve our game against the Ivy League teams. KELSEY NOLAN ’17 Midfielder, Field hockey team The Elis were never able to get past Stanford goalkeeper, Dulcie Davies, who made seven saves to preserve her sixth shutout of the season. Most of her saves came in the second half when Yale outshot Stanford 8–7 with six shots on goal; Stanford now has a seven game home winning streak. Yale was out-shot 14–11 overall, and, although the Bulldogs were tied with Stanford 3–3 on penalty corners, the Elis were unable to convert throughout the game.

LEAGUE

Nolan said that the experience Yale gained this weekend will prove useful later in the season. “Exposure to different teams and different styles will help us improve our game against the Ivy League teams,” Nolan said. The Bulldogs return to New Haven next week with games against Dartmouth on Saturday and Maine on Sunday. Contact ASHLEY WU at ashley.e.wu@yale.edu .

LEAGUE

SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

1

Yale

2

0

0

1.000

3

7

0

0.300

2

Princeton

1

0

1

0.750

4

5

1

0.450

3

Penn

1

0

1

0.750

4

6

1

0.409

4

Harvard

1

1

0

0.500

2

6

2

0.300

5

Columbia

0

0

2

0.500

5

2

2

0.667

6

Brown

0

0

2

0.500

3

5

3

0.409

7

Cornell

0

2

0

0.000

6

3

2

0.636

8

Dartmouth

0

2

0

0.000

4

2

4

0.600

WOMEN’S SOCCER

YALE 3, CALIFORNIA 2 YALE

2

1

3

CALIFORNIA

0

2

2

Saves – 7 – Courtney Hendrickson (Cal) Goals – 2 – Lara Kruggel (Cal)

STANFORD 4, YALE 0 STANFORD

2

2

4

YALE

0

0

0

Saves – 7 – Dulcie Davies (Stanford) Goals – Four players tied with 1

Bulldogs fall again

IVY

LEAGUE

SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

1

Harvard

3

0

0

1.000

7

3

2

0.667

2

Brown

2

0

1

0.833

7

2

1

0.750

3

Penn

2

1

0

0.667

7

1

3

0.773

4

Dartmouth

2

1

0

0.667

5

4

2

0.545

5

Cornell

1

2

0

0.333

7

4

1

0.625

6

Yale

1

2

0

0.333

5

5

0

0.500

7

Columbia

0

2

1

0.167

6

4

2

0.583

8

Princeton

0

3

0

0.000

4

4

3

0.500

Yale boats sweep on Housatonic

KEN YANAGISAWA/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The women’s soccer team dropped its second straight game on Saturday afternoon, falling to 1–2 in conference. WOMEN’S SOCCER FROM PAGE B4 Midfielder Meredith Speck ’15 said that numerous formation shifts may be the reason behind to the team’s lack of potency in the first half. “I think we’re constantly trying to change our formation,” Speck said. “I think 4–3–3 is what works best for us so hopefully we’ll go with that from here on out.” Although scoring opportunities were few and far between for the Elis, forward Paula Hagopian ’16 drew a foul in the penalty area in the 84th minute to set up a chance to completely shift the momentum of the game. Forward Melissa Gavin ’15, who entered the game with goals in three of the past four games and leading the Ivy League in scoring, stepped up to take the penalty for Yale. With all in attendance holding their

collective breath, Gavin’s right foot got under the strike and lifted the ball harmlessly above the crossbar. “I would [have] bet my house on her [Gavin] taking that penalty kick,” Meredith said. “But if I did that today, I would have been homeless.” Yale fought to the bitter end as Hagopian found herself with a decent opportunity for an equalizer with time winding down. With mere seconds remaining, Hagopian took a shot that skated past Dartmouth goalkeeper Tatiana Saunders before rolling just right of the goal. The Bulldogs will not have much time to lick their wounds, as the team will face Marist (7–6–2, 5–2–0 MAAC) on the road tonight. The nonconference matchup will not have implications for the Ivy standings, where Yale suffered a critical blow Saturday afternoon, but it should provide a great opportunity for the team to fine-

tune its performance for the rest of its conference matchups. “Our goal was to win out in the conference and that’s still the goal because anything can happen in the Ivy League,” Hagopian said. “More so than the result, Monday will be important to sharpen up mentally before Cornell on Saturday.” Kickoff at Marist is slated for 7 p.m. Monday night. Contact JAMES BADAS at james.badas@yale.edu .

DARTMOUTH 1, YALE 0 DARTMOUTH

1

0

1

YALE

0

0

0

BRANDON BLAESSER/CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

Both the heavyweight and lightweight crews will compete again Oct. 19 in the Head of the Charles regatta. MEN’S CREW FROM PAGE B4 on the same day as the guys,” Card said in a message to the News. “It’s just a lot of fun.” The Yale freshman boats raced in the regatta but did not have any freshman opponents to compare against. The lightweight freshmen will be able to face competition at the Princeton Chase on Oct. 27. All of the Eli boats will be able to test themselves against more competition at the Head of the

Charles, the largest two-day regatta in the world. “We’re really excited for Head of the Charles,” Johnson said. “As a team, we’re really driving forward, in practice we’re going to be working on moving the boat faster every day. Every time we come off the water we want to feel like we’ve gotten a bit better.” The Head of the Charles will start on Oct. 19 in Boston. Contact GREG CAMERON at greg.cameron@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE B3

SPORTS

“I’m a rock star because I couldn’t be a soccer star.” ROD STEWART MUSICIAN

Football unbeaten no more FOOTBALL FROM PAGE B1 “We wanted to make them onedimensional and we couldn’t today.” That lack of focus began on Dartmouth’s opening drive, when the Big Green quickly marched down the field but missed a field goal attempt wide right. The kicking woes of the Big Green would be a recurring theme all game, forcing Dartmouth to be aggressive on fourth downs. Neither of Yale’s drives in the first quarter were successful. After the second drive, which ended with an incomplete fourth-down pass attempt by quarterback Hank Furman ’14, Dartmouth cashed in with a 14-play drive that culminated in a one-handed touchdown grab in the end zone. The catch, which was Dartmouth’s first fourthdown conversion of the game, gave it a 6–0 lead after defensive end Dylan Drake ’14 blocked the extra point attempt. Quarterback Morgan Roberts ’16 came in for Yale’s next possession instead of Furman, but the result was the same and the Elis were forced to punt. A pair of penalties put Dartmouth in a big hole to start its next drive and Yale forced a punt, taking over at the Yale 46-yard line. Furman stepped back in under center and used his arm to take the Elis inside the red zone, hitting wide receivers Deon Randall ’15 and Chris Smith ’14 on downfield passes. Smith dove for one of Furman’s passes in the end zone, but was unable to hold on, so Yale had to settle for a 29-yard field goal by placekicker Kyle Cazzetta ’15 that cut the Big Green lead to three. A crucial sack by Darius Manora ’17 on second down put Dartmouth in a third-and-long situation on its next drive, and defensive tackle Jeff Schmittgens ’15 caught up with Williams in the backfield to end the Dartmouth drive. Yale had four sacks on the day. The Bulldogs made use of the good field position. Yale man-

GRANT BRONSDON/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s soccer team will try to keep its Ivy League winning streak alive next Saturday against Cornell at home. aged to drive 45 yards in six plays, ultimately scoring on a Furman option keeper from 17 yards out. Just before halftime, however, Furman threw an interception, returning the ball to the Big Green. Dartmouth failed to capitalize, however, as defensive back Robert Ries ’17 intercepted a desperation heave from Williams to maintain Yale’s 10–6 lead at the break. The Elis moved the ball effectively in their first drive after halftime, and Cazzetta’s 32-yard try increased Yale’s lead to seven, 13–6. The Big Green took a chance on its next drive, and it paid off to tie the score. On fourth-andeight, Williams scrambled to his left and fired down field. Wide receiver Bo Patterson hauled in the 32-yard toss in the end zone

to bring Dartmouth within one. After the extra point, the game was tied at 13. “Those scrambles killed us,” Reno said of Williams’ ability to keep plays alive. Yale’s attempt at answering back turned sour when Furman’s swing pass to tailback Tyler Varga ’15 was ruled a backwards pass. The ball was fumbled and Dartmouth recovered at the Yale 36-yard line. Though Varga entered the game averaging 151 rushing yards per game, good for third in FCS, he finished with just 64 yards on 20 carries. “They put more people in the box,” Reno said. “And for a variety of reasons we didn’t execute.” When Yale got the ball back, Consecutive false start penalties doomed Yale to punt right back

Elis swat killer P’s VOLLEYBALL FROM PAGE B1 a strong 18–8 lead over the Bulldogs. Yale fought back and tied it at 25-all, but the Quakers perservered and scored twice to win the set 27–25. Penn recorded 16 kills — more than their first two sets combined — and outhit the Elis 0.286 to 0.250. “They really stepped up their defense,” outside hitter Mollie Rogers ’15 said. “They were a lot more dynamic and we had to adjust to that.”

Sometimes it starts with one person making a good play and getting a few aces and that gives confidence to the team and everyone else steps up. MOLLIE ROGERS ’15 Outside hitter, Volleyball team A revitalized Penn kept the fourth set competitive; the largest lead either team held was just five points. In the end, the Quakers could not match the firepower of the Elis, in particular that of setter Kelly Johnson ’16. She erupted for eight kills, three assists and a service ace in the final set to lead the Elis to victory. She ended the match with a 14-kill, 18-assist, 16-dig triple double. “I think the team really clicked in that fourth set,” Johnson said. “We realized we needed to take control. We showed that we can do great things when we play together.” Rounding out the effort, libero Maddie Rudnick ’15 recorded a team-high 24 digs and middle blocker Jesse Ebner ’16 scored 12 kills on a 0.522 hitting clip in addition to seven digs and a block.

YALE 3, PENN 1

BEAU PALIN ’14 Captain, Football team Yale chose to bring Roberts back in at quarterback after the score, and the ensuing drive went nowhere. Roberts finished a yard short of the first down marker on third down and the Bull-

the Yale defense gave Dartmouth enough time to run out the clock. “Dartmouth played a great football game, but this one hurts,” Furman said. Furman finished 15-32 for 144 yards and an interception. The Bulldogs gained only 264 yards. Dartmouth, meanwhile, was able to run a whopping 93 plays, wearing down the Yale defense. Yale’s next game is this Saturday against Fordham. Kickoff is at noon. Contact GRANT BRONSDON at grant.bronsdon@yale.edu .

DARTMOUTH 20, YALE 13 DARTMOUTH

0

6

7

7

20

YALE

0

10

3

0

13

MEN’S SOCCER FROM PAGE B1

In Saturday’s game, Princeton came out assertively in the first set and at one point held a commanding 20–9 lead. The Elis narrowed the gap to three points, but the Tigers proved too much and took the first set 25–21. Johnson said the Elis lacked aggressiveness coming into the set. “We made a lot of errors as a team it caught us off guard,” Johnson said. “That first loss snapped us back into it and we realized we needed to get it together.” The Bulldogs bounced back strong behind Captain Kendall Polan ’14. Polan took charge in the second set with her deft serving and playmaking, scoring two straight service aces and setting up Johnson for a pair of kills to give Yale a 7–1 lead. The Elis only trailed once by a single point over the last three sets and their average margin of victory was nine. “[Polan] helps us out a lot when we’re in tough spots,” Rogers said. “Sometimes it starts with one person making a good play and getting a few aces and that gives confidence to the team and everyone else steps up.” Polan finished with a match-leading 33 assists and 17 digs while Rogers produced a 13-kill, 13-dig double-double. Johnson had her second triple-double of the weekend with 13 kills, 13 assists and 14 digs. The Elis will head to Cornell next week for the start of a five-match road trip. Rogers said the team’s experience at preseason games in D.C. and Pennsylvania last month will help on the road next week. “It’s a bigger challenge, but that’s what we try to do,” Rogers said. “We want to go to their campus and beat their team.” Yale will play Cornell on Friday in Ithaca, N.Y. and Columbia on Saturday in New York. Contact DIONIS JAHJAGA at dionis.jahjaga@yale.edu .

YALE 3, PRINCETON 1

25

25

25

25

YALE

21

25

25

25

PENN

18

14

27

21

PRINCETON

25

16

14

15

K - 13 - Rogers, Johnson (Yale) A - 33 - Kendall Polan (Yale) Digs - 17 - Polan, Rudnick (Yale)

We absolutely didn’t underestimate them, we just didn’t do our job.

dogs punted to the Dartmouth 44-yard line. “We like to grind teams down and we like to move the ball as effectively as possible,” Furman said. “We didn’t do that today.” The Big Green showcased their two-headed running attack and ran down the clock effectively with Williams and Pierre to set up for a field goal attempt. Dartmouth’s kicking problem again reared its ugly head, however, and placekicker Riley Lyons missed a 32-yard chip shot after a drive spanning 5:24 to keep Yale within a touchdown. Though the Elis brought Furman back in, the switch made no difference. After two plays that went nowhere, Varga fumbled on a swing pass and Dartmouth recovered at the 23-yard line. A fourth down facemask penalty on

Yale wins in OT

YALE

K - 14- Kelly Johnson (Yale) A - 32 - Kendall Polan (Yale) Digs - Dani Shephered (Penn)

to Dartmouth. The Big Green responded with a fast touchdown drive that culminated with a six-yard run by Pierre as the Big Green took a 20-13 lead with 10:11 left in the game.

while the Big Green managed six shots of which Brown saved two. The Elis had previously featured in only one overtime game this season, a 3–2 loss to Cal Poly on Sept. 22, while their opponents had played in six extratime games. The first 10-minute sudden-death period started with a chance for Jacobson, who just missed a curling effort from 20 yards out. Dartmouth would counter with its best chance of the game two minutes later. In the 95th minute of play, a long cross was put into the Bulldogs’ box and redirected by an attacker towards the Yale net. But Brown was able to quite brilliantly dive to his left and force the ball out for a corner kick that was cleared shortly after. The period would end scoreless, leading to a second overtime. With just over four minutes left, Yale found the breakthrough it had been searching for all game. After a Dartmouth foul, Musie sent a dangerous ball into the box that Hickok punched out. The ball fell right to the feel of Albrecht, however, who hit a shot that Kirdzik redirected inside the post to give the Bulldogs the victory. The AlumniDay crowd erupted and for the second straight weekend the fans stormed Reese field in celebration. “It was great to see us dominate possession, connect passes and create danger,” defender Nick Alers ’14 said. “It was awesome to get our first shutout. I was happy for Blake because he played a great game. We still need to be a little sharper in the final third, but I think we played our best soccer of the season so far on Saturday.” Brown finished with three saves in a solid defensive performance. On the offensive end the Elis totaled 23 shots, as six players had two or more efforts. Kirdzik, now atop the Ivy League statistics in shots, tallied the winning goal — his third goal of the season — on his seventh effort of the game.

MARISA LOWE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The Elis came into Saturday’s game averaging 33.67 points per game, but managed just 13 points against Dartmouth. The Elis stand at 2–0 in the Ivy League and have a full week of rest before their next contest. Five of Yale’s remaining seven games are against conference opponents. “We are confident that our method of play will lead to the results we’re looking for,” Schwartz said. “We’re not worried about what has happened before and we are addressing issues as the season has progressed.” The Bulldogs take on Cornell

at Reese Stadium this Saturday at 3:30 p.m. Contact FREDERICK FRANK at frederick.frank@yale.edu .

YALE 1, DARTMOUTH 0 YALE

0

0

1

1

DARTMOUTH

0

0

0

0

Goal – Cameron Kirdzik ’17


PAGE B4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

14.6

The average amount of shots taken against Yale by Darthmouth.

Field Hockey splits west coast swing BY ASHLEY WU CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The Bulldogs traveled to California this past weekend, defeating University of California Berkeley before losing to No. 13 Stanford on the road.

FIELD HOCKEY Yale (4–7, 1–2 Ivy) scored early against Cal (4–8, 1–2 Northern Pacific Field Hockey Conference), then held off the Golden Bears’ late comeback attempt to win 3–2. The Elis scored their first two goals off penalty corners within two minutes of each other late in the first half. Midfielder Nicole Wells ’16 and midfielder Emily Schuckert ’14 both scored off feeds from captain and midfielder/back Georgia Holland ’14. The Bulldogs continued their SEE FIELD HOCKEY PAGE B2

SAM GARDNER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Field hockey came away with a split on its California road trip, beating Cal 3–2 but falling to Stanford 4–0.

Bulldogs taken down by Dartmouth BY JAMES BADAS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The women’s soccer team suffered a crippling blow to its Ivy League title chances Saturday afternoon, falling to Dartmouth by a score of 1–0.

WOMEN’S SOCCER It was more of the same for the Bulldogs (5–5–0, 1–2–0 Ivy) as they continued on a disconcerting trajectory. The loss to Dartmouth (5–4–2, 2–1–0) marked the fifth consecutive game in which the team entered halftime trailing, having been outscored 7–0 in the first stanza during this stretch. One would have to go back seven games to find a contest in which Yale scored in the first half. The Elis last accomplished this feat when they scored in the second minute of action against Towson on Sept. 15. “Our goal was to go 45 minutes without giving up a goal,” head coach Rudy Meredith said. Yale came out with high intensity and was able to efficiently connect its passes and make runs for the first 20 minutes. The offense stalled after that point,

however, and Dartmouth managed to control possession for much of the remaining 70 minutes. With exactly nine minutes left in the first half, the Big Green broke through as forward Emma Brush headed in her team-leading sixth goal of the season. Forward Corey Delaney was able to dribble past Yale forward Georgiana Wagemann ’15, who was a step slow after suffering an apparent leg injury just moments before the play. Delaney’s cross-landed on the head of Brush, who managed to direct it off the far post and in past goalkeeper Rachel Ames ’16. The goal would stand as the game-winner, overshadowing a great performance in net by Ames. The sophomore made nine saves on the day, including two spectacular diving stops in the second half that kept Yale within striking distance. The final score could have been more lopsided as Dartmouth outshot Yale 26 to 10, including a staggering 19 shots in the first half. The Big Green were averaging just 14.6 shots a game prior to meeting the Bulldogs. SEE WOMEN’S SOCCER PAGE B2

KEN YANAGISAWA/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The Elis will try to rebound tonight at Marist, a nonconference opponent.

Men’s crews start season on the Housatonic

BRANDON BLAESSER/CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

Yale’s heavyweight and lightweight crews won every race they entered at the Head of the Housatonic regatta on Saturday. The crews started their races in Sheldon, Conn. BY GREG CAMERON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The men’s lightweight and heavyweight crew teams asserted their dominance in their fall season openers on Saturday, winning every event in the Head of the Housatonic against Eastern Association of Rowing Colleges (EARC) opponents Brown, Williams and Columbia.

MEN’S CREW With their first race of the season behind them, the Eli rowers

now prepare for the much larger Head of the Charles in Boston, where they will compete against every crew that they will face in the spring season. Because of the smaller scale of the regatta and its proximity to New Haven, Yale was the only team to send a full fleet of collegiate boats to the event, which began in Shelton, Conn. The other collegiate boats racing were heavyweight crews from Brown and Williams and a Columbia lightweight boat. “We had a strong performance all the way through the team, from the guys who raced on the

varsity right down to the guys who were racing for the first time for Yale,” said lightweight captain Matt O’Donoghue ’14. The Eli heavyweight varsity eight placed first overall in the collegiate eights with a time of 13:24.7 over the 2.7-mile course. The next best heavyweight opponent was Brown’s varsity eight, nearly 40 seconds behind with a time of 14:02.6. The second Eli heavyweight boat came in 10 seconds behind the Brown heavyweights in 14:12.9, and the second lightweight boat finished behind the Williams heavyweights but ahead

of Columbia’s lightweight eight. Yale’s lightweight first boat finished in 13:48.6, ahead of every boat except the Yale heavyweight first boat. The Head of the Housatonic was a head race, meaning that the boats staggered their starts by 10 to 30 seconds rather than beginning at the same time. The crews raced against the clock instead of each other and found out their placing after every boat had finished. The Yale heavyweight varsity eight started behind their lightweight counterparts but overtook them midway through the race.

“It certainly feels like a full-on race,” heavyweight captain Zachary Johnson ’14 said. “But you usually don’t have the same sideby-side intensity that you would get in the spring season where everyone starts at the same time.” The Eli lightweights also dominated in fours, an event that occurs in the fall but not as often in the spring. Three of the Yale lightweight fours finished ahead of all other competition, while the heavyweight team did not race a four boat. Johnson said that the heavyweight squad is still getting used to rowing at a higher stroke rate

early in the season. “The more time we spend at high rates and the more power pieces we do, the better we can execute them while racing,” Johnson said. Lightweight coach Andy Card also got in on the action in the regatta, placing second out of 16 rowers in the Masters singles event. Each year, Card said that he usually races in the Head of the Housatonic, the Head of the Charles and the Eastern Sprints. “I love rowing, and love to race SEE MEN’S CREW PAGE B2


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