Equestrian Living - March/April 2023

Page 30

MARCH/APRIL 2023 EQ EQLiving.com PEOPLE | TRAVEL | DESIGN | FASHION | STYLE | D É COR
MARCH/APRIL 2023 DISPLAY UNTIL MAY 4 , 2023 EQUESTRIAN LIVING EQ ®
OUR EDITORS ON FANCIFUL ADVENTURES AND INDULGENT ESCAPES
LIVING UESTRI AN
JOIN
THE TRAVEL DIARIES

38

When Mary Donohue was selected to ride in the world’s most rigorous equestrian endurance race, she wasn’t sure she was ready. For 600 miles across the steppe, aboard semi-wild Mongolian horses and staying with local families, the journey was a once-in-a-lifetime adventure.

M c LAIN WARD’S CASTLE HILL 42

Take a tour inside the farm, originally built as a dairy farm in 1910, where four-time Olympic medalist McLain Ward trains. Located in Brewster, New York, the farm is full of delightful details and a unique charm, from the large stalls that once housed the Ringling Brothers’ elephants, to the Grand Old Ballroom, that hosted parties attended by guests like Fred Astaire.

TRAVEL: EDITORS AND WRITERS JOURNEY TO DESTINATIONS HERE AND ABROAD 50

Come along with our editors and writers as they travel far and wide, enjoying adventure and relaxation in a variety of amazing destinations. Our personal travel diaries include the celebration of royal pageantry at Royal Ascot, the U.K.’s famed horse racing event; a child-free wellness retreat to the misty hills of Hawaii; a chilly spring weekend at a beautifully restored Martha’s Vineyard inn; and much more.

MARCELA GANLY IS IMMERSED IN THE DYNAMICS OF LOST WAX SCULPTING 80

Sculptor Marcela Ganly began her career practicing medicine, while perfecting her technique in the lost wax method under the guidance of master sculptor Antonio PujÍa. During a sabbatical leave to pursue her passion, she realized she had found her true path.

50 TRAVEL FEATURES MARCH | APRIL 2023 38
MONGOL DERBY MONGOL DERBY
4 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023 EQ INSIDE EQ INSIDE

Enthusiasts turn out in their sartorial finest to enjoy the fanfare and watch the famed races at U.K.’s Royal Ascot. For full feature, see page 50.

Photo courtesy of

DEPARTMENTS

MARCH | APRIL 2023

FAVORITES

12

Nic Roldan shares his favorites, from restaurants and books to travel and shows.

14

Photographer Shannon Brinkman describes the situation behind her best shot.

GIVING BACK

13

The Grooming Project offers people a life-changing opportunity for a career in animal care.

DESIGN

16

Pantone’s color of the year is the vibrant and lively Viva Magenta. 22

Hermès previews its enchanting 2023 objects collection.

STYLE

20

Custom Holly Spagnola Designs befit riders and their horses. 28

Sleek totes and backpacks for the savvy traveler.

BOOK 23

Read an excerpt from Never Trust a Sneaky Pony by Madison Seaman.

FOOD + DRINK

30

Executive chef of Ocala’s World Equestrian Center, Vincent Cani, shares one of his favorite recipes.

PEOPLE 34

Jeweler Catherine Zadeh of ZADEH NY shares an impactful essay on the oppressive conditions in her home country of Iran.

IN EACH ISSUE

EDITOR’S NOTE 8

Welcome to Equestrian Living RESOURCES 94

Look for CONTACT INFO | PAGE 94 to find the products and services in this issue.

BARN DOGS 98

Jennifer Januzis, founder of Double J Farm, has a barn full of rescues. Her soft spot for Dachshunds has led to her adoption of Charlie, Frank, and Boone.

92

Fitness expert Kali Cram focuses on equestrians.

FASHION

36

The classic Chelsea boot, popular for its versatility, transitions easily from country jaunts to urban outings.

EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES

87 Fabulous farms and ranches.

ON THE
Royal Ascot.
COVER
20 22
6 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023 EQ INSIDE EQ INSIDE
ARIAT.COM/RAVELLO PROUD PARTNER ©2023 Ariat® is a registered trademark of Ariat International, Inc. All rights reserved. INTRODUCING RAVELLO HANDCRAFTED FOR GREATNESS

Aflurry of discussions and articles debating the merits and pitfalls of ChatGPT, a conversational chatbot, has reached a fever pitch. Released by OpenAI, the artificial intelligence bot has wide-ranging capabilities, including writing creative essays, poetry, and authoritative business content. Recently, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School put ChatGPT to the test in an academic environment. The ChatGPT-3 passed the final Wharton Master of Business Administration (MBA) exam with a B-minus score.

Yes, the bot can answer questions, gather mundane data, and, to the chagrin of educators, write credible term papers in minutes. Still, I question whether it could generate a colorful account such as this: “Royal Enclosure rules are incontestable: no lady will be admitted without a hat. There was no way I was

going to get that cream-colored confection re-anchored short of using a staple gun. What a calamity,” writes Rebecca Baldridge in her travel diary recounting her visit to the U.K.’s Royal Ascot. Could a bot capture this comical scenario with such vivid wordsmithing? I think not.

This year, in our 10th annual Travel issue, we dedicate the entire feature to the personal accounts of EQLiving’s editors’ and writers’ travels to a distinctive mix of locations. They pepper their stories with anecdotal humor and wonder that excites and delights. Dare I say they exude the benefits of the human touch?

Our travelers jaunt to a 1000-acre estate in Ireland to cross-country school, navigating log jumps and lakes in the fairytale setting, and to England’s famed Royal Ascot to follow the races from the elite Royal Enclosure. Closer to home, the stars aligned for creative equestrians in the heart of Virginia’s hunt country, fires roared off-peak at a beautifully restored Martha’s Vineyard inn in Massachusetts, and an exhausted mother allowed herself to slow down and enjoy a slice of luxury on a tranquil Hawaiian island.

On a different range of the writing spectrum, Catherine Zadeh of ZADEH NY writes an impactful essay about the oppressive conditions women face daily in Iran, where she was born. Steeped in passion and conviction, we knew the compelling words of the jewelry designer and longtime friend of the equestrian community would resonate with our readers.

Also in this issue, we follow two women’s experiences as they compete in the rigorous 600-mile Mongol Derby and

meet an Argentinian sculptor who left a career in medicine to pursue the lost wax process of sculpting. Additionally, Hermès rolls out its 2023 spring/summer objects collection in a blaze of color, Chelsea boots step out in an array of styles, and a jeweler is crafting high-end jewelry befitting of you and your horse.

As I drafted my letter, I admit to being curious how ChatGPT would respond to my query, so I submitted this question: “What are the benefits of personally written accounts of travel adventure for magazine articles?” The response came in seconds and arrived as a numbered list with five one-word advantages followed by short explanations of the benefits. Included in the list were: authenticity, personal connection, unique stories, insight into local culture, and inspiration. In the case of this bot, I couldn’t agree more.

Look forward to more engaging articles in Equestrian Living that will transport you to newly discovered locations and events and introduce you to equestrians you’d like to meet, whether at their home or the barn.

WELCOME EQ FROM THE EDITOR 8 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023 EQ FROM THE EDITOR
PHOTO GEORGE KAMPER
Your barn is the setting of your horse’s story. We ensure every ride, every bath, every moment is a chapter to remember. 717.687.0292 | BandDBuilders.com Built Right or Not at All

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VOLUME 12 NUMBER 2

EDITOR AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR Stephanie B. Peters

SENIOR EDITOR Jill B. Novotny

PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR George Kamper

EDITORS AT LARGE Rebecca Baldridge, Carol Cohen-Hodess, Judy Richter (2015-2022)

DESIGN MANAGER Mary A. Stroup

SOCIAL MEDIA AND WEB CONTENT Maggie Carty

DIGITAL & CLIENT SERVICES Sarah Lessler

EDITORIAL MANAGER Theresa Cardamone

EQ SPECIAL EVENTS Jennifer Pearman Lammer

UK & LONDON EDITOR Bridget Arsenault

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Rebecca Baldridge, Shannon Brinkman, Amber Heintzberger

Lindsay Hunter, Jennifer Januzis

Sarah Lessler, Catherine Zadeh

PUBLISHER C.W. Medinger

PUBLISHING CONSULTANT George Fuller

PRINT John Spittle

PUBLIC RELATIONS Carrie Wirth, EQmedia.agency

NEWSSTAND DISTRIBUTION Boyd Mulholland

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Favorite charity: I formed Sunset Polo International with friends of mine: Grant Ganzi, Josh Sagman, and Natascha Baecher. We support causes we are passionate about and know the money goes towards making a real difference. Our 5th Annual Nic Roldan’s Sunset Polo & White Party is taking place March 24th 2023. (NicRoldan.com/Events)

Favorite hotel: The Four Seasons Hotel Philadelphia at the Comcast Center. It’s pretty epic and has the most amazing beds and sheets. Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc in Antibes will also always have a special place in my heart.

Favorite escape: For a staycation I’m a big fan of the Four Seasons Palm Beach. When I have more time, I love the Four Seasons Resort Los Cabos at Costa Palmas.

MY FAVORITES NIC ROLDAN

What books are on your bedside table: The 5am Club and The Power of Now.

Favorite show/venue: The fields at Cowdray Park Polo Club, U.K., provide a unique backdrop to a polo field with the Cowdray ruins in the background.

Favorite horse: I was lucky enough to have played a horse that was owned by the patron of the Pony Express polo team, the late Bob Daniels, called Wembley. The legendary horse is now in the Polo Hall of fame.

Favorite TV show: White Lotus and to Survive. I’m a big Formula One fan.

Favorite source for male fashion: I have a simple taste. I get my basic t-shirts from Good Life or James Perse , jeans from Frame, and gym clothes from Alo. I always like Cremieux for dressier occasions.

Proudest riding achievement: Winning the Queen’s Cup in the U.K. in 2018, this will definitely be up there. Winning the U.S. Open Polo Championships (1998), playing in the Argentine Open (2018) and passing my Real Estate exam (2021).

Must-have items when traveling: AG1, Shilajit which are minerals from the Himalayas that are high in antioxidants, as well as my iPad and workout clothes.

Favorite music on your playlist: I’m a big fan of Spotify as I love a wide variety of music from Enya to Kygo to Travis Scott to Diplo and Country.

Favorite App: Zillow by far, as I’m a realtor and keen developer. I love to constantly watch the local market and keep my finger on the pulse.

Favorite way to relax: I’m a huge fan of golf, it’s a great way to disconnect and spend time with friends, that is when I’m hitting the ball straight.

Favorite restaurants: Sexy Fish in London and iMoto in Palm Beach, plus my secret favorite are the ribs at Park Avenue BBQ Grille here in Wellington, Florida.

EQ FAVORITES 12 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023
FAVORITES
SEXY FISH COWDRAY PARK NICK MELE PHOTO: SNOOPY FOUR SEASONS LOS CABOS

THE POWER OF GROOMING

Grooming can transform your pet, but it can also TRANSFORM the groomer.

Though most equestrians are aware that grooming is an essential aspect of the sport, one non-profit in Kansas City, Missouri, has harnessed the art of pet grooming to break the cycle of poverty for struggling parents with nowhere to turn.

“We help our students create financial stability for their families,” said Natasha Kirsch, the founding CEO of the Grooming Project, now called Pawsperity.

Pawsperity operates a grooming school that teaches everything from safe animal handling and bathing to advanced grooming techniques and breed standards. But the program doesn’t stop there. The organization provides a unique combination of job training and personal support services. This gives students an equitable first chance by offering comprehensive life coaching, including access to legal aid, mental health counseling, transportation, and even housing, funded by donations and grants. Many students make the transition into the program directly from homeless shelters.

“Back in 2015, when we were trying to launch the program, I almost gave up. We had a space, but we didn’t have enough funding to purchase grooming equipment,” said Kirsch. “Just when I was ready to pull the plug, boxes of clippers, trimmers, and blades arrived from Matt Andis, the co-CEO of Andis

Company. Matt believed in us and what we were trying to do. I don’t think there would be a grooming project without Andis.”

The Andis Company, founded in 1922, is a fourth-generation, family-led business and market leader in barbering, styling, and animal grooming. Their clippers, trimmers, and styling accessories are well-known across the horse world from professionals to DIYers around the globe. The company has launched the Creator Series, where they highlight partnerships with different people and organizations across the industry who use Andis tools as a vehicle to help drive, inspire, and create new opportunities to positively impact the future.

Since opening its doors in 2016, the Grooming Project has served over 600 parents and children and graduated over 100 dog groomers with a 100% job placement rate. The organization is currently undergoing a massive physical expansion and rebranding to Pawsperity. When it opens its new 16,000-square-foot Kansas City facility, it expects to become the nation’s largest dog grooming school.

Groomers make an annual salary ranging from $35- to 70-thousand dollars. It’s a profession where individuals with many barriers to stable employment—including past addiction, criminal records, and incomplete education— can find employment. Upon completing the six-month grooming training, students can work in one of the Kansas City area’s 200 pet salons or even start their own grooming business.

“Working with Pawsperity is the perfect example of the transformative power of grooming,” said Angie Vlasaty Peterson, Andis Company’s Vice President of Marketing. “Through ongoing financial support from the Andis Foundation and this Creator Series Original feature, we want to illustrate that pet grooming can be literally life-changing. We know that other professional groomers and pet parents will be inspired by these students and their stories of hope.”

CONTACT INFO | PAGE 94
MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 13 EQ GIVING BACK

MY BEST SHOT!

Walking the Badminton, England, CCI5*-L course on the previous day, I knew that this fence—a broken bridge— was the location for me to photograph. It was a throwback to fences I had seen as a child in the 1970s in Kentucky. There was a huge resurgence of post-COVID fans at the May 2022 event, and the crowds created a wave of people. The spectators are far in the background, but you can still see individuals and a few dogs, although the major feature is the number of fans.

Clouds framed the horse and rider, Reve du Rouet and Sarah Bullimore. I felt this was the most striking image of the set, and I have always loved black and white. It works well in this photograph to feel the power of horse and rider in the sky, the rolling wave of the crowd into the landscape, and a visually incredible cross-country fence.

CONTACT INFO | PAGE 94

SHANNON BRINKMAN

is an international artistic sport-horse photographer who has been photographing for 32 years, including five Olympic Games and multitudes of national and international championships.

14 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023 FAVORITES
FAVORITES EQ
MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 15

Viva Terra (right, center) handmade 8-inch ceramic wallflowers are the perfect garnish for tables, shelves, and walls. Each ceramic flower is handsculpted, sometimes using hundreds of petals to form these bright, cheerful blooms.

VIVA MAGENTA

The Lambswool Oversized Scarf from Tartan Blanket Co. is lightweight, and its natural, temperature-regu lating properties will keep you cozy when you’re cold, and cool you down when it gets warm.

Pantone’s COLOR OF THE YEAR 2023

Pantone’s limitededition notebook in the color of the year.

Pantone’s Color of the Year, Viva Magenta 18-1750, vibrates with vim and vigor. It is brave and fearless and a pulsating color whose exuberance promotes a joyous and optimistic celebration. Leatrice Eiseman, the executive director of the Pantone Color Institute says, “It is a color that is audacious, full of wit, and inclusive of all. In this age of technology, we look to draw inspiration from nature and what is real. Viva Magenta descends from the red family, and is inspired by the red of cochineal, one of the most precious dyes belonging to the natural dye family as well as one of the strongest and brightest.

The Charlie Oven allows you to enjoy amazing, restaurant-quality food at home. This all-in-one charcoal BBQ works as a pizza oven, BBQ smoker, and charcoal grill, making it perfect for outdoor kitchens.

The artisans at KOKET have masterfully captured the alluring essence of an enchanted forest with this Viva Magenta Enchanted Dining chair. Prices upon request.

Cariuma joins Pantone in celebrating Viva Magenta with an ivory-contrast canvas sneaker.

The scatter cushion cover with optional feather pad from Storigraphic’s popular Seventies Series new color editions range. edition mug. The Lucy rug (left center) from Rug Society fills the space with trendy colors, Viva Magenta, and unmistakable shapes, transforming the room into a colorful landscape.
EQ DESIGN 16 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023 CONTACT INFO | PAGE 94

SETTING THE STANDARD SINCE 1978

Complete design services and fine craftsmanship

Custom barns, arenas, garages and living quarters

1-888-354-4740 | www.kingbarns.com

PIERSON ROAD • $18,900,000

Rare Opportunity With Direct Access to Wellington International Showgrounds • Newer Build and Meticulously Maintained on 5+ Acres • 24 Stalls With All-Weather Arena and Grass Field • 6 Large Paddocks and Walker • Owners’ Lounge, 2 Offices, and 4-Bedroom Apartment: Each Bedroom has Private Bath and Kitchenette

WHITE FENCES • $4,850,000

MARTHA W. JOLICOEUR, PA

Director of Luxury Sales 561 797 8040

www.MarthasProperties.com

14+ Acre Dressage Facility With Covered Arena • 24-Stall Barn With Center Courtyard • Irrigated Grass Riding Field • Air-Conditioned Tack Room, Kitchenette and Laundry Room • 4-Horse Walker and Wash/Grooming Stalls • 2 Large Staff Apartments • Surrounded by Grassy Paddocks • Access to Numerous Community Trails
HOME IS WHERE YOUR HORSE IS THE NEXT MOVE IS YOURS 1111 LINCOLN RD, PH-805, MIAMI BEACH, FL 33139. 305.695.6300 © 2023 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. IF YOUR PROPERTY IS CURRENTLY LISTED WITH ANOTHER REAL ESTATE BROKER, PLEASE DISREGARD THIS OFFER. IT IS NOT OUR INTENTION TO SOLICIT THE OFFERINGS OF OTHER REAL ESTATE BROKERS. WE COOPERATE WITH THEM FULLY. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. 50TH STREET • $12,000,000 20 Acres in Wellington’s South End • Manor House With Private Entrance and 3-Car Garage • 8-Stall Barn With Another 8 Stalls Possible • 6 Lush Paddocks • All-Weather Riding Arena • Oversized 3-Bay Storage Building • Riding Track Encircles This Equestrian’s Dream Property • Adjoining 10-Acre Farm Also Available for Purchase PALM BEACH POINT EAST • $8,200,000 Scenic 10 Acres on Stables Way • 16-Stall Barn • 4-Horse Walker • Round Pen • 5 Large Paddocks • 3-Bedroom, 2.5-Bath Pool Home With Garage • Custom-Built 4-Bedroom, 5-Bath Staff House • Bermuda Grass Grand Prix Field • Easy Access to WEF Showgrounds • Adjoining 20-Acre Farm Also Available for Purchase UNDERCONTRACT Home is Where Your Horse Is FARMS & ESTATES WELLINGTON, FL

BOLD, BEAUTIFUL, AND BESPOKE

HOLLY SPAGNOLA DESIGNS befit riders and their horses.

Using precious metals and gemstones, artist Holly Spagnola crafts outstanding works of art for horses and those who love them. Often working on custom originals for her horse-enthusiast clients, she enjoys the collaboration and creative process as each piece emerges from sketch to an exquisite statement piece. Working in steel, gold, and silver, accented with enamel and pre cious gems, Holly has simultaneously pursued her passion for design and horses for the past 20 years. Expect to see more of her unique buckles, spurs, and bridles alongside her jewelry collections.

1. Custom Centered Diamond Pendant in solid 14-karat white gold and pavé of diamonds. $3,200. 2. Custom Locket. Add a portrait of your favorite animal behind the lattice of silver and gold with diamonds and gemstones.* 3. Seahorses Western Spur in stainless or gunmetal steel with custom-made multi-step design with a gold and sterling overlay.* 4. Custom Gold Band Cuff Bracelet accented with waves of hand engraving and a wrapping of silver and 14-karat gold. $850. 5. Diamond Dee Earrings with snaffles in 18-karat white and yellow gold, sterling silver horse, and a half-carat marquise diamond. As shown, $4,200. 6. Centered Horse Earrings in low-tarnish silver and diamond-like cubic zirconia. Options in yellow and white gold. As shown, $230. 7. The silver Modern Horse Belt Buckle with blue sapphire and lapis.* 8. Sterling silver Engraved English Spur with band of silver and gold and choice of gemstone. $268. 9. The Feathered Wing Western Spur is a custom, multi-step design with solid gold and sterling overlay and stone inset.*
*Price
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
10. Turquoise Halter Buckles in sterling silver and nickel hardware. Per pair $955.
upon request
20 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023 EQ STYLE CONTACT INFO | PAGE 94

SIGNATURE STYLE

previews its vibrant and enchanting OBJECTS COLLECTION in inimitable fashion.

Prices upon request.

CONTACT INFO | PAGE 94

22 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023
1. The Ballerina in suede goatskin. 2. Rouge Hermès limited editions. 3. Arçon bag in Barénia Faubourg calfskin. 4. Mon premier galop 140-centimeter shawl in cashmere and silk. 5. The 65-centimeter Surfing Fan scarf in cotton and silk. 6, 7, 8. Pendants in printed Swift calfskin. 9. Bracelet in Swift calfskin and gold metal. 10, 11. Bracelets in Swift calfskin and steel. 12. Sarazine small size table lamp in H bullcalf.
4 5
EQ DESIGN 10 11 12

NAILS–SOME HOT, AND SOME “NOT”

An excerpt from NEVER TRUST A SNEAKY PONY by

Dr. Seamans,” a young female voice flowed out of my phone early one evening. “I need to come by your clinic and get some ‘Ace,’ please.”

This was a fairly unusual request, as “Ace,” short for “Acepromazine,” is an old drug—one of the first tranquilizers used in horses. So you gotta have some gray hair to even know what it is. It is not a real good sedative, and it doesn’t do much for pain relief, so I had some questions for this client.

“I’d sure like to help you,” I said. “Have I seen your horse before? Why do you need ‘Ace’?”

The woman identified herself and reminded me that I had seen a horse for her a year or so before and said, “My husband shod her yesterday, and now she’s real lame and we need to pull the shoes…I think she may have a ‘hot nail.’”

The term “hot nail” refers to a relatively common problem when a shoeing nail gets placed too close to sensitive tissue, causing fairly severe pain within a few hours after shoeing. This can happen even to the best of farriers, so I don’t consider it to be due to bad shoeing, just bad luck. Several of my clients shoed their own horses, so it was no surprise to me to hear the term.

“Was she lame before he put shoes on?” I asked.

“Yeah, she’s been a little off—that’s why we thought shoes would help. Now she’s really off, so

can I come by your office today and pick up some Ace?” The tone of her response revealed frustration, fear, with maybe an inkling of irritation.

Although I could empathize with this lady, I was limited in what I could do to help. A good veterinary work-up is usually better than just throwing drugs at a horse. Some people want to avoid this step. (I can’t blame them. I have to be just two breaths short of an autopsy before I will seek medical attention for myself.)

Occasionally, I’ll get a call like this from clients requesting drugs— some Bute or Banamine (common pain relievers and anti-inflammatories), or something else they think will help their horses. However, the Veterinary Practice Acts in all fifty states prohibit veterinarians from prescribing any medication for a patient that has not been examined for a specific case. (Try calling your doctor and asking for medication based on your diagnosis. Once he stops laughing, he’ll tell you to come to his office.)

I tried explaining this to my client, adding that Ace was probably not our first choice, anyway. I concluded by saying I’d be glad to see the horse, but I couldn’t dispense drugs without an examination that deemed them necessary, as I didn’t want to do the wrong thing for her horse, besides breaking the law. This did not elevate her mood very much.

“No problem,” she remarked, just a few decibels shy of a shout and quickly enough to suggest that, yes, my response was indeed a problem. “I’ll call Dr.

This excerpt from Never Trust a Sneaky Pony by Madison Seamans, MS, DVM , is reprinted with permission from Trafalgar Square Books.
MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 23 E Q B O K C LUB
BOOKS EQ
BETWEEN THE COVERS

Welcome

NEVER TRUST A SNEAKY PONY

Smith’s office, I’m sure he will help me.” Emphasis on he will.

I wasn’t trying to be difficult, but as many have said before me, good judgement comes from experience, which comes from bad judgement. I was thinking of a case I had seen many years before that had been a powerful lesson in why we should not diagnose a case or make treatment suggestions over the phone.

I had been in practice in the foothills of the Sierra Nevadas near Yosemite National Park for a few years. Back then, there were many companies called “outfitters” that would rent you a horse, or at least help you pack your gear into the back country where the roads were made by elk and deer. The only way to get to some of these places was on foot—yours or those of a horse or mule. One thing all the outfitters had in common was this: by the time they called a vet, it was a wreck with a capital “R.” Most of these outfits were run by real experienced horsemen, so they doctored most of what they could and relied on the hardiness of the breed and the hand of God to do the rest.

“Doc, I think I need your help. One of our best horses stepped on a sixteenpenny nail earlier today...it looks like it went all the way through her foot.”

Knowing this, a call late Sunday night from one of the chief packers in the region got my attention.

“Doc, I think I need your help. One of our best horses stepped on a sixteen-penny nail earlier today, and I’m pretty worried about her cause it looks like it went all the way through her foot—it’s sticking out the top of it. I called another vet, and she wouldn’t even look at the mare but said just put her down, there’s no hope. We’re a ways back in the hills; in fact, I had to drive a half-hour just to get a cell signal. Is there any way I can meet you somewhere to look at this mare? We’d sure like to save her if we can.”

Although I had seen many horse feet with nails in them, this sounded pretty bad. But we arranged to meet at a wide spot in the road about halfway between my place and Mount Everest—or somewhere in the Sierra—so I could look at the horse.

One of the most influential professors I ever had was Dr. Mike Martin at Texas A&M. He taught me

PROUDLY CRAFTED IN THE USA BLACKWOODSTALLS.COM Stalls | Gates | Windows | Dividers
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E Q B O K C LUB BETWEEN THE COVERS BOOKS EQ

A L E X I S K L E T J I A N

lots of things, but one that has really stuck over the years is about diagnostics. “Most of this stuff is really simple,” he told me almost forty years ago. “It’s not what you don’t know, it’s what you don’t look for.” So I have spent the last several decades trying to not only increase my knowledge base but my observation skills, as well.

By a flashlight and the headlights of our trucks, I started examining this mare. She was “threelegged-lame,” which means non-weight-bearing, rather than missing one leg. My first observation was the pyramid-shape point of what looked like large nail protruding from the coronet of her left fore foot. This was bad.

I grabbed a pair of nail pullers from my truck and picked up her foot. She willingly gave it to me with apparent hopes I could help her. I was looking for the head of the nail and hoping that the “shoe puller”—a large, plier-like device that looks like hoof nippers, would help me remove the nail. The idea here is to pull the nail out of the foot from the bottom, grabbing the end with the head on it. This would be much easier and less traumatic than

dragging the head of the nail through the hoof. This may sound like the obvious course of action, but sometimes, in the middle of a wreck like this, the obvious…ain’t.

From the angle that the point of the nail was sticking out of the mare’s coronet, I figured the head had to be about the middle of her frog. The confusing thing was the fact that there are a couple of pretty hefty bones between those two locations. I wondered how the nail got from the frog to the coronet without being shot from one of those air-driven nail guns used by construction workers. A careful examination of the bottom of the foot was not rewarding. To my shock, there was no nail head present! There was also a conspicuous absence of blood, serum, pus…nothing that would be expected from such a traumatic wound. So I put the foot back down and tried to remove the nail point first, thinking maybe the head got broke off somehow. It was stuck. Really stuck.

Continued on page 90

MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 25
“It’s not what you don’t know, it’s what you don’t look for.”
EQ
BOOKS

WELLINGTON, FLORIDA

10 Acre Estate

10+ ACRES - ABILITY TO HAVE 24 STALLS

WELLINGTON, FLORIDA

This private and peaceful estate is situated on 10.83 acres in the heart of Wellington’s premiere gated equestrian subdivision of Palm Beach Point. The main residence has 4 bedrooms all with in-suite bathrooms, plus a pool-side cabana suite with full bath. The home also boasts stone floors, center-island kitchen with gas cooking, a spacious master suite with his and her offices and a home gym. The riders in the family will love the beautifully landscaped 12 stall courtyard barn with 4 wash stalls, lounge, feed & tack rooms. There are also 8 generous sized grass paddocks, round pen and an arena with world class footing lined by beautiful shade trees and viewing gazebo. The property lends itself to a covered arena and or a grass grand prix field. Every detail of this beautiful farm was painstakingly thought through and must be seen to be truly appreciated.

©2023 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.
Matt Johnson Engel
Volkers Florida Selling Wellington & the Palm Beaches 561-313-4367 • MattSells.com

A TRUE EQUESTRIAN ESTATE

This freshly updated 14.5-acre farm has everything the serious equestrian desires. The center-aisle barn has 20 stalls, 2 tack rooms, covered patio overlooking the 100’ x 213’ covered riding arena with mirrors, observation platform and new footing. The farm also boasts an outdoor riding arena with mirrors, round pen, 51’ x 86’ storage garage and detached staff housing with a 3 bedroom & studio apartment. The 4-bedroom plus office main residence with pool has been completed updated from top to bottom with a new floor plan. Simply a must see!

SUE WEAKLEY ©2023 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.
The full-service media agency with an equestrian focus EQmedia.agency 612-209-0310
Matt Johnson Engel & Volkers Florida Selling Wellington & the Palm Beaches 561-313-4367 • MattSells.com
561-313-4367
LOXAHATCHEE, FLORIDA
New Listing

MAKE ROOM FOR STYLE

TOTES AND BACKPACKS for the savvy traveler.

1. Cuyana’s Triple Zipper Overnight Bag in canvas and Italian leather includes a plethora of pockets and compartments. $298. 2. The generous Derby Work Tote by Oughton infuses equestrian details with halter hardware and bridle stitching. $349. 3. The leather Parker Clay Merkato Shopper with brass detailing is perfect for weekend adventures. $198. 4. The Maestra Bag by Senreve, crafted in a supple and scratch-resistant pebbled leather, can be worn as a backpack, tote, or crossbody. Shown in marine. $945.
EQ STYLE 28 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023 CONTACT INFO | PAGE 94 5 7 1 2
5. Parker Clay’s sleek Miramar Backpack in luxe leather can also be worn over the shoulder. Shown in sand. $248. 6. The James River Carry All versatile Saffiano leather tote by Tucker Tweed holds up to barn days and travel. Shown in brick/slate gray combination with dres sage emboss. $279. 7. The spacious Bo Bucket by Flattered in calf leather boasts top handle, adjustable shoulder strap, and drawstring closure. $279.

FOLLOW YOUR DREAM, HOME.

2515 Cypress Island Court

Only New Construction Home Available in Cypress Island | Spectacular Water & Golf Course Views | Pool & Spa | Offered at $11,750,000

Gated Community | Private Equestrian Facility | Grooms Quarters & Owners Suite | 24-stalls | GGT Arena | Offered at $5,995,000

2698 Sheltingham Drive

6 Bedrooms, 9 Baths | Half Acre Lot | 3-Car Garage | Guest House | 8,033 Living Square Feet | Offered at $6,900,000

12522

3 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms | Fully Furnished | Tranquil Preserve Views | Renovated with Designer Finshes | Offered at $2,595,000

11861 Pebblewood Drive

3 Bedrooms, 3 Baths | 2,401 Living Sq Ft. | Screened Balcony | Private Pool | Full Renovation | Offered at $2,200,000

2600 Muirfield Court

3 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms | Scenic Golf Course Views | Updated Kitchen | Two Primary Suites | Tranquil Front Courtyard | Offered at $1,375,000

Carol.Sollak@evrealestate.com

©2023 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.
A. Sollak,
W.
Carol
P.A. Engel & Völkers Wellington 10620
Forest Hill Blvd #40 Wellington Florida 33414 +1 561-818-9476
more at carolsollak.evrealestate.com
Learn
Mallet Circle 12995 Via Christina

A TASTE OF OCALA

Executive Chef of Ocala’s World Equestrian Center, VINCENT CANI, shares one of his favorite recipes.

CARROT PORRIDGE, PICKLED CORN CHOW CHOW, CRUSHED PISTACHIO, BLUE BORAGE

INGREDIENTS

(One serving)

4 each large carrots, peeled

2 cups homemade vegetable stock

1 teaspoon Baharat (seven spice)

Sea salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste

½ cup cooked creamy polenta

1 ounce crushed roasted and salted pistachios

½ oz pickled corn chow chow (see recipe)

3 each blue borage flowers

METHOD

1. In a medium sauce pot over high heat bring the vegetable stock to a boil and add the carrots, reduce to a simmer, and cook slowly until fork tender. Remove carrots from the liquid and add to a Vitamix blender and begin to puree adding hot stock as needed until smooth. Place in a bowl, season with sea salt and black pepper to taste. Stir in the seven spice and reserve.

2. Next, fold in the hot creamy polenta until the mixture resembles loose mashed potatoes.

3. Place the porridge in a serving bowl, garnish with crushed pistachios, pickled corn chow chow, and the blue borage flowers.

Chef Cani has been at the World Equestrian Center (WEC) since its opening in 2021. He supports the culinary operations throughout the resort and oversees all food and beverage operations including a luxury fine-dining restaurant, upscale bar, pool cabana restaurant, four fast-casual satellite restaurants, two banquet kitchens, a bakery, a general store and eight concession

PICKLED CORN CHOW CHOW INGREDIENTS

1 cup white vinegar

¾ cup granulated sugar

2 tablespoons salt

1 tablespoon mustard seed

1 teaspoon ground turmeric

1 tablespoon jalapeño pepper, diced 2 cups sweet corn kernels, removed from the cob

1 cup red and green bell pepper, diced ½ cup yellow onion, diced

METHOD

1. Dice red (or green) bell peppers and onions into pieces about the size of the kernels of corn.

2. Mix the vinegar, sugar, salt, pickling spice, turmeric, and red pepper flakes in a large pot over high heat. Bring brine to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally to make sure the sugar is fully dissolved. Remove from heat and completely chill the brine in the refrigerator.

3 . Mix corn, peppers, and onions, and divide into 4 half-pint Mason jars and pour brine over to fill.

4. Put on lids and refrigerate. They will be ready to enjoy in 5 days and will last in the fridge for up to 3 months.

stands. Before coming to WEC, Chef Cani spent ten years working for the 1,240-room Hilton Orlando, where he was executive sous chef. During his tenure there, he became passionate about large-scale event hospitality, learning how to keep up with culinary trends and developing a neo-ethnic approach to cuisine. He also served as a member of several culinary task forces for other Hilton properties in Dallas, Texas, Washington D.C., and Denver, Colorado, to assist with hotel openings and carry out new concept

initiatives. Prior to his work at the Hilton, Chef Cani helped guide the success of BB King’s Blues Club in Manhattan, N.Y., where he worked as their executive chef. A New York native, Chef Cani comes from a family that cherished their time gathered around the dinner table, which fostered his life-long love of the culinary arts. He completed his education at the Culinary Academy of Long Island where he learned to come to the kitchen with positivity, and passion, traits he brings with him today.

Chef Vincent Cani Executive Chef, World Equestrian Center—Ocala
CONTACT INFO | PAGE 94
EQ FOOD+DRINK 30 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023 L O C AL F L A VOR HORSEFAVORITESCOUNTRY
Night Stars February 24 CDI3* Grand Prix Freestyle March 3 CDI-W Grand Prix Freestyle presented by IDA Development March 17 CDI5* Grand Prix Freestyle at Wellington International March 24 CDI4* Grand Prix Freestyle presented by Douglas Elliman Real Estate ADRIENNE LYLE & SALVINO • © SUSAN J. STICKLE PHOTOGRAPHY
Saturday through March 25 FREE GENERAL ADMISSION • PARKING $20/CAR • Gates open at 6:00 p.m. Saturday Night Lights February 18 $100,000 WCHR/USHJA Hunter Spectacular February 25 $425,000 Lugano Diamonds Grand Prix CSI5* March 4 $150,000 Nations Cup CSIO4* presented by IDA Development March 11 $425,000 Wellington Equestrian Realty Grand Prix CSI5* March 18 $226,000 Horseware Ireland Grand Prix CSI4* March 25 $146,000 CaptiveOne 1.50m Final CSI4* Wellington International 3400 Equestrian Club Dr. • Wellington, FL 33414 • wellingtoninternational.com • (561) 793-JUMP Equestrian Village 13500 South Shore Blvd • Wellington, FL 33414 • globaldressagefestival.com Fridays through March 24 FREE GENERAL ADMISSION • PARKING $20/CAR • Gates open at 6:00 p.m.
Friday
Every

CATHERINE ZADEH’S IMPASSIONED POINT OF VIEW

Born in Iran, THE FOUNDER OF ZADEH NY addresses the country’s demonstrations, and the impact oppression has on the creative expression of its citizens.

Catherine Zadeh, the founder and creative visionary behind the Zadeh brand, is deeply rooted in the current events in her birth country, Iran. As a jewelry designer grounded in passion and integrity, she expresses disdain for the oppressive regime yet an undeniable hope that the bravery of the Iranian women become the catalyst for change in her essay below.

The equestrian community has long embraced Catherine Zadeh’s timeless, structural works of art.

Fashion is a window into a country’s state of mind and culture. The hijab in the Islamic Republic of Iran started as a symbol of modesty and respect for women, a religious symbol. But today, it has become, for many, a symbol of repression and the male patriarchy.

I was 6 years old when my family left Tehran for Paris along with hundreds of other families who sensed the beginning of the turmoil about to unfold in Iran. The Iran we left was a country of warmth, of culture, of history—indeed, it was once the cradle of civilization. The people of Iran were elegant; they had style and personality. Meet any Iranian ex-pat—whether in Paris, New York, or Los Angeles and they have strong opinions. They throw the best parties; they are the most hospitable and they cook the best food. They have a zest for life—a joie de vivre—that is infectious. Our culture is vibrant. It’s alive and well.

For 40 years, the Iranian regime has attempted to break people’s spirits. But inside people’s homes, beneath the veils, nothing has changed even though the economy has been in disarray, corruption has been rampant, and hypocrisy has been suffocating. The brutal murder of Mahsa Amini at the hands of the “morality police” for not wearing her hijab properly was the last straw that broke the camel’s back.

I have mixed feelings as I see the growing unrest and violence against protesters, particularly against the brave Iranian youth, male and female. I am incensed, yet so hopeful and so proud. I pray for the collapse of this evil regime and for the fierce youth who have resolved to fight.

Don’t be surprised that Iranian women are the catalysts of this latest revolution. They are strong, educated, and fearless, and this regime knows that the only way to survive is to kill them without mercy and to humiliate them. But they’ve been gravely underestimated. The persistence of the demonstrations shows just how courageous and fierce Iranian women are—arguably more so than the men who preceded them in the Iranian Revolution of 1979 or the protests of 2009

Fashion is a way to express one’s individuality, but it’s also an expression of our time: who we are as a society. The Paris-Milan-New York fashion circuit always bursts with creativity, ingenuity,

Catherine Zadeh
34 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023 EQ PEOPLE
Kimberly elongated wood pendant with 18-karat pink gold ring on parachute cord and sprinkles of diamonds. $8,400. MATTHEW STARR

and even controversy. It’s electric. They have so much to say and are free to do so. My motto has always been “live and let live.” I can only imagine what the streets and the runways of Iran might look like if the beauty and artistry of the Iranian people were unleashed. But when you’ve been robbed of your individuality, of your right to choose what to wear and how to wear it, when you are constantly repressed, and your voice muffled, there comes a time when you have nothing left to lose. The time has come.

What are my hopes for Iran?

I see Iran as a beacon of hope for the entire Middle East. These women are fighting not only for their freedom but for the freedom all the subjugated women of the entire Middle East: Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Yemen. The list goes on.

Above: Catherine with her daughters. From left, Celine, Chloe, Catherine, and Sophie. Amado black and yellow gold cuff. $38,000. Blake pendant with 18-karat white gold on parachute cord. $4,450.
MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 35 EQ PEOPLE CONTACT INFO | PAGE 94 MATTHEW STARR
Brant women’s cuff in 18-karat rose gold and diamonds. $9,950.

THE UBIQUITOUS CHELSEA

The classic boot, popular for its versatility, transitions easily COUNTRY JAUNTS to URBAN OUTINGS

The Modtray boot in a Chelsea silhouette by ECCO is a contemporary update to a classic style. Full-grain leathers and a Tredtray insignia elevate the design. The lightweight, lugged sole provides additional cushioning and flexibility. Shown in taupe. $189.99.

The Wexford waterproof countryside boot by

merges a beautiful design with high-performance and protective features. The waterproof suede upper and durable sole render the stylish boot suitable for the elements outdoors or an evening out with friends. Shown

Blundstone’s mate workhorse. The boot, crafted from water-resistant leather, robust lugs, and a shock-absorbing footbed, is designed to stabilize footing over rough terrain. Includes a removable insole. Shown in rustic black. At Nordstrom,

Fairfax & Favor’s boot boasts practicality and style. The all-terrain boot with waxed leather will effortlessly transition you from muddy fields to a cozy fireside tavern. The snug lining is idyllic for spending time in nature without forfeiting style. Shown in oak leather. $345.

The Leopold Chelsea boot by Steve Madden introduces a lug sole that updates the traditional staple with a casual-hip style. The brand, known for its blend of cool and edgy, consistently maintains an effortless balance of whimsy and innovation. Shown in tan suede. $119.95. The Oscar leather boot, in a black and bronze combination by Penelope Chilvers with roots in southern Spain, showcases Caramelo stitchwork that runs up the back and zig-zag edges on the gussets. The warm panel of bronze metallic gives the boot an urban twist. $399. $229.95. Ariat
36 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023 EQ FASHION CONTACT INFO | PAGE 94
Horse Barns I Bank Barns I Indoor Arenas I Garages I Restoration I Venues I 717.768.3200 I precisebuildings.com Building Your Dreams, Preserving Your Legacy

THE MONGOL DERBY

38 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023
PHOTOS SHERI THOMPSON & THE EQUESTRIANISTS

The world’s longest and toughest equestrian endurance race, the Mongol Derby, spans 600 miles and lasts 10 days. The self-navigated race through Mongolia on semi-wild Mongolian horses was something Mary Donohue never thought she could accomplish.

Despite growing up an avid horseback rider and a part of the St. Lawrence University equestrian team, Mary had never considered entering this kind of equestrian event.

That all changed in 2019 when Mary met Krista Carter, a fellow equestrian, while living in Japan. The two fast friends, who had never participated in endurance riding and had not been consistently riding over the last several years, decided to apply for the race as a team.

After follow-up interviews, the race organizers offered Mary and Krista spots for the 2021 Mongol Derby.

THE RIDE OF A LIFETIME
MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 39

But, due to COVID-19, the race was postponed, and Mary returned to the United States. Back in the U.S., Mary’s training intensified, riding as many horses as she could every day around her work schedule. Mary and Krista found an invaluable connection with trainer Stevie Delahunt who specializes in training endurance riders and often specifically in preparation for the Mongol Derby. They went to training with Stevie twice over the course of two years, once in Oregon and once in Northern California. At Stevie’s, Mary and Krista had more reallife experiences of what the derby would be like. With the same GPS technology that would be used in the race, they set out on horseback to practice self-navigating, getting from point A to point B.

Training with Stevie made a world of difference,”

Mary explains. “It made me feel as prepared and confident as possible for the derby. But, it also made me feel the magnitude of what the actual race would entail. The feeling of panic set in and kicked in the motivation to train harder.”

The time had finally come to journey to Mongolia. Mary and the other 45 race participants gathered at a hotel in Ulaanbaatar, the capital of Mongolia. Mary describes the energy of the group. “The group was buzzing with excitement, but there was a clear sense of a competitive edge,” Mary said. From the hotel, the participants set out to the race

start point on a six-hour bus ride along Mongolian roads with no rest stops.

For the race, riders must weigh less than 185 pounds when dressed to ride, and are allowed to carry only eleven pounds of additional weight. “Eleven pounds doesn’t go very far,” explained Mary. “I could only pack one additional shirt, a pair of pants, sleeping supplies, a raincoat, contacts, sunscreen, and a toothbrush.” Ready to battle the elements, she and Krista set a goal to finish the race in the competitive category, which meant not requiring any additional help from race staff. At the three-day start camp, race staff prepared riders with the regulations of the race. They could ride from seven o’clock in the morning to seven o’clock at night. If they rode beyond seven, they incurred penalties. There were checkpoints every 25 to 30 miles, where veterinarians would monitor the horses’ heart rates, and riders would change horses. If your horse’s heart rate was too high, you had to wait two hours before continuing. “Krista and I were very proud that we never got a vet penalty,” Mary expressed. She noted that, at times, they dismounted their horses and hand-walked them into the vet checkpoint.

Mary went into the race thinking that the Mongolian horses would be wild and unruly. However, she found that these small but mighty horses, standing no more than 14.3 hands high, were not unlike the horses she knew back home. “Some are fresh, some are handled a lot, some not at all, some are cuddly and

lazy, others fiery and bold,” she said. “Figuring out each horse was the most rewarding part of the race. As an equestrian, being able to quickly analyze what you have underneath you and how you’re going to get that horse to the next station was fulfilling.

“We rode through deserts, mountains, rivers, and valleys,” she continued. “The terrain was incredible, the views were amazing, and everything was untouched. We were pounded by the elements, and there were days of frigid temperatures and then days of intense sweltering heat.”

One of her favorite parts of the race was spending nights with Mongolian civilians. Mary and Krista always chose to push on if they got to a vet check before seven o’clock and then find a Mongolian family that would let them stay the night. Provided with a letter written in Mongolian describing the race, five families welcomed Mary and Krista into their homes during the event.“Some of the most amazing times and memories were staying with the Mongolians,” she said.

“The most difficult challenge was to navigate,” noted Mary. “You never knew if the path you decided to take was the right one.” Mary’s biggest takeaway from the experience was what she and Krista were able to accomplish together. “It was incredible,” she said. “We were dedicated to staying together, and despite it not making us any faster, we did it.”

MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 41
CONTACT INFO | PAGE 94
Provided with a letter written in Mongolian describing the race, five families welcomed Mary and Krista into their homes during the event. “Some of the most amazing times and memories were staying with the Mongolians,” Mary said.
42 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023
TAKE
McLainWard’s
A TOUR OF

Castle Hill Farm

MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 43
PHOTOS GEORGE KAMPER
44 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023 1 2

2. THE

originally a dairy operation, was built in 1910 by financier Daniel Drew and then purchased by Max Dreyfus, a Broadway producer. When Dreyfus passed away, it was donated to Cornell University and sat vacant for nearly 30 years until it was purchased by McLain’s father in late 1979.

3. SAPPHIRE, the legendary mare, was Ward’s partner for many years. She was inducted into the Horse Stars Hall of Fame and was the 2009 USEF Show Jumping Horse of the Year. Ward says, “I’ve never had a horse that put it all together the way she did.”

MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 45 3 4 5 6 7 JENNIFER WOOD MEDIA
1. McLAIN WARD, a four-time Olympic medalist, has represented the U.S. at the world’s biggest competitions since he was 14 years old, when he became the youngest rider to win the USEF Show Jumping Derby. FARM, 4|5. LEE AND ERICA McKEEVER, with their daughter, Baylee, at the memorial to Sapphire. The McKeevers have managed the operation for over 30 years. 6|7. CASTLE HILL is located in Brewster, N.Y. adjacent to North Salem horse country. It comprises 53 acres, 14 of which are used for horses, with the remainder wooded.
46 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023 1 2 3

4.

with four fireplaces, a working Brunswick bowling lane, and a band on one side, was built by second owner, Max Dreyfus, who produced Broadway musicals with Rodgers and Hammerstein, George Gershwin, and Cole Porter, and hosted parties with guests like Fred Astaire. Today, it serves as a play space for the children or for basketball games for the adults.

MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 47 4
5 1.|6. PRIZES, AWARDS, AND MEMORIES are proudly displayed in the barn’s lounge which overviews the arenas and has a large-screen TV streaming live feeds of equestrian events throughout the world. 2.|3. THE TACK ROOM AND “LIBRARY” The bit cabinet is known as the Library. Erica McKeever says, “Every one tells a story.” THE GRAND OLD BALLROOM,
6
5. ORIGINALLY A DAIRY BARN, the large stalls were once a temporary home for the elephants of the Ringling Brothers Circus, based in nearby Somers, N.Y.

1. THE HOME of McLain and Lauren Ward sits on a hill overlooking the farm on the spot McLain’s father, Barney, had his house. Ward is a talented designer and has enjoyed renovating almost 10 houses in Wellington, Florida. He lives in the homes throughout the competition season, sells them, and begins again the following year. The Ward’s spent three years creating their home at Castle Hill with builder Chris Munch.

2. THIS COTTAGE was the home of the Wards prior to building their new home.

Meet the McKeevers in Equestrian Living’s March/April 2022 issue: eqliving.com/mar-apr22/

48 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023 1 2
MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 49

THE TENTH ANNUAL EQUESTRIAN LIVING TRAVEL GUIDE

TRAVEL DIARIES

“Christine announced that she had arranged for renowned British equestrian photographer Georgina Preston to come to Virginia, for a month to do photoshoots.”

WELBOURNE INN, PAGE 64

“Both George and I were grinning from ear to ear as we gave our horses lots of pats and praise and walked them back to the stables.”

CASTLE LESLIE ESTATE, PAGE 58

“Royal Enclosure rules are incontestable: no lady will be admitted without a hat. What a calamity.”

“The light-flooded aerie was tastefully appointed with English hunt country furnishings, chintz fabrics, and wallpapers in muted huntergreens, burgundies, and rusts.”

WE TAKE YOU ALONG

“This was so much more valuable than a honeymoon, celebrating our marriage rather than just a wedding.”

ROYAL ASCOT, PAGE 52 CHARLOTTE INN, PAGE 76
FOUR SEASONS LANAI, PAGE 70
BY REBECCA BALDRIDGE

ROYAL ASCOT

It was a magnificent hat. Cream-colored, saucershaped, with a profusion of pink, navy, and cream bows exploding from the back. A hairdresser had pinned it atop my hair like a crown. Imagine my dismay when it slipped its delicate bonds and parted company with my head a mere two hundred yards from the entrance to the storied Ascot Racecourse.

This may sound like a minor annoyance to you, dear reader, but it hit me like a falling brick. This was the opening day of Royal Ascot, and I was hot-footing it to the Royal Enclosure. For an avowed Anglophile and lover of the turf, this was a red-letter day, the sweet finale of months of effort. And it was all crumbling to bits because of an ill-fitting hat. Royal Enclosure rules are incontestable: no lady will be admitted without a hat. There was no way I was going to get that cream-colored confection re-anchored short of using a staple gun. What a calamity.

Royal Ascot is the world’s most famed horse racing event, the highlight of England’s summer social season, and a celebration of royal pageantry. Windsor Castle rises magnificently in the distance, overlooking the velvet green of the track, and each day of racing begins with the Royal Procession from the Castle, traditionally led by Her Majesty

MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 53
PHOTOS: ROYAL ASCOT
REBECCA BALDRIDGE EXPERIENCES A MILLINERY MALFUNCTION.
A PERSONAL TRAVEL DIARY
“While Ascot offers a variety of enjoyable options for racing aficionados to view the sport, there was only one for me—the Royal Enclosure .”
PHOTOS: ROYAL ASCOT

the Queen—now of late memory, alas—in a gleaming landau flanked by outriders.

While Ascot offers a variety of enjoyable options for racing aficionados to view the sport, there was only one for me—the Royal Enclosure. In 1845 , authorities enclosed the area in front of the Royal Stand for a visit by Czar Nicholas I. It was immediately the most exclusive precinct of the racecourse and remains so today.

The Royal Enclosure maintains its distinction by limiting admission to invited members and their guests. The inclusion process begins with a deceptively simple application on the racecourse website. The kicker is that two current members, each with a minimum of seven years standing, must support the application. That was a challenge for a Yank unaccustomed to tippling

with London’s toffs and swells.

As good fortune had it, Lavell, my boon companion on many an adventure, is not only English but an Oxford graduate with enough Old Boy Etonian ex-boyfriends to crew a coxed four. “Leave it with me,” she said reassuringly. Letters were sent, old favors called in, and after what seemed an eternity, success! For just one hundred of the soundest of His Majesty’s most sovereign pounds, we were Royal Enclosure Members for life!

While getting into the Royal Enclosure takes some doing, racegoers have other options available for the price of a ticket. The Queen Anne Enclosure is business class compared to the Royal Enclosure’s first. Gentlemen can wear business suits, although most still opt for the traditional top hat and tails. The Village and Windsor Enclosures are progressively less formal.

Each enclosure has its own unique atmosphere, but the

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A PERSONAL TRAVEL DIARY The Ascot shop chapeau that saved the day. PHOTOS: ROYAL ASCOT LAVELL THOMPSON

Royal Enclosure is draconian in its rules. Formal day wear is de rigueur, and hats, not fascinators, are mandatory. No bare shoulders, no halter necks, and certainly no spaghetti straps or miniskirts. We are ladies! Gentlemen must wear a black or gray morning coat, striped trousers, waistcoat, and a top hat. And woe to he whose shoes are not black!

We collected our Royal Enclosure badges, our names meticulously handwritten, and passed through the gates. Clasping the errant hat to my head, I threaded through the throngs of gloriously-topped guests. This was insupportable!

Lavell gave me a gentle prod, “Ahoy! A shop!” Near the back, amidst the official Ascot-branded tea towels, travel mugs, neckties, and sundry souvenirs stood a rack bearing a small collection of straw hats. Perfect for a polo match, but for the Royal Enclosure…well, it would have to do. An elegant blond woman passed by wearing an airy

organza dress and stunning chapeau worthy of the Duchess of Cambridge. I winced, clamped the poor straw to my head, and assumed an elegant attitude. No hat was going to spoil this long-awaited day.

Outlook adjusted, we entered the Royal Enclosure and strolled through a garden dotted with delicate wooden tables lightly shaded by expansive white umbrellas. Men in stripey trousers and top hats poured bubbly for ladies bristling with brilliant plumage. The grass was so green, the sky cerulean, the sun hot as blazes. Concerned I might burst into flames in the sunlight, I suggested we might be happier inside in the shade.

The racecourse building might look familiar to some— it doubled for Shanghai Airport in Skyfall . We passed several swell restaurants, as well as a multitude of bars and stalls offering Pimm’s and champagne. If you don’t

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A PERSONAL TRAVEL DIARY PHOTO: QUINTESSENTIALLY

have a pal with a passel of Old Boys at her beck and call, here’s an expensive secret. Book a table at one of the Royal Enclosure’s fine dining halls and get a badge for the day. There are four: the Sandringham, Trackside, Veranda, and Parade Ring, each featuring menus by Michelin-starred chefs. While its costs upwards of £900* per person, you get a table for the entire day, free-flowing champagne, and afternoon tea to boot. Equestrian dreams rarely come cheap.

Inside, a party was underway all ‘round the compass. We ascended an escalator and found ourselves a shady roost in the stands. It was so gallingly hot that Lavell and I rejected the champers for a couple of icy ladylike pints. We staked out a comfortable spot with an excellent view over the track, taking care to ensure that no voluminous headgear was blocking the action. As is my way, I started to get impatient—it was going on 2 p.m. Looking toward Windsor, I suddenly spied the Royal Procession in the distance. At last, the Queen! I fizzed with excitement. Who doesn’t love Her Majesty? And the Duchess of Cambridge! What would she wear?

The regal landaus rolled into view, the horses glossy and tossing their manes, the coachmen and footmen splendid in red and gold. I’ve always said few things are more magnificent than England’s equestrian pageantry. Wait—that’s not Her Majesty! It was Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall. Perfectly nice, but where is the Anglophile’s favorite granny? Alas, age respects not a crown, and the Queen was suffering from “mobility issues.” This would turn out to be the only Royal Meeting Her Majesty missed in the entirety of her reign. She had horses running too! We suppressed our concerns and turned back to the action.

We stayed for six races, all run on turf, and took a walk past the Parade Ring to see the jockeys in bright silks, astride their sleek mounts. Lavell’s Old Etonian friend, the lovely fellow who enabled the day’s pleasures, expertly walked us through the racing form. His advice seemed sound, and Lavell, ever up for a flutter, jogged keenly to the betting windows. At the end

of the day’s action, she left the track sufficiently wedged up to stand us a fine dinner back in London.

On Friday, in the interest of journalistic inclusiveness (and late in requesting guest badges for our friends), we sat in the Queen Anne Enclosure. The delightful team from Quintessentially, a luxury lifestyle management and concierge firm, had also planned something special for us: they swung us an invite to the owners’ and trainers’ picnic in the car park. Count on them to arrange a one-of-a-kind experience.

In the shade of a soaring oak, Lavell and I met up with Quintessentially’s CEO Darren Ellis, U.S. head Lauren Wilt, and Catherine Mills (opposite page) , their doyenne of all things equestrian. A table tantalized with a variety of rosé wines and to my palate, those most English of dainties—tiny Scotch eggs and hardboiled quail’s eggs with sea salt. A stately marchioness, the first I’d ever spotted in the wild, offered me a bite-sized sausage roll from a silver tray. It was such fun chatting that we very nearly missed the Royal Procession.

The Queen Anne Enclosure did not disappoint. The crowd skewed younger than in the Royal Enclosure, but the racegoers were elegant, with most gentlemen wearing top hats. We staked out a table under an awning and ate pizza with champagne, trotting back and forth to place our bets and watch the races. It was a wonderful party, and with an Ascot-worthy chapeau atop my tiny head, all was as it should be.

By the time we called it a day, it was nearly 11 p.m. What should have been a £20* cab ride to Richmond was now on offer for £150. Step aside, my too-gentle English friends, I said. I haggled, not to say wrestled, the driver down to £100. Fair play to all, as they say on the turf.

And so, I am satisfied. The experience surpassed the Anglophile’s fantasy. I leave you with one warning, my fellow Americans, to avoid the pained wince of refined British disapproval. It’s pronounced AS cut .

*£1=$1.23

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PHOTOS: ROYAL ASCOT

CROSS-COUNTRY SCHOOLING

Ispent my teenage years immersed in Pony Club and spent as much time as possible every day in the saddle. I’ve worked at barns in the U.S. and abroad, and I’ve done my share of riding cross-country. But these days, as a middle-aged mom of two living just outside New York City, my riding time is limited. I’m able to part-lease a nice dressage horse, and when I visit my parents on their farm near Tryon, North Carolina, I can ride to my heart’s content. But my opportunities to school crosscountry these days are few and far between. When I arranged a trip to Castle Leslie Estate in Ireland (EQLiving Gold List seven-time winner of favorite destination) in September that included a cross-country schooling session, it was with equal parts excitement and apprehension.

Castle Leslie Estate, located on 1,000-acres in Glaslough, County Monaghan, is a horse-lover’s fairytale come true. The full-service equestrian

facilities feature top-notch stables, miles of bridle paths and cross-country jumps, and an indoor arena.

I traveled with my friend George Barry, whom I’ve known since we were teenagers in Pony Club, and our families have remained close friends over the years. George and my brother were both on the International Tetrathlon exchange team in the late 1990s, and he’s a very capable rider, but he now lives in Christchurch, New Zealand and works in the city. While he recently went on a riding trek, he is also out of practice and short on time in the saddle—though he competes in Ironman Triathlons these days, so he certainly has the fitness.

George was back in Ireland visiting family, and we met up at his childhood home near Kells, County Meath. He was able to scrounge up an old pair of riding breeches and his brother’s old hunting boots that probably hadn’t seen the light of day in a couple of decades. (Mark has lived in London for more than 20 years now.) The brown tops gave

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A PERSONAL TRAVEL DIARY
IRELAND’S CASTLE LESLIE ESTATE IS A HORSE-LOVER’S FAIRYTALE COME TRUE.
The Lodge, and Oriel Room
“We really wanted to head to the scenic section of the lake where you can ride through the water with the castle as a backdrop.”

him some vintage, fashionable flair. The person I’d emailed at the stables assured us that they stock a quality selection of certified helmets and body protectors. I am notorious for over-packing, so I decided to spare the space in my suitcase and leave mine at home. I did pack a pair of breeches in a performance material, lightweight and quick-drying waterproof paddock boots (Irish weather being unpredictable), lightweight half chaps, and a pair of woven gloves (which offer better grip than leather when they get wet). Thunderstorms had been predicted, but the morning dawned sunny and warm, and a long-sleeved sun shirt completed the ensemble.

A night in the Lodge, where the rooms overlook the stables, with a gourmet six-course dinner in the evening and a full Irish breakfast the next morning in Snaffles restaurant left us refreshed, well-fueled, and eager to get in the saddle. Our session was booked for 11 a.m., and I checked with the front desk staff, who graciously allowed us to check out late so we could shower and change after riding since we were leaving that day for our next destination.

After wandering out to the stables to watch a group of riders who had traveled from the western United States get acquainted with their horses, we met our instructor Steven, who cheerfully introduced us to our mounts: a big gray mare named Blueberry for me, and a solidly built dark bay gelding named Arnie for George. After selecting the right-size helmets and body protectors from a wellstocked room, we mounted up and headed to the indoor arena for an introductory session.

The horses are well-trained and used to a variety of riders, and we put them through their paces at a walk, trot, and canter and schooled a small show jump at trot and canter so that Steven could assess our abilities. I’ve ridden mostly Thoroughbreds in eventing over the years, and their forward and light way of going that tends to require more support from the rider is strongly in contrast to the Irish horses, who tend to be heavier, strong, and independent-minded. You’re better off giving them their head, keeping your leg on, and sitting back,

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George Barry and the author.

trusting that they know their job.

While Steven explained that there are a few different options for schooling, we really wanted to head to the scenic section of the lake, where you can ride through the water with the castle as a backdrop. We had scheduled a one-hour session, and began by crossing through a preserved conservation area, then hung a right up a hill past the Flying Five, a series of log jumps where we would end the schooling session later that morning.

At the top of the hill, we reached the front of the castle, which is also accessible by a road from the Lodge. We stopped well in front of the building and its manicured lawns for a quick photo opportunity and then proceeded along a dirt track lined with stately old trees and flanked by lush, green pastures where the horses are turned out daily. Beyond the pastures, we could see the glint of sunlight on the lake, our ultimate destination, but we had to loop out beyond the fields to get there. On the way, we hopped over a couple of small logs, Steven advising us to take it slow and get a feel for the horses. They were eager to jump, and Blueberry took the

lead with Arnie close behind. I began to feel confident that this would be a straightforward, positive experience.

Many years ago, when I was working at a show-jumping yard near Naas in County Kildare, and George was building cross-country jumps at Punchestown, the two of us embarked on another riding holiday. We schooled cross-country then and jumped massive stone walls, combinations, ditches, and banks. The horses were sure-footed and eager, making the jumps seem easy, but before this trip, it was in the back of my mind that a repeat of that experience might be out of my current comfort zone. I needn’t have worried as all of the jumps at Castle Leslie Estate are on the small side, maybe the equivalent of novice height here.

After going through a gate near the Old Stable Mews, which are also available as accommodations, we headed back towards the castle and jumped a few fences along the way. Steven advised that I sit back a bit and keep my leg on, and Blueberry sailed through without a care in the world. My lack of riding fitness frustrated me because my lower leg wasn’t as secure as I’d have liked. But

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A PERSONAL TRAVEL DIARY Steven Carty.

overall, I was pleased that I was still able to maintain my position in the saddle, and, because the jumps were small, I felt like a kid on a big pony out for a lark in the fields.

At the lake, we let the horses splash around a bit, took some photos with the castle in the background, and met up with the larger group of American riders, who watched our schooling session for a few minutes before moving on. George and I trotted through the water and out over a couple of steps up.

Steven gamely took my phone and recorded videos of us riding, which we enjoyed watching later. After jumping a couple more fences near the water, we walked the horses back across the field and then up the lane toward the castle, chatting amicably on the way. Steven shared stories about the estate and the horses that live there and talked about how he’d left the horse world for a while but was drawn back to riding and enjoys his days working at the stables.

At the castle, we turned right and came to our final

destination, the Flying Five. Steven gave us some advice for riding the line at a steady pace and suggested getting the horses to the base of the fourth fence, the largest of the five, and keeping our leg on. He waited at the top of the hill with the video rolling while we walked down to the bottom and then cantered back up, the eager Blueberry once again taking the lead with Arnie following close behind. By now, I felt like I was back in the groove and in sync with the mare, and the line rode perfectly. Steven took us on a short walk through the woods to see the ice house that once served to keep food for the castle cold, and he continued chatting about the history of the estate. As the horses cooled down from their exertions, both George and I were grinning from ear to ear as we gave our horses lots of pats and praise and walked them back to the stables. We were both thrilled to be back in the saddle, enchanted by the fairytale setting and feeling on top of the world.

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CONTACT INFO | PAGE 94
George Barry and Blueberry.

THE WELBOURNE INN

As an interior designer, I am fortunate enough to have the opportunity to bring a client’s dream to life by incorporating their life as an equestrian with the modern comforts of home. I love the search for the perfect piece of furniture or accessory—it makes me feel like a museum curator pulling together one-of-a-kind treasures to create a cohesive collection that tells a story. For almost as long as I’ve been an interior designer, I have wanted my own shop to showcase a collection of my favorite treasures. I am inspired by the elegance and history of equestrian culture, particularly British, and I designed Modern Equestrian Shop so enthusiasts could create the equestrian look in their own homes. From equestrian artwork to cozy cashmere tartan blankets and saddle leather boxes with brass stirrup buckles, these items are meant to complement an equestrian’s collection of tack and treasures from the barn to create a

cohesive equestrian aesthetic in the home.

As I was searching for the perfect equestrian art prints while redecorating my equestrian bedroom, I came across four vintage prints from Hart Equestrian that stopped me in my tracks. Hart Equestrian, a name that combines Christine Parrish’s two passions— horses and art, is a collection of luxury equestrian home décor inspired by the personal aesthetic she wanted for her own home. She has a passion for uniting equestrian creatives, sharing the work of artists, past and present, and sharing treasures from the past, giving a second life to pieces that may have been lost to history. After posting photos of the final installation of the vintage prints in my home, Christine responded with gratitude, and a friendship began.

Christine and I both expressed an interest in doing a joint photoshoot since our products worked so well together. When Christine announced that she had arranged

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MAJOR PHOTOGRAPHY BY PRESTON EQUESTRIAN STARS ALIGNED IN VIRGINIA HUNT COUNTRY LINDSAY HUNTER A PERSONAL TRAVEL DIARY

“As I drove through the stone gates of Welbourne, I immediately felt like I had journeyed back in time.”

for renowned British equestrian photographer Georgina Preston to come to Middleburg, Virginia, for a month to do photoshoots and had also planned a luncheon event for equestrian business owners where Georgina would be the Guest of Honor; it was an opportunity I couldn’t refuse.

Lisa Harris, the owner and jewelry designer of Savenac 1821, would also be attending this event. Inspired by her grandmother’s classic equestrian style and her Virginia horse farm, Savenac, built in 1821, Lisa designs luxury pieces intended to be family heirlooms for the next generation of equestrians. Lisa worked in the fashion and jewelry business for many years, but it wasn’t until she reconnected with riding that she decided to create a collection of luxury equestrian jewelry.

Upon discovering that Savenac 1821, Hart Equestrian, Modern Equestrian Shop, and Georgina Preston would all be in Middleburg simultaneously, it was clear that the stars were aligned for us to collaborate on a photoshoot. While discussing

possible venues, Lisa suggested the Welbourne Inn, a historic home now a bed and breakfast, which she had seen in the April 2019 issue of Equestrian Living. We needed an exceptional equestrian property to showcase our products in a setting that exuded character and a classic equestrian lifestyle, and the Welbourne Inn was just the right vibe. As I drove through the stone gates of Welbourne and down the long gravel driveway, I immediately felt like I had journeyed back in time. Built in 1775 , the Welbourne was purchased in 1830 and has been in the family for eight generations. The innkeeper explained that it was the home of her great-great-great grandfather, Richard Henry Dulany, who in 1840 founded the Piedmont Fox Hounds, the oldest fox hunting club in the nation, and in 1853 founded the nation’s oldest horse show, the Upperville Colt and Horse Show. The inn has hosted guests such as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Thomas Wolfe, and even Jackie Kennedy while she was fox hunting. The home is furnished with original antiques, art, and enchanting treasures, like a living museum.

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LINDSAY HUNTER

While scouting out the rooms, we were immediately drawn to the rich, red walls of the Library, its shelves of old books, a green leather sofa from the early 1900s, layered antique rugs, and the morning light streaming in through the sheer drapery. Georgina declared that the light chose that room, so we set up in the Library, adjacent to the guest room where F. Scott Fitzgerald had stayed.

As fortune would have it, Georgina’s close friend, artist Madeleine de St. Pierre Bunbury, had accompanied her on the trip from England, and Georgina persuaded her to model for us. We knew of her accomplished work as a painter, but we had no idea she would show up in breeches and boots weathered from the previous day’s hunt: a Martha Sitwell tweed coat with ruffled shoulders and gold buttons and absolutely blow us away with her natural talent. She settled right into the green leather sofa in the Library as though it was her own home, surrounded by Modern Equestrian Shop’s cashmere blankets and leather decor, Savenac 1821 ’s fine jewelry, and Hart Equestrian’s

artwork. Madeleine’s soft blonde curls were styled in such a fashion that had someone told me we had been transported back to the 1940 s, I could have believed them. I wonder, could F. Scott Fitzgerald have taken a seat on this very sofa and picked up a book before heading off to his guest suite?

While we broke for lunch, beautiful classical music mysteriously filled the house. We found Madeleine in the Music room playing Chopin’s Nocturne Opus 9 No. 2 on an antique piano, and it was clear that her talent knows no boundaries.

My favorite room in the house was The Green Hall, part of the “New Wing,” as the family fondly calls it, as it was part of an addition in 1870. The green paint color is unique to the home and was the perfect backdrop for our shoot.

That day was perfectly magical and surreal. Although Modern Equestrian Shop, Hart Equestrian, and Savenac 1821 have different points of view and unique personalities, Georgina seamlessly captured the essence of all three businesses. She told the story of our three lives serendipitously connected in the heart of hunt country. It was an unforgettable day and an experience I’ll always treasure.

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LINDSAY HUNTER

LANAI SENSEI FOUR SEASONS

BY JILL NOVOTNY
A PERSONAL TRAVEL DIARY

Inever thought it would be us. We sat back in our large seats aboard the tiny plane, having just set down our champagne flutes in the private lounge before stepping across the tarmac to board. “It couldn’t have been that long,” I insisted. But it was true. It was us. We were one of those couples that hadn’t been together away from home in years (plural!).

Our two young children, just 3 and 1, were at home with grandma as we banked over the coast of Lanai, Hawaii’s sixth-largest island. The smallest publicly accessible inhabited island in the chain, it is known as Pineapple Island because it was once owned by Dole, one of the world’s largest producers of pineapples. Now, the island is almost entirely owned by Oracle founder Larry Ellison, who brought the vision of Sensei to the Four Seasons in Lanai City. In addition to the Sensei Lanai, there is a second resort at the island’s beach front, the Four Seasons Lanai on Manele Bay. Lanai is a quiet slice of Hawaii, offering

a lower-tourist, natural feeling that only a few travelers will experience. The charming town of Lanai City, which accounts for 99 percent of the island’s population of just over 3,000 people, has no traffic lights and just a few shops and restaurants.

Our ride awaited us on the tarmac by the plane, and we drove past the tiny airport and up a hill, the Pacific Ocean growing wider behind us as we climbed. I watched with wonder as the landscape morphed from open fields into a misty pine grove.

My mind, however, was still with the kids, imagining them waking up, cataloging their snack box contents and planning our first call home. I held onto the idea that we hadn’t left them until now because we didn’t want to; we didn’t need to. We weren’t like other parents, needing a break. As my husband touched my arm to point at something out the window, my neck creaked as I turned. Maybe I did need a little rest.

We pulled up to the Sensei Lanai Four Seasons, dropping

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FOUR SEASONS
PHOTOS:
AN EDITOR WITH SMALL CHILDREN FINDS REAL RELAXATION
“I couldn’t have imagined a more perfect experience to reconnect to myself and my husband after all the hectic changes we’d experienced.”

our bags. It usually takes me a few minutes to absorb the feeling of a new place. In this case, the simple elegance of the building, the lush vegetation, and the lovely and welcoming greeting on the front porch made me feel immediately comfortable.

After we were given our itinerary and shown to our room, we stood on the room’s balcony, looking up to the green mountains crowned with a pictureperfect Hawaiian misty cloud. The decor was minimal yet luxurious, and we noted the gorgeous details of the room. After the first visit to the state-of-the-art bathroom, we laughed about the toilet seat that rose to greet us. (Of course, by the time we left, those jokes about the over-the-top toilet had turned to earnest conversations about the practicalities of how to install a heated bidet in our bathroom at home.)

Our itinerary’s first entry was an afternoon garden tour. I looked forward to seeing more of the incredible property,

although I could sense my husband wasn’t feeling especially enthusiastic about a tour of the plants and gardens. One tree, our guide pointed out, had “glowing bark.” We looked at each other, certain that he was embellishing. Suddenly, with a change of angle, the sun’s light shone through the curling edges of the fiery red bark, and it shined like a neon light. At that moment, the magic of the place hit home. Not only were the plants exotic, vibrant, and entrancing, but our guide led us through the story of their careful selection, the complications of their shipment and quarantine, and their masterful placement by experts in garden design. After the tour, we circled a pond on the winding paths and bridges, pointing out what we had just learned.

At my first wellness visit my guide sat with me to discuss my goals for the trip. I said I wanted a chance to relax, which—surprise—I didn’t get to do much at home with two toddlers. I had visited wellness resorts before and felt some skepticism about the value of this goal-setting;

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The author. A PERSONAL TRAVEL DIARY

aren’t most vacations relaxing? Then, a full wall of the room was lit by high-definition screens, laying out three paths: move, nourish, and rest. We spoke of each, and we concluded together that I was in search of rest foremost, but that I’d also very much like to “move,” to experience the adventures the island had to offer. We completed a body index scan and a series of flexibility tests, information that he could now share with any other wellness experts I would interact with while at Sensei, and my massage or yoga classes could incorporate this information.

With my intention-setting complete, we headed to dinner at the resort’s sole restaurant, Sensei by Nobu, which offers the high-end experience of a Nobu menu with a focus on locally grown produce, sustainable practices, and a passion for food and its

impact on our bodies. Located on a glass pavilion atop a reflecting pond, the restaurant serves dishes incorporating Sensei’s nutritional philosophy and Nobu classics.

The next morning, we rose early (thanks, jet lag!) to the singing birds as we pressed the button to open our automated blackout curtains. Eager to begin our day, we went to the lobby for coffee before hiking up the Koloiki Ridge Trail, a 4.5 -mile round trip. We reunited with yesterday’s guide, David, and picked up where we had left off on the nature walk, asking questions about the ecosystems, history, trees, animals, and edible plants. After winding our way through the forest, we emerged beyond the trees toward a viewpoint of the sea ahead, just out of sight. I pulled to the front of the group, eagerly looking ahead, but just as the trail’s end came into view, a huge wave-like cloud rolled in, covering the mountains, sea, and trail ahead like an avalanche. Suddenly, we could see less than a hundred feet. The disappointment of

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The author and her husband in the clouds.

our missed photo-op stung a bit, but the irony made us laugh.

Back in our room, we planned the rest of our busy day: clay shooting, horseback riding, and then a massage.

Ileft for the Lanai Ranch, a nearby barn surrounded by huge paddocks with views of the ocean. The lucky horses, spending their days in a place that few people are privileged to visit, amble in for private rides arranged by the hotel. Molly Dunwell, the ranch manager, took me for a trail ride into the hills surrounding Koele, to parts of the island I would not have seen otherwise, explaining the terrain, history, and population. Unlike my trail riding experiences along the U.S. east coast, there were very few wildlife encounters, no squirrels, and just evidence of the axis deer and turkey that roam the area. The stillness was profound. As we crested a hill and the bright-blue water below came into view, I realized it was the view we had missed on our previous hike. Spread out

before us were views of the islands of Maui and Moloka’i. “It’s our first trip away from the kids,” I told Molly. She, in turn, told me of her grown children and the challenges she faced. We shared stories of our sleepless nights, the worries, joys, and the increasing pace of life. By the time we got back, I felt like we were old friends.

I was scheduled for a thermal body mapping and massage, followed by a time in the private hale to enjoy the steam room, ofuro bathtub, infrared sauna, outdoor rain shower, and private plunge pools. Though the trip had been very enjoyable so far, I still did not feel particularly relaxed. My muscles ached from the hike and where the shotgun stock had pounded my shoulder, and the Western saddle reactivated my leg muscles. After a brief scan, the massage therapist showed me my results on his iPad. Several areas of my body on the screen shone red and yellow like an angry terrain map. They matched perfectly with the pain points in my lower back, shoulders, and even the muscles of my hands. The massage was the turning

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A PERSONAL TRAVEL DIARY

point of the trip. I felt tension and stress alleviated as I breathed the aromatherapy and began to truly relax.

Despite our plans to laze, we ate an early breakfast. We opted to dine outside, our table just inches from the water’s edge, koi fish swishing between the lily pads. Healthy breakfast consumed, I headed to my private class with Kilty, the resort’s resident yoga guru. Like many people, I’ve taken hundreds of yoga classes, but I’m far from an expert and never had the opportunity to have a private session. Before we began, we sat and spoke about what I wanted to get out of the class and what I could bring home from it. I explained that something hurt all the time. Most days, it feels like all I do is lug bags, snacks, strollers, and thrashing kids up stairs, through the park and into car seats. I constantly exercise with no awareness of my own body. I felt the change of perspective that had been

brewing throughout the trip reach a turning point, and I understood how I had grown separated from my own body. Her pointers and suggestions as we moved through a flow customized for me, have without exaggeration, changed my entire perspective on yoga. I left the class with lightness in my feet, floating on a cloud of decompressed joints, relaxed muscles, and spiritual stillness.

By the time I met with my wellness coordinator again at the end of the trip, I couldn’t quite express the change I had felt over the few days we’d spent at Sensei. I couldn’t have imagined a more perfect experience to reconnect to myself and my husband after all the hectic changes we’d experienced together since our children arrived. We had never quite managed a honeymoon all those years ago, and, in many ways, this was much more valuable to us; celebrating our marriage rather than just a wedding, taking the time and space to appreciate ourselves and our relationship. It was truly a gift with so much to bring home with us.

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THE CHARLOTTE INN

Itend to travel in the shoulder season. That indulgent period on the cusp of high season allows visitors the opportunity to experience a destination without the distractions of bustling crowds and the exuberant cacophony synonymous with high season. The pace is relaxed, and the essence and personality of its residents and the beauty of the surrounding landscape emerge in full view.

In keeping with this travel strategy, I chose to visit the Charlotte Inn, a Relais & Chateaux property on Martha’s Vineyard, Mass., during the calm of mid-May.

While flying into Martha’s Vineyard is an option, my husband and I chose to board a Steamship Authority ferry that departed from Woods Hole, Mass. The 45-minute ferry ride comfortably delivered us to the island’s Vineyard Haven

ferry terminal. A driver, graciously arranged by the inn, greeted us and whisked us off on our 15-minute drive to Edgartown, the picturesque and convenient location of the Charlotte Inn.

We were warmly greeted upon our arrival—our bags transported to our suite with the utmost efficiency as we received a tour of the inn’s common areas that were anything but common. The appealing flow of spacious rooms exuded an informed eye for balancing period décor with fine antiques, equestrian sporting art, and strategically positioning fireside leather wing chairs in which to while away the day if one so chooses. As we meandered further, marveling at the collection of replica vintage coaches secured in their protective glass cases, the inn’s slogan and title of their coffee table book, “Behind the Times on Purpose” became self-explanatory.

There is a colorful history to the inn, which now encompasses four buildings, including both a coach

76 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023
A TREASURED GEM ON MARTHA’S VINEYARD MASSACHUSETTS. A PERSONAL TRAVEL DIARY
PHOTOS THIS PAGE NINA BRAMHALL COURTESY OF THE CHARLOTTE INN
Coach House at the Charlotte Inn

and a carriage house, that collectively host 17 guestrooms and two suites. The original main structure, formerly known as the Osborn House, was completed in 1866, changing hands several times until Gery Conover, the current owner, purchased the neglected Greek Revival property in 1970. He and his wife Paula have spent decades lovingly restoring every inch of the property and secluded gardens to their earlier grandeur. Although each spacious room has its unique personality, a common thread of period wallpaper, traditional paintings by renowned artists, bathrooms with black-and-white tiled bathroom floors, and pedestal sinks form a cohesive and decidedly sophisticated theme at the inn. The Conovers have skillfully infused their passion for antiquities into the outdoor spaces as well, punctuating quiet garden alcoves with planter boxes from Parisian cafes and antique water pumps sourced across Europe.

Before we embarked on a walking tour of Edgartown, we

settled into our beautiful Coach House suite. The second-floor space, entered through a private entrance, was a tranquil sanctuary. The light-flooded aerie was tastefully appointed with English hunt-country furnishings with chintz fabrics and wallpapers in muted huntergreens, burgundies, and rusts. Boot trees, polo mallets, and harness leathers were familiar accouterments. Although it was mid-May, an unusual cold snap rendered the suite’s living room fireplace that much cozier. At times, it was a challenge to coax me from the comforts of the fireside window seat that accentuated the large harbor view Palladian window. I was comfortable here—perhaps a little too comfortable from my husband’s perspective, who was eager to explore the island.

Each morning Paula met us in the breakfast room as we perused our menus. The fire was burning, and the surfeit of polished silver serving pieces reflected the warmth of the flickering flames. Breakfasts, all made to order, ran the gamut from hearthealthy fruits and yogurt parfaits to pancakes, French toast,

MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 77

omelets, and bagels with smoked salmon and capers. Add pastries and cappuccinos to the offerings, and travelers are fortified for the day’s excursions.

The entire staff at the Charlotte Inn was incredibly gracious and helpful with their suggestions for maximizing our visit to the island. Car rentals were arranged, dining suggestions made, and reservations handled with efficiency.

With Gery’s suggested itinerary for first-time visitors in hand and a trusty map, we traversed the island with confidence. There’s a fascinating variety of terrain and foliage on the island that stretches 23 miles long and nine miles wide. Each area: Oak Bluffs, Vineyard Haven/ Tisbury, and Edgartown has distinct points of interest, personalities, and architectural characteristics, including the Greek Revival and Federal style typical in Edgartown in dramatic comparison to the ornate Victorian homes—from grand to gingerbread—in Oak Bluffs. The plethora of beaches surrounding the Vineyard will have to be experienced on another visit,

perhaps during the warmer shoulder season in early fall. As a side note, I would strongly recommend a car for a first-time visit, particularly if it’s offseason when buses aren’t as frequent and taxis are not as available.

During our brief visit, we enjoyed the region’s ubiquitous lobster in innumerable forms, from lobster rolls overflowing with a pound of buttery heaven to chunky chowders or healthier options such as Atlantic Fish & Chop House’s lobster arugula salad with dried cranberries. For an intimate dining experience, Alchemy, a short walk from the inn, offers exceptional seafood in an inviting ambiance. Try the crab and asparagus salad if you want to enjoy the local favorite.

I look forward to returning to Edgartown to explore more of the historic whaling town’s points of interest and to stroll the quaint side streets populated with former captain’s homes and cedar shake cottages, of course, all at a leisurely Vineyard-style pace.

78 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023
CONTACT INFO | PAGE 94
Paula and Gery Conover with their goldens. A PERSONAL TRAVEL DIARY
COURTESY MARTHAS VINEYARD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COURTESY MARTHAS VINEYARD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
“At times, it was a challenge to coax me from the comforts of the fireside window seat.”
Edgartown harbor at dusk. Alchemy restaurant.

MARCELA GANLY SCULPTOR

IS IMMERSED IN THE INTRICACIES OF THE LOST WAX TECHNIQUE.

BORN IN 1970 IN SAN JOSÉ, COSTA RICA, Marcela Ganly became involved in sculpture while studying medicine in Connecticut. Upon her return to Buenos Aires, Argentina, and while practicing medicine, she perfected her technique in the lost wax method under the guidance of master sculptor Antonio Pujía. In 2006, she took a year’s sabbatical leave to dedicate her time and passion to creating new works of art. Realizing she had found her true path, she never returned to medicine. Marcela’s work graces collections in Argentina, Australia, Venezuela, Costa Rica, Mexico, the United States, Canada, England, France, Switzerland, and the United Arab Emirates.

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Flying high Bronze, original wax casting, 29 by 24 by 6.3 inches

Sky high

Lost wax bronze, original wax casting, 22 by 16 by 5.5 inches

MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 81

Your body of sculptures includes a variety of animals, but horses are a dominant subject. What is your connection to the horse world?

Horses have always been a huge part of my life. My family on my mother’s side was very involved with horses. My grandfather had racehorses, my grandmother loved her horses, and my aunt is an Olympic dressage rider. My mother trained horses for dressage and jumping, and I had friends who had farms with lots of horses, which was like heaven on earth.

I don’t remember the first time I got on a horse, but they have always been a part of my life. I grew up with a pony, India, that I shared with my best friend. She lived in my garden for a week and then one week with my friend. The first thing we would do when we got home from school was wolf down our tea, grab the bridle and sheepskin, throw a cinch on, and go out for a ride together. We had the best time on India. We would run errands to the local store, go to art classes, and, on the weekends, play imaginative games with our neighborhood friends who also had a pony.

You studied medicine in the U.S. for a while, took a sabbatical to focus on your art, and decided to dedicate your career to art. How did you know this was the career path you wanted?

Art was always my hobby, but I thought I would ultimately become a horse vet specializing in arthroscopic surgery. I went to the U.S. for six months after finishing high school and stayed for six years. I attended Connecticut College for four years, where I repeatedly sprained my ankles running on rocky paths, landing me in the rehab center and sparking my interest in sports medicine. But art was always an integral part of my life. It was my minor in college, and I had excellent professors such as Barclay Hendricks and David Smalley. During my junior year, the college offered an introduction to lost wax casting course which involved the actual casting process. I was fascinated and loved working with wax. I decided to pursue lost wax sculpture during my senior year. Following graduation, I did a little watercolor. However, once I started medical school in Argentina, I put art on the back burner until my fifth year. (It takes seven years to get your medical degree in Argentina.)

One day, I felt the urge to get back into art and asked Esther Barugel, a friend of my parents who created lost wax sculptures, if she knew someone who could give me classes. She pointed me toward Antonio Pujía, an incredibly talented human being and the most inspiring teacher I could have had. When

I called, Antonio told me he was not giving any more classes as he wanted to concentrate on his artwork (he was 70 then). I begged him to let me know if he got the urge to start up again. Three months later, I got a call notifying me he would be giving a workshop consisting of four classes. Antonio had the most amazing teaching method, and I submerged myself into the world of lost wax with a different point of view. He showed us how different wax combinations behave, but his “ideal” wax, the perfect combination of bee’s wax, paraffin, and resin, is the one I use. It turns into a pliable, stretchy, and very dynamic material when subjected to heat.

Do you have a favorite part of the multistep lost wax casting process?

My favorite part of the process is the last layer of wax that goes into creating the final version of a sculpture. It involves the intricate detail, texture, and overall movement of the surface. My sculptures are not smooth and polished, and lost wax casting will copy every detail, including fingerprints and textures if you use organic materials such as bark, cotton, wool material, and even insects.

You incorporate various equestrian disciplines in your work. Do you have a favorite in terms of the creative challenges it presents?

I would say polo is the most intricate discipline because not only do I have to capture the incredible power, speed, continued on page 86

Artist Marcela Ganly developing an equine form in her studio.
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“EVERY DISCIPLINE AND HORSE BREED HAS ITS OWN PARTICULAR AND DEFINING ESSENCE.”

Maroñas Commissioned by Maroñas Racecourse in Uruguay, Electroplating, 10 by 10 by 2.3 inches

De taquito Lost wax bronze, series of 10, 12 by 20 by 6 inches Swing Bronze, series of 15, 11.8 by 13 by 5.5 inches
MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 83
Equinox , Bronze, original lost wax casting commissioned sculpture, 40 by 83 by 24 inches
84 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023
Progressive stages of the lost wax casting of Equinox. El icaro Bronze, series of 10, 9.5 by 15.75 by 6.25 inches
MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 85
El resero Bronze, limited edition of 10, 12 by 14 by 6 inches

and agility of the polo pony but also the ability of the rider. Additionally, I have to include clothing and accessories. Once the horse and rider are cast into metal, I add the tack, whip, and polo mallet. Getting the myriad of metal “leather” straps and reins going in the right direction is the most difficult and time-consuming part of crafting a polo sculpture. Many different aspects go into creating polorelated sculptures since many forces and actions go on between horse and rider besides what goes on the surface.

Every discipline and horse breed has its own particular and defining essence. I love making Arabians since they are the most expressive, Thoroughbreds are the most elegant, and the Argentine Criollo is a tough, stocky, and loyal subject.

What is the most inspiring physical aspect of a horse to capture? What is the most difficult emotion to convey?

The head and neck inspire me the most as they are the most expressive part of the horse. The essence of the horse, its magnificence, power, and freedom are what I try to convey. I love the feeling I get once I have the proportion and position spot on. Sometimes I achieve it in one attempt, and in other cases, it requires a series of corrections.

You’ve designed some beautiful, commissioned pieces. Do you enjoy the collaborative process of custom work? Are you typically given a lot of artistic freedom?

I really enjoy working on commissioned pieces. They always come with guidelines, but I typically get quite a bit of artistic freedom. I enjoy challenges and interpreting what a customer envisions. At times it may not be what would inspire me, but it’s worth it when I see the positive reaction when I deliver the final sculpture.

My latest creation was a piece I did for the foyer of a very well-known polo team. I called that sculpture “Equinox.” It was a huge challenge since it involved a one-of-a-kind direct wax casting of a large-scale piece of two horses in my more contemporary style. My idea was to create a symbol through these horses, depicting

two fundamental forces that are opposite but complementary, living in harmony and balance. It was my largest commissioned piece, and I was asked to use my contemporary style, which I love since it enables me to stretch proportions and defy movements.

My contemporary style is a flat piece of poured wax that I cut and fold over to create the final shape of the sculpture. I then add just enough texture to achieve the ideal thickness to cast it into bronze. That renders each a one-of-a-kind, original sculpture, with no molds made in the process. Molds for these pieces are extremely complicated to execute. I was able to have two of my sculptures turned into a limited-edition series thanks to a foundry in Colorado where I cast many of my pieces.

Do you find creating pieces that immortalize a client’s favorite animal an honor?

It is a huge honor to be asked to capture not only the animal’s physical traits but also its essence. For this reason, when asked to sculpt a portrait, I need as many visual references, such as photos and videos, as I can get my hands on. My latest commission, however, is not only the animal but also its owner. I have been commissioned to create a sculpture to honor a loving husband and polo player going all out at a full gallop on his favorite pony. I am excited to bring forth their energy in the finished piece.

86 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023
Akhal Lost wax bronze, limited edition of 10, 6 by 4 by 2 inches
continued from page 82 CONTACT INFO | PAGE 94
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SKARA GLEN

WELLINGTON, FLORIDA

EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES

PROPERTY HIGHLIGHTS:

– 21 Acres

– 14-Stall Center Barn

– 6-Acre Bermuda Grass Jump Field

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Stunning 21-acre equestrian compound located in the heart of Wellington close to all world class horse show and polo venues. Not to be rivaled, this estate offers a 14-stall center-aisle barn, large tack room, commercial laundry room, luxurious owners quarters with exceptional detail, a tennis pavilion, 6 acre irrigated Bermuda grass jump field and a new 180- by 300-foot riding arena adjacent to the jump field. There are guest and meeting cottages that open to a grand patio with pergolas overlooking the private pond and waterfall. Truly a ‘’Must See’’ property for the serious equestrian. Offered at $18,975,000

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Founding Associate

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MARCH/APRIL | 2023 | EQLIVING.COM | 89 EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES

I went back to my truck to retrieve another underrated surgical instrument from my pack: vice-grips. I don’t need ‘em very often, but I sure did that night. Of course, by now, the mare had become a little apprehensive about my intentions for her already really sore foot. She greeted me with a snort and a three-legged dance to communicate her displeasure with the evening’s events so far. It looked like this would require a little pharmacologically induced cooperation, what my nursing friends called “IDC.” This is doctorspeak for “I don’t care”—a technical term for human sedating drugs. (They don’t really stop the “hurt” as much as they stop the “care.”)

Within a

few minutes the mare was much less worried about me and the vice-grips so it was easy to pull the offending object from her foot. It was about an inch long and buried deep into sensitive tissue, which was why no drainage was seen around the bottom of her foot. On closer observation, I discovered why I didn’t find the nail head: it was not a nail at all. It was a piece of manzanita—a large-bush-small-tree that grows

in the Sierra foothills. It has beautiful red bark (hence the name, meaning “little apple”), and the wood is hard—very hard. I had seen many injuries induced from this hardy, unyielding plant, but this was the first time I had seen it impersonate a nail.

Iwrapped the mare’s foot with an Epsom salt poultice to draw out inflammatory fluids, and gave her a big shot of penicillin and a tetanus booster. Within a few days the mare was back to work in the pack string, and I learned a valuable lesson: It is seldom okay to diagnose stuff over the phone. Sometimes you just have to see the horse.

This is the reason for the rules outlined in the Veterinary Practice Acts. Though I tried to explain this to the lady with the lame, recently-shod-bymy-husband horse, I just couldn’t convince her she needed my diagnostic help. And I was sure glad I took the time to look at the nail that wasn’t in the outfitter’s mare. She clearly benefitted from the outfitter’s tenacity in getting her some help, and reinforced the lesson Dr. Martin taught me so many years ago: “It’s not what you don’t know, it’s what you don’t look for.”

INFO | PAGE 94
ANNETTE SEAMANS
90 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023 Continued from page 25 NEVER TRUST A SNEAKY PONY E Q B O K C LUB BETWEEN THE COVERS BOOKS EQ
Madison Seamans.

EQUESTRIAN PARADISE

The perfect marriage of rustic and modern, HORSE FARM, located at 2729 Ramshorn Drive in Fremont, Michigan, is a dreamy place of exciting potential. Whether a charming getaway, an equestrian paradise, or even a venue for weddings or retreats, this secret gem of West Michigan is newly available and waiting to bring your magnificent visions to life. Nestled away in the heart of the country, this Farm is paradise found, along a picturesque country road that leads you through trees and rolling fields. As you enter the drive, it is hard to determine where to direct your attention first. For, in a valuable plot of land on the shore of Clark’s lake, sits a property grand enough to help you accomplish all of your dreams.

2729 Ramshorn Dr. NE, Fremont MI, 49412

Price: $2,500,000

• 32 stalls, 5 grooming stations, 2 full-size tack rooms, and more

• 100 x 300 sq. ft. indoor arena

• 90 x 300 outdoor arena

• Farmhouse, apartment attached to the barn and a ranch house on the back side of the property totalling 7 bedrooms 5.5 bathrooms and 3800 square feet

• In-floor heat throughout the facility

GINGER BAXTER

Ginger Baxter Group

Keller Williams North

616-437-0559

ginger@gingerbaxter.com

EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES

IN SHAPE FOR THE SADDLE

Personal trainer KALI CRAM focuses on helping equestrians reach top riding condition.

Kali Cram is not only a National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM)certified fitness professional but an avid equestrian who has spent her life in the saddle and working in the equestrian industry, who now helps riders stay fit and ready for competition.

She grew up riding on the American Paint Horse Association circuit. While attending St. Andrews University in North Carolina, Kali rode for the school’s intercollegiate English and Western teams. “My coaches were a major contributor to the horsewoman I’ve become,” says Kali. The summer going into her senior year, Kali landed a job grooming for Kent Farrington, accompanying him to top events in the United States and abroad for the next three years. During her time in Europe, Kali started to work out. She grew increasingly fond of the time she spent and explored different forms of exercise.

In 2015, Kent helped her to find a job as a farm manager at a private family farm in Newtown, Connecticut, and Wellington, Florida. While working on the farm, Kali’s enthusiasm for fitness grew, not only as a hobby, but also as a passion. On an average day, she would spend time at the gym and then ride four horses. Friends began to want to join Kali in her workouts and would ask her for tips on improving their fitness plans. In 2019 she decided to get certified as a personal trainer.

Soon Kali began working as a

personal trainer out of Limitless Performance in Wellington, Florida, where many equestrian athletes cross-train. When the COVID-19 shutdown halted much of the fitness and equestrian sports industries, Kali moved to Lexington, Kentucky. Soon, she found that much of the industry was moving online, offering services remotely to clients. “This change was actually one that could really benefit equestrian athletes because they are so frequently traveling,” said Kali. She had found her niche.

for details)

BEST EXERCISES FOR RIDERS : (See eqliving.com/kalicram

1. ROWS: using cables for rows is ideal as it imitates the reins. Kali has her clients sit on an exercise ball to create an unstable seat which mimics riding a horse while constantly engaging the core. While many riders won’t have access to cables while on the road at shows, one could use exercise bands.

2. MOBILITY: A rider’s most-used muscle is the hip flexor. Kali recommends always incorporating hip-opener exercises like “pigeon” or 90/90’s into your workouts. Kali focuses on full-body mobility, especially the hips, spine, and shoulders.

3. GLUTE BRIDGE: A glute bridge hold always gets the glutes firing, and having strong glutes will counteract the tightness in hip flexors. “Riders across the board have underactive glutes and overactive hip flexors. Holding a glute bridge or working them into a set is a great way to strengthen the glutes and also stretch the hip flexors,” says Kali.

4. REAR DELT FLIES: to strengthen your back and help eliminate rounded shoulders while riding. Kali says she incorporates rear delt flies “to help open the pectoral muscles, strengthen the back, and bring more movement to the upper body.”

Remote training presented many challenges. Not only could she not physically touch and assist her clients, but people had limited equipment and access to typical gym supplies. So, she adapted her techniques and customized each workout to the client. Not only did clients have different levels of equipment, but as horse shows returned, each client could be in a new location each week. Kali smiles, “I sometimes train clients out of a grooming stall at a horse show.

“Most issues that riders bring to me are related to their hips or their shoulders,” she continues. “Riding puts a great deal of strain on both those body parts, and riders’ bodies are often out of line, so I focus on full-body mobility and flexibility. Many of my clients spend a lot of time sitting on planes and in cars to get to shows, so I stress the importance of mobility in their workouts.

“Training people is a little like training horses,” she says. “You can’t train two horses or two people the exact same way.”

EQ PEOPLE 92 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023
CONTACT INFO | PAGE 94

Muttontown, NY – “Felix Domi” ®

Located just 30-miles east of Manhattan on the North Shore of Long Island, this spectacular 10.47-acre Gold Coast estate is a quintessential interpretation of French Normandy architecture attributed to the masterful design of John Russell Pope. Completed in 1937, the magnificent seven+ bedroom residence is complemented by a glistening swimming pool, a hard-surface tennis court, an artist’s studio and potting shed. For the equestrian, there is an eight-stall barn with a tack room and hayloft. A turnout paddock and jump course provide for a variety of riding pursuits. Lush green lawns meet serene perennial gardens with walking paths. Lovely brick and bluestone terraces are perfect for relaxed entertaining. Enhanced for today’s living, Felix Domi offers extraordinary amenities for a luxurious lifestyle. A Masterpiece Collection Listing.

MLS# 3437884. $6,300,000.

Christina Porter, c.516.835.5512

christinaporter@danielgale.com

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christinateagle@danielgale.com

Each office is independently owned and operated. We are pledged to provide equal opportunity for housing to any prospective customer or client, without regard to race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.

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94 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023
EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES Compass is a licensed real estate brokerage that abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is not guaranteed. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Compass is licensed as Compass Real Estate in DC and as Compass in Virginia and Maryland. 6809 Old Dominion Drive, Suite 400, McLean, Virginia 22101 | 703.310.6111 Cindy Polk & Brandy Greenwell Realtors® Cindy Polk (Owner/Agent): 703.966.9480 | cindy.polk@compass.com Brandy Greenwell: 540.974.7791 | brandy.greenwell@compass.com Won’t You Be our Neighbor? SERVING THE VIRGINIA PIEDMONT COUNTRY SIDE FROM MIDDLEBURG AND BEYOND. BOUNDARY FARM, Middleburg, Virginia. Boundary offers an established equestrian facility for the professional horseman an income producing business for a savvy investor or a country retreat for family and friends. 3 barns totaling 17 stalls, 12 paddocks, 5 run in sheds, 150x250 ring, fully equipped riders lounge and separate farm office in main barn, 4BR Farmhouse, 1 BR Guest Cottage. Pond and views. Orange County Hunt | 34 +/- acres | $3,175,000 We are generational locals and Middleburg residents, with our hands on the reins. Whether buying or selling, we know the footing. Come Ride with us!
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A BARN FULL OF RESCUES

Meet CHARLIE, FRANK, BOONE, and WINNIE.

Jennifer Januzis founded Double J Farm, a competitive training barn, in 2015. Based in Pittstown, New Jersey, during the summer, and Wellington, Florida, in the winter, she has a wide variety of clients and horses competing in all types of classes, from young jumpers to junior and amateur hunter and jumper divisions. Her students have won championships at prestigious shows such as Upperville, Lake Placid, and the Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF).

The second I graduated college, I got my first rescue dog, and that is how it spiraled out of control once I learned about rescues. I decided that would be the only kind of dog I wanted because they needed homes. I started off with large German shepherd-lab mixes. Then I happened to get Hector, a Dachshund mix, from Danny & Ron’s Rescue (D&RR) when I ran into them one day at WEF. Tragically, he was hit by a car, but, because of him, my husband and I fell in love with the breed. D&RR’s Kim Tudor called to tell us that they had just gotten a surrendered Dachshund. Coincidentally, he was injured by a car nearly the same day as Hector. Now, we have three Dachshunds from Danny and Ron: Charlie, Frank, and Boone, as well as a brindle mutt, Winnie, from a local rescue.

I don’t know if I attract a certain clientele, but our barn is filled with rescues, and mostly from Danny and Ron. There

are nine here now. They all get along and fall in line. We really have a great group of clients, dogs, and horses at the moment.

My Dachshund, Charlie, who is also the smallest, is, without question, the leader of the pack. He’s quick to point out any bad behavior. He is the police, the one in charge. Charlie is like a human in dog form.

Frank is a stereotypical Dachshund. He is definitely a one-person dog—me— although he does love my husband. He’s quiet and keeps to himself. Frank doesn’t get involved in the hijinks with the others.

Boone is the life of the party. He is effervescent, happy to be alive every day, and loves everyone. Boone is the official greeter of the group.

Winnie is timid but extremely loyal to the people she knows. It’s like she was born already trained, and she adds a very calm presence at the barn.

Danny and Ron are transparent about what kind of life the dogs lived before adopting them out. They talked with the prior owners and gave me a pretty good idea of why the dogs were given up, what was not working out in their homes, and what they would need to transition into a new home.

Winnie’s litter was found in the woods in Tennessee. My first group of dogs was brindle in color, and when they passed away, I felt like I needed another, which was when Winnie arrived. She was fostered by my friend’s mom, and I was instantly drawn to her when I saw her picture.

It was the same thing with the Dachshunds. Charlie came into my life because he was hit by a car right after my dog Hector. Danny and Ron paid for his surgery, and then he came to me. Frank and Boone arrived shortly after. They’re the best group of dogs I’ve ever had.

The amazing thing is when you get a dog from Danny and Ron, it feels like you’ve received a dog from a family. What sets them apart from other rescues is they are so one-on-one with the dogs.

It doesn’t matter how many years it’s been; when I see them at the horse show, they will always ask me about Charlie, Frank, or Boone, and we’ll remember Hector and how sad it was to lose him. That, for me, is so meaningful.

CONTACT INFO | PAGE 94 EQ BARN DOGS 98 | EQUESTRIAN LIVING | MARCH/APRIL | 2023
Jennifer Januzis with Charlie, Frank, Boone, and Winnie (front). Photo: Shannon Brinkman Photo

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