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Interchange December 2016

Driving near snow plows Tips from WYDOT maintenance


Letters

Interchange

Gratitude expressed to our WYDOT family To all those who donated time to me while I was out on sick leave, thank you very much. It was deeply appreciated.

Thank you, Tim Kennedy

Words cannot express how truly grateful I am to have such thoughtful and giving coworkers. I am in awe about your fundraisers and donations after our fire. WYDOT is a great community and we are so thankful to be a part of it. From the bottom of our hearts, thank you!

Mart and Donna Morss

Vol. 44, Issue 12

Interchange is published for employees of the Wyoming Department of Transportation by its Public Affairs Office and a number of field correspondents. Interchange invites submissions from all employees. Please send them to either your district correspondents or to: Carlie Van Winkle, Interchange editor, 5300 Bishop Blvd., Cheyenne, WY, 82009-3340. The Public Affairs Office may also be contacted by phoning (307) 777-4165, or sending email to carlie.vanwinkle@wyo.gov

Staff WYDOT Director: William T. Panos

Public Affairs Manager: Doug McGee

We want to hear from you! Interchange reader survey

Editor: Carlie Van Winkle

Contributors: Aimee Inama Carlie Van Winkle Jeff Goetz Stephanie Harsha Ronda Holwell Cody Beers Sgt. David Wagener

Public Affairs Public Affairs District 2 District 3 District 4 District 5 Patrol

Photography: Rick Carpenter

Public Affairs

Be sure to check out the online version of Interchange at http://issuu.com/wydot. pao, or click on the link found on the employee’s internal website home page.

The Public Affairs Office would like to get a better idea of what you want from your department magazine. Please take a few minutes to respond to the survey found on Google Forms by Dec. 31.

The short survey can be taken online at:

goo.gl/nkcbA4 Thank you for your assistance. 2

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DOT publication


Contents

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Features 8 Driving near snow plows Tips from WYDOT maintenance

11 Riverton women donate quilts

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“Comfort quilts� go to WHP for use in emergencies

11 Customer satisfaction survey Calling gathers overall satisfaction with WYDOT

12 PSCC official now at WYDOT Bob Symons moves to WYDOT

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Also in this issue Letters.........................................................................................2 District briefs.............................................................................4 By the Numbers.......................................................................7 Training.....................................................................................12 TechNotes................................................................................13 District news...........................................................................14 Awards......................................................................................16 Extra Mile Awards..................................................................16 Passings....................................................................................18 WTDEA......................................................................................19 Break Time.............................................................................. 23

On the cover:

The Snowy Range near Lake Marie. (The image has been slightly edited from the original.) Photo: Carlie Van Winkle

Kindly recycle this publication after reading. December 2016

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District Briefs Commission awards $35 million in highway contracts in November

Cheyenne – Motorists traveling on I-80 will soon see improvements to the road surface in several areas on the western side of the state. The Wyoming Transportation Commission awarded a $14.7 million mill and overlay contract for 10 miles of work between Lyman and Granger Junction, and a $7 million mill and overlay contract for 12 miles of work between Rock Springs and Rawlins during its Nov. 17 meeting. The commission awarded the contracts to Lewis & Lewis of Rock Springs, who was the lowest bidder on both. Those two contracts were one of 10 the commission awarded totaling $35 million. For the $14.7 million contract, work will be completed on the eastbound and westbound lanes. Crews will work on the eastbound lanes during the first year of the project, and then work on the westbound lanes the following year. When crews are working on the eastbound lanes, traffic will be diverted to a single lane, head-to-head in the westbound lanes. When crews are working on the westbound lanes, traffic will be diverted to the eastbound lanes. The project also includes some minor bridge rehabilitation work to nine bridges and total reconstruction of two bridges. The contract completion date is Nov. 30, 2018. For the $7 million project, crews will be milling and adding a 3-inch overlay, and will be working on four bridges. That work will only take place on the westbound lane. While work is taking place, traffic will be diverted to a single lane in the eastbound lane where traffic will travel head to head. The contract completion date is Oct. 31, 2017. The rest of the contracts the commission awarded were for other overlays, bridge, fence and electrical work.

HQ

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McGarvin-Moberly Construction Co. of Worland won a $2.8 million contract for a 9-mile overlay and chip seal project on WYO 230 between Woods Landing and the Colorado state line in Albany County. The work also includes minor bridge repairs. The project is being paid for with 10-cent fuel-tax revenue, and is expected to be completed by Sept. 30, 2017. Lewis & Lewis Inc. also was the low bidder on a $2.6 million overlay project that will involve two sections of road totaling about 7 miles on US 30 between Sage Creek and Kemmerer in Lincoln County. The majority of the work will be a standard mill and overlay. In front of the port of entry is a concrete section that’s less than a mile. For that part of the project, crews will remove the concrete and replace it with a plant mix overlay. Crews will also be performing minor bridge work. The project is being paid for with 10cent fuel-tax revenue, and is expected to be completed by Oct. 31, 2017. Century Companies Inc., of Lewistown, Mont., won a $2.3 million contract for light and median remediation work on US 14A, Coulter Avenue, in Powell. Crews will remove the concrete medians and replace them with concrete pavement so a turning lane can be installed. The other work includes federal Americans with Disabilities Act upgrades to sidewalks and asphalt paving in other parts. The contract completion date is Oct. 31, 2017. Also awarded by the commission were contracts for: n $1.6 million to Hedquist Construction Inc. of Mills for replacing concrete at 12 Street and Wyoming Boulevard in Casper, replacing a waterline in that area and doing sidewalk, curbing and gutter work by Oct. 31, 2017; n $1.4 million to DeBernardi Construc-

tion Co. of Rock Springs for a bridge replacement on County Road 4-37 in Sweetwater County by Oct. 31, 2017;

n $1.1 million to Reimen Corp. of Chey-

enne for the replacement of the Lance Creek Bridge on County Road 14-11 about 12 miles southwest of Mule

Creek Junction in Niobrara County by Oct. 31, 2017; n $804,759 to Casper Electric Inc. of

Casper to replace 17 high-mast tower lights at the junction of I-25 and I-90 east of Buffalo in Johnson County that were damaged during a wind storm recently by Oct. 31, 2017; and

n $767,692 to King Enterprises of Mills

for 3 miles of fence modification and installation of cattle guard on WYO 352 in Kendall Valley in Sublette County by Oct. 31, 2017.

WHP begins preparations for 2017 solar eclipse Cheyenne – Although the highly anticipated August 2017 solar eclipse is still more than nine months away, the WHP is already preparing for the event. With the potential impact of the projected influx of visitors the eclipse will bring to Wyoming, the WHP is taking steps to be ready ahead of time. The Patrol plans on an increase in traffic before, during and after the solar eclipse statewide, as well as above average traffic numbers on Aug. 21 in Teton, Sublette, Fremont, Natrona, Converse, Goshen, Platte and Niobrara counties, as those counties have been identified as prime viewing areas to view the totality of the eclipse. Members of the WHP have already been active with the eclipse planning team in Casper and plan to attend similar meetings across the state. WHP is also coordinating with the Wyoming Office of Homeland Security, local law enforcement, the Wyoming Office of Tourism and other eclipse coordinators to determine the best way to use WHP resources during the event. All troopers and WHP Dispatch Center personnel have already been asked to not schedule leave between Aug. 14 and Aug. 27 so that all troopers, with the help of dispatchers, are available to patrol Wyoming’s highways during the eclipse event. As planning progresses, WHP will continue to evaluate and consider how agency resources can be best used during the eclipse time frame including the possible option of deploying additional troopers from non-prime viewing locations to the counties that will be in the prime viewing areas.


Cheyenne troopers make multiple arrests over busy three-day weekend

Photo: WHP

Cheyenne – Troopers stayed busy over the extended Veterans Day weekend with three significant criminal interdictions ranging from over 16 pounds of methamphetamine seized to a stolen vehicle recovered after a 15 mile long pursuit. On Nov. 11, a WHP trooper stopped a 2007 Range Rover SUV for speeding 94 mph in a posted 75 mph zone near mile post 352 on I-80 eastbound approximately 10 miles west of Cheyenne at 4:13 p.m. After speaking with the occupants of the SUV, the trooper ascertained reasonable suspicion to call for a WHP K-9 with the K-9 alerting to the presence of a controlled substance in the Range Rover. A subsequent search of the SUV revealed approximately 70 pounds of marijuana, 100 electronic cigarette cartridges loaded with THC oil and $2,400 in cash. Both Range Rover occupants were Kansas residents and were arrested and taken into custody. They were charged with felony possession of marijuana and felony possession of marijuana with intent to deliver. The seized marijuana and THC oil has an estimated street value of $290,000.

Methamphetamine was found in the speaker box of the 2004 Infinity passenger car.

On Nov. 12, a WHP trooper stopped a 2004 Infinity passenger car at the junction of I-25 and I-80 for speeding 83 mph in a 75 mph zone on I-80 near the city limits of Cheyenne at 1 p.m. During the stop, a WHP K-9 alerted to the presence of a controlled substance in the Infinity. A subsequent search of the car revealed over 16 pounds of methamphetamine hidden in a speaker box. The two California residents were both

On Nov. 13, a trooper discovered a stolen 1996 Honda Accord after running the vehicle’s license plate near mile post 349 on I-80 approximately 10 miles west of Cheyenne at 12:20 p.m. The Honda initially exited off I-80 onto Otto Road before taking off from the trooper back to eastbound on I-80. The Honda reached speeds of 110 mph before exiting I-80 on to WYO 222 northbound. The Honda continued to elude the trooper on eastbound WYO 210 (Happy Jack Road) until another WHP trooper was able to spike the Honda at the intersection of WYO 210 and I-25. Shortly after the car was spiked, both occupants of the Honda fled on foot, but were both caught by troopers. Both occupants were Cheyenne residents and were arrested and taken to the Laramie County Detention Center. They have been charged with multiple charges including misdemeanor possession of methamphetamine, interference with a peace officer, eluding, speeding and a stop sign violation as well as being booked in on multiple warrants. The Honda was reported stolen from Laramie County on Nov. 2.

Cheyenne – The six Wyoming Highway Patrol State troopers who were sent to assist law enforcement in North Dakota to help with the Dakota Access Pipeline protests have returned home. The WHP Special Services Squad departed for North Dakota on Oct. 22 and returned to Wyoming Nov. 8. The troopers were sent to North Dakota at the request of North Dakota officials as both states are members of the Emergency Management Assistance Compact. WHP Col. Kebin Haller stated, “Our six troopers arrived back safely after having assisted North Dakota law enforcement for the past 16 days. Regardless of assignment, our troopers react as professionals while protecting all people and property including the protection of civil liberties for all. It is good to have our guys back safe and sound.” While assisting North Dakota law enforcement with the protests, the troopers were under the direction of an assigned WHP squad leader who communicated and coordinated with the Morton County North Dakota Sheriff ’s Office. WHP Capt. Shawn Dickerson, WHP Special Services Squad co-commander, stated, “Our troopers displayed excellent self control and professionalism and were not involved in any use of force incidents beyond normal crowd control movements. This was accomplished in spite of our troopers being on the front lines during some intense moments when individuals were throwing rocks, sticks, wood and anything else they could at the officers.” Two of the six WHP troopers did receive minor injuries from thrown objects. All costs associated with the troopers assisting in North Dakota will be reimbursed by North Dakota. There are no current plans to send any additional troopers to North Dakota at this time.

Photo: WHP

Photo: WHP

The Range Rover’s 70 pounds of Marijuana was detected by this well-trained WHP K-9.

WHP troopers return from North Dakota

arrested and taken to the Laramie County Detention Center in Cheyenne where they were charged with felony possession of methamphetamine and felony possession of methamphetamine with intent to deliver. The seized methamphetamine has an estimated street value of $1.8 million.

This Honda Accord was caught speeding 10 days after being reported stolen from Laramie County on Nov. 2.

Briefs continued on page 6 December 2016

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Casper pursuit ends safely in Rawlins Casper – A Casper resident is in custody after an early morning vehicle pursuit on Nov. 15 that ended safely in Rawlins. The 26-year-old man initially took off from the Mills Police Department after he had already given the Mills Police his identification. After eluding the police, the suspect was pursued by Natrona County Sheriffs southbound on US 220 until they discontinued their pursuit as they were unable to keep up with the 1999 Pontiac Grand Prix. WHP troopers were dispatched south from Casper and north from Rawlins to intercept the Grand Prix. In the early morning hours of Nov. 15, a trooper located the Pontiac traveling southbound on US 287 near milepost 43 approximately 43 miles north of Rawlins. As the trooper followed the car while waiting for

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reckless driving, misdemeanor possession of methamphetamine and misdemeanor possession of marijuana.

Photo: WHP

backup to arrive, the Pontiac proceeded west on WYO 73. Once on WYO 73, the trooper attempted a stop. The car initially stopped for the trooper before turning the Pontiac around on WYO 73 and heading back south on US 287. As the trooper pursued the Pontiac south on US 287 at speeds reaching 130 mph, a second trooper spiked the Pontiac at milepost 17 on US 287. After being spiked, the Pontiac continued south on US 287 where a third WHP trooper spiked the Pontiac a second time near milepost 11 on US 287. With multiple tires deflated on the Pontiac, the driver continued into the city limits of Rawlins, at which point the Rawlins Police Department took over the pursuit. As the Pontiac became disabled, it stopped near the intersection of 5th Street and Pine Street within the city limits of Rawlins. With the assistance of Rawlins Police, the driver was taken into custody without further incident. A loaded .357 caliber handgun and a loaded AR-15 .223 caliber rifle were located in the Pontiac. The Casper man was taken to the Carbon County Detention Center in Rawlins and charged by troopers with eluding,

Briefs continued from page 5

Highway pursuit beginning in Casper ends with an arrest in Rawlins.

Wind River Canyon traffic delays during rockfall project Thermopolis – Traffic delays of up to 15 minutes continued on US 20/ WYO 789 through Wind River Canyon as scaling of rocks, cleaning culverts, reshaping ditches and other work entered its fourth week. The work is in response to the Memorial Day weekend flooding and mud slides of 2015. Wilson Brothers Construction Inc., of Cowley is the prime contractor on the $840,000 project. The work within Wind River Canyon is proceeding between mileposts 116.80 (near the tunnels) and 126.82 (about 6 miles south of Thermopolis). “By contract, traffic stop delays will total 15 minutes throughout the project,” according to WYDOT Project Engineer Andy Freeman of Thermopolis. “Please plan accordingly if traveling through Wind River Canyon is part of your trip.” Rock crushing in the Birdseye Pit south of Wind River Canyon at milepost 109.1 on US 20/WYO 789 is part of this project, and motorists are advised of trucks entering and exiting the highway. The Wyoming Transportation Commission awarded the project to Wilson Brothers Construction Inc., at its Sept. 15 meeting. Contract completion date is May 31, 2017.

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‘Trail of the Whispering Giants’ coins removed, replaced during Worland sidewalk improvements Worland – The contractor working on this fall’s $1.13 million Americans with Disabilities Act project in Worland removed and replaced two commemorative “Trail of the Whispering Giants” coins near the Washakie County Courthouse. EHC LLC of Deaver is the prime contractor on the project that has replacing sidewalk corners, sidewalk, curb and gutter, and double gutter this fall, including electrical work, between 10th and 23rd streets in Worland. Workers with EHC LLC noticed the coins in the old sidewalk beside Big Horn Avenue near the Washakie County Courthouse during the project, according to WYDOT Resident Engineer Dan McAfee of Worland. “We appreciate that the contractor wanted to place the 1980 coins in the new concrete,” McAfee said. “We enjoy this noteworthy landmark in Worland, which honors Native Americans.” The coins mark the 1980 work by Sculptor Peter Toth, who carved a Native American statue out of a Douglas Fir tree harvested from the Bighorn Mountains. The Worland statue honors the Eastern Shoshone, Northern Arapaho and Sioux tribes of Wyoming. The statue was erected on the grounds of the Washakie County Courthouse on Sept. 28, 1980. Toth’s statue is one of 67 works located throughout the United States and Canada honoring Native Americans.

Photo: WYDOT

Photo: WYDOT

Wilson Brothers Construction rappelling from a canyon wall to continue rock scaling efforts in Wind River Canyon.

These commemorative coins from the original concrete were removed and replaced in the new sidewalk.

US 14/16/20 speed limit meeting at Wapiti School Cody – A public information sharing meeting to discuss the 70 mph speed limit on about 17 miles of US 14/16/20 west of Cody was held on Nov. 9 at Wapiti School. The 70 mph speed limit is limited to about 17 miles of US 14/16/20, between the tunnels/Buffalo Bill Dam and the boundary of the Shoshone National Forest. “The subject of the meeting is to report results of studies on this stretch of highway relative to the 70 mph speed limit,” according to WYDOT District Traffic Engineer Randy Merritt of Basin. “The consultant will also share its recommendations, some of which WYDOT plans to implement this fall.” The consultant’s recommendations include: n Returning the 17 miles of highway between the tunnels and the Shoshone National Forest boundary to a 65 mph speed limit; n And implementing a nighttime speed

limit of 55 mph for this stretch of highway to protect wildlife populations and drivers.

The 45 mph speed limit through the Wapiti community will remain in effect. n

Total number of employees: as of Nov. 6, 2016

1,908

One month ago

1,894

One year ago

1,944

WHP Total number of highway fatalities: as of Nov. 21, 2016

102

one year ago

136

December 2016

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Driving near snow plows

Photo: WYDOT

by Cody Beers, District 5 Public Involvement Specialist

Are you prepared for winter driving?

Some of the basic ways to be prepared include installing winter windshield wiper blades, and checking headlights and tire pressure. When driving on ice, accelerate slowly – pretend that an egg is sitting under your gas pedal. To stop on the ice, remove your foot slowly from the gas pedal. If your vehicle is equipped with ABS brakes, step on your brakes when slowing. The braking system will help you stop on icy roads. WYDOT maintenance professionals, who work on our roadways every day of the year, share the following winter driving tips: n Make sure your vehicles are in top operating condition. n Bring along safety supplies and be prepared. Carry a sleeping

bag, winter clothes, blankets, flashlights, non-perishable food, water, matches and fire starter, cell phone, a good shovel, flares and even sand or cat litter for traction.

n Let someone know when you leave and when you’ll arrive at

your destination.

n Keep your gas tank full of fuel. n Drivers of some vehicles may want to carry tire chains. n If you’re stranded during the winter on the open road, stay

with your vehicle. Your vehicle is your protection against winter weather, and staying with it offers your best refuge and protection of surviving a blizzard. If running your vehicle’s engine while stranded, make sure exhaust pipe doesn’t become plugged with snow.

n And, know before you go. For Wyoming road conditions this

winter, call 511, or log on to the Internet at www.wyoroad. info.

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n Earlier this year, WYDOT launched a new smartphone app

that provides pre-trip and route travel information. The app can be used to view the large WYDOT network of web cameras, a color-coded system that shows pavement conditions and traffic hazards, and it can provide traveler location information to friends and family. The app is available for both Android and Apple phones.

Winter driving requires a light touch and a cautious approach.

Winter conditions sometimes dictate that roads are closed to travel. Reasons may include snow depth, limited visibility, high winds and drifted snows. “We realize these closures may be frustrating if you’re traveling or late for an appointment, but the road has been closed for a reason. In winter, give yourself extra time to reach your destination without having to drive faster than the conditions allow,” said WYDOT District Engineer Pete Hallsten of Basin. “Winter driving requires a light touch and a cautious approach.” Hallsten said drivers should remember that it takes extra time to slow down or stop on slick roads. “Don’t use your cruise control, and drive at appropriate speeds. If you encounter poor visibility, slow down. Always slow down for safety. If you don’t have to go, don’t.”

WYDOT uses a variety of tools to provide a safe, high quality and efficient transportation system.

WYDOT employees are out on the highways every day and many nights attempting to provide a safe, high quality and efficient transportation system for the citizens of Wyoming. WYDOT employees are on the roads when the conditions are the worst, and they’re out there between storms, too.


Photo: WYDOT

WYDOT has numerous bright yellow snow plows, and when working the roads, these plow trucks have amber, red and blue flashing lights mounted on top of the cab and on the back of the sanders. Snow plows are huge machines, capable of moving tons of snow every minute. Operators of these snow plows are highly trained professionals. These snow plow professionals need cooperation from drivers so they can do their jobs and keep the road safe for drivers. Give them room to operate. “Stay well back from operating snow plows,” said Hallsten. “They are spreading sand, anti-icing and de-icing chemicals on the roadway. It’s always a good idea to stay back from snow plows while their operators are doing their jobs.” With limited visibility, snow plow drivers can’t see vehicles behind them if the vehicles are too close to the plows. “Remember, the safest driving surface is behind the plow. If you must pass, don’t pass on the right into the plume of snow being moved,” Hallsten said. “Be sure on two-lane highways that you have plenty of time to pass. Keep a close watch, these huge plows often stir up their own whiteout conditions while doing their work.”

New tow plow deployed to improve safety of Fremont County highways

Operation of a tow plow this coming winter on Fremont County highways will improve safety and snow-plowing efficiency on Wyoming highways. “The theory is the tow plow can do the work of two trucks, and will result in improvements in driver productivity while decreasing snow removal expenses,” Hallsten said WYDOT deployed a pair tow plows last winter in the Casper area, and this year four more tow plows are being added to the state’s snowplowing arsenal for winter maintenance operations. The new tow plows deployed this winter include one each in Douglas, Gillette, Patrick Draw and Riverton. “The tow plow is a trailer mounted, 26-foot plow that is towed

behind a 10-wheeled plow truck. It has the capability of plowing and treating with salt brine an entire additional lane of roadway at normal highway speeds when completely deployed,” Hallsten said. “The entire trailer unit shifts to the right, utilizing movable axles on the trailer unit as well as hydraulic controls between the truck and trailer. It can take the place of another plow truck by allowing one truck to plow two lanes of roadway, or a single lane of roadway and an eight-foot shoulder.” Hallsten said WYDOT’s new Riverton-based tow plow will be used to clear snow on multi-lane sections of highway throughout Fremont County this coming winter, and two-lane highways as well. The truck pulling WYDOT’s tow plow is equipped with heated mirrors which help the driver monitor the tow plow’s location. For the safety of other vehicles on the road, tow plows have a rear lighting package that mimics the lights of the truck body. The tow plow will plow snow at about 35 mph, but depending on the snow load, it may be able to travel faster while working.

Snow plan helps WYDOT set priorities

WYDOT maintenance crews have a plan of attack during winter storms. Limited resources require priorities to be made. A snow removal plan goes into action during storms, creating a prioritized list of routes based on traffic counts and school bus routes. This plan is divided into four levels: high volume, medium volume, low volume and closed. The snow plan is available at www.wyoroad.info. This website can also be used to access road and travel information, including web cameras and road closure information. High volume roads are plowed up to 24 hours a day, and usually consist of interstate highways and urban routes, such as Interstate 80 in southeast Wyoming. Medium routes are plowed to keep them passable and reasonably safe, and are a secondary priority to high volume routes. Low volume routes are only serviced after high volume and medium volume roads have been cleared, and are only plowed during daylight hours. Closed refers to seasonally closed roads, where the cost of keeping them clear outweighs their use. December 2016

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Exceptions to the plan include school bus routes, which are plowed at least twice a day regardless of their priority.

WYDOT uses liquid de-icers and anti-icers to battle ice on our roads

In the course of winter maintenance, WYDOT treats roads with liquid de-icers and anti-icers to keep ice bonding to the roadways, or to remove the ice if it has already formed. These mixtures include salt/sand, liquid salt brine, magnesium chloride and beet juice. When snowfall can be predicted, some of these chemicals are sometimes applied to roads before storms to help keep snowpack from accumulating, and to assist with the removal of snow after the storm. “We try to prevent the snowpack from forming, but we can’t always do that. Chemicals do help with the removal of the snowpack after the storm,” Hallsten said. Other chemicals are used continuously to help battle snowpack and icy conditions. “We do what is called ‘pre-wetting.’ This is where we use a salt/sand mixture that has been pre-wet with a chemical, usually salt brine (salt mixed with water). This helps the sand stick to the road,” Hallsten said. Salt, or sodium chloride, is the most common and cheapest tool for fighting ice. Salt has an important role in ice removal. Using salt on roads lowers the temperature at which ice will melt, and helps to prevent the formation of ice at lower temperatures. But when temperatures drop below 15 degrees Fahrenheit, salt becomes ineffective. Another compound, GeoBrine, is another WYDOT tool for battling ice on the highways. Also known as beet juice due to its association with sugar beets, the sticky, red solution is composed of 60 percent salt brine and 40 percent beet juice, which give it the red color. GeoBrine is often used as a preventative action when roadways are pre-wetted prior to storms. Salt brine freezes at 6 degrees below zero when mixed properly, while GeoBrine freezes at 26 below zero. Beet juice works by basically stopping the ice and snow from bonding to the pavement during the storm, which allows WYDOT maintenance workers to plow off excess moisture easier and quicker, which clears roads faster. Pre-wetting roads helps WYDOT to provide safer conditions for drivers during the storm

as well. This helps maintenance crews from spending excessive amounts of time chipping ice off highways throughout Northwest Wyoming. Supplementing beet juice mixtures in WYDOT’s battle against icy road conditions allows ice and snow to melt at lower temperatures, and also provides a preventative coating on the highways which lasts longer, giving crews a chance to get more snow and ice of the roads in a timely manner. “We try to prevent the snowpack from forming, but we can’t always do that,” Hallsten said. While research verifies fewer accidents occur on treated highways, these de-icers and anti-icers can be sprayed up on vehicles from tires and wind. “After storms, we’d suggest washing your vehicle to minimize the effects of these chemicals,” Hallsten said.

Information links may help in planning your winter outings n National Weather Service – www.weather.gov/crh/ n WYDOT road conditions – www.wyoroad.info n WYDOT road conditions – 1-888-WYO-ROAD n Twitter: @WYDOT (see below graphic for location names) n Wyoming 511 mobile smartphone app available on both the

Google Play Store and the Apple App Store

n 511 Notify – Dial 511 on your cell phone to obtain road infor-

mation. This system can also be enabled to deliver road alerts as text messages to your phone or emails to your computer or phone on routes that the user identifies. Go to www.wyoroad. info and choose the 511 notify icon to set-up your account.

In case of emergency, the following number may be contacted for assistance: n Wyoming Highway Patrol, 24 hours per day – (800) 442-9090.

Try the Wyoming 511 app with a hands-free feature!

Available for free download at the Google Play Store.

Available for free download at the Apple App Store.

Get travel information by dialing 511, following us on Twitter, visiting www.wyoroad.info, or through the new Wyoming 511 app.

Take it slow Know before you go.

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Follow us on Twitter: @WYDOT_I80

@WYDOT_Northeast

@WYDOT_I90

@WYDOT_Northwest

@WYDOT_I25 @WYDOT_Central

@WYDOT

@WYDOT_Southeast @WYDOT_Southwest


Noteworthy

Riverton women donate ‘comfort quilts’ to Wyoming Highway Patrol

Photo: WYDOT

Two Riverton women are donating 25 “comfort quilts” to the Wyoming Highway Patrol for use in comforting citizens involved in crashes and other life-threatening situations along Fremont County highways.

Lila Stark and Joanne Bessey enjoy quilting and donate quilts to groups throughout Fremont County. They estimate they’ve each sewed 500 quilts since they’ve been retired. “We like to recycle, we like to sew, and we love helping people,” says Stark. Wyoming State Troopers Eli Miller and James Weck accepted the quilts Wednesday morning, including warm hugs from Stark and Bessey. “Lots of times when we (highway troopers) show up out on the highway, people aren’t having a good day,” says Miller. “Homemade quilts really help to calm people, such as people involved in vehicle crashes. These quilts will help people relax in their time of need.” Weck says the quilts donated by Stark and Bessey will be used in Fremont County. “We sure appreciate it,” Weck says, “and citizens will really appreciate this act by these two wonderful ladies. The people who end up receiving these quilts out there on the highway will carry these quilts and treat them as gifts from guardian angels.” “It’s a good feeling to know you have helped somebody,” Bessey says. Starks agrees. “I’ve had many blessings in my life. I’m sharing warmth with people.” n

Trooper James Weck, Joanne Bessey, Lila Stark and Trooper Eli Miller with the handmade “comfort quilts.”

WYDOT begins customer satisfaction survey calls The Wyoming Department of Transportation wants to know how the public feels about how the department is performing. The Wyoming Survey and Analysis Center at the University of Wyoming started calling Wyoming residents Nov. 10, asking them to complete a customer satisfaction survey for WYDOT. WYDOT wants to let the public know that the calls are legitimate and at no time will any personal information be asked or collected. The calls are being made on weekday evenings, Saturday afternoons and Sunday evenings. The survey includes up to 30 questions and takes less than 10 minutes to complete. The goal is to get responses from a sample of about 900 Wyoming residents, and the calls will continue until that number is reached or until the end of December. WYDOT contracts with UW to conduct the survey every two years to measure residents’ satisfaction with the department’s performance, and identify areas where improvement is needed.

The questions will focus on topics such as highway construction, condition of state highways and interstates, rest areas, Aeronautics, Driver Services, Highway Patrol, Public Affairs and overall satisfaction with WYDOT. The last time WYDOT did the survey was in 2014. Eighty percent of residents expressed overall satisfaction with the department’s stewardship of the state’s transportation system. Three percent said they were dissatisfied while 17 percent were neutral on that question. The 2014 survey also found that 85 percent of people agreed the state’s highways and interstates usually permit travel with only minimal delays. More than 76 percent were satisfied with the smoothness of the ride on the interstates and highways near their homes. And, of the 67 percent of respondents who had conducted business at a driver license office during the past two years, 90 percent said they were satisfied with the courtesy of the staff, and 78 percent said they were satisfied with the promptness of the service. WYDOT apologizes for any inconvenience the calls may cause, and thanks residents who choose to participate for providing the department with their valuable feedback. n December 2016

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Noteworthy PSCC official now at WYDOT

by Aimee Inama Bob Symons, statewide interoperable coordinator for the Public Safety Communications Commission (PSCC), is now part of the Wyoming Department of Transportation team. In early October, state officials moved Symons from being housed under the Wyoming Office of Homeland Security to WYDOT as a way to better serve the PSCC, WYDOT and WyoLink, the statewide public safety communications system. “We’re very excited to have Bob here to help us continue to build and improve upon our public safety communications network,” said WYDOT Director Bill Panos. “WYDOT and Homeland Security officials worked together to make this happen and to ensure a smooth transition.” Gregg Fredrick, WYDOT chief engineer, agreed and said that the move is beneficial for the state’s emergency communications efforts. “With WyoLink being the first responders’ communications system, Bob’s reporting to WYDOT will assist in the continued implementation of the system throughout the state,” Fredrick said.

Training Stop Kicking My Seat!

by Todd DePorter, Training Services “Stop kicking my seat!” Those are the words I anticipated to hear on a recent flight out of Denver to Chicago. I was expecting the older gentleman in the row adjacent to mine to get up, turn around in his chair and say those words to the 6-year-old boy who was sitting restlessly behind him. The boy’s head and eyes were focused toward the plane’s window; however, he was kicking his legs as if he was on an imaginary swing at the park. It’s a scene I’ve witnessed played out on other flights and I didn’t sense the outcome of this incident would be any different. To my welcomed surprise, something else happened. Instead of angrily telling the boy to stop, he started a casual conversation with him. The gentlemen asked the boy what his name was, where was he headed to, and was this first time flying on a plane. I couldn’t hear the young man’s responses, but I saw him smiling and looking back up at the gentleman as he answered. From my point of view, it looked like the gentleman was asking questions in order to get the boy’s perspective before making his own decision on how to respond. They entered into a mutual conversation. This conversation appeared to help eliminate the assumptions and dictate the gentleman’s more mature decisions or actions. In our workplaces we often fall prey to the assumptions of making decisions or choices without obtaining the perspectives from others on our team. According to a Partners in Leadership “Workplace Accountability Study,” as noted in the 2016 book, “Fix It” Getting Accountability Right, 77 percent of respondents surveyed stated their organizations don’t practice the strength

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Symons, who has extensive experience as a first responder working as the Sheridan fire chief, said he’s excited over the move as well. “It’s a good fit because the PSCC is the governing side of WyoLink,” Symons said. “Being at WYDOT, I’ll get to work more closely with teams implementing the system.” The PSCC is comprised of representatives from public safety agencies, professional associations and state department who are appointed by the governor. The PSCC main goals are to: n Recommend strategies for improving Wyoming’s wireless interoperability; n Determine standards for the WyoLink network; n Identify immediate short-term technological and policy solu-

tions that tie existing infrastructure together into an interoperable system;

n Develop long-term technical and policy recommendations to

establish the development and implementation of the WyoLink network; and

n Develop recommendations for legislation or other state action

that may be required to further promote wireless interoperability in Wyoming. n

of obtaining the perspectives of others. Additionally, 66 percent related it doesn’t exist in their functional teams. What happens when you exclude 66 percent of our team’s perspective? As a leader, you’ve just limited yourself to only 34 percent of possible solutions to problems or performance efficiency. The benefit of gaining other people’s perspective also helps winning their commitment to the team. This is evident by their ownership of the team’s processes, performance and top results. Whenever you are put in a leadership position, you need to be careful and resist the pitfalls of not obtaining the perspective of others due to lack of time or energy. Make obtaining the perspective of others an operational necessity and not an option. At WYDOT-U we offer many classes geared toward gaining the perspective and feedback of your teams. Some of the upcoming workshops to help you bridge the gap and sharpen perspective gaining skills are: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, on Jan. 10 and Breaking Through the Barriers: Improving Your Interpersonal Skills on Jan. 11. Next time someone is kicking at your seat, remember to take a minute to gain their perspective and enter into a discussion in order to understand their point of view. You might be as pleasantly surprised as I was on that flight from Denver to Chicago. n


TechNotes

Smart options for smartphones by AJ Myers, IT Have you ever found yourself in the field, on leave or after hours and remember that you have forgotten to enter your timecard? Realizing that you have only your phone and not a computer, now you have to wait to call payroll tomorrow or Monday – or do you? If you have a smartphone (iPhone or Android), Information Technology can help you install and configure Citrix receiver on your device. This will give you access to a select list of applications within the WYDOT environment that can help you accomplish a task when you find yourself in a situation where all you have is your smartphone. While the screen size is not conducive to long term usage of applications and could require you to scroll quite a bit, in some cases it is necessary to get to an application to query or enter data. Citrix over your phone

would give you the capability to do just this and may save your day. Some of the applications that are available to WYDOT employees through Citrix are ERP, WYDOT Intranet and Grouplink. Depending on your department and need of access, there may be other applications that could be made available to you. If your application doesn’t exist on Citrix today, Information Technology may be able to install your application in Citrix so that you could access it via your phone or computer outside of the DOT network. If you have questions or would like to inquire on how to use this capability, please contact Information Technology help desk. n

Check out these upcoming training opportunities from WYDOT-U, the Transportation Learning Network (TLN) and WeLL.

Coming in December: Date Class 12/13/16 12/15/16 12/15/16 12/16/16 12/20/16 12/20/16 12/21/16

How Do I Respond to That? A Practical Approach to Conflict WYDOT “Developing The Leader Within You!” Workshop 9 - Self Discipline TC3 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) WYDOT “Developing The Leader Within You!” Workshop 9 - Self Discipline Leveraging Diversity FISH! Delivering Leading Edge Customer Service Building Collaborative Relationships to Achieve Key Results

Coming in January: Date Class 1/4/17 1/6/17 1/10/17 1/10/17 1/10/17 1/11/17 1/18/17 1/19/17 1/23/17

District 1 Roadshow - Franklin Covey’s Millennial @ Work Pavement Management: Cold-in-Place Recycling (CIR) and Cold Central Plant Recycling (CCPR) Present to Inform Critical Thinking & Problem Solving PE Review (winter session): Jan. 10 through March 7, 2017, require minimum of 16 registrations Speak Up! Improving Your Assertive Communication Skills Confined Spaces Awareness Preventing Backovers and Runovers New Employee Orientation

PMI Competency

Location

Personal Effectiveness

TLN

Leadership Vocational

Cheyenne TLN

Leadership Developing Others Customer Service Team Player

Cheyenne TLN WYDOT-U WYDOT-U

PMI Competency

Location

Developing Others

Laramie

Vocational Personal Effectiveness Judgment & Decision Making

Webinar TLN WYDOT-U

Vocational Communication Vocational Vocational Communication

Webinar WYDOT-U TLN TLN WYDOT-U

To register, or to find out more details, visit the Training Services intranet page.

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District News

Retirements Brian Mertz retired on Oct. 4 after 20 years of service. During his time at WYDOT, he worked as a field data collection and lab analyst specialist for the Materials-Bituminous program.

Headquarters

Welcome

Service Awards

Damion Aldana, Office ServicesMailroom; Misty Cowles, Motor Vehicle Services-Registration/Title; Matthew Gonsoulin, Highway Development-Photogrammetry/Survey; April Klahn, Human Resources; Elizabeth Lack, Environmental Services; Vincent Martini, Driver Services-Policy and Records; Robert Symons, Public Safety Communications Commission; and Jason Walter, TelecomDistrict 1 Radio Shop.

Cathi Lutz, Materials-Pavement Management Systems – 30 years; Yolanda Pacheco, Highway Safety – 15 years; Caryn Erickson, Budget – 10 years; Mary Thieken, Financial ServicesPayroll – 10 years; Amanda Deppe, Procurement-Administration – 5 years; and Susan Talkington, Port Of Entry-Cheyenne US 85 – 5 years.

Promotions and Transfers Mark Gillett, Operations-Division Administration; Phillip Hearn, Construction Staff; Elizabeth Helm, Financial Services-Revenue; Chad Mathews, Planning-Traffic Data Analysis; Anthony Savastano, GIS/ITS; and Andrew Smyth, Management Services. Gillett

Pacheco

Erickson

Michael Niehay retired on Oct. 4 after working for WYDOT for 20 years. During his time with the department, he worked as a field data collection and lab technician with the Planning and Counter program.

Cradle Call Jason and Hilary Wasserburger welcomed Jensen David into this world on Sept. 19 at 3:17 p.m. He weighed 7 pounds, 3 ounces and was 19.75 inches long. Hilary works in the Human Resources office in Cheyenne. n

Talkington

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HQ got into the Halloween spirit: (from left) Human Resources staff took a trip through the decades, Financial Services made the “sweetest” bunch, members of the Budget-Federal Aid group were on the lookout for Waldo and Amy Lambert’s (Right of Way) 9-year old son, Caleb, dressed up as a WYDOT construction zombie.

Photo: Amy Lambert

Smyth

Photo: Rick Carpenter

Mathews

HQ Halloween Hijinks

Photo: Rick Carpenter

Helm

Photo: Rick Carpenter

Hearn

Troy Babbitt has been selected as the Telecommunications Program manager. Babbitt has worked at the Wyoming Department of Enterprise Technology Services since 2012, serving as the state broadband enterprise architect. Prior to that, he worked as a communications systems senior specialist for ITD/ETS. Babbitt was selected by Gov. Matt Mead in 2013 to be the point-of-contact for the nationwide FirstNet project and has since served in that capacity. He assumed his program manager duties Dec. 1.

Photo: Rugged Grace Photography

Congratulations


Kurt Augustin, Laramie Construction – 15 years; Merna Carver, Baggs Maintenance – 15 years; and Kenneth O’Leary, Saratoga Maintenance – 5 years.

Augustin

Carver

Retirements Ross Doman, public involvement specialist for District 1, retired on Oct. 18 after 10 years of service to the department. Prior to WYDOT, Doman worked as the public information officer for the Wyoming Department of Health for four years, and as Doman editor of the Wyoming Catholic Register for two years. Before coming to Wyoming, Doman worked as a journalist for the Associated Press in Boston and in New York for a year, and covered the 1996 presidential campaign for America Online. He has written for publications including the Boston Tab and Boston Magazine. Doman, who is a native of Milwaukee, Wis., earned a bachelor’s degree in international relations from the University of Wisconsin, and a master’s degree in journalism from Boston University. n

Retirements

Zackary Blackmore, Midwest Maintenance; Matthew Gustman, Chugwater Maintenance; Tyler Strickland, Casper Maintenance; Terry Vollmar, Casper Maintenance; Zacharia Weller, Muddy Gap; and David Cobble, Chugwater Maintenance.

Promotions and Transfers Kevin Cook, Muddy Gap Maintenance; and Asa Kidney, Casper Maintenance.

Cook

Larry Lijewski with the District 2 Maintenance Staff retired on Nov. 7 with 26 years of service to the state. Lijewski began his career with WYDOT in Evanston in 1990 and then moved to Casper where he worked on a construction crew. Lijewski is from Scottsdale, Pa., but attended Casper schools from elementary school through high school and graduated from Kelly Walsh High School before attending Casper College and then enlisting in the U.S. Army. In his retirement, he is looking forward to restoring an old pickup that he has had for years and his wife, Katie, probably has a long list of “honey-dos” for him. n

Kidney

Service Awards Brock Wollerman, Casper Construction – 30 years; Rex Kelson, Muddy Gap Maintenance – 10 years; Tyrel Cross, Torrington Patrol – 10 years.

Photo: WYDOT

Service Awards

Welcome

Wollerman

Recent retiree Larry Lijewski at his retirement party with his cake.

Cross

District 3

Welcome Eric Schwendiman, Granger Maintenance; and Anthony Spiker, Rock Springs Maintenance.

Service Awards

Franklin Boone, Wamsutter Maintenance – 5 years; and Jesse Boyles, Lyman Maintenance – 5 years. n

Douglas Kruske, Rock Springs Construction – 5 years;

Boyles

IT

K LIC

OR

click it or ticket. no excuses.

ET

Daniel Brandt, Laramie Maintenance; Mark Day, Laramie Maintenance; Rand Selle, Laramie Maintenance; and Gustin White, Cheyenne Maintenance.

District 2

C

Welcome

District 1

T IC K

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District 4

Welcome

Nicholas Woods, Sheridan Maintenance-Guardrail – 5 years;

Travis Harnish, Sheridan Traffic-Striping; and Kyle Wood, Hulett Maintenance.

Promotions and Transfers

Service Awards Nicki Wilson, Gillette Port Of Entry – 10 years; Joseph Lambert, Sundance Mechanics – 5 years; Kimberly Ashley, District 4 Administration-Sheridan – 5 years;

Tarno

Ashley

Woods

Wilson

Okray

Parkison

Lambert

Randall Okray, Gillette Maintenance – 5 years; Richard Parkison, Sheridan Port Of Entry – 5 years; and Susan Jenn, Sheridan Maintenance – 5

Jenn

Cradle Call Lisa and Marco Roethling welcomed Parker Michael into the world in Weisbaden, Germany on July 18. He weighed 8 pounds, 6 ounces and was 20 inches long. Lisa contracts with the US government for counseling on the US Air Force base and Marco works in IT security with a worldwide company. Proud grandparents are Darwin and Jennifer Mitchell in Gillette. Darwin works in the Gillette shop and Jennifer works in Gillette IT. n

Photo courtesy of Jennifer Mitchell

Timothy James, Sheridan Construction; and Kodi Tarno, Sundance Construction.

years.

Awards

The Wyoming Chapter of the Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials (APCO) hosted an awards banquet in Casper on Nov. 9 to recognize radio techs across the state. APCO Awards Committee Chairman Joey Williams presented WYDOT telecom tech David Shepard of the Cheyenne Radio Shop with the Wyoming APCO Chapter’s 2016 Technician of the Year. WYDOT Telecom techs have also been winners in 2010, 2012, 2013 and 2014.

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WYDOT salutes the following Director’s Extra Mile Award recipients. The award is presented to individuals who have traveled the “extra mile” in service to WYDOT.

Photo: Larry Sheridan

Joey Williams, award committee chairman, presents David Shepard (right) with the Radio Tech of the Year award.

Congratulations to our January recipients!

December 2016

Brett Baker Ernestine DeHaven Chris Foster Lyndy Gunther Ryan Higgins Les Jones

Debbie Meza Tracy Romero Ashley Schlegel Dan Sutton Estevan Trujillo

For more information about the Extra Mile Award or to nominate someone, contact Katherine Castaneda at Katherine.Castaneda@wyo.gov.


District 5

Hallsten promoted to lead transportation efforts in northwest Wyoming

Dalen Davis Jr., Telecom-District 5 Radio Shop; Cort Jones, Cody Mechanics; and Chad Shaffer, Lander Maintenance.

Promotions and Transfers Martin Christian, Lander Mechanics.

Service Awards

Christian

Shane Pugh, Riverton Maintenance – 25 years; Barry Armstrong, Thermopolis Maintenance – 10 years; Bruce Thompson, Dubois Maintenance – 10 years; and Jaycob Ingwerson, Shoshoni Maintenance – 5 years.

Armstrong

Thompson

Ingwerson

THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE

WHO THINK

THE ONES

WHO ACTUALLY DO.

Photo: Mark Redland

THEY HAVE THEIR CHILD IN THE RIGHT SEAT.

le Afte yc

ading! Re

Pugh

r

WYDOT’s district maintenance engineer in Basin has been promoted to lead state transportation efforts as the District 5 engineer. Pete Hallsten has been District 5’s maintenance engineer since 2015; his promotion to district engineer was effective Nov. 1. “Hallsten has demonstrated the technical Hallsten knowledge, leadership abilities, and team work necessary to advance the outstanding work within District 5, foster a continued working relationship with the contracting community, and provide a unique perspective into several new and exciting challenges facing the Department of Transportation,” said WYDOT Chief Engineer Gregg Fredrick. Hallsten replaces Shelby Carlson of Greybull, who recently accepted an administrative position with the Wyoming State School Facilities Division in Cheyenne. Hallsten joined WYDOT as an engineer in June 1990. He was promoted to resident engineer in Pinedale in 1997, and he transferred to Jackson in 2000 and served the Jackson area until 2011. In 2011, he transferred to Pinedale as resident engineer. He became District 5’s

maintenance engineer in January 2015. “I am looking forward to continuing to develop the excellent relationships with the communities and citizens of northwest Wyoming,” Hallsten said. “I’m feeling pretty lucky to be here and working with all of the people in District 5. Being district engineer is a big responsibility and a big opportunity. We’re going through changes as an agency; I’m looking forward to engaging in the process.” WYDOT District 5 includes state transportation facilities in five counties – Park, Big Horn, Washakie, Hot Springs and Fremont counties – and the eastern edge of Teton County and western edge of Natrona County. Hallsten was born in Fort Collins, Colo., and was raised in Fairbanks, Alaska. His education includes a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Colorado State University. Hallsten and his wife, Shelly, have two sons, ages 24 and 22, and they make their home in Worland. Their oldest son lives and works in Pinedale, and their youngest son is a student at the University of Wyoming. Hallsten enjoys fishing, archery hunting, riding bicycles and nordic skiing in his spare time. n

ease Re c Pl

Welcome

When Ten Sleep employee Mark Redland needed to move his cattle the Friday morning before the Cowboy-Boise State football game, Ten Sleep Maintenance Foreman Matt Jones helped him out by putting up the signs. (Not entirely sure why the sign is upside down – perhaps it’s an inside joke.)

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Passings James E. Goodwin

James Edmund Goodwin, 85, of Sheridan, died on Aug. 4, 2015, at the Billings Clinic Hospital. He was born on March 7, 1930, in Tulsa, Okla. Goodwin worked as a temporary worker for WYDOT in Goodwin Sheridan from 1991-2000. Prior to his work at WYDOT, Goodwin graduated from Natrona County High School in Casper and then served in the U.S. Army as a sergeant for three years in the 35th Combat Infantry Division. He was stationed in South Korea where he earned two Bronze Stars, a Korean Service medal and a Nations Service medal. Later, he attended the University of Wyoming, graduating with a degree in architectural engineering. He worked as an estimator for Husman Brothers, an architectural engineer for Malone and Associates. He also owned Cloud Peak Construction. He designed and built his home in Sheridan. Goodwin was a member of the Wyoming Archaeological Society. In his spare time, he helped with set technology for many Sheridan Wyoming Civic Theater Guild Productions. He was an avid fly fisherman, photographer, backpacker, kayaker, four wheeler, cross-country skier and fine artist. He was also a woodworker and skilled stone mason. Goodwin and his dad, Skinny, built many stone chimneys for cabins in the Big Horn Mountains. In his later years, he designed and built many stained glass lamps and windows.

Jim Kladianos Sr.

Clarence U. Moore

James W. Kladianos, 91, of Rawlins, passed away Nov. 7 at his home. For his entire career, Kladianos worked as an engineer in both Colorado and Wyoming, including serving as the Rawlins city engineer for 10 years and a resident engineer for the Wyoming Department of Transportation for more than 22 years until his retirement in December 1989. Born in Superior in 1924, Kladianos was raised and educated there, graduating from Superior High School in 1942. He served his country in the U.S. Army during World War II and then earned an engineering degree from the University of Wyoming in 1950. He will be remembered as a devoted husband, father, grandfather and a friend. His interests included hunting, fishing, gardening and spending time with his family and friends. His greatest passion was helping others any time he could. Kladianos is survived by many family members including his son, Jim, who works for WYDOT in the Laramie Design Squad. A Mass of Christian burial was celebrated at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church Nov. 11 with military honors and burial at Rawlins Cemetery.

Retiree Clarence Udie Moore Jr., 67, of Worland, died Oct. 23 at the Wyoming Retirement Center in Basin. Moore retired from WYDOT in July 2008 with 20 years of service to the state. He worked as a heavy mechanic in the Worland Maintenance shop. Moore The Wyoming native had lived in Lovell, Bonneville, Shoshoni and Thermopolis before graduating from high school in 1968. Following graduation, Moore enlisted in the U.S. Army Medical Corps and he served until his honorable discharge in 1971. He moved to Cheyenne and furthered his work as a nurse at the VA hospital and continued serving as a member of the Wyoming National Guard until he was discharged in 1977. Moore had worked for TRW Reda Pump prior to coming to WYDOT in 1988. Moore enjoyed hunting, classic country music, dancing, reading, but most of all he enjoyed playing cowboy with his family and friends; lending a helping hand to whomever needed it. A graveside service with military honors was held Oct. 28 at the Riverside Cemetery in Worland. n

Julian B. Vigil Retiree Julian “Bennie” Vigil, 90, died Sept. 10 in Rapid City, S.D. Vigil retired with 25 years and 6 months of service to the old Wyoming Highway Department, WYDOT’s predecessor agency. He retired in Sept. 1987 from the Rawlins shop.

Get smart!

Download and use the free Drive Sober Wyoming smartphone app. drivesoberwy.com 18

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December 2016

AVOID THE

DUI LIFE


Outdoors WTDEA

Show us what you do outside for fun.

Get those photos in!

Deadline:

12/16/16 carlie.vanwinkle@wyo.gov

s S tate E mployee

Successful Chili Cook-off WTDEA extends a huge thank you to those who stopped by the chili cookoff on Nov. 2. Chili recipes from our very own WYDOT employee-chefs were sampled by 90 people. Renee Kraweic with Driver Services whipped up the winning number 11 chili, giving her 2016 champion bragging rights. A 50/50 raffle was held during the chili cook-off and Chris Potter with Bridge held the lucky ticket was pulled from the

50/50 raffle bucket. Funds from both the chili cook-off and 50/50 raffle went to support the WTDEA Relief Fund. Thank you to those employees who took the time to cook up their favorite recipes. Many thanks to the WTDEA State Board, members of the Payroll office, WyHy Federal Credit Union, Taqueria Mexicana Mi Tierra and all of the volunteers who helped make the event such a success! n

WTDEA 2017 Cash Calendar Enjoy 12 months of photographs taken by WYDOT employees.

SERG

up Retirement Gro Gather with other state retirees monthly.

SERG meets at noon the second Monday of each month at the Cheyenne Radisson (formerly the Holiday Inn). The gatherings include a brief business meeting, social luncheon and an educational program. Contacts for further information:

Roger Nelson – 634-1881 Ron Labreque – 632-8240 Donella Marrs – 635-5858

The calendar makes a great birthday or Christmas gift! All proceeds benefit the WYDOT Employee Relief Fund The Relief Fund is a benefit available to ALL WYDOT employees. December 2016

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Photo: Ty Jereb

Rides Although this exotic car doesn’t actually belong to Calvin Williams of the Jackson Construction crew, his good friend in Salt Lake City was kind enough to let him try it out. The very rare 2015 LaFerrari touts high performance speed – the 950 hp engine can produce 0-60 mph in 2.5 seconds. This car also has a very steep price tag – nearly $4 million, if you can find one for sale. Only 499 of this particular Ferrari model exist in the world.

Evolution. Jereb 11 Mitsubishi Lancer this turbocharged 20 ns more horseow g gs din rin ad Sp by ck n Ro sig Ty Jereb in racetrack-inspired de , rse ou r speeds. He d-c he roa hig a h at more downforce modified the car wit s and a rear wing for eel wh ter us. ligh mp , Ca ue rts orq power/t h Motorspo car in Utah at the Uta occasionally races the

Photo: Jim McLean

Photo: James Stout

hJames Stout of the Hig owns m gra Pro y fet Sa y wa red this beautiful, bright dere 1967 Plymouth Belve ture pic is Th . ute II GTX trib ssiswas taken on the Mi 4 at sippi Gulf Coast, Oct. e Th in uis “Cr this year’s ebrate Coast” festival to cel hot antique, classic and re rod vehicles. There we red iste reg s icle veh 57 7,9 da from 41 states, Cana two and Australia. Only the vehicles registered in oming. event were from Wy 0 CID Stout’s car has a 44 ed pe 4-s a d engine an . manual transmission

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Jim McLean with South Pass maintenance got out on his new ride this summer. He took this gorgeous 2009 Harley Davidson Electra Glide Ultra on a trip to Redwoods National Park in California in early June.


Photo: Rick Carpenter

Photo courtesy of Calvin Williams

Brian Lahnert with Facilities Management in Cheyenne owns this 1975 Pontiac “Ghost Dancer.”

e–a

y from hom Mike Schulte and his home awa National Dolphin.

Photo: Rick Carpenter

Photo: Rick Carpenter

Jesse Burgess with Maintenanc e-Equipment Repair at Headqu arters owns this classic 1967 Camaro RS with an LS1 motor and a T56 6-sp eed transmission.

Photo: Rick Carpenter

Photo: Rick Carpenter

Vince Lucero with the Sign Shop in Cheyenne owns this Ford F-25 0 Crew Cab, lifted 4x4. The truck has 18-inch Moto wheels and a custom Iron Cross bumper.

Retiree Mike Schulte gets arou nd town in this 2001 60th Anniversary Jeep Wrangler.

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Make the holidays more affordable with a WyHy VISA Credit Card

on balance transfers, purchases and cash advances until January 6, 2017!

Apply for yours today!

WyHy.org/VISA *Visit WyHy.org/VISA or contact the Credit Union for full details.

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Holiday Break Time Check your answers online at: employees.dot.state.wy.us, or if not able to access the employee site: www.dot. state.wy.us/home/engineering_technical_programs/manuals_publications/ interchange.html. See if you can find the following 25 words hidden in the grid to the right: Caroling Chimney Christmas Eggnog Elf Frankincense Fruitcake Gingerbread house Hanukkah Holly Jingle bells Mistletoe Myrrh Naughty Nice North Pole Poinsettia Scrooge Sleigh bells Snowflake Sugarplum Tinsel Toboggan Wintry Wreath

A M B L I N F I R E G I N S P E R G O T L T R E E G S P C K I N C A N V O F N H I WD E S N F J E A G L V A C Z A F Z C C K H A M E E G J M L T O V N E O O F O B G D T R R E WU T A T I R H T H L K P E E L E O W R P Y L Q S T P E A P P L E M I N C E K S C R O NWU R K G H A G K T I S N A W I V W Z T I D Y E H I N I A OWN D N L S I Y O L O A N T Y R K S T W I S A H S E A S O

Z Z A R G C V WW I L W C E N G I F T G L E V E E W E W K R D Y T K B A N K O R A L K C E L P I G A M R P G D O R J Y H K R U L O C F A S U I N R T S G L E O E K O Y A S A K L C T O N A D A C R K C S O V N I O L Q R A N D H U R M C I D E R M E A T G O G E C O S H O P P O T W B O S N OW Y R H A C S A P V E K A A L C H S T B U K G A E OM W S F R R I D E C O E M L P L N R S O U

B N C C J G D T O Y R S T R R L P T T R H A C C H A I O S C S I R K I R H T

L T H L O O R I B H H O A S G O K M X B D X L E R T N T P A I M N N A A O H

U S T R Y B I L L G U E R N O O R R L K E E L I S E Y O P N O Y L W L G L I I I I S O N N T S T A R E K R X B A C OWH U B A G E N H L G P L E N U H E S D G C E S L H A R K R F M N G T N E Y S A T G P I F R O T I O T C H P O L

E R Y X I C Y U L E V N Y Y F N S S S T R E U H E L U J W T D N I C E I UW T S L E N R C W I S E A A S N O M P K S P R S L E I G H A T R I MM G Y Y M Y R D R MG A R E A E I V P GM Y E T A N P E R T E T I O N R I Q O C P S H U I B H C C J O Y O O L F U N N G L I L O N S G G O I G N O G J E F O I Y I S B WU D E V E R G S I A A E S E I N L I L T V K G C E E I R W I I N S O R L G W I W E E H N T E A S T S T Y T H E N S N H A N O C O L A T E R E D P A

E S K X R U A S G C U A OWG C P R D R P H E A WM C U B E B E L E R P R HM L A N A R A C H A C HM N A E N B T E G O A S S A R E A V F A S T R N P R N R R E E F G S R G E O N N S O T T G S Y A Y A R A S N O U K K E V E R T R

A D O E L H A I C X L I I D D T L E S I X E A N I Q N P A G E A N T W A L I

T E S W O L P H O S E C L F S H P O T A E P A R T S R I P Y E T N P L Y K G I V S E WW E WO A Y A X R T S MM E S B H L A Y U O I K G G L R S R E L L T R D P O N Y A B N U R E L C T S Y A I E O N E N I D S U S L H Y I E O U L N L L O I T E G D R I C Y A T C S D R L A I M A N T H U T I X S A O D G E N

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Wyoming Department of Transportation 5300 Bishop Blvd. Cheyenne, Wyoming 82009-3340 Address Service Requested

Pre-sorted Standard U.S. Postage Paid Cheyenne, WY 82009 Permit No. 24


December 2016 Interchange