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Interchange a WYDOT publication

April 2013, Vol. 41, Issue 4

Right of Way

Paving the way for construction


Letters

Interchange WTDEA donates supplies to the Cheyenne VA; veterans appreciative Thank you for your donations. I was in the V.A. for three surgeries and I have used them. I was in the Marines.

James M. Zuniga

Interchange is published for employees of the Wyoming Department of Transportation by its Public Affairs Office and a number of field correspondents. Interchange invites submissions from all employees. Please send them to either your district correspondents or to: Carlie Van Winkle, Interchange editor, 5300 Bishop Blvd., Cheyenne, WY, 82009-3340. The Public Affairs Office may also be contacted by phoning (307) 777-4165, faxing (307) 777-4289, or sending e-mail to carlie.vanwinkle@wyo.gov

Staff Rick Peterson benefit chili cook-off We would like to say how humbled we, the Patrol, are for the overwhelming support shown for Rick Peterson at the benefit chili cook-off held in March. The outpouring of support from the WYDOT family, friends of family and neighbors only shows how great a person Peterson is and the type of impact he has made on those around him. More than 195 people in attendance tasted 11 different types of chili. The great cooks who made the chili, which ran from mild to wild, gave attendees a great selection to satisfy their taste buds. Due to overwhelming attendance, most of the chili ran out before the event was over. The event raised more than $4,400 for Peterson to support his fight against cancer. The event was originally to be held in the Patrol training room, but once the word of the event spread, it was evident our training room would not hold the crowd that would eventually show up. We would like to thank everyone who helped

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make this so successful. We are not going to name names, because we don’t want to forget anyone, but you know who you are and a heartfelt THANK YOU goes out to you all. Without you, the event would not have been such a tremendous success. The winner of the chili cook-off was Beth Hilleman from Fuel Tax with her chicken chili (#6); second place Sgt. Duane Ellis from Patrol (#1); and third place Lt. Klief Guenther from Patrol (#4). We expect you to take full advantage of your bragging rights! Thanks to all of you! Also, a special thank you to the Highway CafÊ for your donation of chili and corn bread. We value your unwavering commitment to WYDOT. Thank you for your donations: Great Harvest Bread Co., The Bread Basket, Thrivent Financial for Lutherans, Hilary Michelena (Silpada benefit party) and Shelly Erickson (message bracelets)!

Thank you, Rick Peterson benefit chili cook-off committee

WYDOT Director: John F. Cox Public Affairs Manager: Doug McGee Editor/Art Director: Carlie Van Winkle Contributors: Bruce Burrows Public Affairs Dave Kingham Public Affairs Carlie Van Winkle Public Affairs Ross Doman District 1 Jeff Goetz District 2 Stephanie Harsha District 3 Ronda Holwell District 4 Cody Beers District 5 Sgt. Stephen Townsend Patrol Photography: Rick Carpenter Public Affairs


Also in this issue

Contents

Letters.....................................2 District briefs.........................4 Training at a Glance..........17

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Extra Mile Awards..............17

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District news.......................18 Noteworthy......................... 20 WTDEA................................. 22 Outdoors............................. 25

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Passings............................... 26 WYDOT by the Numbers... 27 Break Time.......................... 27

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6 Road Construction Begins

The cowboy state gears up for summer

10 Right of Way paves the way

The team behind the scenes

14 Remain Vigilant Be sure to check out the online version of Interchange at http://issuu.com/wydot.pao, or click on the link found on the employee’s internal Web site home page.

Protect yourself from hackers

16 Designated Driver Campaign

March 14 kick-off for statewide program

On the cover: Right of Way is involved behind the scenes on projects where pavement meets the shoulder. Photo: Carlie Van Winkle

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District Briefs WYDOT seeks input for Airport Economic Impact Study

Cheyenne – If you or your business benefit from one of Wyoming’s airports, the Wyoming Department of Transportation’s Aeronautics Division needs your story. The division is conducting research to measure and report how airports benefit businesses, agencies, residents and other groups in Wyoming. The researchers are seeking input from employers and individuals throughout Wyoming who may be improving their efficiency, enhancing their economic viability or supporting their operations through the use of a Wyoming airport. “If you benefit by having customers or suppliers fly to Wyoming, or if you have employees who improve their efficiency by using commercial airline service in Wyoming, your response is critical to our research,” said Christy Yaffa, planning and programming manager for the Aeronautics Division. She encouraged everyone in the state who uses a Wyoming airport for scheduled commercial airline service, flights on privately owned general-aviation aircraft or for overnight shipping or air freight to participate in the study. “One goal for our research is to not only quantify potential economic benefits from aviation in Wyoming, but also to document how each airport may be supporting the communities it serves in ways that cannot be expressed in numeric values,” Yaffa said. “Our goal is to identify activities at each airport that demonstrate its importance to the community-at-large.” The Aeronautics Division will use information provided by the survey to support its programs and inform the public on the role airports play in improving Wyoming’s economy and supporting many important services.

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Changes to Transportation Commission and $12.5 million in contracts awarded at March commission meeting Cheyenne – Contracts totaling $12.5 million for 12 highway projects around the state were awarded by the Wyoming Transportation Commission during its March meeting in Cheyenne. Cheyenne’s Knife River won the largest of the contracts with the low bid of nearly $4 million for rebuilding five miles of WYO 310 and 311 (Hightower Road) about three miles west of Wheatland. The project will be a full-depth reclamation in which the deteriorating pavement will be ground up and left in place to serve as the base for a new layer of pavement. The work also will include replacing an aging timber bridge. Work is not expected to begin until late September, and the contract completion date is Oct. 31, 2014. High Country Construction of Lander submitted the low bid of nearly $3 million for repairing a slide-damaged section of the westbound lanes of I-90 about 18 miles east of Buffalo. Unstable soil at the Crazy Woman Slide will be removed and replace with lightweight rock fill that will allow better drainage. Then the tenth-ofa-mile section of the highway affected by the slide will be rebuilt over the new fill. The contract completion date is Oct. 31. Wilson Brothers Construction of Cowley was the low bidder at $1.4 million for work on 15 culverts to improve drainage along I-25 and WYO 196 and replace right-of-way fencing along nine miles of WYO 196. The project will extend 13 culverts on WYO 196 and line two deteriorating culverts on I-25 in Johnson County. The contract completion date is June 30, 2014. Cannon Builders of Blackfoot, Idaho, won a $974,000 contract for rehabilitation of bridges on highways in Lincoln, Sweetwater and Teton counties by Oct. 31. American Pavement Marking and Products of Layton, Utah submitted the low bid of $697,000 for installation of spe-

cial pavement markings on highways in Natrona, Sweetwater and Uinta counties by Sept. 30. Pab Good Trucking of Greybull was the low bidder at $616,000 for construction of a runaway truck ramp on US 14 in Shell Canyon about 27 miles east of Greybull. The ramp will separate gradually from the north side of the highway and consist of a 1,500-foot-long arrester bed of gravel 36 inches to 48 inches deep. The contract completion date is Sept. 30. Also awarded by the commission during the meeting were contracts for: • $576,000 to JM Concrete of Idaho Falls for rehabilitation of three bridges in Converse and Natrona counties by Oct. 31; • $475,000 to Advanced Electrical Contracting of Sheridan for replacement of signal indications at locations in Casper, Torrington and Rock Springs by Sept. 30; • $395,000 to S&S Builders of Gillette for repairs to the I-80 bridge over the Laramie River in Laramie by June 30; • $163,000 to Kolbe Striping of Castle Rock, Colo., for thermoplastic pavement markings on highways in Big Horn, Fremont, Hot Springs, Park, Teton and Washakie counties by Sept. 30; • $134,000 to American Pavement Marking & Products for thermoplastic pavement markings on highways in Lincoln, Sublette, Sweetwater, Teton and Uinta counties by Aug. 31; and • $109,000 to Worland’s Hout Fencing of Wyoming, for installation of right-of-way fence along 1.5 miles of the Orin Way I-25 Service Road in Converse County by July 31. Also at the meeting, Todd Seeton of Jackson and Bob Ruwart of Wheatland were sworn in as new members of the commission. They were appointed to the commission by Gov. Matt Mead and confirmed by the Wyoming Senate for six-year terms. Ruwart will represent Goshen, Laramie and Platte counties on the commission, and Seeton, represents Lincoln, Sublette, Teton and Uinta counties. Ted Ertman of Newcastle was elected commission chairman, and Bruce McCormack of Cody was elected vice chairman.


Strong winds create “dirt blizzard” with zero visibility causing road closure

WYDOT snow removal information for February

Torrington – March 17 brought strong gusty winds and created what one trooper called a “dirt blizzard” in eastern Wyoming resulting in hazardous driving conditions and zero visibility for motorists traveling on US 85 south of Torrington. The zero visibility resulted from blowing crop land dirt which prompted WYDOT to close US 85 south of Torrington in the early afternoon. The highway remained closed until evening when the winds died down and the visibility improved. Troopers were dispatched to several non injury crashes in the area and were also called upon to rescue stranded motorists during the height of the wind storm. Troopers found nearly 20 stranded motorists who had come to a complete stop in the roadway or on the shoulders of US 85. Several motorists, thinking they were still on the roadway, drove off the roadway and became stuck. The nearest WYDOT wind monitoring station is approximately 33 miles south. That wind station recorded wind gusts as high as 57 mph. Troopers working in the road closure area believe wind gusts in their area were higher. Several patrol vehicles sustained minor damage due to sandblasting of the decals and paint.

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Photo: Wyoming Highway Patrol

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Troopers stopped on the shoulder of US 85 assisting motorists south of Torrington during the “dirt blizzard.”

Sheridan – February was a busy month for WYDOT’s snowplow crews. In Sheridan County alone WYDOT crews spent 3,608 man hours plowing roads, they applied 5,159 tons of salt/ sand and 18,842 gallons of liquid deicer to approximately 312 miles of roadway. In Johnson County crews spent 1,648 man hours plowing roads, they applied 3,356 tons of salt/sand and 18,313 gallons of deicer to approximately 210 miles of roadway. To make winter roads passable, highway personnel usually must either apply a liquid deicer to melt ice and snow or spread sand to provide traction. WYDOT applies both salt/sand and a liquid deicer to the roads in both Sheridan and Johnson Counties. The salt/ sand is a mixture of 5 percent salt and 95 percent sand. This material is brown in color (not red scoria) and is used to improve vehicle traction on snow and ice covered roads. Salt/sand can be used at all temperatures. WYDOT also applies a liquid deicer that is a mix of 70 percent brine and 30 percent beet juice. The beet juice reduces corrosiveness and lowers the effective temperature range in which the brine can be used. WYDOT often applies the liquid deicer to melt existing snow pack on the road surface. WYDOT divides roads into one of three different levels for snow removal priority. The first level, high volume roads such as I-90, I-25, major interchanges and some urban or heavily traveled primary and secondary routes will be manned for 20 hours daily between the hours of 4 a.m. and 12 p.m. by staggering or extending shifts to meet manpower and equipment needs. During state athletic events such as state wrestling and state basketball, both I-90 and I-25 are manned 24 hours a day. The second level, medium volume roads which are those primary and secondary rural highways that act as collectors, will receive approximately 16 hours of snow plow coverage, the normal hours

for these types of roads is from 4 a.m. to 8 p.m. The third level, low volume roads which are usually the primary and secondary roads which only carry local traffic, receive 12 hours of service each day usually from 6 AM to 6 PM. School bus routes always receive special attention. “Although WYDOT is constantly looking for more efficient ways to clear the roads, and our crews are out there working hard to keep them clear, it is also the motorist’s job to drive cautiously, pay extra attention to signs and drive defensively,” District 4 Public Involvement Specialist Ronda Holwell said.

Bridge rehab project to begin in Dayton on the Tongue River Bridge Dayton – S&S Builders of Gillette began a bridge rehabilitation project in Dayton on the Tongue River Bridge in late March. Motorists could expect delays and a single lane of traffic. There was a 12-foot width restriction in place. Traffic was controlled with flagging operations as well as portable traffic signals. Speeds in this area was significantly reduced. The project is scheduled to be completed by July 31.

DUI patrols stepped up for St. Patrick’s Day Riverton – Fremont County law enforcement agencies enhanced patrols during St. Patrick’s Day weekend in midMarch. “If you’re going to drink during this holiday, make sure you have a designated driver,” Fremont County Deputy Sheriff Arnie Zertuche said. Zertuche said enhanced law enforcement efforts will include officers from the Fremont County Sheriff ’s Department, Wyoming Highway Patrol, and Riverton and Lander police departments.

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ROAD CONSTRUCTION SEASON BEGINS

Another road construction season is gearing up across Wyoming, with work already in progress on numerous projects in various locations around the state. During the current construction season, numerous contractors will be working on WYDOT-sponsored projects. In addition to road and bridge improvements, the project list accounts for miscellaneous work such as gravel production and stockpiling, lighting installation, fence construction, and pavement markings. Altogether, WYDOT anticipates that more than 150 projects will be under way between now and this fall. The estimate for this fiscal year’s construction budget is between $250 and $260 million, similar to what was available in both 2010 and 2011, but down from the 2012 construction budget of $320 million. Factors in the decrease from last year include declines in funding from both state and federal sources, including appropriations drawn from the state general fund and federal abandoned mine lands money. WYDOT’s budget for road improvement peaked in 2009 at about $400 million, due primarily to a surge in funding provided by the now-concluded American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA; federal economic stimulus plan).

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This past February, Gov. Matt Mead concurred with the Wyoming Legislature’s decision to increase the state fuel tax by 10 cents per gallon. For WYDOT, the revenue impacts of the tax hike, which will go into effect July 1, will not be fully evident until the 2014 construction season. WYDOT estimates the increase will provide about $45 to $50 million more annually for improvement work on state roads. Major interstate projects starting up this spring include pavement milling and resurfacing, along with bridge rehabilitation work, for eight miles on I-90 in Sheridan County. The $11.4 million project includes the nearly five-mile-long Sheridan marginal, plus another three miles of the route immediately to the south. Similar pavement milling and resurfacing work ($9.6 million) will be in progress on 11 miles of I-25 in the vicinity of Kaycee, and on the same route for four miles south of Chugwater ($2.9 million). Also on I-25, a $4.6 million effort to improve a four-mile section of the route northwest of Douglas will be ongoing; work includes three miles of pavement overlay and one mile of reconstruction work. Widening on WYO 220 outside Casper continues this summer. The project is expected to be completed this year.


Photo: Carlie Van Winkle

(Above) WYDOT is wrapping up a roadway realignment project on WYO 70 in southern Carbon County.

Another new I-25 project already in progress this spring is located at the College Drive Interchange (exit 7) at the south edge of Cheyenne. The $3.1-million effort The diverging diamond configuration should alleviate traffic congestion and improve safety will convert the at the I-25 and College Ave. intersection south interchange into a edge of Cheyenne. “diverging diamond” design configuration, which will improve traffic flow and safety at the site, which features a high volume of heavy truck traffic. Scheduled to go to contract in May is a project to improve about three miles of northbound I-25 north of Wheatland in the vicinity of the El Rancho Interchange. The work is a mix of reconstruction, bridge rehabilitation and roadway widening, including milling and resurfacing. On I-80, pavement overlay work, along with bridge deck repair ($4 million), will be commencing on six miles of the route (westbound lanes only) over Dana Ridge between Walcott Junction and Elk Mountain. Other I-80 projects continuing from last season include pavement milling and resurfacing, along with bridge rehabilitation work, for nearly 12 miles on I-80 just west of Rawlins ($17.3 million), along with comparable milling and resurfacing work on about eight miles of I-80 further west in the Wamsutter area (also $17 million). The latter project includes building a large truck parking area adjacent to the Wamsutter Interchange through the use of special federal grant funding. The list of carryover Interstate projects also includes a 5.8-mile resurfacing project ($20.3 million), including isolated

Photo: WYDOT

WYDOT is increasing its use of “full-depth reclamation” (FDR), a technique that makes use of existing plant mix (asphalt) pavement and existing base materials when improving deteriorated and/or substandard roads. The process starts with the inplace pulverization of existing asphalt and road base materials in place. An asphalt reclaiming machine pulverA stabilizing agent izing existing asphalt and returning it to may be added to the road. the pulverized mix, which is then compacted and topped with a new layer of asphalt pavement. FDR offers cost savings by making use of the recycled materials, while reducing the need for producing and hauling in new aggregate. Additional benefits can be an increase in the structural integrity of the compacted base materials, allowing a reduction in the thickness of the overlay, as well as a shortening of project duration compared to traditional reconstruction.

Photo: WYDOT

Photo: Vince Cavanaugh

Full-depth reclamation saving WYDOT dollars

Full-depth reclamation (FDR) was used in Laramie on the Grand Avenue project.

The potential for future reflective cracking is also greatly reduced by FDR, particularly for projects where the roadway is being widened to add shoulders. The process also makes it easier for the contractor to establish optimal cross slopes, including specified superelevations. Results from recently completed projects which featured full-depth reclamation, such as the Grand Avenue Project in Laramie, have been positive, and FDR is incorporated into design plans for upcoming projects on US 16, Newcastle-South Dakota state line; WYO 310/311, Hightower Road (Wheatland); and WYO 410, Mountain View-Robertson. April 2013

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Photo: Rick Carpenter

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New dynamic message signs like the one shown above will be deployed on I-90 in the Sundance, Gillette, Buffalo and Sheridan areas and on I-25 at Orin Junction.

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change on I-80 will be reconstructed and widened from two to five lanes; the next two miles will be resurfaced and widened in select locations to accommodate the addition of turning lanes. A similar project is located just south of Afton, where a widening project ($3.9 million) will transform 1.5 miles of US 89 from two to five lanes. A project to reconstruct and widen US 14A, from two to five lanes, for 3.5 miles just east of Cody, is slated to go to contract later this spring, depending on funding and rightof-way acquisition. If the project goes as scheduled, it will mark the conclusion of a series of reconstruction projects which began in 2001 to widen the entire 23-mile length of US 14A between Cody and Powell. US 89 project A $11.9-million project Widening from starting this spring on two to five lanes just south of town US 287 north of Rawlins consists of placing pavement overlay for 10 miles and adding passing lanes in both directions of travel between mileposts 19 and 20. Another project on US 287 may possibly begin this summer; the effort would entail widening, with isolated reconstruction, the 4.5mile Beaver Creek section east of Lander. Other projects with a possible 2013 construction starts including widening and resurfacing 9.5 miles of US 14-16 near Spotted Horse northwest of Gillette and similar work, along with bridge widening, on 8.2 miles of US 16 between Newcastle and the South Dakota state line. Just northwest of Thermopolis, work is well under way on a $6.7-million project to improve 3.3 miles of WYO 120. The I

reconstruction, on I-90 about midway between Buffalo and Gillette. Further west toward Buffalo, another I-90 project ($3 million), involving slide repair on the westbound lanes, will be starting soon. New electronic equipment to help get road, weather and traffic information to interstate highway travelers will be installed as part of $5.4 million “Intelligent Transportation Systems” project. A total of 19 new overhead “dynamic message” signs will be deployed; locations include I-90 in the Sundance, Gillette, Buffalo and Sheridan areas and I-25 at Orin Junction. Another large project ($25 million) still under contract in northwest Wyoming is the reconstruction of Hoback Junction south of Jackson, where U.S. routes 26-89 and 189-191 intersect. The project includes reconstructing and realigning the junction into a roundabout and replacing the 60-year-old Snake River bridge just west of the junction. The new roundabout is now in service, but work on the remainder of the project is yet to be completed. Reconstruction and widening work will be in progress on a number of non interstate routes as well. The projects include a section of WYO 220 leading southwest from Casper, extending the current fourUS 191 lane divided highway widening by nearly 5.5 miles project area (mileposts 102-108; $25.2 million). The project, which began in 2011, is expected to be completed this year. Nearby on WYO 220, a slide remediation project at the “Narrows” (milepost 101; $6.9 million) will be in progress. West of Casper, work will be resuming on a pavement milling and resurfacing project (11.1 miles; $6.9 million) involving US 20-26 between Waltman and Powder River. Work is in its early stages on a $14.5-million project to improve three miles of US 191 southwest of Rock Springs. The first mile of route leading south from the Flaming Gorge Inter-


Photo: Carlie Van Winkle Photo: Vince Cavanaugh

effort includes both reconstruction and widening/resurfacing to add shoulders. Reconstruction and widening work is also in progress on WYO 270 between Manville and Lance Creek in Niobrara County (3.4 miles, $5.5 million). Between Cheyenne and Laramie, $7.3 million of resurfacing work, including widening to add shoulders, is on tap for 6.4 miles of WYO 210 (Happy Jack Road). On WYO 70 between Baggs and Encampment in southern Carbon County, crews will be wrapping up a $3 million roadway realignment project which began last year. The reroute was necessary due to a large landslide which activated in 2011 and severely damaged the roadway near milepost 30, a few miles west of Battle Pass. Pavement overlay work will be in progress on 19 miles of WYO 431 west of Worland ($5 million), and 8.5 miles of US 287 north of Medicine Bow ($2.9 million). Likely going to contract in June is a project to upgrade 6.6 miles of WYO 410 in Uinta County between Mountain View and Robertson. The roadway will be resurfaced after widening to add shoulders, with minor realignment also being undertaken.

A landslide necessitated the realignment of WYO 70 between Baggs and Encampment. Work will be completed this year.

The most comprehensive slate of work in an urban area is located in the Casper area, where work continues for a second year on a $19.2 million project to build future roadbed, as well as a bridge and other structures associated with the future West Casper Belt Loop. A second phase of work will go to contract later to pave the 7.1 mile route, which will connect WYO 220 southwest of Casper to US 20-26 at the west end of Shoshoni Bypass just northwest of the city. Nearby, two WYDOT-sponsored projects are under way to improve Natrona County Road 201 (Poison Spider Road), beginning at that route’s intersection with US 20-26 in Mills, and continuing west nearly two miles to where it intersects with Robertson Road in the vicinity of the Belt Loop corridor. The work includes updating the US 20-26 intersection and widening the road to three lanes. In Cheyenne, reconstruction of a 0.6 mile section of Pershing Boulevard immediately east of the PershingRandall Interchange on I-25 Pershing-Randall Interchange reconis nearing completion. The struction. $3.4 million project includes widening to accommodate addition of a center-turn lane and replacing water and sanitary sewer lines. Also continuing this spring is a $12.2-million project in Torrington to build an overpass on US 85 to span the BNSF Railroad. The overpass, which will connect US 85 to US 26 in downtown Torrington, will serve as an alternate route to the existing at-grade railroad crossing on US 85. In Jackson, work is starting on a reconstruction of 0.3-mile of US 26-89-189-191 (West Broadway) between the Flat Creek Bridge and Jackson Street. The $5.8-million project includes new concrete pavement, water and sewer lines, and bicycle and pedestrian pathways. Just west of Wheatland, work will be starting soon on a $4 million project to reconstruct and widen 5.1 miles of Hightower Road, which consists of a portion of WYO 310 and all of WYO 311. – Bruce Burrows

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Photo: Rick Carpenter

Dirt movers working on the early stages of the West Belt Loop project in Casper.


Right of Way paves th Much of the time when a highway construction project is let to contract, it’s a safe bet that the staff of WYDOT’s Right-of-Way Program (ROW) have worked extensively behind the scenes to get that project ready to go. Whether the work involves realignment, reconstruction or resurfacing, ROW experts have been involved in property identification, appraisal, and negotiations with landowners. Indeed, securing rights of way for transportation purposes is a principal activity for Right of Way, but there are other important responsibilities, including assisting owners or tenants who need to be relocated from their home or place of business due to a road improvement project. Other ROW responsibilities include regulation of outdoor advertising and junkyards, managing WYDOT-owned properties, and administering relocation services for WYDOT employees who qualify for assistance when transferring to a new work station. Right of Way has seen several staffing changes in the past few months, in the wake of last year’s retirements of longtime ROW Administrator John Sherman and Assistant Administrator Ron Archuleta. The new administrator is Michael J. Miller. Reporting directly to Miller are Craig Alexander, assistant administrator for quality, and Kevin Lebeda, assistant administrator for production. For much of its history, the Right-of-Way Program was organized into four primary functional areas – engineering, appraisals, acquisitions, and property management. As a result of restructuring implemented a few years ago, a team approach is now in place. Four multidisciplinary squads were formed; Michael J. Miller each is headed by a project manager and includes an engineering technician, an appraiser, and two acquisition agents. One squad also has a property management function. Additional ROW staff provide the four squads with important review and quality control assistance. When a land acquisition becomes necessary, Right of Way personnel work up an offer to the property owner based on a developed opinion of fair market value. Acquisition agents make contact with affected owners to provide project details and options for the acquisition of land. The goal is to accomplish the negotiation and acquisition with a single offer, unless an alternate appraisal is considered to be in the best interest

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Photo: Rick Carpenter

Photo: Rick Carpenter

Photo: Carlie Van Winkle

he way

of all involved. WYDOT operates under a set of standard processes to assure equity to landowners and taxpayers who are ultimately funding the road improvements. This policy provides uniformity and is designed to reduce differences between landowners and WYDOT. ROW’s work is most often associated with large value WYDOT construction projects impacting multiple small landowners. As soon as the program becomes aware of the anticipated beginning of any project which may require acquisition work, WYDOT notifies in writing all owners of property located within or adjacent to the project corridor. It’s an ongoing process that results in WYDOT negotiating right-of-way actions on an approximate average of 700 parcels each year with acquisitions ranging from a few square feet to more than 80 acres. In some cases, the acquisition is an outright purchase with permanent ownership transferred to the Transportation Commission. In other cases, the acquisition is only for a specific time frame which could be likened to a rental or lease. “Ours is a diverse and complex obligation and we build in some redundancies to ensure accuracy,” said ROW Administrator Michael Miller. “As soon as we get a set of grading plans, we go through title research to make sure we are talking to the correct landowners when we make our offer and write our letters. Our engineering techs develop the legal descriptions to secure the correct piece of property. The state land surveyor checks the description to make sure it’s correct and then the information goes to appraisers who travel the state to value the property and double check figures with realtors and other appraisers who reside in the area.” WYDOT’s authority to acquire property rests on powers granted to government called “eminent domain,” which includes the provision that property owners must receive just compensation for their property. The process of a government agency, such as WYDOT, exercising eminent domain, includes the possibility of a “condemnation” proceeding becoming necessary when a agreement about property values or even roadway design cannot be achieved. “There’s a perception that we do a lot of condemnation, but in reality, it’s rarely necessary,” Miller said. “Probably less than 1 percent of the time do we even get to the point of initiating the condemnation process. Even after we get to that point, we still work on a settlement before it goes to a judge. Only a few cases have actually gone through the full condemnation procedure.” A bill passed by the Wyoming Legislature during its 2013 session was concerned with the issue of eminent domain. If a condemnation filing does end up in court, and a judge determines that fair market value is more than 15 percent higher than the last offer made by the condemning agency, the agency would also have to pay the landowner’s legal fees.

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– Carlie Van Winkle

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Photos: Rick Carpenter

Photo: Rick Carpenter

“In appraising the land, we are guided by state and federal guidelines, and it is our advantage to be on the high side of value, regardless of the new law, because we are often dealing with landowners who would rather not sell,” Miller said. “It’s good to be able to offer some incentive, and there is simply no advantage to us trying to underpay a landowner.” Most right-of-way acquisitions do not require the property owner or tenant to move. When that step is necessary, statutory safeguards are in place to protect and assist those who are affected. ROW staff work directly with owners or tenants to find and obtain a suitable new location to live or run a business. The assistance rendered extends to reimbursing expenses related to relocation. Relocation of homeowners and tenants is based on acquiring comparable housing, and in certain cases in which a replacement home is not available, a home can be built using funds authorized for this purpose. Regulation of outdoor advertising (previously handled by the Traffic Program) is the newest addition to the ROW slate. Activities and the responsibilities include estimating the value of outdoor advertising signs and monitoring sign placement and removal. For junkyard control, Right-of-Way staff regulates and restricts junkyards adjacent to the interstate and any primary roads. Both of these responsibilities trace back to the Highway Beautification Act of 1965. ROW’s property management function, coordinated with Financial Services and Office Services, is responsible for the keeping an inventory and maintaining WYDOT’s property holdings. Some of Billboards like this one are monitored by ROW this property is and can be slated for removal. excess land which was originally acquired by the department during the course of road improvement projects. Other parcels are those typically acquired for new transportation facilities. Property management also maintains the leases on homes which house WYDOT employees and leases on WYDOT-held properties such as remote stations and office spaces in some communities. They also pay the leases on driver services sites and lease WYDOT-owned buildings and offices to other businesses across Wyoming. ROW administers the employee relocation expense plan, in addition to the aforementioned activities. The expense plan is designed to relieve employees of the major financial burdens associated with transfers. The goal of the plan is to facilitate and expedite moves that are determined to be in the best of WYDOT at reasonable costs, because without these incentives, the department would not be able to staff certain vacant positions with the most qualified personnel available.


Wyoming’s first traffic fatality occurred in 1906, just three years after Ford introduced its original Model A and seven years before the first automobile was licensed in the state. Newspaper articles recounting the tragic death of a 5-yearold Rawlins boy were tracked down to answer a research request from the University of Iowa. Highway Safety’s Kay Perry consulted Wyoming State Archives, where Carl Hallberg found the articles. Accounts in the Rawlins Republican and Grand Encampment Herald describe the death of Dean Weightman, who was struck by an automobile driven by F.A. Luckfield on the evening of Nov. 4, 1906. The tragedy occurred in front of the boy’s home on Seventh Street, where he was playing with a friend. Luckfield was driving southbound on the street at about 10 mph and sounded the horn when he saw the children in the street about half a block ahead. Both the children ran to the west side of the street, but the victim’s friend then ran back across the road to the east side of the street. “The boy also started back to the east side of the street, and seemingly was very much bewildered,” the Rawlins Republican reported. “The car was approaching nearer all the while, but had slowed a great deal. The little boy then started west again, but only a few steps when he turned to the east a second time, but in his all his maneuvering hardly getting out of the course of the car. Another step would have saved him, but the mud fender over the left wheel struck him at the back of the head.” The boy’s changes in direction left the driver guessing as to which way to turn and without enough time to stop the car, the newspaper reported. Luckfield first steered to the left and then

to the right to avoid the boy, whose fate was determined by inches. “The whole party in the automobile was struck dumb to see the boy attempt to pass in front after going to the west side of the car, and mortified at the awful results,” the Republican reported. The boy’s father, William Weightman, a local butcher whose meat market had been gutted by fire that same year, came out of the house and carried his son inside, where the boy died within minutes. After hearing testimony from several witnesses at a coroner’s inquest, a three-member jury exonerated Luckfield, finding he had used caution in handling the vehicle and the accident was unavoidable.

Photo courtesy Associated Press

State’s first traffic fatality recounted

The state’s first traffic fatality occurred between a pedestrian and a vehicle which may have looked similar to this Ford Model T.

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Remain V Watch out! Whether you know it or not, you are a target for cyber criminals. Most people regularly log in and out of their computers, mobile devices, or smart phones without a thought toward the potential dangers. Unfortunately, lurking in the World Wide Web shadows, the criminals of the cyber universe are waiting to pounce. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, “In 2010 about 8.6 million households had at least one member age 12 or older who experienced one or more types of identity theft victimization.” Protection of your work-related usernames and passwords are important, but protection of your personal username(s) and password(s) are also crucial. Not taking the proper precautions can change you from a target to a victim. This poster covers the issue of identity theft along with additional risks associated with having your username and password compromised. The average person goes about their daily lives comfortable that they can continue to use the same old “easy to remember” password and nothing bad will happen. Understanding the risks involved with this way of thinking is the first step to avoiding potential disaster. This poster provides a link to information and a newsletter that will help you take steps to protect yourself and your family. Become informed and take action. Below are some tips on protecting your username and password.

• Don’t use public computers (e.g. public library, hotel lobby) for online banking or for doing credit card transactions. • Don’t share your username and password with others. • Use unique passwords for your different accounts. • Change your password often (several times per year). • Use strong passwords - check this link for more information: http://www.microsoft.com/ security/online-privacy/passwords-create.aspx Feel free to remove this centerfold for future reference. 14

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Vigilant

Artwork used with permission.

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this program,” said Tom Montoya, chief of enforcement for the Wyoming Liquor Division. The campaign is the result of concerns over the rising number of impaired driving fatalities around Wyoming, said Mike Reed of the Governor’s Council on Impaired Driving. Since the crash in 2001 in which a drunken driver killed eight members of the University of Wyoming cross country team, more than 650 impaired driving deaths have occurred in Wyoming, he said. “Choose a designated driver or pay the price with a DUI arrest, or even worse, pay the price of killing someone while driving intoxicated,” Reed said. “Lets start making some adjustments starting with picking a designated driver before going out this St. Patrick’s Day, and by doing that you could save innocent lives.” For those who drink and fail to designate a sober driver, the Patrol has a zero tolerance policy. “If law enforcement catches a person behind the wheel that shouldn’t be there, they will take the appropriate action to prevent injury, and that is taking them to jail,” Butler said. – Dave Kingham

The Wyoming Highway Patrol kicked off its new designated driver promotion “Gotta DD?” in conjunction with the Wyoming Liquor Division and Governor’s Council on Impaired Driving on March 14 in Cheyenne. “Our goal is to once again share the message amongst the drivers, amongst those retail liquor establishments that it’s important to have a designated driver,” Patrol Col. John Butler said. “On behalf of the Wyoming Highway Patrol and the citizens, I thank you for your participation and we’re looking forward to the success of this program.” The Liquor Division is distributing “Gotta DD?” license plates to bars and retail liquor stores around the state. Wyoming Liquor Division Administrator Greg Cook said Wyoming liquor retailers are partners in the effort to remind people of the importance of having a sober designated driver, and the goal is to get the plates into as many bars and package stores as possible. The “Gotta DD?” campaign originated in Park County, and the Patrol and Liquor Division are taking it statewide. “It’s the partnerships that we see that have really made these programs The “Gotta DD?” campaign may have started in successful in Wyoming and we’re really Park county, but has now gone statewide with the proud and honored to be partnering help of the Wyoming Liquor Division, the Governor’s Council on Impaired Driving and combined local law with the Wyoming Highway Patrol on enforcement.

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Photo: Rick Carpenter/WYDOT file photo

Patrol kicks off designated driver campaign


Briefs continued from page 5 “We want everyone to stay safe during the St. Patrick’s Day weekend (March 15-17) and other times as well,” Zertuche said. “With so many people out at parties or bars, there’s the potential for more drunk drivers to be out on the roads.” In 2011, there were 35 alcohol-related fatalities on Wyoming roads. “This year, the St. Patrick’s Day holiday falls on a weekend. Weekends are consistently when a higher number of alcohol-related crashes occur,” Zertuche said. “Don’t ruin your holiday or someone else’s. Don’t drive if you’ve been drinking. If you or a friend have had too much to drink, call a cab or get a ride home from someone who is sober,” Zertuche said. “Remember, buzzed driving is drunk driving.”

Training ata Glance

Here are upcoming training opportunities from WYDOT University and the Transportation Learning Network (TLN) Date Class Location Apr 2-5 Apr 4 Apr 4 Apr 8 Apr 8-12 Apr 9 Apr 10 Apr 16 Apr 17 Apr 23 Apr 25

New Supervisor Orientation #2 (NSO) Cheyenne Plant Control for Warm Mix Asphalt Webinar NHI - HSM Practitioners Guide to Inspections TLN Shale Oil Exploration and Production: Webinar Impacts on Traffic and Roads New Employee Orientation #4 (NEO) Cheyenne Managing Conflict TLN Maintenance of Guardrail and Appurtenances TLN Results-Based Performance Management WYDOT-only TLN Intentional Leadership Conversations Cheyenne Tractor Operator Safety (9:00-2:00) TLN MBTI and Teams Cheyenne

Coming up in May 2013: May 1 May 2

Dou ble Header

FiSH! for Customer Service Generations in the Workplace

Cheyenne Cheyenne

To register, or to find out more details, call the Training Program and talk to David Talley (777-4792), Jim Boyd (777-4791) or Rhonda DeLeeuw (777-4790).

Extra Mile

Get those spring skiing, hiking, camping & biking photos in Interchange! Submissions deadline for

WYDOT Outdoors:

06/14/13

carlie.vanwinkle @wyo.gov

AWARDS Congratulations February recipients! WYDOT salutes the following Director’s Extra Mile Award recipients. The award is presented to individuals who have traveled the “extra mile” in service to WYDOT.

Dave Haller

Scott Elliot

Pat Varland

Craig Cohrs

For more information about the Extra Mile Award or to nominate someone, contact Janet Farrar at janet.farrar@wyo.gov or Mel Anderson at mel.anderson@wyo.gov. April 2013

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District News

District 1

Promotions and Transfers

Headquarters

Welcome

Richard Diefenderfer, Patrol Dispatch – 15 years; Chelsey Lindsay, Financial ServicesDisbursements – 5 years; Brett Martin, Aeronautics Flight Operations – 5 years; and Cori Schrinar, Procurement ServicesBuying – 5 years.

Laura Brewer, Motor Vehicle Services-Registrations/Titles; Katherine Castaneda, Human Resources; Cathryn Connell, Financial Services-Disbursements; Ken DeJersey, Right Of Way-Negotiations; Robert Jones, Geology-Drillers; and Kristi Pomeroy, Motor Vehicle Services-Registrations/Titles.

Congratulations

Retirements William Morse, Patrol-Support Service Operations

Promotions and Transfers Robert Doering, Highway Development-Project Development; Renee Krawiec, Driver Services-Training; Gregory Milburn, Materials-Operations; and Keith Tupper, Traffic.

Service Awards

Photo: WYDOT Equipment

Timothy Carroll, Environmental Services – 35 years; Bryan Wenger, Equipment-Administration – 20 years;

Katherine Castaneda has been chosen as the new Human Resources Associate 2 for the Human Resources Office at Headquarters. Castaneda replaces Alicia Glover and assumed her new position Feb. 19. Katherine Castaneda Hank Doering was selected as the new design team leader for Project Development in Cheyenne. Doering replaces Chris Pivik, and began his duties as a principal engineer March 1. Greg Milburn Hank Doering is the new Program Manager for Materials in Cheyenne. Milburn replaces Rick Harvey, and assumed his duties as the new engineering manager 2 Feb. 14.

Service Awards Jimmy Swingle, Laramie Maintenance – 15 years; Mark Urban, Cheyenne Construction – 15 years; and Brian Martin, Rawlins Construction – 5 years.

Congratulations Wayne Shenefelt has been chosen as the new resident engineer for District 1 in Cheyenne. Shenefelt is replacing Don Fuller, and began his duties as the resident engineer Feb. 19. Congratulations to Merna Carver on her Wayne Shenefelt recent promotion to maintenance foreman in Baggs. Carver replaces John Gallenbeck who retired in February. Congratulations Merna! Congratulations to Kory Cramer on his recent promotion to project engineer in Laramie.

Greg Milburn

Photo: WYDOT District 1

Bryan Wenger, equipment program coordinator, receiving his 20-year service award from Bernie Kushnir, state equipment manager.

Brendan Byron, Highway Development-Project Development-Laramie Design Squad; Merna Carver, Baggs Maintenance; Shelby Kindsvater, Highway Development-Project DevelopmentLaramie Design Squad; Taylor McCort, Highway Development-Project Development-Laramie Design Squad; Wayne Shenefelt, Cheyenne Construction; and Kory Cramer, Laramie Construction.

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Don Fuller receiving his retirement award from District 1 Engineer, Pat Persson, upon his retirement last month.


District 2

District 3

Welcome

Welcome

Service Awards

Gregory Hopper, Shirley Rim Maintenance; Nicholas Jenkins, Torrington Port Of Entry; and Michael Kurka, TrafficElectrical.

Zachary Keetch, Cokeville Maintenance; Christopher Kelsey, Rock Springs Maintenance; and Tiffany Pearce, Kemmerer Construction.

Kurt Anselmi, Jackson Construction – 15 years; and Ty Huffman, Pinedale Patrol – 10 years.

Jake Gores, Wheatland Maintenance.

Service Awards Patrick Nelson, Douglas Maintenance – 20 years; Debra Cain, Driver Services-Torrington/Lusk – 15 years; Shawn Scolari, Kaycee Maintenance – 5 years; Joshua Simonson, Casper Maintenance – 5 years; Marc Wheeler, Traffic-Electrical – 5 years; and Wade Wintermote, Douglas Construction – 5 years.

Tiffany Pearce

Promotions and Transfers Jeramy Pittsley, Rock Springs Patrol; and Carl Eggleston, Afton Traffic Striping.

Photo: Stephanie Harsha

Promotions and Transfers

Kurt Anselmi receiving his 15 year service award from District 3 Engineer, John Eddins.

District 4

Welcome Thomas Skubal, Gillette Maintenance.

Promotions and Transfers Daniel Haas, Sundance Maintenance; and Jeffrey Barker, Sheridan Traffic Striping.

Service Awards

Over the Limit? Under Arrest.

Lawrence Konetzki, District 4 Maintenance Staff – 35 years; Kevin Legerski, Sheridan Patrol – 20 years; William Torrance, TelecommunicationsDistrict 4 Radio Shop Larry Konetzki – 15 years; Brian Brownell, Sheridan Mechanics – 10 years;

Bill Torrance

Larry Davis

Brian Brownell

Dawn Trautman

Larry Davis, Gillette Maintenance – 5 years; and Dawn Trautman, Sheridan Port of Entry – 5 years.

District 5

Welcome

HIG

L

c se Re

Paul Boedeker, Dubois Maintenance – 25 years; Hilary LaBudda, Basin Traffic Striping – 25 years;

le Afte yc

April 2013

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ading !

OMING WY HWAY PATRO

Service Awards

Re

PROGRAM

Larry Jansma, Cody Construction.

r

HIGHWAY SAFETY

Promotions and Transfers

ea Pl

Always use a designated driver.

Hannah O’Rourke, Thermopolis Maintenance.

Brenda Ellis, Driver Services-Cody/ Lovell – 15 years; Glen Thomas, Thermopolis Maintenance – 15 years; and Barbara Archibald, District 5 Maintenance Staff – 5 years.

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January and February Service Award Recipients

Photo: Rick Carpenter/WYDOT

Service award luncheons are held by the Transportation Commission for employees celebrating milestones of 25 years of service or greater. Service award recipients at this month’s luncheon: (from left) Tony Laird, Hil LaBudda and Bill Gribble.

Noteworthy The U.S. Forest Service has presented WYDOT and the Federal Highway Administration with an award for outstanding partnership in the reconstruction of US 26-287 between Dubois and Moran Junction, a highway known as the Togwotee Trail to Yellowstone. Joe Alexander, supervisor of the Shoshone National Forest, and José Castro, deputy forest supervisor of the Bridger-Teton National Forest, presented the award to Chief Engineer Del McOmie on Feb. 26 in Cheyenne. “The excellence in design and cooperation preserved, conserved and enhanced the project’s natural, scenic, visual and wildlife resource values,” the award plaque reads. “Congratulations on an outstanding new highway that will provide economic mobility, visitor access and forest management benefits for many years.” “It’s an excellent project that did a great deal for changing the whole use area,” Alexander said. “I think we’ll see increased use of the forest and improvements for those communities on both sides and the public in general.” Castro called the project a model for future work in environmentally sensitive areas. The 38-mile reconstruction was completed in five phases beginning in 2006, and included structures to provide safe crossings for wildlife and snowmobiles, parking areas for snowmobiles, stabilization of landslide areas, passing and turn lanes

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Photo: Rick Carpenter

Togwotee project honored by Forest Service

Del McOmie, chief engineer, receives the award from U.S. Forest Service representatives José Castro and Joe Alexander.

to improve safety and widened shoulders to provide room for bicyclists. Final paving was completed last September. The Brooks Lake phase of the project completed in 2007 received the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials President’s Transportation Award for Excellence. That award cited the 10-mile project’s success in improving safety while minimizing impacts on traffic, the environment and the local economy.


Noteworthy Troopers instrumental in ending hunt for suspects in triple homicide Three Wyoming Highway Patrol troopers based in Cody, including 10-year WHP veteran Dan Walker, played a key role in apprehending two homicide suspects last month alongside WYO 120 near the community of Clark in northern Park County. In a case that drew national headlines, Ildiko Freitas, 40, and her father Janos Volgyessi, 69 and her mother Hildegard Volgyessi, 70, were found shot to death late Saturday morning, March 2, in a rural residence on Big View Road just outside Clark, which is about 30 miles north of Cody. Stephen Hammer, 19, and Tanner Vanpelt, 18, were arrested in the case. The teens face 11 felony counts each, including murder charges that could carry the death penalty. A neighbor discovered the bodies of the murder victims in

the Freitas residence and a search for the perpetrators began. The manhunt would turn out to be short-lived, concluding when Hammer and Vanpelt, fleeing down a county road, approached the state highway opposite the Edelweiss Bar and Grill, located between mile markers 129 and 130 on WYO 120. Trooper Walker had already reached the Edelweiss parking lot, and an eyewitness to the scene told the Powell Tribune that Walker’s decisive action helped bring the incident to a quick and peaceful conclusion. “At that moment, the state trooper came across the highway from the parking lot . . . very quickly. He drew his gun and pointed it at the driver of the . . . car and it was done,” according to the witness. “Basically, they gave up right there.” Division “N” Lt. Phil Farman of Cody told the Tribune that Trooper Walker did “very well” in ending the incident. “I think he presented himself well enough that they (the suspects) had to figure it was time to give up,” Farman said. Trooper Richard Scovel followed by Trooper Brad McConnell arrived on scene in quick succession to back up Walker. Farman also credited the Park County Sheriff ’s Office for quickly relaying information about the suspects’ vehicles. “If it was not for the diligent effort by the sheriff ’s department to get the information out, it (the arrest by Trooper Walker) never would have happened,” he said.

Transportation Commission changes in March The Wyoming Transportation Commission gained two new members − Bob Ruwart and Todd Seeton − in March. The two men were appointed to the commission earlier this year by Gov. Matt Mead and subsequently confirmed by the Wyoming Senate. They were sworn in at the commission’s March 21 meeting in Cheyenne. Also at that meeting, Ted Ertman was elected the new commission chairman and Bruce McCormack was elected vice chairman. Ertman represents Crook, Niobrara and Weston counties, and McCormack represents Big Horn, Hot Springs, Park and Washakie counties. Ruwart owns and operates Bob Ruwart Motors in Wheatland, and represents Goshen, Laramie and Platte counties on the commission. He replaces Cactus Covello of Torrington. Seeton, agency manager for Mountain West Farm Bureau Insurance in Jackson, represents Lincoln, Sublette, Teton and Uinta counties. He replaces Jim Latta of Pinedale. Covello and Latta concluded their

Bob Ruwart

Todd Seeton

six-year terms on the commission in February. Ruwart moved to Wheatland in 1990 from his native Colorado to buy the business that now bears his name. In somewhat of an ironic twist, Ruwart purchased the dealership from Chuck Brown, who served as a transportation commissioner himself from 1995 to 2001. Prior to moving to Wyoming, he had worked at his father’s dealership in Denver, Chuck Ruwart Chevrolet. The younger Ruwart earned an associate’s degree in automotive marketing from Northwoods Institute. He has chalked up extensive community service, with memberships and leadership positions with the Wheatland

Junior Chamber of Commerce, the Platte County Chamber of Commerce, the Wheatland Economic Development Board, and the Wyoming Automobile Dealers Association. He currently is serving his second term on the Platte County Economic Development Board of Directors and is a member of an advisory board for the First State Bank of Wheatland. During his spare time, Ruwart enjoys snowmobiling and riding ATVs, and spending time at the mountain cabin that he and his wife Rhonda built. Seeton has lived in Teton County for 26 years. He joined Mountain West Farm Bureau in 1995. In addition, he and his wife Laura have operated Granite Management since 1997, managing Granite Hot Springs and other recreational sites in Bridger-Teton National Forest. He is a long-term member of the Rotary Club of Jackson Hole and the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce, and he attends the First Baptist Church. Among favorite hobbies, he lists outdoor activities with his family, as well as hunting, fishing, backcountry skiing and golf. April 2013

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WTDEA

Late last year a survey for employees regarding WTDEA was administered at Headquarters. Results tallied from survey responses address what WTDEA can do for you. Concerns of the majority of survey respondents related to the categories of employee advocacy, communication and new events for WTDEA. WYDOT’s employees group focuses on employee advocacy through a variety of functions. They ensure that all employees have the right to voice a concern to the WTDEA board, while also ensuring representatives from each department are able to attend regularly scheduled WTDEA meetings. Aside from meetings, WTDEA hosts quarterly blood drives and ensures that employees have time available for donating or helping with the sign-in or snack table duties in the recovery area. The group recently aided in getting a new ATM machine in the Headquarters building. In an effort to better communicate with members and nonmembers, the Headquarters chapter has revamped its informative brochure which contains representative information and quick facts about the WTDEA. The current Web site will see revisions to include a Google events calendar and list of frequently asked questions (FAQs). Meeting minutes will be emailed to each member directly from the WTDEA secretary rather than through each repreWTDEA survey respondents were asked if sentative, ensuring monthly meeting minutes were being received, that communicavia email or otherwise, and nearly 52 percent tion is delivered in a replied no. WTDEA secretary, Merri Burkett, timely manner. plans to send minutes out herself, hopefully fixing a lack of communication. The “Someone You Should Know”

Headquarters WTDEA chapter ramping up for Spring Festival All WYDOT employees, family and friends are invited to WTDEA’s Spring Festival on Friday, April 19 at the Cheyenne Knights of Columbus hall. The festival will kickoff the newly created Grant Assistance Program (GAP). This program is available to WTDEA Headquarters chapter members and their families. GAP is meant to enhance quality of life for WTDEA members and families’ lives through participation in health,

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series will be resurrected and Interchange will feature monthly highlights of WTDEA representatives, officers and happenings in each of the five districts. Creating new events for WTDEA is a challenge, and the newly elected chapter board members are ready for the task. WTDEA would like to create an atmosphere of inter-program relations and friendly competition. Nearly 91 percent of respondents know that Commitment and support for any new volunteering helps WTDEA achieve goals. idea is key, and the board is looking forward to having more members participate with upcoming new activities. WTDEA also aims to cultivate members new to WYDOT, and members who would enjoy discount trips to sporting and theater events or gambling and other social activities. Lastly, fundraising keeps WTDEA’s programs moving. Raising money for the causes WTDEA supports is necessary to their livelihood. Consider being a supporter of WTDEA by becoming a member. Editor’s note: Last month’s article erroneously stated that members and nonmembers are all welcome to sit in at monthly meetings. Only board members and representatives are allowed to attend monthly meetings and WTDEA strongly encourages members and nonmembers to take all concerns to their representative prior to the monthly meeting held on the first Thursday of each month.

education, cultural and sports activities. The festival begins at 5 p.m. and includes a Mexican dinner, cash bar, carnival games for all ages, electronic hunting/shooting competitions, a silent auction and multiple raffles. This function is open to the public. Only 200 dinner tickets are available. Don’t miss out on a great meal. If you are unable to attend Spring Festival, but want the Mexican dinner, dinners can be taken to go. Advance dinner tickets cost $7 for adults and $4 for children 10 and under. Tickets not sold in advance will be $10 for adults and $6 for children 10 and under at the door. GAP grants will be awarded on a

quarterly basis. WTDEA members can apply once per calendar year. The number and amounts of grants awarded each quarter will vary based upon the available funding. GAP is intended to provide aid when paying for educational courses, sports camps, 4H, scouts, FFA, or activities that help improve the quality of life for a WTDEA family. Further information about GAP will be available on the employees Web site under the Headquarters chapter tab. Support the WTDEA GAP and bring your family and friends to Spring Festival. It will be a good time for all ages.


WTDEA Store

Hats

WTDEA State Board is selling hats. The hats are $18. Contact your WTDEA representative for more information.

Gloves

Pigskin leather work gloves. $5.25 for members, $6.25 for non-members. Call Tina Thomas at 777-4486.

Cookbook

The Roadkill Cookbook is selling for $10. Call Barbara Thomasee at 777-4494.

Cash Calendar

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Thursday

3

9

December 2012

Weekends $20.00 Drawings

Wednesday

2

8

22

29

9

16

23

30

Saturday

3

10

17

24

31

An 18 Month Calendar (7/2012 - 12/2013) is selling for $15. Daily chances to win starting January 2013. Contact your representative for information. If you would like your WTDEA event to be placed in Interchange, please contact Heidi Martin, heidi.martin@wyo.gov or Ryan Sorenson, ryan.sorenson@wyo.gov

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WyHy has GREAT rates on all

Recreational Vehicle Loans Check out the displays from our local dealers and save a ton on your next ATV, motorcycle or RV at our

SPRING SPORTING EVENT Tuesday, April 30 10am–2pm All WYDOT employees and their families can belong.

WyHy.org • 800.442.2392 307.638.4200 Cheyenne • 307.234.2373 Casper Federally insured by NCUA

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Coggins

while on off his riding skills blic Affairs showing nt. Mo Bruce Burrows of Pu , an zem y Resort, near Bo recent trip to Big Sk

a

Shawn Coggins (no t pictured) spent a day with his buddies biling at Bear Lodg snowmoe this winter.

Photo: Shawn Coggins

Shawn C oggins sp otted this testing a biso gu Tepee on ardrail near Paha n ska US 14-16 -20.

Burrows Photo courtesy Bruce

thy showing Chris Aberna ll elk. Chris bu st off his fir ge, a WYDOT and dad, Geor ove Lander ab e er retiree, w eetwater Sw r hunting uppe er. back in Octob

Photo: Shaw n

rnathy Photo: George Abe

Outdoors

WTDEA Outdoors

The day’s first-place catch was netted by Vickie Hintze of Facilities Management – 3 lbs, 6 oz; second place awarded to Gail Fibranz, wife of Jim Fibranz in the Traffic Program – 3 lbs, 5 oz; third place went to Jim Fibranz, Sr., father of Jim Fibranz, with a weight of 3 lbs, 2 oz.

Vickie Hintze of Facilities Management holding her first-place catch.

Photo: WYDOT

Photo: WYDOT

The 2012 WTDEA Walleye Tournament was a big success last summer. It was held at Glendo Reservoir on June 16. A turnout of 36 employees, retirees, family and friends participated.

Jim Fibranz, Sr. and Gail Fibranz, father and wife of Jim Fibranz, Jr. of Traffic, won second and third place.

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WYDOT Golf

The WYDOT golf league is pleased to announce that the 2013 regular season will begin on May 13. The league is a handicap league open to WYDOT employees, retirees, family and friends with the need for one player of each team to be employed by WYDOT. Each week, two players from each team (four players per team) play a match against another team. The regular season will last 10 to 12 weeks and be followed by a playoff or a tournament. Regular season entry fee is $15 per player and registration or information requests can be directed to wydotgolf@me.com. We look forward to a funfilled 2013 WYDOT golf season.

Passings Former WHPer Halstead succumbs Former Wyoming Highway Patrolman Rich Halstead died March 2 in Scottsbluff, Neb. He was 79. Halstead, a native of Mitchell, Neb., joined the Patrol in 1965 at Laramie. The following year, he transferred to Wamsutter, where he remained until 1970, when he transferred to Cheyenne. Halstead resigned from the Patrol in 1974. He was a graduate of ScottsRich Halstead bluff High School and a fouryear veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. His subsequent law enforcement career, in addition to his nine years with WHP, included stints as a police officer in Torrington and Chadron, Neb. In addition, Halstead worked in construction and for a time, owned and operated his own gas station, in later years, he worked in the trucking industry as a safety supervisor and driver. Funeral services for Halstead were conducted March 8 in Scottsbluff, followed by interment in the Mitchell Cemetery.

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Guido ‘Gus’ Gezzi dies in Cheyenne Gus Gezzi, 67, who worked in WYDOT’s Records Section for two years, died on March 6 in Cheyenne. Gezzi came to WYDOT in 2010 after a career as a broadcaster, dispatcher and records clerk. He was born July 11, 1945, in the Bronx, N.Y. After serving in the Army, he came to Cheyenne in 1972 and worked as a television and radio Gus Gezzi broadcaster, including as news anchor for the Cheyenne television station. He then worked as a dispatcher and records clerk for the Cheyenne Police Department. He was a member of First Christian Church and the Moose Lodge, and was an avid Los Angeles Dodgers and Colorado Rockies fan.


 A memorial service was conducted March 21 in Cheyenne.


Break Time Total number of employees: as of Feb. 28, 2013

Can you spot the five differences in the photos below? Check your answers online at: www.employees.dot.state.wy.us, or if not able to access the employee site: www.dot. state.wy.us/wydot/engineering_technical_programs/manuals_publications/interchange.

2,050

One month ago

2,053

One year ago

2,062

Submissions deadline for the May issue of Interchange: 04/12/13 carlie.vanwinkle@ wyo.gov

Retiring from WYDOT?

Don’t want to miss a single issue of Interchange? Give us your name and address and we’ll be sure to put you on our mailing list. Retiree name: Mailing address:

Please fill in, cut out and return this slip to WYDOT Public Affairs Office, 5300 Bishop Blvd., Cheyenne, WY 82009. Or, e-mail Carlie Van Winkle at carlie.vanwinkle@wyo.gov. April 2013

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Interchange

Wyoming Department of Transportation 5300 Bishop Blvd. Cheyenne, Wyoming 82009-3340 Address Service Requested

Pre-sorted Standard U.S. Postage Paid Cheyenne, WY 82009 Permit No. 24


Interchange - April 2013