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Interchange a WYDOT publication

May 2012, Vol. 40, Issue 5

Road Construction Begins Numerous projects commence this spring


Letters

Interchange

Applause for outstanding customer service

WYDOT family gets heartfelt thanks

Marian, You have been so helpful and easy to work with. I just wanted to thank you for being so friendly and helping explain as much as you did. It is a rare find these days.

I would like to thank everyone who donated sick leave days to me when I had my accident in Billings on Nov. 27. That was one less thing I had to worry about. After breaking my tibia in five places, and developing compartment syndrome, I’ve been working on mending and have recently begun walking again without assistance. My strength is returning and please know that I couldn’t have done it without all of your support. WYDOT has been part of my family for 25 years and I truly appreciate the caring people who work here for the wonderful cards, phone calls, and other acts of kindness that were shown to me while I was recuperating. I have to thank Lois Neckel for taking care of my cats and my house while I was gone. Once again, WYDOT certainly stepped up in my time of need and continues showing their support! Thank you all for everything!

Much appreciated, Celes Watson Editor’s note: The above letter was sent to Marian Scott, Motor Vehicle Services, Headquarters.

From the loving family of Jan Kahler We would like to thank all who shared their kind words, thoughts, prayers, flowers, food and donations. A special thanks to WTDEA. All your support was deeply appreciated during this most difficult time.

Sincerely, The Gary Kahler family, and Darlene Hoffman and family

Keep up the great work Hello WYDOT. I just want to say thank you for having such a wonderful 511 system in place; via e-mails, and by calling 511. I am a truck driver from Brockway, Penn. and I normally stay east along I-95. Well, your state is sure beautiful. It was a pleasure to get all the e-mails informing me of issues on Wyoming’s roadways. I use hands-free e-mail reading while I am in transit. Safety is a number one thought while driving. Being informed of issues while driving through, and staying in Wyoming was a huge success for me. Please pass along my utmost heartfelt thank you to all for having such a stateof-the-art system.

Thank you so much, Stephen M. Bulman

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Interchange

Interchange is published for employees of the Wyoming Department of Transportation by its Public Affairs Office and a number of field correspondents. Interchange invites submissions from all employees. Please send them to either your district correspondents or to: Carlie Van Winkle, Interchange editor, 5300 Bishop Blvd., Cheyenne, WY, 82009-3340. The Public Affairs Office may also be contacted by phoning (307) 777-4165, faxing (307) 777-4289, or sending e-mail to carlie.vanwinkle@wyo.gov

Sincerely, Cheryl Argento

Look Twice, Save A Life. Watch for Motorcyclists!

Staff WYDOT Director: John F. Cox Public Affairs Manager: Doug McGee Editor/Art Director: Carlie Van Winkle Writers: Cody Beers District 5 Bruce Burrows Public Affairs Ross Doman District 1 Jeff Goetz District 2 Stephanie Harsha District 3 Ronda Holwell District 4 Dave Kingham Public Affairs Barbara Thomasee Office Services Sgt. Stephen Townsend Patrol Carlie Van Winkle Public Affairs Photography: Rick Carpenter Public Affairs

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Also in this issue

Contents

Letters.....................................2 District briefs.........................4

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Extra Mile Awards................6 IT Consolidation................ 10

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Nice Shot!.............................11 Recording. History.............16 Training at a Glance..........17 In the Community.............18

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District news...................... 20 WYDOT by the Numbers....21 WTDEA................................. 22

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8 A Broken Helmet

Safety Matters

9 Smooth Operation

Paving our way to better highways

12 Road Construction Season Begins

Numerous projects start soon

14 Alive at 25 Be sure to check out the online version of Interchange at http://issuu.com/wydot.pao, or click on the link found on the employee’s internal website home page.

Educating young drivers

On the cover Crews continue work on the bridge over the Snake River near Hoback Junction. Photo: Rick Carpenter

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District briefs Cheyenne gears up for construction near 1-25

Douglas’ 4th Street gets a facelift

Cheyenne – Officials from the city of Cheyenne, WYDOT, and the Federal Highway Administration invited the public to join them for an open house meeting on the upcoming West Pershing Blvd. reconstruction. The meeting was held, April 19 at the city of Cheyenne - Kiwanis Community House in Lions Park. The reconstruction project commenced on April 23 and is projected to end for the season in mid-October. The work will pick up again the following spring and be completed in late summer of 2013. The scope of the job covers I-25 to Pioneer Avenue. The construction schedule was introduced at the meeting. Temporary parking requirements and detour information was a helpful point of interest for area residents prior to the start of work. Meeting participants learned about the improvements ahead in road design, including a third, center turn lane, new sidewalk alignment, drainage upgrades, landscaping and water and sewer upgrades.

Douglas – This summer, Douglas’ Fourth Street will receive a facelift, but it won’t be without some traffic disruption. The federal project encompasses .71 miles of Fourth Street, between Richards and Center streets, and includes a new roadbed, storm sewer inlets, side street tie-ins to Fourth Street, and signage. The project is expected to be completed by Aug. 15. Construction will take place on one side of the street at a time, with twoway traffic allowed. Lane widths will be narrower than normal. No over-width vehicles will be allowed through the construction zone (those wider than 8.5-feet). No parking will be allowed along Fourth Street during construction. Side street parking will still be allowed outside the construction area. Access to all businesses along the route will remain open. It’s anticipated the major traffic disruption (millwork and paving) will begin in early June. Construction will begin with storm sewer inlets and side street tie-ins.

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WYO 220 widening

Construction on the Pershing Blvd./Randall Ave. intersection just east of 1-25 in Cheyenne will commence April 23 and is not expected to be finished until late summer 2013. Photo: Rick Carpenter/WYDOT

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Casper – This project involves widening the existing road from two lanes to four lanes from milepost 102 to milepost 108 on WYO 220 southwest of Casper. The project extends the current four-lane highway south from Casper approximately six miles. The project also includes the installation of overhead dynamic message signs, to be located facing both directions at approximately Gothberg Road. This project will affect WYO 220 intersections at Jackson Canyon Road, El Rio Road, Bessemer Bend North Road, Goose Egg Road and Gothberg Road. All intersections will remain open during construction.

Work on WYO 220 continues at a rapid pace. Here, fill work continues just northeast of Goose Egg Road on April 16. Photo: Jeff Goetz/WYDOT

Poplar Street resurfacing Casper – The Poplar Street project encompasses .41 miles of Poplar Street (WYO 220) from I-25 south to the BNSF railroad overpass. It includes resurfacing of the existing roadway and the construction of sidewalks on either side of the road. The project does not include any work to the bridge over the BNSF Railroad tracks, nor is the roadway being widened. During the project, one 12-foot lane in either direction will be kept open. However, all lanes of Poplar Street will be closed for 10 days between Bighorn Road, which is just north of the railroad bridge, and West First Street to allow for resurfacing work. Dates for the full closure have not been set. During the closure of this area, access will be provided to Black Hills Trucking. Access to all businesses will remain open throughout the duration of the project. Variable message signs will be in place one week prior to the beginning of work on the project. They will notify drivers of the project, lane changes, detours and any other information about the project, as necessary. This project is scheduled for completion by Aug. 31.


WYDOT begins work on I-80 near Evanston Evanston – WYDOT will get a jump on the spring construction season, beginning with work on Interstate 80 east of Evanston at two locations and some bridge repairs near the Bridger Valley. WYDOT will begin work on two new chain-up areas and road repair between milepost 7 and milepost 9 outside of Evanston, and also at the Fort Bridger Interchange at milepost 34.74. Construction operations are tentatively scheduled to begin the first week of April. The $6.2 million project was awarded to HK Contractors. The project will provide two new chain-up areas for motorists and truck drivers.

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The Fort Bridger Interchange will soon be home to a new parking area for chaining up and a new scale house. Photo: Stephanie Harsha/WYDOT

“If we expect truck drivers and motorists to comply with the chain laws, we must be able to provide them with a place to do it. That is the purpose of this project,” Resident Engineer Charlie Bauer commented. The work will include grading, draining, new pavement and wetland area modification. The project will also include the construction of a scale house, weight scales and other electrical and miscellaneous work at the Fort Bridger Interchange. One of the bigger features of this project is the 17 tower lights to install — 15 around Evanston and two at the Bridger Interchange to assist truckers and motorists while they put on and take off their

chains. The project will provide parking for 50 trucks on the eastbound side of the Evanston location, 10 trucks for the westbound side of the Evanston location, and 111 trucks at the Bridger Interchange. The traveling public will see little impact, but will be subject to temporary lane closures during the day and decreased speed limits to 65 mph for about 1.5 miles. The work is scheduled to continue through the summer and next spring, with the completion date set for June 2013. WYDOT has also focused its attention on a district-wide effort to maintain bridges across southwest Wyoming. Some of those bridges saw work in April. Cannon Builders will be rehabilitating and upgrading bridges at two locations on I-80 between Evanston and Green River, near the Bridger Valley. Work will take place on the eastbound bridge at milepost 46.56 and on the westbound bridge at milepost 48.30. The work will include resurfacing the bridge deck, milling and chipping out old concrete and adding a new layer of pavement. The work on both bridges will be done simultaneously, and traffic will be limited to single lane across the bridge while the work is in progress. The project is expected to be completed by the end of the summer. WYDOT reminds drivers to slow down in work zones, be alert and cautious of roadside workers.

Bridger Valley will see road repairs, new bike path Mountain View – WYDOT has begun construction work on WYO 414, Urie to Mountain View. The $2.9 million project was awarded to LeGrand Johnson Construction of Logan, Utah. Project improvements will include grading, draining, new pavement, new guardrail and fencing, replacement of sidewalks, curb and gutters, and other miscellaneous work. It will also include a new bike path from milepost 96.83 to milepost 98.99. The bike path, which is about 2 miles

long and 8 feet wide, will provide the residents of the Bridger Valley a safer alternate route for biking and walking. “Other parts of this project will be bringing the sidewalks up to ADA standards, extending curb and gutter and sidewalk in front of the Pamida and in Urie, and building a center turn lane into the industrial park at Bridger Valley Lane.” Resident Engineer Charlie Bauer said. WYDOT and LeGrand Johnson Construction also plan to mill down the existing road through Mountain View and add some new pavement, along with making improvements to the bridge over the Smiths Fork River. The bridge work will include sealing and other miscellaneous repairs. While WYDOT and LeGrand continue with their project, the Bridger Valley Joint Powers Board and town of Mountain View will be making their own improvements to the section as well, including water and sewer work. Although the projects are separately funded and performed, the work will occur simultaneously for maximum efficiency. Continued on next page

Do you have stories, team kudos, letters or photos to share? Get them in the June issue of Interchange by submitting to carlie.vanwinkle@ wyo.gov by May 18, 2012. May 2012

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Continued from page 5 Bauer also said WYDOT and LeGrand Johnson will be taking down the dangling flashing red lights at the Urie intersection and replacing them with a single flasher atop each stop sign at the intersection. “This will do two things for safety: one, allow for taller vehicles to travel through the intersection, and two, allow safer access for maintenance workers when repairing the lights,” Bauer said.

milepost 3.86 to milepost 10.5 and will include widening, new overlaying pavement and some isolated reconstruction on the sharp curves in the road. The project is scheduled for letting this fall and work should begin next spring.

Ground saturation has caused the WYO 410 to flex and contract causing cracking, buckling and crumbling. Photo: Stephanie Harsha/WYDOT

The hanging lights in this intersection in Urie will be removed and replaced with flashing red lights atop the stop signs. Photo: Stephanie Harsha/WYDOT

Weight Restriction issued on WYO 410, repairs in future The WYDOT officials have issued a weight restriction on WYO 410, also commonly known as Robertson Road, in the Bridger Valley/Evanston area. Due to roadway pumping, subgrade saturation and subsequent break-up of the asphalt surface, WY 410 travelers will be subject to a weight restriction of six tons per axle. The limits of the restriction are between milepost 6 and milepost 10. “This section of highway sits on a high plateau with minimal drainage, the spring melt and frost coming out of the ground saturates the old subgrade,” District Maintenance Engineer Tory Thomas said. “This causes roadway pumping and results in the break-up of the asphalt surface.”

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In the meantime, WYDOT crews will be waiting for drier conditions to begin patching the damage sustained during the spring. The weight restriction helps minimize damage to the road during periods of instability and any violations could cause serious damage. The restriction is effective immediately and will continue until WYDOT authorities release it. However, residents of the area will soon be seeing improvement to this road next year. The project will extend from

Construction beginning on new Mortimore Lane bridge in Lander Lander – Preliminary work started this week on the $1 million bridge construction project on Mortimore Lane at the south edge of Lander. Project work officially started on Monday, March 19. “We’re expecting the majority of the construction work on the new bridge and roadway to begin in mid-May and continue throughout the summer,” ac-

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Extra Mile

AWARDS

Congratulations to the March recipients! WYDOT salutes the following Director’s Extra Mile Award recipients. The award is presented to individuals who have traveled the “extra mile” in service to WYDOT. Elena Mondragon Paul Feyhl Alesha Dern Curtis Olson Jeff Erdahl Dave Cooper Lisa Ayers Steve Olson Rick Carpenter Dan Prickett Kim Jorgensen LaDonna Hurd Diane Archerd Mike Gunyan Matt Simpson Lana Fisher Donna Earl Bill Whipple Erin Simkins Marty Bach Chica Thomas Clyde Harnden Rado Kekich Mark Janicek Joe Gillespie Mike Hoover Mark Garcia Joe Holloway For more information about the Extra Mile Award or to nominate someone, contact Janet Farrar at janet.farrar@wyo.gov or Mel Anderson at mel.anderson@wyo.gov.


partment to hire three additional people in Driver Services to help handle growing lines at driver license exam offices around the state. Beginning in 2015, WYDOT will get more gasoline tax revenue as a result of the lawmaker’s vote to end a gasoline tax credit of 40 cents per gallon for producers of ethanol. The tax credit approved in 1995 originally was scheduled to continue until 2021. After the credit expires on July 1, 2015, WYDOT will get an estimated $1.8 million more a year in gasoline taxes for use on the state’s highways. Another $1.4 million in additional gasoline taxes are expected to go to local governments for use on their roads. The Legislature’s Joint Revenue Committee will study WYDOT’s long-term funding during the interim before the 2013 legislative session. Lawmakers also approved a bill that effectively does away with cost-of-living adjustments for state retirement benefits. The bill would allow COLAs only if the increased benefits can be provided while the retirement plan continues to meet an actuarial funded ratio of 100 percent or

In addition to the $50 million in general fund appropriations for each of the next two fiscal years approved for use on the state’s highways, the 2012 Legislature passed two other measures that will increase funding for WYDOT. The lawmakers directed the department to establish a fee for drivers applying for an ignition interlock restricted driver license. The bill authorizes the department to set the fee at an amount that will cover all costs the department incurs in operating the ignition interlock program. “The intent of the bill to make the program self-sufficient,” Support Services Administrator Tom Loftin said. The program costs WYDOT about $100,000 a year to operate, which means the licensing fee probably will have to be about $100 per ignition interlock license to fully cover costs, Loftin said. The Legislature also authorized the de-

Worland – Road improvement activities are picking up on U.S. 16 as part of the $6.94 million Worland East project, according to Kelly Erickson, WYDOT project engineer in Worland. “Motorists should expect 10- to 15-minute stop delays with road construction beginning to pick up on the east edge of Worland,” Erickson said. “These delays will be necessary as pipe is being installed across the roadway, and asphalt is scheduled to be milled from the roadway.” Erickson said construction of a box culvert on the Upper Hanover Canal is continuing, and work is scheduled to begin next week on the Slick Creek bridge. “Bridge work is scheduled to be completed by early August,” Erickson said.

ease Re l c P

Legislature approves additional funding for WYDOT

Traffic delays on Worland East project

Hout Fencing of Wyoming, of Worland is the prime contractor on the project. The company is responsible for grading, draining, asphalt pavement leveling and paving, removing the old bridge and building a new bridge over Slick Creek, placing crushed gravel base, removal and replacement of fencing and cattleguards, and other work on 3.35 miles of U.S. 16 beginning at reference marker 1.52 just outside of Worland. Hout Fencing was awarded the $6.94 contract for the U.S. 16 bridge improvements by the Wyoming Transportation Commission in October. Completion date for the improvements is Oct. 31.

le Afte c y

ading! Re

high water/flooding conditions of the Middle Fork of the Popo Agie River in 2010.

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cording to Erik Smith, WYDOT resident engineer in Lander. Cannon Builders, Inc., of Blackfoot, Idaho, is the prime contractor on the bridge construction project over the Middle Fork of the Popo Agie River. The Wyoming Transportation Commission awarded the project to Cannon in February. Construction activities will include grading, draining, placing crushed gravel base, asphalt paving, construction of the bridge structure, and other work on Fremont County Road 20 (Mortimore Lane) beginning at reference marker 2.25 in the Town of Lander. WYDOT’s contract with Cannon calls for a completion date of Nov. 30. Funding for construction of Mortimore Lane bridge is being provided by federal Emergency Relief Funds (90.49 percent), and the state of Wyoming through the Office of Homeland Security (9.51 percent). The bridge connecting the west end of Mortimore Lane to Sinks Canyon Road (WYO 131) was washed out during the

more. That is a standard the Public Employee Plan that most WYDOT employees are enrolled in doesn’t currently meet, and is not expected to meet for more than 40 years. However, the bill also instructs the Joint Appropriations Committee to study the cost efficiencies of offering an annual cost-of-living adjustment to the current defined benefits plan paid for with employer and employee contributions. The committee also will study other types of pension plans the state could offer. Retirement benefits levels for all current state employees and retirees will remain the same, but the lawmakers did approve some changes in retirement benefits for new state employees hired after Aug. 31, 2012. Additional information on legislative action affecting the state retirement system is available at http://retirement. state.wy.us. Story by Dave Kingham, Public Affairs Office

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Evan Brinley’s top-of-the-line helmet sits broken. Without it, Brinley may not have survived. Photo: Rick Carpenter/WYDOT

“There was an accident… and your child was hurt.”

Those words are undeniably the last words that a parent wants to hear over a poor cell phone connection. But, on Sept. 10, 2011 that is exactly what Dawn Pratz, from Facilities Management, heard from her son’s uncle. Jon Richardson and Dawn’s son, Evan Brinley, had gone out to Medicine Bow, in Albany County, to have fun on their ATVs on a beautiful autumn day. They had ridden on trails and back roads roughly two miles from the main road when the day went horribly wrong. Evan and his uncle Jon had been riding around on dirt roadways when they came to an unassuming curve in the road covered with loose gravel. Coming into the curve, not knowing of the hazard, Evan lost control of his ATV. He and the ATV were both thrown into a rocky field next to the road. The ATV hit a granite rock, flipped, and rolled to a stop while throwing Evan head first into a different granite rock. Richardson was quick to react trying desperately to get a cell signal to call for help. He first called Pratz with the ominous message, “There was an accident. Evan was hurt.” The cell connection was so poor that Dawn wasn’t able to speak with her son before the transmission failed. Another static-filled call from Evan himself put Dawn more at ease. “I’m OK,” is what she heard from her son.

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Thankfully, he’d been wearing his helmet. The plastic and fiberglass helmet took the beating and not Brinley’s head. Pratz left her home immediately rushing to Medicine Bow to be at her son’s side. The 45-minute drive to get to her son was nerve-wracking. When she had gotten to her son only to find that they couldn’t move him without causing intense pain, she called 9-1-1. Cell service was still very sparse and the 9-1-1 dispatcher ended up finding them with the GPS coordinates in their phones. First responders arrived within another 45-minutes to extract Brinley from the scene to the hospital. Brinley escaped the accident with a broken right arm and broken left collarbone. He underwent surgery to place a 4-inch metal plate with six titanium screws into his left shoulder and has had several surgeries on his right wrist to correct the breaks there. “If you don’t have a helmet, you don’t ride,” is what Pratz told her 15-year old son when he was learning to ride. He took that message to heart and is now very glad that he did. First responders told Brinley and Pratz that had he not been wearing the now battered and broken helmet he would not be among us today. Pratz continues, “He was very lucky that he had it [the helmet] on. It saved his life.” Story by Carlie Van Winkle, Public Affairs Office


WYDOT’s high speed inertial profiler van. Photo: Rick Carpenter

There is nothing worse than driving down a rough stretch of highway. It makes for a miserable drive. What’s even worse is that it costs WYDOT and the state of Wyoming a lot more money. Since the inception of WYDOT’s smoothness awards in 2001, our roadways have been getting smoother and much more enjoyable to traverse. “Smooth roads last longer and improve the public’s perception of our state’s infrastructure,” says Ken Keel, Construction staff engineer. Joel Dagnillo, pavement design engineer, oversees the certification of contractors who conduct the testing of roadway pavement smoothness. The smoothness of the pavement is measured with a high-speed inertial profiler. This van-, or SUV-, mounted equipment measures the International Roughness Index (IRI), while computer data that is generated gets processed on-board the vehicle. The bumper houses a laser system that records data from the pavement and sends it to the on board computer. “The metal bumper on the WYDOT van shoots laser light down onto the pavement to measure bumps or deviations on the surface of the road,” says Dagnillo. The WYDOT van is used to verify the smoothness data given to us by various contractors. According to data collected from the past two years, the Smoothness Award has garnered the attention of many of

the state’s contractors. “Our roads are getting better every year,” says Keel. “The contractors are paying attention to the specs to make the roads smoother and win award money.” Statistics show that in 2010, out of the 24 projects statewide, three resulted in a deduction (whereby the contractor pays WYDOT), 10 projects had a 1.0 pay factor (contractors followed specs), and 11 projects received bonuses for their work. This year, 25 projects were evaluated and two projects resulted in a deduction, only three projects had a 1.0 pay factor and 20 projects received bonuses. The bonuses for exceptional pavement have increased from a total of $468,400 in 2010 to $588,263 in 2011. At this year’s Wyoming Contractor’s Association/WYDOT Engineer’s meeting in Casper, the asphalt smoothness awards were presented. Projects were sorted based on whether they had a wearing course, or if they were without a wearing course. A wearing course is the top threequarters of asphalt that is used in place of a chip sealing application to make the road smoother. Wearing course applications are used on interstates where the road must be smoother at higher speeds. Out of the 25 projects that were evaluated, McGarvin-Moberly Construction and Mountain Construction won high accolades for asphalt paving.

McGarvin-Moberly Construction personnel accepting their smoothness award. (l to r) Chief Engineer Delbert McOmie, Kevin Kraft, Matt Larson, and Jonathan Downing. Photo: Wyoming Contractors Association

McGarvin-Moberly won for smoothest pavement without a plant mix wearing course and had an average IRI of 37.86, which is lower than the X-value (adjusted IRI) of 42.64. Their stretch of road was the Manville – Lance Creek Road project on WYO 220. Mountain Construction won for smoothest pavement with a plant mix wearing course and had an average of 27.72 IRI, which is lower than the X-value of 30.05. Mountain worked on the Cody – Powell (Cody Northeast/Phase 2) project on U.S. 14-16-20. Story by Carlie Van Winkle, Public Affairs Office

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The 2012 Legislature’s creation of a state Department of Enterprise Technology Services (ETS) is expected to affect most WYDOT employees in some way, although the full effects of the change are still being determined. “Obviously it will affect the Information Technology (IT) folks most directly, but it will have a broad effect on others within the agency because business as usual is going to change some,” Assistant Chief Engineer for Operations Ken Shultz said. The new law is expected to result in some IT positions at WYDOT being transferred to the new department, and a new level of approval being required for hiring IT or telecommunications personnel. “Realistically, we believe that some positions will have their direct supervision shift from WYDOT to ETS,” Shultz said. “It appears that many of the people will continue to be located at WYDOT, with their main focus remaining the support of WYDOT’s needs. That said, some personnel will likely relocate with the new department.” WYDOT currently has 47 positions identified for evaluation, most within the Information Technology and Geographic Information Systems/Intelligent Transportation Systems programs. However, additional technology positions around the department may also be assessed, either now or in the future. Meetings with program managers to evaluate the positions have begun. WYDOT will work with ETS though the end of May to identify which of its current positions fall into categories that should be under ETS. ETS has until Oct. 1 to finalize an overall consolidation plan, including any position transfers, and send it to the governor for review and approval. The approved plan will be submitted to the Legislature’s Joint Appropriations Committee in mid-November. Purchases of $500 or more for IT hardware, software or contractual services now require ETS approval before a requisition is created. ETS has established a process for that approval, but because WYDOT does not use the same accounting or procurement systems as the rest of the state, the two agencies are working together to develop specific procedures for WYDOT. “All of this is going to reach out and affect nearly everyone at WYDOT,” Shultz said. “We’re not going to be allowed to function totally independently any more, but the intent is well-meaning, and I think the effort will be successful.”

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During a meeting with interested WYDOT employees on March 30, Chief Engineer Del McOmie said his expectation is that the level of IT service at WYDOT will remain at least as high as it currently is through the reorganization. “As the state goes through IT consolidation, WYDOT IT will work with the ETS to continue to provide WYDOT with the same level of support that we’ve always provided,” IT Manager Rusty England said. During the March 30 meeting, Flint Waters, the state’s chief information officer and director of ETS, answered questions about the reorganization. He said the new law charges him with reviewing all computer technology (CT) positions in state government and recommending whether they should stay with their current agency, be consolidated under his department or, in some cases, divide their time between the two agencies. “I think there is a very real advantage to the state to look at leveraging the common services that we provide as an IT community across the state,” Waters said. “But we don’t want to break the subject matter expertise where it exists and where it takes care of a mission-critical data set.” He said he and his staff are working closely with state agencies in the assessment of their computer technology and telecommunications positions. “We don’t want to violate rule No. 1, which is the service level commitment of the agencies,” Waters said. “We do look at the needs of the state, we look at the specific agency and what they’ve requested and we also look at the career paths of the employees.” Some computer technology positions may be eliminated through attrition as the assessment process and transition to the new department continues and efficiencies and cost savings are found, he said, but the assessments also may show some agencies need more CT resources rather than less. “The agencies that are likely to benefit the most from consolidation are the agencies that are making the most effective use of their IT staff,” Waters told the meeting. “If they’re drawing on them and they are 100-plus percent utilized, the agencies that are 40 percent utilized are going to be contributing to help carry that.” As an example of his efforts to reduce bureaucracy since taking over as CIO last November, Waters said beginning July 1, WYDOT and other state agencies will no longer have to pay the Department of Administration and Information a $39 monthly fee for each computer they have connected to the state network. He said ETS also is creating a GIS map of the state with Internet access information to take advantage of the highest quality connections available in an area, an effort he said has already resulted in improved network speeds at lower costs in some areas. Waters said his staff has improved security for the state’s computer network and solved problems that allowed a malfunction in a single agency to take down the entire state network. “I like to solve a problem,” Waters told the WYDOT employees. “We’re a solution shop.” You can find more information on the new ETS and IT consolidation process at http://ets.wyo.gov. Story by Dave Kingham, Public Affairs Office


Nice Shot! W

alking through a gallery of nearly 4,200 photographic prints of your peer’s work can be very humbling. Walking through that same gallery that you know four of your own pieces are being presented in is also very humbling. Your pieces have been handselected to represent you in this gallery. What an amazing feeling that must be. That is the feeling Rick Carpenter, Public Affairs photographer, experienced at the Professional Photographers of America (PPA) awards ceremony. Carpenter received accolades at the January 2012 ceremony in New Orleans, Louisiana. There were 1,041 photographers represented with 4,164 photographic entries for this years PPA ceremony. Carpenter had submitted three prints and one album of combined prints to the competition, with all four being accepted for reproduction in the PPA Loan Collection Volume XIV book. “The PPA Loan Collection is considered to be the best of the best in photographic circles,” says Carpenter. “It is very prestigious to be chosen for the

Rick Carpenter (center) receiving his 2011 award for the winning album Cowboy Down. He is pictured with Don Dickson, President of the Professional Photographers of America (left) and Dennis Craft. Photo courtesy Rick Carpenter

Carpenter’s winning submissions (clockwise from top left) Cowboy Country, Buffalo Run, Moon Light Over Venice, and an excerpt from the winning album, Cowboy Down. Photos: Rick Carpenter

collection.” Carpenter’s submissions include Buffalo Run, Cowboy Country, Moon Light Over Venice, and his album of prints, Cowboy Down. Buffalo Run and Cowboy Country are rustic looking images depicting the vastness of the prairie found here in Wyoming. Buffalo Run shows hundreds of dusty buffalo on the move, while Cowboy Country is a glimpse of a cowboy rounding up a herd of rough stock horses for rodeos. Moon Light Over Venice contrasts nicely to Carpenter’s other pieces, as it does not have a Wyoming or wild-west theme. It is a stunning view of nighttime Venice, complete with a gondola on the canal, with lights shimmering on the water and a full moon partially hidden by clouds. The submitted album, Cowboy Down, is a rough and gritty look at the tough life of pro-rodeo cowboys. Most of the images, taken at Cheyenne Frontier Days, show the riders being thrown from the

beast they were trying to best. The album is not for the faint of heart, but did earn Carpenter second place in the awards competition, as well as earning his album a spot in the Loan Collection. Carpenter’s four accepted submissions allowed him to earn the Diamond Award for the PPA Photographer of the Year. Carpenter was one of only 12 photographers that were honored with the Diamond Award for 2011. This is Carpenter’s first Diamond Award with the PPA. He has had 13 Loan Collection entries throughout his career. The PPA awards ceremony is a threeday event filled with awards presentations, including Diamond Award winners and Image of the Year recipient, gallery shows and slideshow presentations of winning work. Story by Carlie Van Winkle, Public Affairs Office

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ROAD CONSTRUCTION SEASON BEGINS

IN THE

STATE

Another road construction season has arrived in Wyoming, with work already in progress on dozens of projects around the state. During the current construction season, numerous contractors will be working on WYDOT-sponsored projects. In addition to road and bridge improvements, the project list accounts for miscellaneous work such as gravel production and stockpiling, lighting installation and fence construction. Altogether, WYDOT anticipates that close to 200 projects will be under way over the next several months. The estimate for this fiscal year’s construction budget is about $330 million. In early March, the Wyoming Legislature concurred with Gov. Matt Mead’s recommendation to provide $100 million for road improvement during the upcoming biennium, which begins July 1. The appropriation, drawn from the state general fund and from abandoned mine lands money, will help sustain the revenue stream for road work, now that the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA; federal economic stimulus plan), has concluded. Also helpful will be nearly $21 million in federal emergency relief funds, to be used to partially make up the budget shortfall caused the cost of repairing damage to state highways caused by extensive flooding and landslide activity during 2011. (See sidebar, page 13.) WYDOT’s budget for road improvement peaked in 2009 at about $400 million, due primarily to a surge in funding provided by ARRA. In all, stimulus funding was used to support 70 projects over the past three years, with all of that work now complete. Set for substantial completion by late summer or early fall is

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the upgrade of the 38-mile-long “Togwotee Trail” section of US 26-287 in northwest between Moran Jct. and Dubois. The effort, which began in the spring of 2006, has consisted of four major projects. This season, work will include putting the final touches on the third of the four projects, namely reconstruction of Togwotee Pass and Fourmile Meadows sections, which together amount to 14.4 miles of the route. Crews will not likely return to the high-elevation project site until next month when snow conditions permit. Traditional federal aid funds are being used to meet the majority of the cost, which at $65.3 million, constitutes WYDOT’s most expensive single construction contract ever. Meanwhile work has already resumed on the adjacent Rosie’s Ridge section of US 26-287, thanks to relatively dry, warm weather this spring. The project, valued at $22.7 million, involves 6.6 miles of roadway on the Moran Junction side of the mountain. Rosie’s Ridge, which is the fourth and final Togwotee Trail project, includes remediation of six distinct landslide areas. Another high-dollar project ($25 million) continuing in northwest Wyoming is the reconstruction of Hoback Junction south of the Jackson, where U.S. routes 26, 89, 189 and 191 intersect. The project includes replacing the 60-year-old Snake River bridge just west of Hoback Junction, and reconstructing and realigning the junction itself into a roundabout. The project, which began in 2010, is slated for substantial completion this construction season. Major interstate projects starting up this spring include pavement milling and resurfacing, along with bridge rehabilitation work, for nearly 12 miles on I-80 just west of Rawlins ($17.3 million), along with similar pavement milling and resurfacing work on about eight miles of I-80 further west in the Wamsutter area (also $17 million). The latter project includes building a large truck parking area adjacent to the Wamsutter Interchange. A third I-80 start-up project ($6.3 million) is adding a similar large truck parking area near the Fort Bridger Interchange (exit 34) for use during highway closures or when the chain law is in effect. Other temporary parking areas will be added adjacent to the roadway at sites near Evanston and Fort Bridger to allow vehicles to pull off and safely install or remove chains. On I-25, a $4.8 million effort to mill and resurface 6.6 miles of the route north of Cheyenne will be in progress soon. Scheduled to go to contract in May is a 5.7-mile resurfacing project, including isolated reconstruction, on I-90 about midway between

May 2012


WYDOT gets federal emergency relief funds to cover disasterrelated repair costs

Buffalo and Gillette. Other Interstate projects continuing from last season include resurfacing on I-25 for 9.9 miles, with shoulder widening, south of Buffalo ($9 million), as well as resurfacing for 10.2 miles on I-90, with slide repair at three sites, south of Sheridan ($7 million). New electronic equipment to help get road, weather and traffic information to the public will be installed on I-80. The work will include a new dynamic message sign on I-80 east of Cheyenne, a new Web camera on I-80 in the Three Sisters area east of Evanston, new variable speed limit signs in the Elk Mountain and Laramie areas, and new weather sensors between Laramie and Cheyenne. The project also includes installing variable speed limit signs on a 27-mile section of WYO 28 over South Pass. The $2.4 million effort should be completed by this fall. Reconstruction and widening work will be in progress on a number of non-interstate routes as well; the projects include a section of WYO 220 leading southwest from Casper, extending the current four-lane divided highway by nearly 5.5 miles (mileposts 102-108; $25.2 million). The project, which began last summer, is expected to stretch into next year. Another WYO 220 project ($7.7 million) continuing from last year is resurfacing a 13.5-mile section of the route northeast of Muddy Gap. The work, which includes the addition of passing lanes, should be completed this summer. Work has already begun on a $6.9 million project to improve 3.4 miles of US 16 immediately east of Worland. The effort includes widening the first mile of roadway at the edge of town to five lanes and replacing the existing Slick Creek bridge with a new, wider structure. Further to the east in the Big Horn Mountain, another US 16 project ($8.2 million) will result in safety improvements on 2.3 miles of the route west of Powder River Pass. Work will include flattening existing steep side slopes, removing large boulders to reduce the potential for dangerous rock fall, and building retaining walls. The project could extend into next summer. A $3.3-million project starting this spring on US 191 just south of Pinedale will result in widening of a two-mile section of the route from two to five lanes. A pavement overlay project ($8.6 million) on WYO 59 north of Gillette will also involve widening work, with shoulders being added for 6.5 miles in the vicinity of Weston. Another WYO 59 project ($4.6 million) involves resurfacing of 11 miles of the route near Bill north of Douglas. A different type of overlay project, at least for WYDOT, will be in progress on nine miles of US 30 north of Cokeville; the work will consist of “white topping,” whereby a layer of the

WYDOT will receive almost $21 million in federal funding to help the agency pay for repair work on numerous roads damaged a year ago by landslides and flooding. The funding award, announced in early April, will reimburse the cost for work undertaken on an emergency or urgent basis at nearly 60 sites located in 13 counties. The repair sites covered by the award include the Dry Sandstone slide on WYO 70 near Battle Pass between Baggs and Encampment, the Double Draw slide on US 26-89 in Snake River Canyon southwest of Jackson, and the washout of WYO 130 at Brush Creek east of Saratoga. All three events resulted in extended road closures, and in the latter case, the drowning deaths of four members of a Colorado family whose vehicle was swept away by flood waters.

Crews surveying the damage of the WYO 130 washout. Photo: Rick Carpenter/ WYDOT

“Unprecedented snow pack, rapid snow melt, spring rains and high reservoir levels caused major flooding throughout the state from May 18, 2011 through July 8, 2011. Drainage in several counties rose to capacity and in many cases, above capacity in a short period of time causing damage ranging from minor erosion, to landslides, to loss of roadway use,” the U.S. Department of Transportation said in announcing the award, which is being channeled through the Federal Highway Administration’s Emergency Relief Program. Other road sections damaged last year, with repair costs now eligible for reimbursement, include US 14 in Shell Canyon east of Greybull, the US 14A causeway over Bighorn Lake east of Lovell, a landslide area on I-90 south of Sheridan, the Rupe Hill landslide on US 14 near Sundance, and several sections of US 14-16-20 west of Cody where erosion from high water in the North Fork of the Shoshone River began to compromise the roadway. In some cases, WYDOT has already paid for repairs which were made under emergency conditions. In addition, the agency will continue to be liable for urgently needed work either still in progress or starting soon. In total, the damage to roadways from landslides and flooding will amount to an estimated $32 million.

Continued on page 17 May 2012

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It’s

close to the end of the day and the building is quiet. Thirteen young adults, ages 15 to 22, file into a cold meeting room at the local WYDOT office, which also houses the District Highway Patrol offices. A young girl turns to her sister and sighs. “It’s going to be a long night and I am missing work right now,” she complains. “I can’t believe mom is making us take this stupid class.” They file in silently, carefully spreading out between the long tables, cautiously avoiding eye contact or conversation with their fellow students. Nobody knows what to say. Shortly after, a woman strides in with an air of direct authority that alternates with a compassionate smile on her face. Clearly the instructor, she shuts the door exactly at 4 p.m. Karla Nichols sizes up the class, looking up and down the rows. The students shift nervously in their seats and sit at attention–backs straight up. Even out of uniform, the students can feel the influence of law enforcement. Nichols is an active Wyoming Highway Patrol Trooper of 13 years and a lifelong Wyoming resident. She is one of the instructors for Wyoming’s Alive at 25 classes and also one of the original pioneers of its inception. Vehicle crashes are the number one cause of death for people between the ages of 16 and 24. Each year, more than 6,000 young adults are killed in vehicular crashes and more than 326,000 young drivers are seriously injured. The

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National Safety Council resolved to take action and developed the Alive at 25 class. Soon after, the state of Wyoming was on board with Nichols and several other troopers establishing classes across the state. “This class isn’t about teaching them driving regulations. This class is about opening their eyes to the consequences of their actions. To show them what can happen and what does happen if they don’t take safety seriously,” Nichols said. The class is a four-hour comprehensive course designed to teach young drivers the consequences of decisions made on the road. The class is filled with multimedia clips, group discussions, worksheets, and role-playing, in addition to personal anecdotes of the trooper teaching the course. Nichols begins each class the same way. She begins with the most important question. “Why are you here?” Nichols asks as she looks around at the name tags propped up on the tables. They look confused, so she explains her presence in the room. “I’m here because we are losing too many of you on the road. I know why I’m here. I don’t want to have to knock on any more doors and tell someone that their child is dead,” Nichols explains. “So, why are you here?” she repeats.

Her eyes move to the back of the room. “Willie. Why are you here?” she asks a young man in the back of the room. “Court ordered. For speeding,” he answers quickly. Nichols moves through the students. Most of the students are there to complete a court-ordered violator program due to speeding or drinking and driving infractions. Some of the students in front are enrolled by parent request. Over the course of four hours, Nichols will review safer driving habits and help the students identify positive convictions and strategies that will keep them safer on the road. They discuss experiences and situations every young driver encounters. The students loosen up and speak more freely. Halfway through the class, Nichols offers an invitation to answer any question. “Nothing leaves this room. Go ahead and ask me whatever you want,” she offers.


Wyoming Highway Trooper and Alive at 25 instructor Karla Nichols instructs young adults on the importance of safe driving habits. Photo: Stephanie Harsha/WYDOT

Nichols is hit with a flurry of questions about driving laws, enforcement, drinking, drugs and other miscellaneous ideas that inevitably begin with “I have this friend that ...” Nichols continues on with the course, sharing personal experiences, death in her own family, and recounts incidents in her career that have affected her. She shares her memories of certain accidents she was involved in and crashes she has responded to. The students began to share

her emotion and some tear up. As the class comes to a close, Nichols has one more video to show them, Mechanism of Injury. This video is an unfiltered look at car collisions and death. No frills, no multimedia magic, just the reality of death and injuries that follow unsafe driving. “The video really ties everything together. In this day and age, kids are seeing violence everywhere. Just look at the video games they are playing. They need to see the reality of it and the dangers of not caring. They need to see that this is what will happen to you. It opens their eyes and ties everything together,” Nichols said. At the end of the class, students are asked to evaluate the class and to make a change in their behavior. Most promise to do so. The comment section on the survey, usually blank when dealing with young adults, is filled with comments like: “All kids should have to take this class to get their license” and “This class made me think about my actions.” One student even wrote, “Those videos … it really hurt me inside to see what really happens to kids my age … I want to stay alive.”

And stay alive they do. After establishing the Alive at 25 classes, roughly 6,000 young adults have come through the program and to date, none of them have been lost in a vehicle collision. The class is open to anyone ages 15-24 and is free to young drivers looking to better their driving habits or reduce their insurance costs. For those who are court ordered to take the course due to driving infractions, the cost is $35. However, parents are not allowed to sit in on the class, but can review the videos and workbooks upon request. Nichols encourages parents to enroll their young drivers in the course for many reasons. “Driver’s education can cost upwards of $500. This class is free. It can lower some insurances as well. But the main reason is to change the behaviors that lead to accidents. To open their eyes,” Nichols said. You can find more information about the Alive at 25 program at www.wysafedriver.org or contact your local Wyoming Highway Patrol Office. Story by Stephanie Harsha, Public Involvement Specialist, District 3

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A record, is a record, is a record... NOT!

But for now, let’s just talk about business records..... What is a record? The world authority on Records and Information Management, ARMA International, defines a record as follows: “A record is the recorded information, regardless of medium or characteristics, made or received by an organization in pursuance of legal obligation or in the transaction of business.” So a record is recorded information for or about a company regardless of the format (i.e., Paper/hardcopy; Electronic/

digital; Texts; IM; Via Email; Chats; Microfilm, etc.). In any business or organization every employee has responsibility in the control and management of records. These records and information need to be managed properly throughout their life cycle. Records are simply an integral part of everyday business. Records not only show the progress of work, including who’s responsible for what, but records and record keeping can also make or break a business.

Good record keeping is the ‘key to success’ If it wasn’t for records we wouldn’t know about the past (and possibly the future). We have all seen the JFK assassination film clips. These films recorded a horrific time during our nation’s past and they are records that are now, in fact, historical records. Other such historic records could include the Watergate Scandal - proof of the abuse of power and the near impeachment of a president. All those phone tapes and documents are records. And yes, even the Bible is a record. Records go all the way back to prehistoric times, when inhabitants drew on walls. These wall paintings are the recorded history of a long-long since past. A record can become very valuable not only historically but also for future reference. Next month I’ll talk about are what types of records we have here at WYDOT. Story by Barbara Thomasee, Office Services

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Continued from page 13 existing asphalt pavement will be milled off and replaced with concrete. The result of the $7.8 million project will be a road surface more resistant to rutting, which has been a problem due to increases in heavy truck traffic. Resurfacing work will also be progressing on the westbound lanes of US 30 between Rock River and Bosler (16.1 miles; $3.9 million) and WYO 134 (Missouri Valley Road) northwest of Riverton in Fremont County (9.2 miles, $2.7 million) A $6.6 million project now in progress will result in a new bridge over the Union Pacific Railroad on Laramie County Road 149 just north of Burns. The bridge, which will replace an existing at-grade railroad crossing, will be incorporated into the state highway system as part of WYO 213, which connects I-80 and US 85. On WYO 28 south of Lander, a section of landslide-damaged roadway near milepost 55 will be reconstructed ($5.8 million). Meanwhile, work continues along US 85 north of Newcastle on a $4.6 million project to realign 1.3 miles of roadway to avoid a recurrent slide area. Reconstruction work will also be under way on WYO 313, immediately west of that route’s junction with US 85 in Goshen County (11.2 miles, $3.3 million). In Uinta County, four miles of WYO 414 between Urie and Mountain View will be resurfaced ($2.9 million). The most comprehensive slate of work in an urbanized area is located in the Casper area. Work is gearing up this spring on a $19.2 million project

to build future roadbed, as well as a bridge and other structures associated with the future West Casper Belt Loop. A second phase of work will go to contract later to pave the 7.1 mile route, which will connect WYO 220 southwest of Casper to US 20-26 at the west end of the Shoshoni Bypass just northwest of the city. In Cheyenne, reconstruction work has begun on 0.6 mile of Pershing Boulevard immediately east of the Pershing-Randall Interchange on I-25. The $3.4 million project includes widening to accommodate addition of a center-turn lane and replacing water and sanitary sewer lines. A less conventional project involves US 189 and US 191 west of Pinedale, where six underpasses and two overpasses are being installed in the Trapper’s Point wildlife migration corridor. The $9.7 million project, which began last year and should be complete by this summer, is designed to boost safety for both motorists and big game animals. (The Trapper’s Point project was highlighted in the September 2011 issue of Interchange.) Another atypical project is installing metal snow support structures to help prevent avalanches on a side slope high above US 26-89 south of Jackson. Because of the elevation and steepness of the terrain, the $2.3 million project, to be undertaken this summer, will require the use of helicopters for making the installations. Planting of native trees in front of the structures is expected to follow next spring. Story by Bruce Burrows, Public Affairs Office

Training ata Glance

Here are your training opportunities from WYDOT University and the Transportation Learning Network (TLN)

Date Class May 2 May 2 May 3 May 9 May 9-10 May 14-18 May 16 May 22 Dou ble Header May 23

Location

Strategic Planning (8 a.m. - 12 p.m.) How to Build Performance Measures (1 - 5 p.m.) The Fun of Thinking and Acting Like an Effective Leader Alternatives to Paving (8 a.m. - 12 p.m.) Train-the-Trainer New Employee Orientation (NEO) Managing Organizational Communication Building Trust, Credibility and Influence ABCs of Employee Engagement

Cheyenne Cheyenne Cheyenne TLN Cheyenne Cheyenne TLN TLN TLN

Coming Up in June: June 5

Team Building

Cheyenne

To register, or to find out more details, call the Training Program and talk to David Talley (777-4792), Jim Boyd (777-4791) or Rhonda DeLeeuw (777-4790). When you call, ask about the videos, books and audiotapes available from the Training Resource Library.

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In the Community WYDOT employees win Pole Pedal Paddle charity race

While some Wyoming residents are trying to escape the winter weather, WYDOT District 3 employees are making the most of it while it lasts. Four employees from the Jackson office entered the 38th Annual Pole Pedal Paddle (PPP) Competition, a local event that takes place in Jackson. On March 30, Jamie Yount, Don Lawless, Nick Shidner and Dave Kaufman competed in the four-event race, where contestants compete either individually or in teams. The contest consists of an alpine ski section, a cross-country ski section, a bicycling section, and a boating section. This was the first time the four of them competed together, although Shidner and Yount had participated separately before. The event is a fundraiser for the Jackson Hole Ski & Snowboard Club, a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing affordable snow sports programs to Jackson youth. “The PPP is a really fun race with all kinds of participants. Some racers take it really seriously and others are just out to have fun,” Yount said. The WYDOT team competed in and won the Team Recreational Men’s Division, led by top finishes by Nick Shidner and Jamie Yount. The WYDOT team also placed 20th among all divisions, out of more than 100 teams. The alpine ski leg is the first leg of the race and takes place at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. All of the divisions ski a 3,500-foot giant slalom course approximately three miles in length. Lawless was concerned immediately, after watching many competitors crash next to him. “Throughout my run, there were competitors off to each side which had fallen and I quickly left behind many broken bodies and spirits in my wake. Upon passing the team jersey to Jamie for the skate ski leg, I felt relieved that I had come out of the caldron unscathed,” Lawless said. The cross-country, or Nordic skiing leg, consisted of 10 kilometers of prepared track at the base of the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort over rolling terrain.

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Team WYDOT at the 38th Annual Pole Pedal Paddle Competition: Nick Shidner, Dave Kaufman, Jamie Yount and Don Lawless. Photo: WYDOT

WYDOT’s Jamie Yount finished top of his class in first place with a time of 40:29, taking the lead for the Team Recreational Men’s Division. “The nordic leg was pretty soggy from all the rain and made for a really slow course, it took me awhile to find a rhythm but I felt like I finished strong,” Yount said. The bicycle leg is a 19.8 mile course that began at the exchange area in Teton Village parking lot. The route followed Teton Village Road, Wyoming Highways 22 and Wyoming 187/189 to the exchange area beneath South Park Bridge. WYDOT’s Dave Kaufman finished the section in fourth, with a time of 50:55, passing on WYDOT’s lead to the final racer, Nick Shidner. “I was getting nervous that I was going to have to deal with some cold, rainy conditions, but I shed some clothing at the last minute, even though it was looking rainy and overcast and drizzly that morning. But it was a good decision because the sun came out and it was a good ride,” Kaufman said. The boating leg takes place on the Snake River. The route includes nine miles of Class 1 and 2 moving water with small waves and strong eddy lines. The stretch is from South Park Bridge to Snake River Sporting Club Bridge. Shid-

ner finished with a total time of 1:01:43, putting WYDOT’s final time at 2:37:12, which put them in first place in the Team Recreational Men’s Division. “Being a boater and growing up in the kayaking community of Jackson Hole, I felt it was my duty to step up to the plate and volunteer my skills to Team WYDOT for this event. The kayak leg is the last activity of the event and can be the last chance to catch up and make time, so with the pressure on and my team in mind, I gave it my all,” Shidner said. Shidner faced many obstacles like slippery conditions, and Shidner was nervous after watching a comrade flip over right out of the gate. “As I passed under the finish line bridge, I was filled with joy knowing that I had given 100 percent and fulfilled my commitment to the WYDOT team,” Shidner said. The WYDOT team celebrated the completion of the competition together afterward. “Best part of the race was hanging out in the sun with the WYDOT team at the finish,” Yount recalled. The team won a custom footbed liner from a local company and a custom belt buckle for their top finish. The Department of Transportation District 3 supports community involve-


ment and is glad to see employees get involved. “It is great that Jamie, Dave, Don and Nick participated in the Pole, Pedal, Paddle and I congratulate them on winning their division. Over the years the PPP has become quite competitive, and for Team WYDOT to win the division is fabulous,” District Engineer John Eddins said. Lawless attributes the win to the teamwork he and the others learned working at WYDOT. “Through years of working at WYDOT, we all know how to work together as a team and I think that really put us over the top of the other athletes in the field,” Lawless said. So remember, as Eddins reminds us, “Don’t frown: Pole, pedal, and paddle around as fast as you can!” There won’t be any frowning in the Jackson offices for a while. Story by Stephanie Harsha, Public Involvement Specialist, District 3

Never too early to learn about Wyoming winters Nineteen little pairs of eyes stared intently at Gillette Highway Maintenance Technician Randy Okray as he dumped salt into their cups of ice. Okray had brought a snowplow and a few demonstrations to show the 3, 4, and 5 year olds at All the King’s Children Preschool, where his bonus-daughter is a student. The children answered questions about Wyoming winters and hazards associated with snow and ice. Okray talked about some of the ways that WYDOT treats roadways to make them safer. Each child had been given a Dixie cup filled with ice. A handful of salt was then sprinkled into each child’s cup. The preschoolers could see how the ice was melting right before their eyes. A sheet of ice was passed around and each child could feel how slippery it was. Okray showed everyone how just a small amount of sand is applied to the ice to make it less slippery. The children felt the ice again, after

the sanding, to compare the slickness to an unsanded sheet of ice. (Not everyone wanted a dirty hand, so there were some children who passed on the second part.) After the demonstrations, all the children lined up and walked around the snowplow. They were able to stand next to and touch the wing plow, snowplow, and sander. Each child got a chance to sit in the driver’s seat of an eight-yard WYDOT snowplow. Their eyes lit up in amazement when they sat in the seat and looked out the window at how high they were sitting. After the tour, all the children were treated to a Popsicle. Area Supervisor Barry Bowersox and Crew Leader Larry Davis supported Okray and his family by approving the public outreach at the preschool. Okray thanked Barry Bowersox, Larry Davis, and the teachers at All the King’s Preschool for the opportunity to support his bonus-daughter and talk about WYDOT. Story by Ronda Holwell, Public Involvement Specialist, District 4

Over the Limit? Under Arrest.

Always use a designated driver. HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAM

OMING WY HWAY PATRO HIG

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Randy Orkay, left, with preschoolers from All the King’s Children preschool. The WYDOT snowplow became the main attraction of the day’s show and tell. Photo: Gillette Maintenance/WYDOT

Do you have recent outdoor adventures to share? A spring break to tell everyone about? Biking, boating, hiking, hunting, motorcycling, skiing or snowboarding? Get those shots in the July edition of WYDOT Outdoors by submitting to carlie.vanwinkle@wyo.gov May 2012

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District news

Headquarters

Welcome Landon Call, Patrol-Safety & Training; Randall Davis, Patrol-Safety & Training; Mariah Drake, ITS/GIS; Scott Grauberger, Highway Development-Photography/ Survey; Roger Veach, Patrol-Safety & Training; and Jennifer Woodworth, Facility Maintenance.

Service Awards

Lou Ann Cropper, Bridge Engineering Design – 35 years David Hamilton, Maintenance Staff – 35 years Larry Perkins, Planning-Statistics/ Inventory – 30 years Jody Brown, Motor Vehicle Services – 30 years Cheryl Argento, ITS/GIS – 25 years Chad Matthews, Planning-Statistics/ Inventory – 25 years Janis Kotlark, Highway DevelopmentEngineering Services – 15 years

Michael Niehay, Planning-Counter Shop – 15 years John Perkins, Materials-Surfacing – 15 years Melvin Anderson, Quality/Customer Service – 10 years Stacey Gierisch, Highway Safety – 10 years Patrick Lacroix, Right of Way-Engineering – 10 years Steve Narvais, Materials-Surfacing – 10 years Gerald Collicott, Equipment Mechanics – 10 years Ann Smith, Highway Safety – 10 years Nicole Harvey, Driver Services-Policy and Records – 5 years Daryn Kramer, Right of Way-Engineering – 5 years Connie Crandall-Patton, Financial Services-General Ledger – 5 years Taylor Rossetti, Planning-Local Government Coordinator – 5 years Steven Shay, Compliance Investigation – 5 years

District 1

Service Awards

Cradle Call

Michael Ginther, District 1 Traffic Staff – 15 years Jay Scheel, Rawlins Patrol Field – 10 years David Noland, Rawlins Patrol Field – 5 years

Congratulations to Randy and Lauren Griesbach of Laramie on the birth of their first grandchild! Joshua Morrison was born in Laramie on March 15, weighing in at 7 pounds, 5 ounces and measuring 22 inches long. Joshua’s parents are Leah and Andrew Morrison of Laramie.

Promotions

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May 2012

Jackson and Bridger Engels enjoying a little father-son time. Photo courtesy Jackson and Sue Engels

District 2

Welcome Mike Cruickshank, Casper Maintenance; Jesse Shenefelt, Casper Maintenance; Christopher Sanderson, Wheatland Construction –15 years

Retirement Earl Putney, Midwest Maintenance.

Good Luck

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Congratulations to Jackson and Sue Engels on the birth of their son Bridger John Engels. Bridger was born March 16 weighing in at 7 pounds, 11 ounces. Jackson is an assistant Attorney General who works on legal matters for WYDOT.

Service Award

Congratulations to Richard Demoney, senior heavy mechanic; Ricky Wilcox, senior construction & field survey specialist; and Bradley Schaefer, highway maintenance technician.

Good luck to Tim DeVoss, on his recent promotion to equipment training. Tim was the heavy equipment operator in Cheyenne Maintenance.

Cradle Call

Proud grandpa, Randy Griesbach, with grandson Joshua Morrison. Photo courtesy Andrew and Leah Morrison


District 3

April Service Award Luncheon

Welcome William George, Labarge Maintenance.

Service Awards Curtis Melson, Rock Springs Construction – 35 years Matthew Brackin, Pinedale Patrol Field – 10 years Kurt Kuhlmann, Rock Springs Construction – 10 years Heather Carter, Rock Springs Driver Services – 5 years

District 4

Welcome Christie Butler, Sheridan Port of Entry; Douglas Turner, Gillette Mechanics; Corey Vine, Sheridan Port of Entry; and Natalie Webb, Gillette Port of Entry;

Service Awards Steven Brantz, Sheridan Mechanics – 30 years Scott Waugh, Hulett Maintenance – 30 years Edward Golson, Burgess Junction Maintenance – 25 years Martin Noonan, Sundance Patrol Field – 20 years Robert Betz, Pole Creek Maintenance – 15 years

Service award luncheons are held by the Transportation Commission for employees celebrating milestones of 25 years of service or greater. Our April service award recipients: (back) Chad Wells, Cheryl Argento, Chad Matthews, Neal Perkins. (front) Dave Hamilton, Lou Ann Cropper, and Steve Brantz Photo: Rick Carpenter/WYDOT

Frank Schrater, recent retiree from Buffalo Maintenance, didn’t let retirement slow him down. It just gave him the chance to do what he loves to do – woodworking. He recently made a gun cabinet for his son, Steve.

Total number of employees:

as of

Mar. 30, 2012

2,057

WYDOT’s new Sheridan/Dietz Port of Entry officers, Corey Vine and Christie Butler, sworn in by Lt. Russell Christoferson of Montana Deptartment of Transportation, Motor Carrier Services.

One month ago

2,062

Photo: Sheridan/Dietz Port of Entry,WYDOT

One year ago

District 5

Service Awards Chadwick Wells, Dubois Maintenance – 25 years Frankie Horsley Jr., Basin Maintenance – 10 years

2,088

Photo courtesy Frank Schrater

May 2012

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WTDEA happenings WTDEA is the place to look for classifieds

WTDEA Store

Bookmark the WTDEA classifieds website at www.wtdeaclassifieds.com. You can sell practically anything you want, including jewelry, electronics, homemade crafts, automobiles, ATV’s, guns and furniture. You can even advertise services like DJ services, auto repair, daycare services, handyman work, house painting, lawn mowing and artwork. There are also options to search for items wanted, browse for garage sales near your home and purchase WYDOT apparel. Placing an ad on the website is simple. Email nick.hines@wyo.gov with the ad details and then arrange for payment. Be aware that this is available to all WYDOT locations, not just employees at headquarters. Fees for a 30-day ad are $2 for members and $4 for non-members. A flyer measuring up to 8.5 inches x 11 inches can be placed on the website for $5.

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Snack baskets making an appearance

The classified site can be a great advantage for WYDOT employees trying to sell or buy items, as well as advertise for special events.

WTDEA representatives around the headquarters buildings are showing off snack baskets. Everything contained in the basket is $1.00 each. Items include: peanuts, Jack Links beef steaks, candy bars, Poptarts, Chex Mix, Gardetto’s, Skittles, strawberry licorice and Nibs. Items will change based on demand, so there will be different things available.

WTDEA coloring contest Coloring fun was the name of the game for the WTDEA’s Easter coloring contest. Participants of all ages were encouraged to participate in this event. There were five different coloring pages designed for five age level groups. This year, the coloring sheets that were given out were: 0-3 years, Bunny; 4-6 years, Rabbit Helicopter; 7-9 years, Easter Girl; 10-12 years, Easter Tree and ages 13 and up were given an Egg Hunt image. The contest was open to WTDEA members, their kids/grandkids, nieces and nephews. The winners and runners up were all awarded Easter baskets full of candy and other goodies.

Hats

WTDEA State Board is selling hats. The hats are $18. Contact your WTDEA representative for more information.

Gloves

Pigskin leather work gloves. $5.25 for members, $6.25 for non-members. Call Tina Thomas at 777-4486.

Cookbook

The Roadkill Cookbook is selling for $10. Call Barbara Thomasee at 777-4494.

Cash Calendar

An 18 Month Calendar (7/2012 - 12/2013) is selling for $15. Daily chances to win starting January 2013. Contact your representative for information.

If you would like your WTDEA event to be placed in Interchange, please contact Tina Thomas, tina.thomas@wyo.gov or Tony Niswender, anthony.niswender@wyo.gov

Interchange

n

May 2012

July 2013 Sunday

Weekdays $10.00 Drawings

Monday

Tuesday

1 7

14

15

21

Sunday

Monday

August 2012

S

M

T

W

T

1 5 12

6 13

7 14

8 15

F

2 9 16

19

20

21

22

23

26

27

28

29

30

S

3 10

18 25

2

M

T

1 7 14 21 28

8 15

W

2 9 16

3 10 17

22

23

24

29

30

31

T

F

4 11

Wednesday

S

5 12 19

20

26

27

Friday

1 4

5

6

7

11

12

13

14

15

20

21

22

28

29

17 24

18 25

19 26

27

Tuesday

8

7

14

2

21

28

8

9

22

29

16

3

10

24

23

30

24

Saturday

5

Monday

S

6

Tuesday

January 2013 T W T

M

1

10 17 24

7

2

8

9

13

20

21

22

23

27

28

29

30

F

3 10

14 15 16 Saturday

2

4

Wednesday

S

19

19 26

S

M

3 10

T

4 11

W

20

27

T

F

S

S

M

1 5

6

7

8

12

13

16 19

14

17 20

15

M

T

W

T

F

S

4

5

6

7

11

8

12

13

14

15

17

23

24

18 25

S

24 27

31

18

19

20

21

22

25

26

27

28

29

Christmas Day

August 2013

M

T

W

T

1

3 10

19 26

20 27

21 28

22

4

5

11

12

18

29

19

25

26

6

7

13 20 27

14 21 28

F

S

1

2

3

8

9

10

15 22 29

16 23 30

17 24 31

August 2013 Sunday

Monday

July 2013

S

M

8 15

T

W

2 9 16

3 10

T

F

4

S

5

11

12

18

22

19

23

20

24

25

29

26

30

27

31

M

1 8 15

2 9

T 3

W 4

10

11

T

F

5

13

11

17

18

19

23

20

24

21

25

26

30

27

28

1

5

12

6 13

7 14

8 15

18

19

20

21

25

22

26

27

28

29

4 11

T

W

T

F

1 5 12

Weekends $20.00 Drawings

Thursday

7 14

16

22 29

4

Wednesday

S

6

12

Weekdays $10.00 Drawings

Tuesday

September 2013

S

6 13

17

21 28

6

13

7

14

6 13

7 14

8 15

2 9

S 3 10

18

19

16

20

17

21

25

22

26

23

27

24

28

29

30

18

25

19

26

20

27

21

28

Holidays $50.00 Drawings

Friday

2

8

15

November 2012

1 5 12

17 24

Saturday

4 11

September 2012

16

Friday

12

18 25

31

3

2

30

13

26

23

Thursday

5

11

17 24

6

6

12

25

2

9 16 23 30

1310

9 16

14

9

8 15 22

29

5

June 2013

S

Friday

4

11

18

30

21

28

12 9

23 26

25

31

Thursday

31

7

20

27

30

30

7

17

6

26

18

1

15

5

12 13 14 Friday 19

18 25

Day

11

17

23

29 Wednesday

Saturday

3

16

Monday

1 Thursday

6 13

18 25

10

Labor Day

23 30

Tuesday

October 2012

S

4 11

17 24 31

9

Sunday

22

28

October 2012

September 2012

16

Sunday

November 2012

M T W Holidays T F S $50.00 Drawings 1 2 3

S

11

4

Independence

10

4

Thursday

3

9

December 2012

Weekends $20.00 Drawings

Wednesday

2

8

22

29

9

16

23

30

Saturday

3

10

17

24

31


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May 2012

n

Interchange

23


Interchange

Wyoming Department of Transportation 5300 Bishop Blvd. Cheyenne, Wyoming 82009-3340

Pre-sorted Standard U.S. Postage Paid Cheyenne, WY 82009 Permit No. 24

T KE

C

K

R N’T IS

T KI

C LI

It’s your job. Buckle up, Wyoming.

DO

Address Service Requested

IT O R TIC


Interchange - May 2012  

May 2012, Vol. 40, Issue 5

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