Issuu on Google+

Interchange a WYDOT publication

November 2012, Vol. 40, Issue 11


Letters

Interchange

Rumble strips not just for highway dozers

Generously donated sick leave

A few years back I was driving on I-80 just west of Laramie when I came across a sudden blinding snow storm. I wasn’t sure what to do because I couldn’t see anything and it was very cold. I was low on fuel and couldn’t stop for fear of running out of fuel and freezing. With the aid of my GPS and your rumble strips on the edge of the highway I was able to keep going and finally made it into Laramie. Without the rumble strips on the edge of the roadway, I would have been lost. My only way of ensuring I was still on the highway was by hearing the noise and feeling the vibration in my steering wheel, thus I was able to keep moving. I know they’re on many roadways throughout the nation and I always thought they were a great idea to keep people on the roadway who might be falling asleep, but I’ve found another use for them. Thank you for your concern for highway safety and I hope you can add them to many other roadways throughout your great state.

I would like to thank everyone who donated sick leave on my behalf. Your thoughtful generosity is greatly appreciated. It helps in the recovery process to know that people you work with care about you. Thank you again.

Jody Peck Dubois Construction

Getting IT done Good Morning Dave (Birge), I have had the pleasure the past two months, working with Mark Briggs in your department to assist in access to the RIS system. Our IT representative is only here every other week, so the timing and security issues have been interesting. Mark was exceptionally knowledgeable, kind and patient during this process. We can connect now and we appreciate all of his help. Have a great day and make sure to tell Mark how much we appreciate his help.

Mary Wood Kuhl Crook County Treasurer

Photo: Rick Carpenter

Jim Mentzer

Webcams fantastic addition in District 5 Thank you for adding the webcams to the northwest part of the state.

Kevin Mitchell

2

Interchange

n November 2012

Thank you for your thoughtful support.

-Janet Farrar

Interchange is published for employees of the Wyoming Department of Transportation by its Public Affairs Office and a number of field correspondents. Interchange invites submissions from all employees. Please send them to either your district correspondents or to: Carlie Van Winkle, Interchange editor, 5300 Bishop Blvd., Cheyenne, WY, 82009-3340. The Public Affairs Office may also be contacted by phoning (307) 777-4165, faxing (307) 777-4289, or sending e-mail to carlie.vanwinkle@wyo.gov

Staff WYDOT Director: John F. Cox Public Affairs Manager: Doug McGee Editor/Art Director: Carlie Van Winkle Contributors: Bruce Burrows Public Affairs Dave Kingham Public Affairs Carlie Van Winkle Public Affairs Ross Doman District 1 Jeff Goetz District 2 Stephanie Harsha District 3 Ronda Holwell District 4 Cody Beers District 5 Sgt. Stephen Townsend Patrol Photography: Rick Carpenter Public Affairs


Also in this issue

Contents

Letters.....................................2 District briefs.........................4

6

Strategic Performance........7 Noteworthy..........................14

8

WYDOT by the Numbers....14 District news.......................16 In the Community.............17 Extra Mile Awards..............17

10

Passings................................18 Training at a Glance..........18 WTDEA Happenings..........19

15

6 I-25 Southeast Travel Center

Impressive site off of High Plains interchange

8 Realigning WYO 70 10 The Togwotee Trail

Reconstructed highway grand opening

15 I-80 wheelchair rescue Be sure to check out the online version of Interchange at http://issuu.com/wydot.pao, or click on the link found on the employee’s internal Web site home page.

On the cover: The Togwotee Trail to Yellowstone highway reconstruction project comes to a close with a ribbon cutting and grand opening ceremony. Photos: Rick Carpenter

November 2012

n

Interchange

3


District Briefs Cheyenne – WHP joined Safe Communities, WYDOT Highway Safety, Cheyenne Police Department, Laramie County Sheriff ’s Department, “CLICK Kids”, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and other partners across the nation for National Teen Driver Safety Week, held Oct. 14-20, reminding teens about the risks of the road and to think twice before driving distracted. Statistics show nearly 3,100 people were killed and an additional 416,000 were injured across the nation in motor vehicle crashes involving a distracted driver during 2010. In 2010, 11 percent of all drivers under the age of 20 involved in fatal crashes were reported as being distracted at the time of the crash. With more than 196 billion text messages sent and received just during June of last year, distracted driving continues to plague all drivers, but particularly teen drivers in Wyoming and across the country. All drivers can be distracted by cell phones, adjusting the radio, using a navigation system, CD player or MP3 device, but unfortunately, it is our most inexperienced drivers — teens — who are the most likely to put themselves and others in harm’s way by driving distracted. Texting while driving takes a driver’s eyes from the road for an average of 4.6 seconds — the equivalent of driving the length of an entire football field, blind, at 55 mph. Moreover, driving while using a cell phone may reduce the amount of brain activity associated with driving by up to 37 percent. While all distractions are dangerous, text messaging creates a crash risk 23 times worse than driving while not distracted. And in Wyoming, it’s against the law.

HQ

4

Interchange

n November 2012

WYO 22 expecting shoulder improvements

Teens are getting the message, but we must continue to educate them on the risks of distracted driving to keep new drivers safe and to remind seasoned drivers of the law and the risks.

Bicyclists and other highway users will see road improvements on two sections on WYO 22 as early as next spring. WYDOT will be doing some districtwide road overlays that will include shoulder work on two 1,000-foot sections on WYO 22, one near Brown’s Curve and the other near the entrance to the Bar Y west of Jackson. “We will be widening the shoulders to eight feet to accommodate a path for bicyclists,” District Construction Engineer Ted Wells said. The project will be let to contract in December. When completed, the two sections will again have 8-foot shoulders, while still accommodating two 11-foot wide drive lanes and a 10-foot center turning lane. The work will take place during the 2013 construction season and be completed by the end of next June. “This way we can accommodate both left-turning traffic and bicyclists in those locations,” Public Involvement Specialist Stephanie Harsha said.

Tanker transporting crude oil crashed, closed I-25 Wheatland – A tractor-trailer tanker crashed approximately two miles north of Wheatland on Sept. 25. The early morning crash resulted in the closure of both north and southbound lanes of I-25 due to the crude oil spill from the tanker. No injuries were reported as a result of the crash. Troopers on scene estimated that more than 200 barrels of crude oil spilled when the tanker trailer was breached during the crash. Traffic was diverted onto alternate routes to avoid the area. The interstate closure lasted several hours as WHP, WYDOT, Wheatland Fire Department, Platte County Sheriff ’s Department, Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality and the Wyoming Office of Homeland Security finalized the crash investigation and cleanup process. The tractor trailer combination is owned by Basin Western Incorporated of Roosevelt, Utah.

D3

D2

‘Efficiency, safety’ are goals of new traffic signal in Greybull

Photo: WYDOT

Raising teen awareness about distracted driving to save lives

An early morning crash closed north- and southbound I-25 for more than six hours.

Greybull – The town of Greybull’s new traffic signal has new pedestrian push buttons to ensure pedestrians have enough time to safely cross the street at the downtown intersection. “At this time, the pedestrian walk signal and subsequent countdown timer will not be displayed unless a pedestrian activates the push button,” according to

D5


Thermopolis – A $6.67 million highway improvement project is underway on WYO 120 directly northwest of Thermopolis. McGarvin-Moberly Construction Co., of Worland is the prime contractor on the 3.28-mile project between mileposts .94 (the northwest edge of Thermopolis) and 4.21. “The contractor will be hauling equipment to the project. Work will start on drainage pipe and box culvert extensions, and grading off the existing roadway,” according to Todd Frost, WYDOT resident engineer in Cody. “No asphalt will be removed from the existing roadway until next spring.” Frost said this fall’s highway improvements will occur off the shoulder of the roadway. “Motorists should expect short delays,” Frost said. “Please follow reduced speed limits through the work zone. Remember to pay attention or pay the price.” The Wyoming Transportation Commission awarded the project to McGarvin-Moberly in June.

WYO 138 now a Wind River Reservation road WYO 138 between St. Stephen’s Mission and Hudson is no longer under jurisdiction of WYDOT. The roadway officially became a tribal road in January 2011 under the direction of the Joint Tribal Council on the Wind River Reservation. State highway signs were removed from WYO 138 at the beginning of October. “Wyoming 138 is officially in tribal hands, and we will not be actively patrolling that roadway in the future,” said Capt. Len DeClercq of the Wyoming Highway Patrol. “If there is a problem or an emergency, we will respond. We will not take routine enforcement actions in the future, such as speed enforcement.” Under terms of the agreement between WYDOT and the Joint Tribal Council, the council has assumed maintenance and enforcement responsibilities for the rebuilt roadway. WYDOT completed highway improvements on 7.95 miles of WYO 138 in 200708. High Country Construction Inc. of Lander was the prime contractor on the $9.5 million project to rebuild WYO 138 between mileposts .047 east of Hudson at the junction with WYO 789 and milepost 8.002 near St. Stephen’s. The Hudson-St. Stephen’s project included about 94.3 percent of reconstruction, widening near the bridge over the Little Wind River and Lamoreaux Draw, and widening of the highway and an asphalt overlay near the junction of WYO 137 on the north end of the project.

Thermopolis – Northwest Wyoming drivers will benefit this winter and in the future with the installation of eight new Web cameras located throughout central and northwest Wyoming. Web cameras are now operational on Beaver Rim, 5.99 miles west of the Sweetwater Station rest area on US 287; at Kinnear Junction, one mile west of Kinnear on US 26 west of Riverton; in Wind River Canyon, 9.5 miles south of Thermopolis on US 20/WYO 789; on Meeteetse Rim, 9.5 miles north of Meeteetse on WYO 120; and on Skull Creek Hill, eight miles north of Cody on WYO 120. “These new WYDOT Web cameras will help drivers make good choices about winter travel before heading out there this winter,” said Russ Dowdy, WYDOT maintenance foreman in Thermopolis. “And internally within WYDOT, these Web cameras will help improve our winter plowing efforts, and should enhance public safety.” For drivers heading south between Lander/Riverton, Jeffrey City and Rawlins, three other new Web cameras are also operational. They are located 9.6 miles west of Jeffrey City; at Muddy Gap at the junction of WYO 220/WYO 789 and US 287, and on Willow Hill, 11.6 miles north of Rawlins on US 287.

A still image taken from the newly installed Web camera found in Wind River Canyon on US 20.

Photo: Cody Beers

WYO 120 highway project underway northwest of Thermopolis

New Web cameras available to northwest Wyoming drivers

Photo: WYDOT

Lyle Lamb, WYDOT’s traffic engineer in Basin. “This was necessary until we install the traffic signal’s new vehicle detection system on Greybull Avenue so the traffic signal will operate correctly and facilitate efficient traffic movements.” Lamb said the traffic signal’s new vehicle detection system is scheduled for installation some time this fall. “We are encouraging pedestrians to activate the pedestrian walk signal and countdown timer by pushing the push button,” Lamb said. “Remember to always yield to vehicles before walking into the intersection.”

The last look at this WYO 138 sign before it was removed at the beginning of October. WYO 138 is now under the direction of the Joint Tribal Council on the Wind River Reservation.

November 2012

n

Interchange

5


6

Interchange

n November 2012

Visitors stopping at the “Light, Wind, Action!” interpretive kiosk. The center’s energy levels can be observed on touch screens.

on the high plateau,” noted Shober. Shober and her Wyoming Office of Tourism staff are housed in the new welcome center. She says the former location on the west side of I-25 below a hillside offered neither of the key factors – high visibility and easy access – that make for a successful welcome center. “You can’t miss us here and listening

to the comments of the guests who have been in to see us already, this location will greatly bolster our ability to send visitors to all four corners of the state,” she added. – Lori Hogan, sr. communications specialist, Wyoming Office of Tourism

Photo courtesy Wyoming Office of Tourism

The new Southeast Wyoming Welcome Center will give visitors an impressive start to their travels in the state and the $13 million public investment in tourism was officially opened to the public Oct. 12. The center is situated along the east side of I-25 at the High Plains Road exit (Exit 4) near the Colorado/Wyoming border. “We are very thankful for the legislative support that made this project possible and the untiring efforts early on by Gov. Freudenthal and continued backing from Gov. Mead. They realize tourism is a vital industry to Wyoming, and a gateway welcome center enhances the visitor experience. It is an effective means of directing tourists to many interesting Wyoming locations they might have missed otherwise,” said Diane Shober, state tourism director. The main exhibit showcases the region’s early inhabitants in the form of a Columbian Mammoth cast. There are interactive displays particularly hands-on for kids along with wildlife exhibits and several video stations. “It’s really a stunning piece of architecture and functionally it is outstanding for visitors,” said Shober. The building and surrounding grounds boast many features that were specially crafted. “From the rammed-earth walls to wind turbines and solar panels, there’s a whole energy value package and system in place that puts us at a very low carbon footprint.” Center project coordinator Suzanne Norton has been told by Cheyenne Light, Fuel & Power Co. officials the building’s renewable energy generation system produces enough energy to sustain the entire welcome center. “We are astonished to see the amount of energy produced each day,” said Norton. There is a kiosk in the center that shows the energy levels and the module can be accessed online as well. Shober believes the positioning of trees and “shelter belts” around the property bode well for the future. “I think what we are going to see as the facility and landscape matures will be a fine example of what can be done with a large, open space

Photo: Rick Carpenter

I-25 Southeast Travel Center Debuts


STRATEGIC PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT

Employee Recognition Survey & Teamwork Survey Results Janet Farrar and Mel Anderson of the Strategic Performance Program study different aspects of WYDOT and report their findings back to executive staff. In 2010, a survey was offered to WYDOT employees to gauge how they felt about certain areas of their career. One particular issue received the lowest score; namely receiving recognition for a job well done. A follow-up survey was drafted specifically focused on recognition and sent to a random selection of 476 employees. Some employees said that a manager or supervisor just relaying a heartfelt, “thank you” is sufficient recognition of a job well done. One respondent stated, “Being told that I’m doing a ‘job well done’ and a ‘thank you’ would help once and awhile.” But others said that without a bonus or raise situation here at WYDOT, recognition is not happening as frequently as it might elsewhere. “When the group was asked, ‘What kinds of performance are usually recognized by your supervisor?’ there were mixes of both positive and negative answers,” said Farrar. “Doing a good job in a timely manner, going above the call of duty and major accomplishments are the most frequent of the positive answers,” adds Anderson. Farrar and Anderson asked the Training Services Program to create a training session for supervisors focusing on rewards and recognition for employees. The session, which will be delivered during New Supervisor’s Orientation, will enable supervisors to better understand a typical level of giving recognition and rewards to others and what motivates their employees, and develop strategies for future recognition. “Recognition can be an authentic way to show people you care and you’d like to see them succeed. The course, in a big way, is meant to change mindsets,” said Jim Boyd, with Training Services. “A pizza lunch might be a great motivator for a team that already feels appreciated and engaged. A Starbucks card could do the same thing. But

even beyond that, a heartfelt ‘Thanks for doing A, B, and C today’ can go just as far, if not further. Especially when it’s done consistently and authentically.” Teamwork is another highly debated and often surveyed subject. In a 2012 survey focusing on teamwork at WYDOT, 288 respondents claimed that teamwork is “more cooperation and communication working together toward a common goal.” Yet, many respondents said their workgroups do not have cooperation and communication. “According to the scores, everyone knows what teamwork is and how it is best utilized. The teamwork within a work group scored very high, whereas the teamwork between work groups remained low,” said Farrar. Some WYDOT employees are still not sure what other WYDOT work groups do on a daily basis. “There is no definitive answer on how to facilitate interprogram teamwork,” she said. Individuals within the programs need to take initiative to make strides within their own work groups or districts to reach out to others.” “Executive staff is getting this survey information and is looking into the best ways to follow up on the concerns,” Anderson said. WYDOT-U, whether at Headquarters or via TLN, offers numerous classes that aim to strengthen teamwork, deal with difficult people, and aid in successful communication. The New Employee Orientation course gives a high level view of what each program does within the agency. “We’re looking forward to creating a follow-up survey to be offered this coming spring to see if any growth has happened within WYDOT regarding these two topics,” said Farrar. – Carlie Van Winkle

November 2012

n

Interchange

7


‘12

WYO 70’s

Realignment

1

8

Agency geologists who investigated the slide in preparation for a permanent repair recommended realigning the road, in lieu of rebuilding on the old existing alignment, which would have required expensive stabilization work, with no guarantee that additional movement of the slide might still not result in future road maintenance issues. The geologists characterized the event as a “large complex block-flow” slide and found that a major contributing factor to the instability of the slide area was an abundance of subsurface water saturation resulting from deep snow accumulations during winter, combined with steep terrain at the site. The road damage was first noted in late May 2011, when a group of late seaPhoto courtesy Tim McGary

Two semi-truck length sections of WYO 70 dropped several feet during the landslide.

Interchange

n November 2012

son snowmobilers came across the slide area and reported it to John Gallenbeck, WYDOT’s maintenance crew leader in

Photo: Cory Rinehart

A realignment project on WYO 70 (Battle Mountain Road) in southern Carbon County made good progress this summer and fall, with close to a mile of new roadbed now substantially complete. The project stems from the Dry Sandstone Landslide which activated during the spring of 2011 near milepost 31, just west of the Bear Peak Overlook. The slide destroyed a 600-foot long section of the route, dropping both lanes of the highway between 18 to 24 feet. In the short-term aftermath of the slide, WYDOT crews were able to build and open a one-lane, gravel-surface detour adjacent to the damaged road section, and this temporary measure has been place since then to provide access between Baggs and Encampment.

An inclinometer set into a hillside near WYO 70 to measure ground movement. The inclinometer probe is lowered by cable (black) into the notched PVC tubing by a pulley system. Data is recorded by the probe at specific intervals and then downloaded back in the office.

2

Fork in the road. The righthand road leads to the newly realigned WYO 70, the left leads to Bear Peak Overlook.


Baggs. Their concerns were that the vertical drop posed a safety hazard. By early June, Geology was on the scene to the begin initial assessments. Because ground water in the area was still high due to the unusually deep snowpack which had accumulated 2 during the preceding winter, it was 3 deemed necessary to wait until near the end of June to begin more extensive investigations, including drilling and placing inclinometers. Work to build the temporary detour along the back slope of the affected section of highway began on July 11 and was completed within a 1 few days. A Web camera was installed at the site to enable remote monitoring of the detour. Study and project planning continued for the rest of 2011, and A detailed topographical map from Planning which shows major features of the highway’s realignment. the realignment was identified as the length, features a relatively steep grade of a deceleration lane to be added alongside preferred alternative in an environnearly 10 percent for approximately 2,000 the eastbound travel lane to facilitate safe mental assessment issued earlier this year. feet at the east tie-in, and WYO 70 will be turning movements into the section of A contract for the project was awarded to shortened by 0.3 mile. Portions of the old existing road which leads to the overlook. Lander-based High County Construction alignment will remain in place to provide The section of WYO 70 damaged by the in June. access to the Bear Peak Overlook, located slide will be obliterated and revegetated. The project area is located with the just east of the slide area. seasonal closure of WYO 70, so work is Project details included removing –Bruce Burrows being suspended for the winter. Paving timber and brush on approximately will commence next summer when con35 acres of forest to accommodate the ditions permit. realignment. The steep grade resulted in The realignment, just short of a mile in Photo: Vince Cavanaugh

3

Photo: Vince Cavanaugh

A look from the top of the realigned section of WYO 70.

November 2012

n

Interchange

9


Wet and cold weather on Oct. 16 may have required a change in logistics, but it did not dampen spirits for a celebration of the completion of seven years of reconstruction work on US 26-287, the “Togwotee Trail to Yellowstone,” west of Dubois. The event, which included a bus tour starting in Dubois, was capped by a ribbon-cutting ceremony, originally scheduled to be held outside at a scenic overlook about nine miles west of the summit of Togwotee Pass. Rain and snow prompted the location to be moved inside to WYDOT’s new maintenance facility about seven miles east of the pass. Shelby Carlson, District 5 Engineer, cut the ribbon to officially open all sections of the new highway. “The road is beautiful,” Carlson said. “And we did retain the scenic beauty of Togwotee Pass.” “We’ve had wildlife we had to accommodate. We have wetlands we’ve had to

10

Interchange

n November 2012

accommodate,” Carlson continued. “We have landslides; everybody thinks those mountains are sitting still, but they’re not. They’re moving all the time.” The grand opening tour left the Headwaters in Dubois the morning of the event with a 54-passenger Dubois school bus accom- Shelby Carlson (center), District 5 Engineer, and other dignitaries panied by a 15-passenger during the official opening of the reconstructed Togwotee Trail. van. Nearly 65 people Judith Strausberger, WYDOT’s Togwotee signed up to tour the Togwotee Trail projTrail public involvement specialist. ect corridor. Five stops were scheduled One of the tour stops was the wildlife where passengers could get outside and arch located 10.5 miles east of Moran Jct. experience the trail first hand. This site was chosen for the arch after “During the bus tour, participants studies showed extensive use as a wildlife weathered rain, snow, and finally some crossing. sunshine with an amazing rainbow with This is also the location of the Rosie’s both ends visible. As a fortuitous sign, East landslide, where a toe berm was one end of the rainbow actually appeared constructed to help stabilize the large, to stretch down onto the highway,” wrote creeping landslide. The toe berm area is

Photo: Rick Carpenter

W


Togwotee Trail reconstruction by the numbers The now-concluded improvement of US 26-287, the primary corridor connecting central Wyoming to Grand Teton and Yellowstone National parks, served to boost traveler convenience and safety in a number of ways. Crews replaced deteriorated road base and pavement, improved roadway drainage and widened the road to include eight-foot shoulders for bicycle use and emergency parking. Other numbers associated with the effort: N Eight passing lanes added, along with 16 parking areas (300 parking stalls); N 3.7 million cubic yards of dirt and rock excavation; Photo: Rick Carpenter

N 575,000 tons of crushed gravel topped by 245,000 tons of new asphalt; N 3,755 linear feet of retaining walls; N 1.2 million square yards (enough to cover 200 football fields) of construction fabrics; N 17 landslides stabilized, with more than 22 miles of horizontal drains installed for slide mitigation;

Photo: Rick Carpenter

south of the highway and below the wildlife arch. A lunch-stop at the new maintenance shop included humorous anecdotes and fiddle playing by Les Hamilton in his role as Roamin’ Wyomin’, construction cowboy. Lyle Lamb, WYDOT project engineer in Dubois during most of the Togwotee Trail project series, related facts about the seven-year reconstruction of the 38-mile corridor. He answered questions, and described the innovative construction techniques used on the Brooks Lake, Togwotee Pass/ Fourmile Meadows, Rosie’s Ridge, and Buffalo Fork River sections of the project.

Breath-taking scenery surrounds drivers on Togwotee Trail to Yellowstone.

N Five structures for deer, elk, moose, bison, bears and smaller wildlife to safely cross underneath the new highway, along with three underpasses for snowmobiles, which can also be used by wildlife. November 2012

n

Interchange

11


New Web cameras operational WYDOT now has 118 Web cameras operating around the state to provide views of current road conditions for the use of the traveling public, WYDOT maintenance crews and the Transportation Management Center. The new cameras installed around the state this year were placed primarily on highways not previously served by the Web camera system, ITS developer Suzie Roseberry said. Among the locations where new cameras are in operation are three sections of US 287 between Rawlins and Lander, three sections of US 85 between Cheyenne and Mule Creek Junction, two sections of US 30 between Laramie and Walcott Junction, two sections of WYO 22 between Wilson and the Idaho border and two sections of WYO 120 in the Meeteetse and Cody areas. Interstate 80 got additional cameras in the Evanston and Green River areas and Interstate 25 got one in the Midwest area and one in the Douglas area. Roseberry said the locations for the new cameras were chosen based on requests from the public and WYDOT maintenance personnel. “We do take the public comments into consideration and then the maintenance districts also let us know where we have trouble spots where we could put cameras for the public to view,” she said. “Our maintenance crews use them to help monitor and see if they need to go out on certain stretches of road to plow, and our Transportation Management Center also monitors the cameras for any issues that might arise on the roads.” The cameras and their installation cost about $10,000 each, and the GIS/ITS Program has funding in its budget for installing another 20 cameras that could be operating soon. “We actually could get them running and on the Web site in the current season,” Roseberry said. “We’re taking comments from the public and the maintenance districts to decide where to put those cameras.” Suggested locations for those cameras can be sent to wyoroad@wyo.gov. All the available Web camera views can be seen on the 511 Travel Information Web page at wyoroad.info, and on the interactive map at map.wyoroad.info, where clicking on the Web camera icon on the map brings up the view from that camera.

Two of the new Web cameras along US 287 between Rawlins and Lander. Maintenance crews will use the new cameras to monitor road conditions.

– Dave Kingham

Holiday parties are nearing. Law enforcement will be cracking down on drunk drivers. 12

Interchange

n November 2012

Please designate a sober driver.


November 2012

n

Interchange

13


Noteworthy Jones promoted to major

years later, he was promoted to administrative sergeant in headquarters, and in 2001, he was appointed to lieutenant overseeing the newly formed Capital Protective Division in Cheyenne. Since 2005, he had served as District 1 Commander, responsible for troopers and port-of-entry personnel in Albany, Carbon and Laramie counties. As support services commander, he manages commercial carrier, dispatch, evidence, equipment, safety, training, and records functions. Jones is a Casper native and graduate of Natrona County High School. He has earned an associate’s degree in science from Casper College, a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Wyoming and a master’s degree in educational administration from the University of South Dakota.

Major Perry Jones

Total number of employees: as of Oct. 2, 2012

How It’s Made airing this November Mike Schulte, retired WYDOT Geologist, will be featured on the Science Channel’s TV show How It’s Made featuring his jade golf putters. The segment is scheduled to air at 7 p.m., Nov. 8 on the Science Channel (Optimum 168). Check with your provider’s listings for the correct channel. You may recall that Schulte was featured in the November 2011 issue of Interchange regarding taping of the show.

Miller tabbed to head Right-of-Way Michael J. Miller of Cheyenne recently assumed duties as Right-of-Way Program administrator, filling the vacancy created when John Sherman retired this summer. Miller is a 36-year WYDOT veteran. He first worked for the agency as a summer hire in the Materials Laboratory prior to earning his bachelor’s degree in business from the University of Wyoming. Following his 1977 graduation from UW, he accepted permanent employment

Photo: Rick Carpenter

Photo: Rick Carpenter

Perry Jones of the Wyoming Highway Patrol in Cheyenne was recently promoted to major and has assumed duties as WHP’s support services commander. Jones joined the Patrol in August 1991 and was stationed in Cheyenne. Eight

within the Right-of-Way Program. He is a Cheyenne native who attended St. Mary’s Catholic High School and subsequently Laramie County Community College. Miller started with Right-of-Way as a negotiator and later worked as an appraiser and review appraiser. Since 2000, he had been right-of-way manager. He is a certified general real estate appraiser in Wyoming, and he has volunteered in different capacities for WyHy Federal Credit Union.

Schulte showing Interchange staff his jade putter during his 2011 interview.

2,046

One month ago

2,046 2,003

14

Interchange

n November 2012

Photo: Rick Carpenter

One year ago Michael Miller

Submissions deadline for the December issue of Interchange: 11/16/12


off a vehicle without the owner’s knowledge, the samaritan’s concern was getting it back to its rightful owner. Highway Patrol was alerted and the samaritan was asked to bring it to Cheyenne. Thinking their wheelchair had been Dale Roberts, Vance Lucero, Dale Castle and DJ Sandoval placing the wheelchair and rack stolen, the couple back on the RV with the help of Carl Moody called the Wyoming and a loader while Sgt. Duane Ellis looks on. Highway Patrol to report it missing. “As the wheelchair was being unloaded from the samaritan’s vehicle, the owners were calling us to report it missing,” said Sgt. Duane Ellis. “I told them they could come to Cheyenne to claim it.” Finding out the wheelchair had made it to Cheyenne Patrol headquarters; the Jacksons were relieved to hear the news. “I’m so happy that it got found,” said Jackson. Carl Moody, along with fellow workers from the Headquarters rigging shop loaded the carrier rack and wheelchair back onto the RV with the help of a WYDOT front-end loader. “We just wanted to get them (the Jacksons) loaded back up so they could get back on the road to see their 17 grandchildren,” said Ellis. The Jacksons are making their way to Florida to visit 15 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, three of whom they’ve not yet met. – Carlie Van Winkle

William Cheney named to Wyoming Aviation Hall of Fame

Photo: WYDOT

power line inspection and taxi and charter flights. When U.S. Rep. John Wold ran for the U.S. Senate in 1970, Cheney flew him to campaign stops around the state. In 1977 he established the Cheney Flying Service using the William H. Cheney, whose aviation career encompassed private airstrip on the family ranch he grew up on in the Bates everything from conducting wildlife surveys to managing the Hole area southwest of Casper. Agencies and corporations that Guernsey Airport, will be inducted into the Wyoming Aviation contracted for his services included the Wyoming Game and Fish Hall of Fame during ceremonies Nov. 10 in Casper. Department, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, He was selected for the honor by the Hall Wyoming Department of Corrections, Ruof Fame’s board of directors with the approvral Electric Association, Glenrock Coal and al of the Wyoming Aeronautics Commission. numerous oil, gas and uranium companies. Cheney, 77, logged nearly 17,000 hours Cheney also earned his instrucof flying time during his career, most of it tors license and was the president of the at the controls of single-engine, tail-dragger Wyoming chapter of the Flying Farmers aircraft, often under extreme and unusual Association. conditions. He has flown at least 32 different He served as manager of the Guernsey aircraft, including models made by Cessna, Airport from 2008-2010, and continues to Piper, Beech, Stinson, Air Tractor, Lockheed, live in that community. Bellanca, Maule and Citabria American The Wyoming Aviation Hall of Fame Champion. was established in 1994, through the efFlight services he provided over the years forts of veteran Wyoming pilot R.R. “Red” include aerial spraying, transporting survey Kelso, to honor individuals who have made crews and laborers to remote job sites, conoutstanding contributions to the establishducting wildlife surveys, towing advertising ment, development and advancement of banners, predator control, livestock locating, aviation in Wyoming. transporting patients and prison inmates, – Dave Kingham Wyoming Aviation Hall of Fame inductee William Cheney.

November 2012

n

Interchange

15

Photo: Carlie Van Winkle

A bright but chilly day last month found Tom and Phyllis Jackson searching for a missing wheelchair along a busy Wyoming interstate highway. The Jacksons, of Vancouver, Wash., had been towing their recreational vehicle eastbound on I-80 past Laramie when a fellow traveler signaled them that something was awry. Tom and Phyllis pulled over near milepost 315, just short of the Grand Avenue Interchange, and discovered that indeed, a carrier rack mounted on the back of the RV had malfunctioned, resulting in the rack, which holds their wheelchair, dragging along the pavement. The Jacksons detached the rack, complete with wheelchair, and left it along the roadside before heading back into Laramie to locate someone to retrieve the items and repair the rack. A Laramie tow company driver went looking for the wheelchair around the The wheelchair escaped area that the couple reported it to be. The driver found the skid marks from damage after the rack’s malfunction on I-80. the dragged carrier, but there was no carrier and no wheelchair. Much to the Jackson’s dismay, this had all happened within an hour of dropping it off on the shoulder of the interstate. Jackson quipped, “When the wrecker got out on the highway, guess what wasn’t there – the wheelchair.” As it turned out, while the Jacksons were in Laramie making calls to find needed services, a good samaritan had picked up wheelchair. Thinking that the wheelchair and carrier had fallen

Photo: Carlie Van Winkle

Wheelchair goes missing on highway


District News Headquarters

Jason Behrens, Facilities Management-Custodial; Rick Beisner Jr., Cheyenne I-25 Port of Entry; Candace Herrera, Office Services-Files; Curtis Hunsaker, Facilities ManagementBuilding Maintenance; Bret Lamblin, Telecom Administration; Troy McAlpine, Cheyenne I-80 Port of Entry; and Joshua Taylor, GIS/ITS.

Service Awards Douglas Dome, Patrol-Commercial Carrier – 30 years; Lorraine Abeyta, Human Resources – 25 years; James Bruckner, Equipment Mechanics – 15 years; John Davis, Management Services – 15 years; Jess Fresquez, Cheyenne I-80 Port of Entry – 10 years;

Christopher Sanchez, Highway Development-Project Development-Utilities – 10 years; Bryan Stirzinger, Aeronautics-Flight Operations – 10 years; Lawrence Emery, Motor Vehicle Services-Registration/Title – 5 years; Ravid Ingram, Materials-Bituminous – 5 years; William Ostrander Jr., Bridge-Operations Inspection – 5 years; and Jamie Romo, Budget-Federal Aid – 5 years.

Congratulations Sara Janes has been chosen as the new Senior Policy and Planning Analyst for the Local Programs Team in the Office of Local Government Coordination in Cheyenne. Sara assumed her new duties on Oct. 1.

Headquarters Driver Services staff went out of their way to make Ken Bixler, regional supervisor, feel like royalty on his birthday. Seems that it was a happy birthday, all joking aside.

District 2

Welcome Luke Chaires, Torrington Traffic Striping Sara Janes

District 3

District 1

Welcome

Welcome

John Kirsch, Rock Springs Mechanics; Kurtis Qualman, Rock Springs Mechanics; and Kenneth Walter, Farson Maintenance.

Jacqueline Shotkoski, Laramie Driver Services.

Service Awards

Congratulations Kevin Treat, of Saratoga Maintenance on his recent promotion to Highway Maintenance Specialist 1. Two District 1 employees have transferred to District 3. Will Vegors, Laramie Mechanics will now be working with IT;

16

Interchange

n November 2012

Service Awards Photo: WYDOT

Jacob Brown, Cheyenne Maintenance – 10 years; Mark Garcia, Laramie Maintenance-Guardrail – 5 years; Kelly Smock, Elk Mountain Maintenance – 5 years; August Trabing, Laramie TrafficStriping – 5 years. AJ Trabing

Photo: Rick Carpenter

Welcome

Jacob Brown accepting his 10-year certificate from Tim McGary, District Maintenance Engineer.

and Jake Webber, Rawlins Maintenance is now working with Pinedale Maintenance. Matthew Haas, Cheyenne Maintenance recently transferred to Pine Bluffs Maintenance.

Larry Booth, Afton Mechanics – 25 years; David Neilson, Kemmerer Construction – 15 years; Perry Olson, Rock Springs Traffic-Electrical – 10 years; Donald Lawless, Jackson Construction – 5 years;

Larry Booth

Retirement Alvin Smock, Pine Bluffs Maintenance

David Neilson

Donald Lawless


District 4

Welcome

In The Community

James Donahue, Moorcroft Maintenance; and Loren Woodin, Sheridan Construction.

Service Awards James Fowler, Sundance Maintenance – 35 years; Rachelle Degen, Gillette Port of Entry – 25 years;

District 5 Tamara Clark, Cody/Lovell Driver Services – 5 years; Donald Jackman, Thermopolis Maintenance – 5 years;

Congratulations District 5 mechanics pass FOS tests. Brandon Blakesley from Thermopolis passed and is certified in administrative procedures and received his master technician certificate; Clifford Wise from Thermopolis passed and is now certified in hydraulics, power trains and rigging; Robert Dalin from Basin passed and is now certified in General Shop; and Robert Zuspan from Lander passed and is certified in power trains.

Submissions deadline for the next issue of

WYDOT Outdoors:

12/12/12

Get your photos published! carlie.vanwinkle@wyo.gov

Photo: Scott Taylor

Service Awards The Gem City’s young gridiron greats squared off in Deti Stadium on Oct. 16 for a playoff game. These future Plainsmen are ornery with unbuckled motorists.

Ice & Snow? Take it slow.

Know before you go.

Extra Mile

AWARDS Congratulations September recipients! WYDOT salutes the following Director’s Extra Mile Award recipients. The award is presented to individuals who have traveled the “extra mile” in service to WYDOT. Chaundra Paice

Mariah Drake

Brian Peel

Tegan Carter

David Rush

Blaise Hansen

Liane Terrill

Vincent Cavanaugh

For more information about the Extra Mile Award or to nominate someone, contact Janet Farrar at janet.farrar@wyo.gov or Mel Anderson at mel.anderson@wyo.gov. November 2012

n

Interchange

17


Passings

Beefing up ECAR

Grant H. Willson

Ken E. DeWitt

Retiree Grant H. Willson, 92, died Oct. 6 in Cheyenne. Willson joined WYDOT’s predecessor agency, the old Wyoming Highway Department, in 1958 as superintendent of buildings and grounds. He transferred to Purchasing (now Procurement Services) in 1973 and served as the department’s purchasing agent prior to his retirement near the end of 1981. He was a native of Greeley, Colo., and a graduate of the University of Colorado. Willson, who served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, moved to Wyoming in 1946 to operate Skateland, Cheyenne’s first roller skating rink. Willson was a founding member of the Cheyenne chapter of the Wyoming Archaeology Society and twice received the society’s “Golden Trowel Award.” He also volunteered at the State Museum and the Travel Commission. An open house in his honor is scheduled for Nov. 17 and 18.

Ken Elton DeWitt, 39, of Sheridan passed away on Oct. 6 at his residence. DeWitt had worked for WYDOT at the Shirley Rim maintenance facility for six years until July 2008. DeWitt was also a member of the Wyoming National Guard. Ken DeWitt He enjoyed fishing, camping, hunting, four-wheeling and spending time with his family. Services for Ken were held Oct. 12 at Kane Funeral Home with Reverend Kevin Jones officiating. Memorials to honor Ken may be made to the Ken E. DeWitt Children’s Fund in care of the Bank of Sheridan, 1375 Sugarland Dr., Sheridan, WY 82801.

Gerry V. Tippetts Gerry V. Tippetts, 75, retired Lovell Maintenance heavy equipment operator, passed away on Oct. 12. Tippetts worked for WYDOT for 27 years. Tippetts was schooled in Lovell and went to Pocatello, Idaho, post-graduation to learn welding Gerry Tippetts and mechanics. He returned to Lovell to help run the farm and dairy at his parents’ farm. Tippetts and his family have been members of the Lovell Third Ward since they were married. The family was sealed in the Idaho Falls Temple on July 24, 1974. Services were held Oct. 16 at the Lovell LDS Stake Center with Bishop Steve McArthur officiating. Burial followed at the Lovell Cemetery. Our deepest sympathy to his family, including son-in-law Chad Aagard of Casper, and friends.

18

Interchange

n November 2012

WYDOT has renewed efforts this fall to beef up “ECAR,” whereby motorists can pitch in to assist WYDOT personnel in providing information to the ever-popular 511 Travel Information service. (ECAR is short for “Enhanced Citizen-Assisted Reporting.”) First-hand observations of road surface and weather conditions remain an essential part of the 511 system. Adding ECAR volunteers has helped meet the challenge of keeping road and weather reports current and accurate. A typical ECAR participant is someone who drives a particular stretch of road regularly. Many volunteers are affiliated with a transportation company or business which distributes its products via Wyoming’s highways. Volunteers are supplied with an illustrated handbook including written and visual definitions of different types of pavement and weather conditions. ECAR application forms are available online via the 511 Travel Information Web site. Prospective volunteers can also call the GIS/ITS Program at 777-4623 or send an email to ecar@wyo.gov.

Training ata Glance Here are upcoming training opportunities from WYDOT University and the Transportation Learning Network (TLN)

Date Class Nov 1 Nov 1 Nov 7 Nov 8 Nov 13 Nov 14 Nov 15 Nov 29

Dou ble Header

Dou ble Header

Coming Up in December: Dec 5 Dec 6

Dou ble Header

Location

Improving Your Facilitation Skills NEW TLN Taking Care of the Customer NEW Cheyenne Improving Your Ability to Deal w/ Conflict WYDOT-only TLN The Honor of Leadership NEW Cheyenne Successfully Communicating with Your Boss, Co-Workers, and the Public Cheyenne Team Building Cheyenne Building Credibility and Influence WYDOT-only TLN Stepping Up: Initiative in the Workplace Cheyenne Business Writing Today Problem-Solving and Decision-Making

Cheyenne WYDOT-only TLN

To register, or to find out more details, call the Training Program and talk to David Talley (777-4792), Jim Boyd (777-4791) or Rhonda DeLeeuw (777-4790). When you call, ask about the videos, books and audiotapes available from the Training Resource Library.


WTDEA Happenings District 2 annual WTDEA Headquarters pumpkin decorating a ghoulish success Relief Fund Poker Run

Each year, WTDEA sponsors a pumpkin decorating contest at the Headquarters building. Judges have the tough task of picking winners, even though each pumpkin is unique and creative.

It was another great ride, and fun was had by all. Aug. 25 brought a hardy group of motorcyclists and poker players together at the WYDOT complex in Casper, where the first cards were drawn. The group was 10 strong; eight bikes and two vehicles for the 15 of us. Kaycee Rest Area was our first stop, then on to Buffalo where we joined the State WTDEA annual barbecue. We spent a couple of hours enjoying a great barbecue lunch, watched (or won) various drawings and prize giveaways, then we made off for the other side of the mountain.

For those who had never been down the Ten Sleep Canyon it was the perfect end to a great day. The group stopped in Ten Sleep, drew a card and wet our collective throats. We finished the day in Thermopolis. Andy Freeman‘s Round Top Motel was a great place to stay – what a great host! They had dinner cooking on the grill when we showed up. We had some great food and drinks and watched the sun go down. The winner of the “Big Money Hand” was Bob Zigweid, from Muddy Gap, with $201.25. He donated it all back. Second place was Barb Miller, of Sheridan Port of Entry. Her hand won $120.75, which she also donated back. The “Worst Hand” belonged to Kurt Miller of Casper Maintenance worth $80.50. Kurt kindly donated $40 of it back to the relief fund. In all, $764.50 was raised by this year’s run. A big “thanks” to everyone who purchased poker hands. There is talk of a hog roast with live music next year in Thermopolis. Ride safe, hope to see you again next year. – Steve Hinton

In the 8-15 year old category: Jack Skellington by James Hamilton – 1st place. In the 16 and up category: Oggy Boogy by Aria Edwards – 1st place

Cash Calendar

WTDEA Store

Photo: Bob Zigweid

(Clockwise from top left) In the 0-7 year old category: Cat got the Mouse by Sonya Cavanaugh – 1st place; Lady Bug by Anna Yearout – 2nd place; Goonies “Hey you guys” by Kayden Martinez – 3rd place.

An 18 Month Calendar (7/2012 - 12/2013) is selling for $15. Daily chances to win starting January 2013. Contact your representative for information.

July 2013 Sunday

Weekdays $10.00 Drawings

Monday

Tuesday

1 7

Monday

August 2012

S

M

T

W

T

1 5 12

6 13

7 14

F

2

8 15

9 16

S

3 10 17

20

18

21

22

23

24

27

25

28

29

30

31

2

9

M 1

7 14

Tuesday

October 2012

S

4 11

19 26

8 15

T 2 9 16

W 3 10

T

F

4 11

Wednesday

S

5 12

Sunday

1 Thursday

6

18

19

22

20

23

24

25

26

29

27

30

31

4

5

6

Labor Day

11

12

13

7 14

8

7

2

14

8

9

3

17

18

19

20

21

24

22

25

26

27

28

29

21

28

10

Sunday

22

29

16

23

30

31

Thursday

Friday

4

Saturday

5

11

13

T

W

M

3 10

T

F

S

9

S

17

23

24

30

January 2013 T W T

M

1

10

16

22

29

5

5

6

7

8

12

13

14

15

16

17

23

24

S

6

7

13

2

8

3

9

10

15 16 17 Saturday 21 14

20

22

27

2

28

23

29

24

6

30

Tuesday F

4

Wednesday

S

18

19

20

21

25

22

26

27

28

29

30

4

31 T

5

W

11

6

T

12

7

13

14

F

T

W

T

F

S

2

3

9

10

6 13

7 14

8 15

18

19

20

21

25

22

26

27

28

29

4 11

15

16

5

6

12

7

13

19

8

14

20

26

15

21

27

22

28

29

17

18

19

20

21

25

22

26

23

27

24

28

29

30

31

Sunday

Monday

July 2013

S

M

8 15

T 2 9

22

23

29

30

W 3 10

16

21 28

20

M

17 24

T 4 11

F

S

5 12

6 13

18

19

20

25

26

27

31

Tuesday

September 2013

S

M

1 8 15

2 9

T 3

17

23

24

30

W 4

10

16

22 29

11 18 25

T

F

5

13

Wednesday

S

6

12

Weekends $20.00 Drawings

Thursday

7

1

14

19

20

21

26

27

28

4

11

Weekdays $10.00 Drawings

5

12

6

13

7

14

T

6 13

W

7 14

T

8 15

F 2 9

S 3 10

18

19

16

20

17

21

25

22

26

23

27

24

28

29

30

18

25

19

26

20

27

21

28

Holidays $50.00 Drawings

Friday

2

8

15

November 2012

1 5 12

Saturday

1 4 11 18 25

Christmas Day

August 2013

27

S

1 5 12

17 24

Friday

12 19 26

3

S

1 8

September 2012

4 11

16 23

Thursday

5

11 18 25

31

1310

17 20 24 27

August 2013

M

1

4 11

14

19

26

S

2 9

8 15

21

28

12 9

M

3 10

6

12

18

25

30

7

20

27

16 19 23 26

June 2013

S

2 9

7

17

24

19 26

18

25

30

30

31

6

13 14 Friday

12

18 25

Day

11

17

24

Monday

November 2012

5

11

4

Independence

M T W Holidays T F S $50.00 Drawings 1 2 3

S

4

Thursday

3

10

16

23

December 2012

Weekends $20.00 Drawings

Wednesday

9

15

22

29 Wednesday

1

15

15

16 23 30

Tuesday

Saturday

1

3 10

Friday

13

17

21 28

Monday

2

8

14

21

Sunday

28

October 2012

September 2012

22

29

9

16

23

30

Saturday

3

10

17

24

31

Gloves

Pigskin leather work gloves. $5.25 for members, $6.25 for non-members. Call Tina Thomas at 777-4486.

Cookbook

The Roadkill Cookbook is selling for $10. Call Barbara Thomasee at 777-4494.

Hats

WTDEA State Board is selling hats. The hats are $18. Contact your WTDEA representative for more information. If you would like your WTDEA event to be placed in Interchange, please contact Tina Thomas, tina.thomas@wyo.gov or Tony Niswender, anthony.niswender@wyo.gov

Be sure to check out our internet classified site at:

http://wtdeaclassified.com November 2012

n

Interchange

19


Interchange

Wyoming Department of Transportation 5300 Bishop Blvd. Cheyenne, Wyoming 82009-3340 Address Service Requested

Pre-sorted Standard U.S. Postage Paid Cheyenne, WY 82009 Permit No. 24


Interchange - November 2012