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PREGAME

// WITH WEEKEND

Daughter of Eli, daughter of John

FBOOK PAGE W7 ATTIRE PAGE W8 TAILG8 PAGE W10 MUSIC PAGE12 MUNCHIES PAGE W16


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YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 · yaledailynews.com

PREGAME CONTENTS W3

NO, YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND // Lauren Oyler You think you know how cold it is in Cambridge. You’re wrong.

PUT DOWN THE LOKO. WATCH THE GAME. // Zachary Fuhrer Believe it or not, The Game is about more than drunken debauchery.

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DAUGHTER OF ELI, DAUGHTER OF JOHN

// Cora Lewis and Danny Serna

HARVARD, LAMPOONED

// Chase Niesner What is this “Harvard” thing, anyway? One young Yalie investigates.

PUNK VS. PATRIOT

// Baobao Zhang Mark Zuckerberg may be influential, but he’s no Henry L. Stimson.

COVER STORY: MUCH LIKE THE TROJAN WAR, THE HARVARD-YALE GAME IS A TESTOSTERONE-CHARGED SHOWDOWN FOR HONOR AND GLORY. IN THE ANCIENT EPIC, ACHAEAN MEN FOUGHT VALIANTLY FOR THEIR PRIZED HELEN. THIS WEEKEND, OUR ALL-MALE TEAMS CLASH ON THE FIELDS AS COLLEGIATE WOMEN CHEER THEIR HEROES FROM THE SIDELINES. CORA LEWIS AND DANNY SERNA GIVE YOU THE BITTERSWEET VIEW FROM THE BLEACHERS AND COMPARE NOTES ON WOMEN’S EXPERIENCES AT EACH COLLEGE // PAGE W4

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GAME GEAR OF THE YEAR

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OF U-HAULS AND BBQ

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WELCOME TO THE FAILGATE. ACT ACCORDINGLY.

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WHAT ALL THE NOISE IS ABOUT

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BEYOND THE BLEACHERS: A ROOKIE’S GUIDE TO THE GAME

// Katerina Karatzia A guide to this year’s Yale T-shirts, when it’s too late to get one.

// Christina Hull Revisit the tailgates of Yale’s past.

// Courtney Pannell Yale’s tailgating MVP helps you prepare for Harvard.

// Raphael Shapiro and Rolf Schaapirø The case for vuvuzelas … and the case for alphorns.

// Brenna Hughes Neghaiwi and Grace Patuwo What to do if you only attend the Game so you can wear your blue and white Yale scarf.

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IF ART IS MORE YOUR SPEED

// Caroline Tan A look inside Harvard’s art museums.

HARVARD SQUARE: THE BASICS // WEEKEND You’re here! Now you probably need to eat something.

HARVARD, AFTER HOURS

// Nicolas Niarchos Don’t get left out in the cold: where to go when the parties wind down.


YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 · yaledailynews.com

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PREGAME VIEWS

NO, YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND

Put down the Loko. Watch The Game.

// BY LAUREN OYLER

// BY ZACHARY FUHRER

Let me tell you something: The Game 2008 was the coldest I’ve ever been in my life. Even colder than in third grade when Joey Ballingee poured ice water down my back when we were walking home from the bus stop. In February. Even colder than the time senior year of high school when my friends and I did a totally adorable snow-day photo shoot in our bikinis. Even colder than the cold shoulder I gave the guy I hooked up with last weekend after I saw him making out with a girl at Toad’s. It was, as they say in the Great White North, “wicked freakin’ cold.” What? Weather.com says it’s going to be 48 degrees and mostly sunny on Saturday? Well, you must not have checked the windchill factor. Check it again. Check it again! You know how Willow Smith whips her hair back and forth? It’s like that, only imagine her hair is the fierce, frigid wind beating against your delicate porcelain skin. Did I mention I’ve never been so cold in my life? And it’s not like it was snowing or anything. Like if you saw a picture of the day, you would be like, “Oh! What a lovely day to toss around the ol’ pigskin!” But then you would notice that all of the people in the picture were crying and their tears were frozen on their cheeks and one girl’s hand was purple and you would know that it was not a lovely day at all. You know, I don’t trust weather.com. I can’t imagine Cambridge being 48 degrees. They

This past week, I rushed the Yale Bowl field in a Thomas the Tank Engine outfit, alongside a troupe of 8-year-olds seeking autographs. The kids shouted, “Thomas, show us the quarterback!” I found a worn-out, but victorious, Patrick Witt ’12 and introduced him to the awe-struck children. “It’s gonna feel incredible when we storm the field at Harvard, Pat.” Few people failed to appreciate the world class sporting event known as the Yale-Princeton tailgate. The “Player of the Game” award went to some kid in a blazer who gargoyled a keg of Natty until he more or less passed out in the back of a U-Haul. (Congrats, bro.) Freshmen and their FroCos happily coexisted over 7-8loko, while undergrads joined alums for high-quality alcohol and snacks after the Yale Police Department took the taps off communal kegs at noon. The most extreme tailgaters didn’t enter the stadium before the third quarter, if at all. While they sported “Pi Phi Loves Our Bulldogs” stickers and the numbers of Yale football players on their torsos and t-shirts, the outcome of the football game was much more important to the 8-year-olds in the stands. For them, our players are heroes; for us, our players are large shirtless men, dancing atop DKE’s wooden bar on a Saturday night. Over my three years as a Yale student, I’ve never seen an article by a non-scholar athlete praising our football team for their ability to manage full academic schedules and mentally and physically grueling practices. Students question the place of offensive linemen without remarkable SAT scores in the Yale student body, and assert that Division IAA football is hardly a significant aspect of Yale life. Citing tradition, members of the Yale Party of the Right sing anti-communist and borderline anti-Semitic tunes (really, “Deutschland Über

// DAVID YU

must be confused. Cambridge is a frigid shell of a place where only polar bears are happy. I don’t know how else to explain how cold it is there. If Froyoworld were literally a world made of frozen yogurt, it might be almost as cold as Cambridge was two years ago. But Cambridge doesn’t have a pumpkin pie flavor! The only flavor they offer is icy despair! Freshman-friend Phillip, you better get out your long underwear, because I’m telling you, Cambridge is colder than the polar ice caps topped with a million scoops of ice cream drizzled in liquid nitrogen! That’s why they won’t let us tailgate! Because they don’t want us to be outside for too long, die of hypothermia and sue them! Sophomore Sarah, I don’t know why you’re nodding along in agreement with me! You weren’t there! You don’t know how cold it was! I thought that my fingers were LITERALLY going to fall off! It was LITERALLY the coldest I’ve ever been! Ever! But this year, I’m prepared. I’ve got socks. I’ve got scarves. I’ve! Got! A! Fur! Hat! I’ve got those fingerless gloves with the mitten flaps with the cute animals on them to remind me that the entire planet is not a barren, arctic wasteland! Like the frozen tundras of Manitoba. Or Cambridge. Or the hearts of Harvard students. Contact LAUREN OYLER at lauren.oyler@yale.edu .

WE RECOMMEND CURIOUS GEORGE & FRIENDS

Who says you have to be crimson or blue this weekend? Let’s all just wear yellow hats!

Alles”) and over-achieving juniors cringe at the thought of being snubbed by a landed senior society. So why overlook the historical importance of football at our university? Forget Louis’ Lunch and Pepe’s, Yale was the birthplace of American football. College Football Hall of Famer Walter Camp 1882 is considered alongside John Heisman and Pop Warner as one of the fathers of the sport. Each January, the best college football players in the nation travel to Yale for the Walter Camp Awards, before taking their massive frames to New Haven’s most historic club — Toad’s Place. And while few undergrads think anything of it, award show attendees appreciate the importance of football at Yale and the legacy of Walter Camp. Sure, the outcome of the Yale-Harvard game will have no impact on the Division IAA championship, let alone the BCS and Division I award-show circuit. But football is much more central to Yale’s identity than it is to Harvard’s. Harvard doesn’t have the equivalent of the Yale Bowl and the hometown of their starting quarterback was the setting for the crappiest musical of all time — “Oklahoma!” So, instead of whining about the mediocre tailgate that Harvard will produce, look forward to the spirited tradition that is The Game. Look forward to rushing the field and congratulating our players on an incredible season after we trounce the Crimson. Look forward to sharing a smile with some old alums who’ve traveled hundreds of miles to see our team play against their biggest rival. And thank G-d that you’re a Yalie and not a miserable douchebag who thanks his lucky stars that his father’s checkbook got him into Porcellian. Contact ZACHARY FUHRER at zachary.fuhrer@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 · yaledailynews.com

PREGAME COVER

HIGH HEELS, HIGHER (ED) WALLS // BY CORA LEWIS AND DANNY SERNA li Yale and John Harvard maintained strict “NO GIRLS ALLOWED” policies since the time their storied institutions were founded over three decades ago up until the latter half of the 20th century. Forty years after the gals first bust into the old boys club, great prog-

E

ress has been made toward gender equity — but, as now-infamous Old Campus chants indicate, much work remains to remove traces of institutional sexism at each school. Although some maintain that Yale is superior to Harvard in ever imaginable respect, the two colleges are undeniably very similar institutions, and the lives of women at each college naturally

// MONA CAO

have much in common, ever since co-education hit the Ivy League. Last week, we two intrepid reporters suppressed our hostility toward our frenemies to the North and boarded a midnight train to Cambridge. We dove headfirst, like sea wolves, into the uncharted waters of Georgian architecture and Final Clubs and set out to determine what elements distinguish the experience of a Harvard girl from that of a young woman who studies at Yale. While statistics alternately show progress and hurdles still to be overcome, such as the number of women professors on track for tenure and the number of female undergrads in leadership positions, the social culture at each college remains gendered, students report. Read on for the legacies of Radcliffe

women, the support structures available at both schools and the scoop on parties in the all-male clubhouses of Cambridge. WEEKEND investigates.

A BALANCING ACT

For all their differences, Harvard and Yale share one thing: gender imbalance. Student government, administrative make-up, and tenure-track faculty still have a way to go toward gaining equal representation of the sexes. For the Crimson and the Old Blue, undergraduate populations are both split relatively evenly between the genders. Women hold a slight majority in Harvard College (3,279 men to 3,371 women); at Yale, they’re a minority by single digits (2,624 men to 2,618 women in the fall of 2009).

The first time female students outnumbered male students at Yale was in 1999; at Harvard, fall 2007. These numbers represent an irrefutable accomplishment, but they are also a departure from national statistics. A January report from the American Council of Education showed that nationwide, women account for between 56 and 58 percent of undergraduates, putting these two Ivies below the national average. Among administration and faculty, the scales are much more lopsided. Eighty percent of Yale’s senior faculty are men; at Harvard, 74 percent of ladder faculty are. The Yale Corporation, Yale’s highest governing body, counts only four women as part of its 15-man committee. And Harvard’s primary governing body (the Presi-

WE RECOMMEND RADCLIFFE COLLEGE

The shoes on my feet (I’ve bought it) / The clothes I’m wearing (I’ve bought it) / The rock I’m rockin’(‘Cause I depend on me).


YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 · yaledailynews.com

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PREGAME WOMYN dent and Fellows of Harvard College, also known as the Harvard Corporation) is only 25 percent female. Student governments at both schools have struggled with gender parity, too. An article in the Harvard Crimson last week, titled “Gender Parity Elusive for the Undergraduate Council,” noted that just one in five members of the Undergraduate Council is a woman and that ladies have served as the body’s president just five of the past 15 years. The only woman to serve as Yale College Council president in the past 10 years was Rebecca Taber ’08. Last spring, Courtney Pannell ’11 lost her bid to become one of the few female Yale College Council presidents in the institution’s history by only a handful of votes. The bruising election became gendered when an opponent’s campaign aide compared Pannell — a blonde, Southern, conservative member of Pi Beta Phi — to Sarah Palin and Miss South Carolina Teen USA. On a campus as seemingly progressive as Yale’s, Pannell, a former multimedia editor for the News, said she was taken aback to see gender play such a defining role in the election. “I knew that those were stereotypes that I was going to have to overcome in some people’s minds, so I went into the elections sort of trying to frame myself as a more serious candidate,” Pannell said. “I didn’t think that those issues would come up as strongly as they did.” Female students’ progress in gaining equal representation in leadership positions has been “slow, small and recalcitrant” said Laura Wexler, a professor in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and co-chair of the Yale Women Faculty Forum. The gender imbalances in student leadership roles, tenured faculty, and administrative composition are significant because they demonstrate enduring gender discrimination, Wexler said. Female students also miss out on having models of successful women in their respective fields. Furthermore, crises of sexism on campus, such as when fraternity brothers

I’m not sure it’s appropriate for us [at the Harvard Women’s Center] to speak for all women. We empower other women to speak for themselves. My interns will often take public positions on issues, and since they work at the Women’s Center, you could certainly extrapolate and say we are supporting those issues. SUSAN MARTINE, H A RVA R D WO M E N ’S C E N T E R D I R ECTO R

from Delta Kappa Epsilon chanted misogynistic slogans on Old Campus this fall, especially inhibit women from fulfilling their potential. “It was a way of impeding women’s leadership,” Wexler said of the incident. “It said, ‘We run this university, and you’re only going to have a certain kind of a voice.’ That’s effective at impeding how welcome people feel to speak openly and strongly on these issues.”

THE RADCLIFFE TRADITION

At the start of coeducation, Harvard and Yale did things differently. The way each college went about accepting women led to discrepancies in resources at the two schools. Since Harvard merged with an all-women college — their sister school, Radcliffe — they gained the existing gender resources at that college along with the college’s students. Although Yale flirted with the idea of merging with Vassar in the ’70s, the school ultimately decided to accept women without combining with another institution. As a result, Yale’s female alumnae network begins with the graduates of ’69, while Harvard’s also draws on alums from Radcliffe, which was founded in 1879. One Radcliffe resource that endures, the Radcliffe Union of Students at Harvard, originated as the student government at Radcliffe and became an undergraduate organization at Harvard when the two colleges merged. Today, it

focuses on feminist activism and awareness on campus. The Radcliffe Union of Students also helps run a mentoring program that pairs current female undergraduates with alumnae. Students — male and female alike — are invited to apply for the program by selecting mentors with whom they think they would be compatible. The alumnae then select students to guide, though the vast majority of students who request mentors receive one. Although women have a much longer history at Harvard and organize alumnae to mentor current students, Yale College Dean Mary Miller said Yale’s alumnae are just as supportive. “The network of female alumnae is incredibly strong,” Miller said. “There’s a longer tradition of having female graduates at Harvard, but by this point it’s irrelevant.” Susan Marine, the director of the Harvard Women’s Center, said that the RUS typically takes on global issues related to feminism, rather than issues primarily related to campus life the way the Yale Women’s Center does. Marine distinguishes RUS from the Harvard Women’s Center because the Center is staffed by adults and included under the Office of Student Life, while RUS is student-run. When they accepted Radcliffe students, Harvard also gained the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Study and the Schlesinger Library, located a short walk from its original central campus. The library

WE RECOMMEND STEERING CLEAR OF THE STATUE OF JOHN HARVARD

Otherwise, urine for a surprise.

has one of the most comprehensive collections in the country on women’s history, feminism, suffrage and equal rights. Founded in 1943 with a gift from Maud Wood Park, a 1898 Radcliffe alumnus, Schlesinger includes among its archives the papers of Betty Friedan, Laura Shapiro, Julia Child and artist Judy Chicago, said Lynda Leahy, one of Schlesinger’s reference librarians. “We also have one of the largest collections of cookbooks in the country,” Leahy said. “Because what did women do before they gained equal rights? They cooked, cleaned, and raised children.” The library keeps in its collections, among other objects significant to women’s history, one of the whisks used by Julia Child and original sashes worn by suffragettes marching for the women’s vote. Leahy estimated that about half the traffic in the library comes from faculty and students at Harvard, the rest coming from outside researchers and independent scholars. Yale has no equivalent. “I wish very much that we had an equivalent to the Radcliffe Institute at Yale,” said Wexler. “We need to have a gender institute — a way to bring people here to do research in a coordinated way and to have this discussion at a high level.”

BASEMENT ACTIVISM

Sharing a subtle slight, both the Harvard and Yale Women’s Centers are housed at the basement level of freshman dormito-

ries (Durfee Hall at Yale; Canaday at Harvard). Referring to the Center’s location, Marine said, “Would we like to be above ground? Of course. Everybody would like to have a big huge space with light streaming in the windows. But I don’t spend a lot of time thinking or worrying about the space as a deficit.” Harvard’s Women’s Center boasts a full-time, paid adult staff, some with PhDs. In contrast, Yale’s Women’s Center is student-run and student-staffed. Professor Melanie Boyd ’90 acts as an advisor and liaison between the Center and the Dean’s office at Yale, but students take primary responsibility for the center’s role and activism on campus. Said Yale Women’s Center Coordinator Diana Saverin ’13, “We find feminist activism, which is initiated and driven by the student body, important, while also recognizing the need to work with the administration in order to achieve institutional change.” Marine said that student-run organizations, such as the Radcliffe Union of Students, fulfill that role at Harvard, while the Women’s Center there sees itself more as a social space and supportive organization. “I’m not sure it’s appropriate for us [at the Women’s Center] to speak for all women,” said Marine. “We empower other women to speak for themselves. My interns will often take public positions on issues, and since they work at the Women’s Center, you could certainly extrapolate and say we are supporting those issues.” Yale’s Women’s Center, on the other hand, has actively taken up the mantle of responding to cases of sexism on campus, such as the Zeta Psi incident two years ago when fraternity brothers held up a sign that read, “We Love Yale Sluts” outside the Center, and this year, with the DKE initiation rite on Old Campus. Among the activities that the Harvard Women’s Center organizes are knitting sessions and advice on successful interviewing and pay negotiations. One male SEE WOMEN PAGE W18


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YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 19, 2010 · yaledailynews.com

PREGAME IDENTITY

HARVARD, LAMPOONED // BY CHASE NIESNER

Although I understand it’s all in good fun and spirit, I can’t say I’ve never been disturbed by Yale’s outright hatred for that sub-human cespool of squalor that is Harvard. I just can’t help myself wondering how easily Harvard could be replaced in the minds of Yalies with someone or something that I hold close to my heart, like hippies. With the horrific possibility of persecuted hippies weighing on my mind, I jumped at the opportunity to further explore Harvard and get to the bottom of our mutual misunderstandings. But when I set out to boil Harvard down to one absolute phrase that would once and forever encompass its essence (“The _____ Ivy”), I failed to consider that I knew little to nothing about this bastion of higher education. I have never graced the sidewalks of Cambridge with my presence, I have no friends currently

Harvardians (Cantabs? Crimsons? Pompous jerks?) are supposedly quite a funny bunch of intellects, and their comedic reputation precedes itself.

enrolled there and I never seriously considered applying; perhaps I was foolish to embark on such a quest. In a frenzy, I went on a 24-hour research binge worthy of even the most strenuous term paper, and came to some interesting conclusions about our mortal enemies to the north that, frankly, I had no right to make.

My first stop was obviously Wikipedia, and, wouldn’t you know, Harvard is old (and they’re damn proud of it). The word “old” or “first” appears on their Wikipedia page 52 times! Now, I can appreciate the sanctity of tradition, but Harvard as “The Oldest/ First Ivy,” though true, is hardly a compelling moniker in itself. Harvardians (Cantabs? Crimsons? Pompous jerks?) are also supposedly quite a funny bunch of intellects, and their comedic reputation precedes itself. The Harvard Lampoon gave rise to the comedy giant National Lampoon and its subsequent masterpiece “Christmas Vacation” (a perennial favorite in my household). Conan “Coco” O’Brien (class of ’85), the biggest act to ever hit basic cable, is also a Harvard alum. So maybe Harvard is “The Funny Ivy?” To find out, I scoured their humor publications and HUTV (Harvard Undergraduate Television) for some sidesplitting comedy. Sure, there was a parody of “The Departed” titled “Yale: The Retarded” that was mildly humorous if not slightly offensive, and the Harvard Hooligans interviewed Will Ferrell, but overall my reaction was lukewarm at best. Believe it or not, there are some funny people at Harvard, but nothing spectacular. “The Understandably Mildly Funny Because They’re Intelligent Ivy?” Now that might stick. Next I turned to the Harvard Crimson for some leads. The top four most-read articles are about Four Loko (yes, we know: if you drink it you WILL DIE), Phi Beta Kappa selections (obviously), “Facemash Creator Survives Ad Board” (hmm …) and vuvuzelas at The Game (oooh, cultural).

// DAVID YU

The 2003 “Facemash” article is about none other than the infamous Mark Zuckerberg and his harrowing journey to the Ad Board and back for his salacious stunt as a Harvard undergrad. It’s a bizarre sort of “metahistorical” and ironic moment when you see a Facebook “Like” button next to the article’s title, but that’s a whole other issue. With all the recent hype surrounding “The Social Network,” it’s not necessarily surprising that this article is in popular demand. Unfortunately, I am unable to make a judgment on Harvardians (?) themselves because it’s most likely not Harvard students who are the cause for the article’s popularity, but rather the greater American public. Americans are proud of Harvard, and understandably so. “The Darling of America Ivy”? I can live with that, but I’m still not totally convinced. So hours of “research” later (mostly devoted to watching HUTV), I still had no leads. I finely broke down and asked some friends if they knew anyone at

Harvard. They did, and I emailed a young lady in the sophomore class, asking her if she would kindly attempt to characterize her school in a simple phrase. Her response was, “Uh, The Brick Ivy, because there are lots of bricks?” I was doomed! Following the advice of a recent NPR article on doodling and writers block, I doodled, a lot. As I rounded out the last tentacle of a football-playing Octopus, it hit me. Maybe there was a reason I was having so much difficulty? Maybe there is nothing unique about Harvard to set it apart form the other Ivies? Well, “WE”RE #1!!!!!” was the response I imagined, but to be honest, who in the Ivy League is counting? It seems that Harvard very well may be “The Brick Ivy” or, more aptly put, “The Square Ivy”: pompous and dull. I’d sure hate to ever take myself so seriously.

WE RECOMMEND COMPING THE CRIMSON

Nobody wants to be a Poon!

Contact CHASE NIESNER at chase.niesner@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 19, 2010 · yaledailynews.com

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PREGAME RIVALRY // CREATIVE COMMONS

Yale vs. Harvard? Please. This year, it’s all about Stimson vs. Zuckerberg.

Punk vs. patriot // BY BAOBAO ZHANG

Like it or not, Mark Zuckerberg has become Mr. Harvard these days — thanks to Facebook and now to the film “The Social Network.” He has become the Bill Gates of our generation. And as we all know, Gates also attended Harvard as an undergraduate, only to drop out. While “The Social Network” paints a unflattering portrait of Zuckerberg, it also demonstrates his incredible influence. When actor Jesse Eisenberg throws out crazy numbers on the silver screen, he is speaking the truth: Zuckerberg, valued at nearly $7 billion, is the youngest billionaire ever. Of course, not everyone at Harvard aspires to become the next Zuckerberg. But a friend from Harvard said that certain circles of ambitious students view being “punched” by one of the Final Clubs, which are like all male versions of our secret societies, as their endgame at the university. Eric Tipler DIV ’12, a Harvard alum, said he felt that Harvard students are more driven to achieve individual success

than Yale students are. So perhaps there is a Zuckerberg-esque streak among Cantabs. If the Harvard Guy is an entrepreneur who throws his best friend under the bus for money, then who is the Yale Man? I like to think the Yale Man/Woman has a broader perspective than any Mark Zuckerberg. He/she clings to the integrity of “For God, For Country, For Yale.” He/she exhibits the patriotism of stoic Nathan Hale 1773.

Society and tapped by Skull and Bones. A loyal alum, he attended Yale commencements and reunions whenever he could. Stimson’s Wikipedia page might not be as extensive as that of Mark Zuckerberg, but his accomplishments spanned two world wars. Aside from serving in the cabinets of the Taft and Hoover administrations, Stimson successfully managed the U.S. military during his tenure as Secretary of War in WWII. He fought

Stimson’s Wikipedia page might not be as extensive as that of Mark Zuckerberg, but his accomplishments spanned two world wars.

One name comes to mind: Henry L. Stimson 1888. By the standards of old Yale, Stimson was the ideal student. He was elected to the Phi Beta Kappa

as an army volunteer in his fifties and helped develop the US nuclear weapons program in his seventies. Stimson was everything Zuck-

WE RECOMMEND GOOD WILL HUNTING

Everything we know about Cambridge we learned from Matt Damon. “How ’bout them apples?”

erberg is not. Stimson was a man of fierce loyalty; Zuckerberg was loyal to none except himself. Stimson rose to the top by working within the system; Zuckerberg revolted against his alma mater, against federal law, against the code of friendship. In short, Zuckerberg is a punk. But I do not suggest Stimson is a saint. He played a large role in the decision to drop atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. For months leading up the bombings, Stimson daily contemplated the morality of nuclear warfare. Ultimately, he prevented the bombing of Kyoto, the ancient Japanese capital that housed priceless art and artifacts. Zuckerberg and Stimson are both controversial characters who wield(ed) tremendous influence. But the motivation of the two couldn’t be any more different. Zuckerberg — at least as depicted in the movie — created Facebook to get the attention of a girl who broke up with him. Stimson contributed to the decision to drop atomic bombs because he wanted the US to win WWII.

Over the years, military and public service have lost their glitter in the eyes of Ivy Leaguers as the goals of students have become overly bourgeois. While many Yalies have gone into investment banking and consulting, the Yale Man/Woman has still clung to the spirit exhibited by Stimson. He or she is still very much a political animal interested in the powers of foreign policy, and war and peace. For instance, the Yale Political Union, the political science major and the “Studies in Grand Strategies” program are all popular among Yale students. Or just take a look at the “For God, For Country, For Yale” banners hung over the mantles of many a suite. If he were alive today, Nathan Hale could have cared less about Facebook. But he certainly would have liked Twitter #onelifetolose. Contact BAOBAO ZHANG at baobao.zhang@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 · yaledailynews.com

CHEESE

GAME GEAR OF THE YEAR // BY KATERINA KARATZIA

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A time-honored tradition, customed T-shirts are arguably as indispensable an accessory to The Game as those adorable fight songs. I say “adorable” because although the chirpy disposition of “Boola Boola” never fails to please us with its delightful sequence of Boola Boos, we tend to resort to T-shirt designs for the hard-core slander. The origins of The T-shirt are as obscure as are the reasons that urge some lost souls to choose Harvard over Yale. The past of The T-shirt is, at best, murky. A plethora of controversial designs by both institutions have occasionally caused both on- and off-campus outrage. Previous Harvard designs include gems like “Yale: Harvard for Dummies” and “We’ll Kick Your Ass Today/And Fire Your Ass Tomorrow” — i.e., grandiose, elitist clichés. The Yale T-shirt’s predecessors include “Yale rules, Harvard sucks, and Princeton doesn’t matter” and “Huck Farvard.” Others reference pop culture; one features infamous Harvard College alumnus Ted Kaczynski, class of ’62 (a.k.a. the Unabomber), and reads “You’d have to be crazy to go to Harvard.” This year, some of the Harvard designs dwell on pop culture items, uninvolved wordplay and recycled jokes. The winner of the Harvard College Fund Undergraduate Committee’s T-shirt competition reads “Google Safety School … Did you mean: Yale” (The newest rendition of an old joke by several Harvard alumni who in 2002 purchased the domain www.safetyschool. org and linked it directly to Yale’s website). (They still have control of the

domain.) In any case, our designs for this year may not be the most memorable ones (blame it on the host), but there’s still some degree of originality and timely referencing going on. Let’s break it down.

1. FRESHMAN CLASS COUNCIL

This year’s FCC design is referencing the recent movie “The Social Network,” which chronicles the rise to infamy of Facebook’s Frankenstein. The Facebook blue, eerily reminiscent of Pantone 289 (a.k.a. Yale Blue), acts both as inspiration to our team — most won’t distinguish one hue of blue from the other — and as an wry bitch-slap to Harvard’s claim to a dropout’s success. Although less controversial than last year’s prototype, which cited F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby” — “I think of all Harvard men as sissies” — this design still managed to gather some publicity. Various websites, such as Gawker and Hillicon Valley, commented on Yale’s depiction of Harvard as the anti-social network. “The don’t exactly attend a party school, either,” Sara Jerome said in her piece for Hillicon Valley, “Yale Students mock Harvard over Zuckerberg Affiliation.” Well, Sara, 1) In comparison to Harvard, UChicago is a party school, and 2) You have clearly not been to the Cavity. Joseph Yagoda ’14, who came up with the idea of using a distorted version of the recent blockbuster, said that the FCC “wanted the T-shirt to be interactive.” With this design, the organization is encouraging Yalies to fill in the blank as they see fit. In other words, they’re

WE RECOMMEND BEING FOLKSY

The HCAMA joins TUIB for “GET FOLKED UP” Friday at 9:00 p.m. at WHRB. “And all the people were singin’…”


YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 · yaledailynews.com

PREGAME NO

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TOMATO

leaving the inappropriateness to the student body. Sneaky.

2. THE YALE RECORD

Ngozi Ukazu ’13, who designed the T-shirt, believes her T-shirt is “going to be big.” “When people are looking for a game shirt, they are looking for a shirt that’s funny and looks nice,” Ukazu said. “The joke is pretty clear, it applies to a lot of Yale students and hopefully people will appreciate it.” Playing off the stereotype that Yalies are more academically oriented, the Record presumably hopes to attract a crowd that, not unlike myself, is only going to the game to witness Harvard’s defeat.

3. YALE CENTER FOR BRITISH ART

The Yale Student Guide Program at the YCBA is also issuing a limited 40-piece design that wordplays on the now popular World War II poster. The design, based on a poster first distributed by the British government in 1939 as “Keep Calm and Carry On,” was chosen after a competition within the Center’s undergraduate guide program, David Mogilner ’12, current member of the program, said in a phone interview. I have mixed feelings. The crown makes me think of Mexican beer and lime garnishes, which is good. Then again, the original poster first appeared in 1939, and during the next six years, hundreds of thousands of British people died as a consequence of a global conflict, which is bad. It all comes down to the fact that the YCBA guides designed a T-shirt and their counterparts at the Yale University Art Gallery did not, which is what this is all about.

4. SIGMA CHI FRATERNITY

“We felt that The Game shirts in the past have been too negative and aren’t in the spirit of sportsmanship,” Daniel Choi ’12, SigChi Vice President, said in an email. “So we thought we’d instead use an inspirational quote from a famous leader.”

It all comes down to the fact that the YCBA guides designed a T-shirt and their counterparts at the Yale University Art Gallery did not, which is what this is all about. Alright, I’m not even going to pretend this one is good. Why is Gandhi relevant? Isn’t it a little weird to quote him as just “Gandhi,” like we’d quote Cher or Madonna?

make a Yale tee using it,” she said in a e-mail. The back features Harvard’s official tailgating rules, and a stamp-like rendering of the group’s plans for the hours preceding The Game.

5. INDEPENDENT

6. WOMEN’S CLUB WATER POLO

It’s a rainy October day and Florian Koenigsberger ‘14, Cristina Vere Nicoll ‘14, Seth Thompson ‘14 and Sterling Brinkley ‘14 have nothing to do, i.e. whipping their hair to Willow Smith’s single is starting to get boring. Too late to submit anything to the FCC competition, the group decides to print their design nonetheless — on an American Apparel ‘super soft’ unisex tee. The Bulldog in the front was originally designed by Vere Nicoll “the plan being that [she] would one day

This is only an attempt by the Women’s Club Water Polo to fundraise for the team. As in, the strategy is pretty much rehashing and old, non-specific design that vaguely promotes Eli spirit to make money. But we all want money, and to be honest, my favorite thing about this T-shirt is that there is no

mention of Harvard at all. It’s also surrounded by what I presume to be paw prints. Like, bulldog paw prints, right? Contact KATERINA KARATZIA at katerina.karatzia@yale. edu .

3

OK, so this was not our best year T-shirt-wise, but dame otra Corona y pásame la lima.

WE RECOMMEND PRINCETON

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

2

5


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YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 · yaledailynews.com

PREGAME EVOLUTION

OF U-HAULS AND BBQ // BY CHRISTINA HULL

At the Yale-Princeton game last Saturday, alumni from the past 65 years flocked to the Yale Bowl to cheer on the football team in its last home game. Before kick-off, blue-clad alumni popped open their trunks and gathered around tables laden with traditional tailgating fare. Across the field, current students participated in their own tailgate, drinking spiked hot chocolate and cider served out of the back of U-Haul trucks. The spirit of Yale tailgating has stayed basically the same for over 50 years. The game-day atmosphere makes many of the alums feel at home as they join in the festivities that has, on the whole, not changed since their years at Yale. But some older alumni said that tailgating seemed to be more popular when they were in college. Bill Owens ’45, who has gone to “60-something” years of Yale football games — everywhere except for Hawaii — said that in recent years, he has noticed that the number of people who attend tailgates seems to be declining. But George Spaeth ’54 said the attendance problem was not a product of different attitudes towards tailgating, but in the changed nature of Yale football itself. “[When I was a student,] every sport, including football, was much more amateur,” he said. “It’s gotten much more industrial and

much less fun.” Spaeth added that tailgating has also been altered over the years. When his daughter — a member of the women’s hockey and lacrosse teams — was at Yale, he said the whole family would come to tailgate and bring a picnic of cold sandwiches with them. Now barbecuing has become a tailgating staple, making pregame snacking far fancier than before.

recent tendency to continue tailgating after the start of the game probably developed once the drinks and the party could no longer be brought into the stadium. But even though technology has changed and tailgating has become more elaborate, some things never change. Matt Walton SOM ’78, who started tailgating at Yale 59 years ago because his parents were both faculty members, noted that the

They used to play jazz and swing, and now they play hip hop. But the pageant is still the pageant. M AT T W A LT O N S O M ’ 7 8

Another advancement in tailgating technology was the advent of the U-Haul truck. Caroline Hendel ’83 and Laura Reilly ’83, roommates during their time at Yale who met up with a group of friends at Saturday’s game, said that the trailers allow students to bring more supplies to prolong the tailgate past kick-off. “We always went to the game,” Hendel said. “We never stayed outside and tailgated.” Reilly added that the more

only thing that has changed since then is the music. “They used to play jazz and swing, and now they play hiphop,” he said. “But the pageant is still the pageant.” As to what Yalies can expect this weekend, one alum offered insight from experience. It seems that Harvard’s hatred of fun has some historical precedent. “Harvard is terrible at tailgating,” Hendel said. Even alumni say the tailgates are always better when The Game is here at Yale, but many students do not seem worried. The last home game may have passed, but Yalies and their tailgating paraphernalia will be out in full force in Cambridge. As one student put it, “the real game is tailgating.” Contact CHRISTINA HULL at christina.hull@yale.edu .

WE RECOMMEND BABY VEG BBQ

They are never too cute.


YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 · yaledailynews.com

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PREGAME DRUNKSCAPE

Welcome to the failgate. Act accordingly. // BY COURTNEY PANNELL, IVY LEAGUE TAILGATE MVP

We may not win The Game, but we’ve never lost The Tailgate. For those of you who have never traveled to the Harvard Stadium, set low expectations for everything associated with our Ivy counterparts — their level of attractiveness, their drinking prowess and especially their tailgating skills. One would think Harvard would have tried to adopt some of our antics over the years, but I’m convinced that they’re genetically incapable. I hope most of you have taken part in a Yale tailgate, but in case you haven’t, let me paint a picture: It’s like a fuzzy, warm fantasyland. At every turn, someone is urging you to take a juicy piece of meat in your mouth, offering you a nibble of cookie, or pouring a fountain of Boone’s Farm into your awaiting cup. Everyone is dressed in costume, because in the land of the Yalegate, you can be whomever you want to be. Ballerina? Check. Antoine Dodson? Check. A pilgrim? Sure. God shines down on this land, so it’s always warm and sunny. Policemen are angels that are more frequently found taking pictures of inebriated groups of friends than stealing cans (RIP Four Loko) and bottles from

students’ grips. Booze is the ultimate truth serum, so Yale tailgates are truly the embodiment of “Lux et Veritas.” Now picture a cold, hard, dry, crumbling biscuit. This is Harvard. You’re going to freeze (though the Weather Channel suggests you may not get frostbite, as we did two years ago) and everything will be done in an effort to keep you somber and sober. The biscuit that is Harvard will not satisfy your cravings and will only try to fill your belly with carbs, not libations. Take note — you’ve been warned. Your friends at the Yale College Council recognize this struggle and are going to try to make the situation less painful this year, or at least make it so we can all suffer together. There will be one central Yale tailgate in the tennis court area, where you can find beer, wine and BBQ steak tips. But no kegs or liquor are allowed anywhere near the stadium — Harvard’s rules. Harvard is providing a DJ, but I can’t promise that he/she will play “Whip My Hair” or “Teach Me How to Dougie.” So what’s a Yalie to do when stuck on Cantab turf? Here are Coco’s recommendations: 1) A flask — this is really a MUST.

They’ll probably pat you down and take it away from you before you enter the stadium, so don’t take a flask that you would hate to surrender. Fill this flask with something that makes you happy and reminds you of home and/ or Yale. I’ve elected to fill mine with moonshine from Kings County Distillery in NYC. It’s made by a southerner and a Yalie, so it reminds me of both. 2) A seat cushion. Harvard wanted their stadium to look and feel like the Coliseum, so they made the seats so hard that you think you’re a peasant in ancient Rome. Bring a cushion to help stave off the inevitable numbness — at least until half time. 3) One of those cool “Harvard Sucks” pouch hats. I don’t have one yet, but they’re so nifty! 4) “Harvard Sucks” sunglasses — Because Harvard does suck, and the money goes to good causes. 4) School spirit — If we win, I want to perch myself atop the goalpost and sing “Boola Boola” for hours. I hope you’ll join me. Contact COURTNEY PANNELL at courtney.pannell@yale.edu .

// YDN

The classic Yalegate: booze, barbecues and bulldogs. Can Harvard measure up? Doubtful.

WE RECOMMEND PAHKIN’ THE CAH IN HAHVAHD YAHD

People here are wicked smaht, bro.


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YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 · yaledailynews.com

PREGAME VUVUZELA P O I N T //T H E S O U N D O F N O S I L E N C E

WHAT ALL THE NOISE IS ABOUT // BY RAPHAEL SHAPIRO

L

et me ask you a question. Why do you think car racing is so popular in America? Is it the potential for fiery crashes? The efficiency of the pit stops? The excitement of recognizing the brands on the hoods?

While each of these is plausible, I think the answer is something far less subtle. It’s all about the noise. If there’s one thing we love, it’s a constant background drone. Think elevator music, or the television always on in your kitchen, or the Harkness bells. So it’s no wonder that a record number of Americans tuned in this past summer to watch the FIFA World Cup. Some may say that it’s because soccer is a burgeoning sport here, or that the United States squad played more promisingly than it has in years, or that team captain Landon Donovan looks like a hotter, male version of Natalie Portman. But you and I both know the real reason. After all, wasn’t the 2010 contest the noisiest World Cup on record? Indeed it was, thanks to host country South Africa’s penchant for a certain cheap plastic horn known as a vuvuzela. Stadiums sounded like giant beehives and Americans could finally turn to a soccer game in search of aural satisfaction. Given this, it makes perfect sense that the brainsters at Harvard should recognize this trend, and in their cold and calculating way decide to bring vuvuzelas to The Game. And the cunning Yalies, as ever, decided to one up the Cantabs by doing the same thing, but organized by much cooler and more attractive people. Also, theirs just say

Theirs just say “Harvard,” and ours say “Harvard Blows.” Get it, Harvard? If you’re wondering, yes, that’s what it feels like to be totally razzed.

“Harvard,” and ours say “Havard Blows.” Get it, Harvard? If you’re wondering, yes, that’s what it feels like to be totally razzed. Needless to say, the idea is genius, especially on our behalf because first is the worst and second is the best. Which is probably why Harvard, with its tail between its crimson legs, decided to ban vuvuzelas from the stadium. All of those awkward pauses between plays and during plays could have been eliminated. Now, silence will ring through the Horseshoe, and you may have to strike up a conversation with your friends next to you, instead of listening to the sound of hundreds of vuvuzelas, all around you, blaring at 127 decibels each. Or you could have played your own, of course, warming your wind-bitten lips by buzzing proudly into the cheap and undoubtedly jagged plastic mouthpiece. After all, why should the YPMB have all the fun? They

always say that anyone can join the band, regardless of musical experience, and that idealistic motto could have truly come to fruition. We the fans will once more be helpless to add our own flavor to The Game’s soundscape, unable to happily toot along, trading eight-bar singlenote phrases. Jazz vuvuzela, so post modern. But if you do manage to get your horn in, past the strip searches and vuvuzelasniffing dogs, don’t forget to play with the band during their halftime show, as loud as you can. They’ll be so bummed if you don’t. I have another question for you. Why let Harvard ruin all the fun? We love noise, and a vuvuzela allows us to bring it with us wherever we go. I’m ordering my own just for finals period. Get ready, Bio Anthro classmates. I’m going to have my “Ardipithecus Blows” vuvuzela at our exam, and I’m not going to quit for a second.

WE RECOMMEND ‘WHY DID I CHOOSE YALE?’

Almost funny, On Harvard Time. Still your best, though.


YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 · yaledailynews.com

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PREGAME BZZZZZZZ C O U N T E R - P O I N T // S O M E T H I N G ’ S T H E M A T T E R H O R N

// BY ROLF SCHAAPIRØ

A

ll my life I have played the alpine horn. Since before I ate solid foods, when all else I can remember is the smell of our family’s goats and my grass-stained knees beneath hand-stitched lederhosen, the alphorn has been my calling. I was drawn first to the horn’s aesthetics, the smell of the wood, the smoothness to the touch, the slow grace of its curvature. Rolf, I recall my father saying, Rolf, this is an alphorn. This is what we play. And I blew into the mouthpiece and the mountains sang back and I was content in my knowledge that I would soon master the king of the valveless horns. But now there is a pretender to the throne, and it fills my heart with sorrow to see it, let alone hear it. The vuvuzela, the Scourge of South Africa, I detest it. I though at first, it���s true, that it was just a flash in the pan, a passing fad, but it seems the shoddily crafted labrophone and its flatulent bellows are here to stay. Even my own beloved Swiss carry them now to our football matches, our flag emblazoned on the plastic bell as if it were some unholy tool on an army knife. It makes me sick. And the children, in the village, you know what they are saying now? To their parents? Mother! Father! they cry, might I not just play my vuvuzela? I tire so of my alphorn, I do not wish to practice it, and the vuvuzela is very similar. And the parents, finding no adequate retort,

comply with their child’s wishes. But these parents are fools. There are no similarities. In playing the vuvuzela there is no finesse, no grace. No curve. They are more portable, fine, but I remain firm in that one can bring an alphorn anywhere so long as one has the gumption. What do you want with a horn you can wave in the air? That’s no instrument, it’s a goat swatter. It’s obscene. I bring my alphorn to sporting matches sometimes, when I have finished all of my exercises and when the weather is fair enough that I might safely traverse down the mountain. I find that recently I am the only one in attendance, be it at a football match or a goat race or a ski jump contest, who has brought an alphorn, when it past years I might be among four or five other alphorners at least. Many people, good people of Swiss blood, don’t even know what it is. Curious adolescents ask me how I light a pipe that large, or why I have such a funny looking hockey stick, all the while waving their vuvuzelas like madmen. Most of these barbs I am able to brush off, and respond with a brief lesson on the significance of alphorns to Swiss heritage. But if another person asks me for a Ricola, I’m going to break my horn over their head. Contact RAPHAEL SHAPIRO at raphael.shapiro@yale.edu .

In playing the vuvuzela there is no finesse, no grace. No curve. What do you want with a horn you can wave in the air? It’s obscene. // ZOE GORMAN

Left, Raph loves his valveless horn! Above, don’t even mention them to Rolph.

WE RECOMMEND HANGING IN LAMONT LIBRARY

Get the real Harvard Friday night experience.


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YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 · yaledailynews.com

PREGAME KISSCAM

BEYOND THE BLEACHERS: A ROOKIE’S GUIDE TO THE GAME // BY GRACE PATUWO AND BRENNA HUGHES NEGHAIWI

Don’t like football? We know. The Game is so much more than football — it’s Yale, it’s pride, it’s letting loose after three long months of bench-pressing textbooks and being tackled by midterms. But if mid-game your voice gets hoarse from cheering and you can’t bear to sit on those stone steps any longer, here are some alternatives for debauchery on Crimson turf:

DRESS TO IMPRESS

Harvard-Yale … a rare opportunity to bust out your most self-congratulatory university paraphernalia and feel no shame. What’s more, you can bask in the glory of the preppiness (and frattiness — did someone say lax pinnies?) that surrounds you. Pearls, bow ties, class rings, furs, anything with the Yale insignia will do (nothing is too over the top). But if you forgot your seersucker at home, stop by Newbury Street to pick up a few last-minute essentials. We recommend checking out Ralph Lauren Rugby — so collegiate! But if you’re missing out on the mass-market hipster vibe, there’s an Urban Outfitters just across the street.

TOOT THEM HORNS

Those stinking Crimsons bought 2,000 vuvuzelas and launched the “Silence Yale” Campaign. Sucks for them — Harvard officials have officially banned them from the Game. It’s prob-

ably a good thing. At 120 decibels, these horns are quite the noise-makers. (The threshold for pain is at 130 dB. Yikes, guys.) But you can still make that droning, vuvuzela sound with your voice, right? Who wants to be the conductor?

PRANKSTER

If watching a football get thrown around isn’t entertaining enough for you, devise a mischievous plan with some buddies. You won’t have a Marauder’s Map to navigate Harvard Stadium, but for inspiration, Wikipedia this: We Suck.

SUPPORT YALE GRANDMAS

If you have the stamina to make it to the stadium, you might look for something to distract you from the large men in tight pants below. What’s better than knitting to occupy your hands? You could start crafting a Christmas gift for Mom or some mittens for yourself — very useful for the cold winters in New England. If you are particularly ambitious and well-prepared, you could even start knitting a Yale scarf for next year’s Game on home territory. Get creative.

PDA

“Rah! Rah! Rah!” cheers the crowd. But you ain’t feeling any of that. You’re going gaga for that handsome/beautiful guy/gal beside you. Go for it! Translate that adrenaline into passion for a fellow

Eli. Take this couple caught at The Game last year for example. Oh, young love (lust?).

EXPLORE BOSTON

Partied too hard Friday night and didn’t get to see the great city of Boston? Go on a Duck Tour for wacky, quacky, totally tacky trip around the Bean Town! Ridin’ high on these brightly repainted WWII amphibious vehicles is a hoot. With high audience participation with zero physical activity, this option is perfect for some post-Tailgate fun.

CHOW DOWN, BEAN TOWN

Delve into some deep investigation of your own and hop on The T to China Town or Faneuil Hall, conveniently located right across the river, for cheap eats and restaurants of every kind. Of particular interest is Faneuil Hall’s Durgin Park, one of Boston’s crowning culinary glories that dates back to 1742. It’s known for its traditional New England fare … lobster, chowder and — best of all — Boston Baked Beans. Sounds like a tootin’ good time.

HISTORICAL HAUNTS

The Freedom Trail is a great way to enjoy a stroll through the city while educating yourself on the nation’s history. Check out some of the Revolutionary hotshots at the Granary Burying Ground and enjoy the swan boats at Boston Common. You might also learn that the man on the Samuel Adams beer bottle is in fact Paul Revere. Scandal!

FEELING HOMESICK?

Alternatively, get all your things packed up and hurry to catch an early flight home after the tailgate. While the journey might be rough, there’s nothing like a good night’s sleep in your own bed to cure your post-Game ailments. Contact GRACE PATUWO and BRENNA HUGHES NEGHAIWI at grace.patuwo@yale.edu and brenna.neghaiwi@yale.edu.

// GRACE PATUWO

Patuwo and Hughes Neghaiwi help you survive the football part of the Game. Snuggling with a fellow spectator? Sounds good to us.

WE RECOMMEND GOING TO THE GAME

Just in case you forgot why you’re here amidst The Bus Ride, The Tailgate and The Resultant Hangover.


YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 · yaledailynews.com

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PREGAME KALEIDOSCOPE

If art is more your speed // BY CAROLINE TAN

// YDN

WE RECOMMEND SKIPPING THE GAME TO SEE ‘HARRY POTTER’

We hear Harry and Hermione kiss in this one! (Check out AMC Loews Harvard Square 6 on Church Street.)

For those of you battling winter chills and stuffy noses, the Harvard Art Museums offer a nonalcoholic way to beat the cold in Cambridge this weekend. The sports-illiterate and those not quite up for sitting outside for hours on end can find refuge in the exhibitions on view. The Harvard Art Museums consist of three museums, the Fogg Museum, the Busch-Reisinger Museum and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum. Although the building that houses the Fogg and Busch-Reisinger museums is closed for renovation, the Sackler remains open and showcases the best of all three museums’ collections. (Sound familiar? The Yale University Art Gallery is undergoing a similar renovation. Only one of its three buildings — the Louis I. Kahn building — is open until the construction is completed in 2012.) “I Was Not Waving but Drowning,” a collection of 14 photographs that depict artist Atul Bhalla submerging himself in Delhi’s Yamuna River, is on temporary display. When viewed choronologically, the vertical photographs show the progression of Bhalla’s slow walk into the river. The exhibition investigates the contemporary and environmental issues surrounding the depiction of water as a life source. Contrary to the exhibit’s title, though, no one actually drowned during the production of the photographs. Also on view is “The Art of Deceit: Looking at French Trompe l’Oeil,” which highlights illusionistic works from 18th-century France by artists Jean-PierreXavier Bidauld, Louis-Léopold Boilly and Jacques-Charles Oudry.

This exhibit highlights the humorous and intellectual side of paintings that “trick the eye” (trompe l’oeil). There is also an installation of unique Chinese brush paintings that include elements from traditional Eastern artwork and modern Western techniques. The exhibit, “Brush and Ink Reconsidered: Contemporary Chinese Landscapes,” ties this Far East movement to Western society, inviting audiences to “examine the meaning of ‘contemporary’ in non-Western contexts.” Who knew art could feel so fly (like a G6)? The Harvard Art Museums provide something for everyone, from contemporary photographs and Byzantine art to an extensive collection of German work in all mediums. Regardless of your preferences, the museum has over 250,000 works of art in its permanent collection for any type of art enthusiast. Yalies looking to preserve their hearing from the thousands of vuvuzelas expected to turn up Saturday, or those uninterested in watching America’s (other) favorite pastime, should consider taking a look at some of these cultural artifacts instead. But don’t expect too much: Everybody knows Harvard’s art collection can’t compare to Yale’s extensive gallery, which covers 10 curatorial areas and includes an exhibit on coins and medals. The Harvard Art Museums are open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesdays to Saturdays, and charge $6 for college students with valid ID. Contact CAROLINE TAN at caroline.tan@yale.edu .


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PREGAME

YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 · yaledailynews.com

POSTGAME

Harvard, after hours // BY NICOLAS NIARCHOS Deep in the shady sadness of Cambridge, the music’ll start to fade and Harvardians’ll start mumbling about papers. No matter that it’s only 12:05 on a Saturday night, the party’s over. Here are a couple of things to do in the twilight hours between fiesta and bed.

PARTY SOME MORE

Not all Harvardians go to bed when the music stops. A select few head on over to Harvard’s “elite” final clubs where the party just doesn’t stop. That is, if you’re a good-looking girl. But don’t despair — most of the clubs have easily scalable walls. With a bit of gumption and a boost, any intrepid (read: drunk) Yalie can find him-/herself off of Mt. Auburn Street and into the Phoenix’s backyard. That said, Friday night, kinda like Tap Nite, will be the initiation night for new members of several final clubs, and Yalies coming to their doors in search of fun may be disappointed.

IN DA CLUB

Sources say the top floor club at Hong Kong restaurant on Harvard Square is always a cool spot, although they’re reported to be very strict on IDs. For those willing to journey into Boston’s throbbing core, nightclubs like Rumor (100 Warrenton Street — the “more Euro, more fun” option) and Mantra (52 Temple Pl.) should satisfy. But make sure you find an afterparty — Massachusetts state law dictates that all clubs have to close by 2:00 a.m. For a later party, check out the Sheraton Commander’s ballroom, which a couple of Cantabs have hired for a $20-a-head extravaganza Friday night.

MUNCHIES

You certainly don’t want to die of exhaustion on the cold streets of Cambridge. Luckily, late night eat-

eries abound. Pinocchio’s Pizza and Subs (74 Winthrop St.) is the classic in late night dining. On Harvard Sq., there’s also Felipe’s Taqueria (83 Mt. Auburn St.), a great Mexican joint that’ll keep the cold out with steaming hot burritos and flamingly flavourful tacos. If you want to eat after 2:00 a.m., make a quick walk over the town line to Somerville’s Market Basket, a G-Heav-style deli with subs, wraps and sandwiches available 24 hours a day. It’s rumoured that the b.good burger joint (24 Dunster St.) will be open later for The Game, but, Yalies, try to treat them with respect if they’re closed. Not everyone can have Louis’.

HOOK UP

Yeah, Harvard students wouldn’t know what sex was if it came up and smacked them in the face. But on the off chance that you reach across the aisle during your time at Cambridge, make sure that you do it in style. Apparently the primo location for Harvardians to hook up is

in the stacks of Widener Library. Wonder why they need a widener?

PRIMAL SCREAM

Okay, so you can’t run Primal Scream (the annual naked run around Harvard Yard) with the Cantabs, but who would want to? They probably look even worse without all of that crimson on. Get your birthday suit on and show them what Yale is made of beneath its soft blue exterior. Please take precautions against frostbite.

SLEEP

In the middle of Game madness last year, I found a spot so warm, so perfect, so wonderful, that I almost thought myself back in New Haven. Where? The hot air duct in Harvard Square. It’s the perfect place to sleep for any sozzled Yalie, and let me tell you, when you’ve napped there, you know what refreshment is. Contact NICOLAS NIARCHOS at nicolas.niarchos@yale.edu .

HARVARD EATS: THE BASICS

1 111 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 7 77 7 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9

HONG KONG AT HARVARD SQUARE, 1238 Massachusetts Ave. Scorpion bowls if you’re of age, scallion pancakes if not. Get your greasy fix here. Open 11:30 a.m.-3:00 a.m. FELIPE’S TAQUERIA 83 Mt. Auburn St. Fresh salsa, juicy steak. In a word, “delicioso.” Open 11:00 a.m.-2:00 a.m. PINOCCHIO’S PIZZA AND SUBS 74 Winthrop St. A local institution famous for its Sicilian slices. Open 11:00 a.m.-2:30 a.m. B.GOOD 24 Dunster St. The requisite favorite burger joint. LE’S RESTAURANT 36 JFK St. Cheap, fast pho that’ll leave you satisfied. L.A. BURDICK CHOCOLATE CAFE 52-D Brattle St. Give into the desire and indulge; you know you want to. CREMA CAFE 27 Brattle St. This coffee and sandwich nook is known especially for its sweet potato sandwich. VEGGIE PLANET 47 Palmer St.”What do you mean you don’t eat no meat?” HARVARD SQUARE STATION Dunster St. To get you where you’re going.

WE RECOMMEND BEFRIENDING A CANTAB!

You know you’ve been meaning to do some community service.


YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010· yaledailynews.com

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PREGAME HAPPENSTANCE

CONNECTICUT LADIES IN KING HARVARD’S COURT? WOMYN FROM PAGE 5 Yale’s Women’s Center, on the other hand, has actively taken up the mantle of responding to cases of sexism on campus, such as the Zeta Psi incident two years ago when fraternity brothers held up a sign that read, “We Love Yale Sluts” outside the Center, and this year, with the DKE initiation rite on Old Campus. Among the activities that the Harvard Women’s Center organizes are knitting sessions and advice on successful interviewing and pay negotiations. One male Harvard student said that he had heard the Women’s Center was housed in what was formerly a kitchen, but Marine clarified: “We have a kitchen, but we are located in what was formerly the office of a liberal campus publication. We use the kitchen for cooking, health purposes, and community building.” She said she sees it as a positive tool and rejects the idea that the presence of a kitchen in the Center promotes the perception of women as domestic and belonging in the home.

FINAL CLUB, FINAL SAY?

But for all the number-crunching, tallying of academic archives and comparison of student support facilities in place, the most significant difference between the lives of women at Yale and women at Harvard is probably what they do for fun on a Friday night. Students might be tempted to compare Final Clubs at Harvard to Yale’s secret societies, but the two have only so many characteristics in common: both are exclusive, own land near the schools, and host extravagant parties. Both have alumni networks and spooky

// MONA CAO

or mythological names. The similarities essentially end there. At Harvard, students are ‘punched’ (read: ‘tapped’) for Final Clubs in the fall of their sophomore year. As a result, the clubs have more of an influence than societies on student social lives throughout their four years of college. Female students may attend parties at the clubs from their first days on campus, while freshman boys tend to have to wait until their second year at Harvard to gain acceptance, “unless you know someone,” Harvard freshman Jason Hirschorn said. Hirschorn’s fellow underclassmen agreed that their experiences at Harvard are particularly rough. “But I don’t think it’s particularly easy anywhere to pick up girls as a freshman guy,” Hirschorn said. “Any freshman guy I’ve talked to at any school says the same thing.” Harvard freshman Angela Song

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said it was annoying to go out at night with a group of guy friends, because they can’t get into the same Final Club events as the girls, and so the two often end up splitting along gender lines. Yale offers a slightly more equal playing field, since underclassmen guys and girls alike are excluded from parties at societies. With few exceptions, Yale societies tap their members junior year, which means students only attend gatherings in tombs for their last year-and-a-half at school. Additionally, nearly all Yale societies are co-ed, while at Harvard eight of the Final Clubs are all-male, six all-female. The all-male groups have a considerable stigma associated with them, said underclassmen students. Five freshman girls interviewed said they don’t feel comfortable going to parties there alone. There are also discrepancies

between the resources of all-male and all-female clubs, said students. The all-male clubs host most of the parties, and they own property — including a few old and lavish Boston mansions — while the female ones rent it (often from their male counterparts). “We hear a lot of frustration with the fact that social life at Harvard feels like it’s male-dominated,” said Marine. But the inequalities don’t necessarily bother everyone. Three freshman girls interviewed compared the final clubs to fraternities, calling them “exaggerated frats” or “the same as any other school,” and said they don’t consider the clubs’ practices anything out of the ordinary. One female sophomore, who was recently punched for an all-female final club, refutes the idea that the male control of Harvard’s social scene reflects a gender imbalance at the school. If womens’ groups on campus wanted to open their doors to partiers, she explained, they, too, could dominate the campus social scene. “It’s a matter of happenstance that men play that role on campus,” said the sophomore, who spoke on the condition of anonymity. “Men’s final clubs are the ones that are willing to open their space weekend after weekend.” Even so, the poor reputation of the clubs pervades pop culture, most recently depicted in the film, “The Social Network.” Writing in the Crimson this past April, final club member Daniel Herz-Roiphe made the case for why the clubs should be abolished, in an article titled “Long Overdue.” “The clubs’ discriminatory membership policies place the accumulated wealth, real estate and prestige of dozens of genera-

tions in the hands of men alone — and at a school with limited social space, this imbalance warps gender relations into something out of a Jane Austen novel,” he wrote. According to another recent Crimson article, a group of students is organizing to try to eliminate the clubs, though students interviewed said initiatives like this one have popped up several times over the years, without meaningful results. Harvard junior Joe Hodgkin, who is friends with some of the students in the anti-final club movement and not a member of a club himself, said, “Final clubs contribute negatively to campus because of the gender-politics dynamic they create. They aren’t subject to university control, and they serve to perpetuate a culture that isn’t in line with mainstream Harvard culture today.” Hodgkin went on to describe mainstream Harvard culture as “increasingly diverse and accepting, across race and ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic class.” In the ’80s, Harvard banished Final Clubs to off-campus locations and today does not endorse their existence, but the clubs undeniably still play a large role in social culture, because there are only so many parties thrown by other organizations, students said. “Harvard made a good choice when it made the clubs independent of the school,” said Arturo Elizondo ’14. “But the parties at Harvard just aren’t very good.” Contact CORA LEWIS and DANNY SERNA at cora.lewis@yale.edu and daniel.serna@yale.edu .


PREGAME