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REPORT KE

2018

Integrated Annual Report


Š Roger Leguen / WWF

This Integrated Annual Report covers the period July 1 2017 to June 30 2018.

Any reproduction in full or in part must mention the title and credit World Wide Fund for Nature -Kenya (WWF-Kenya) as the copyright owner. Š2019 WWF-Kenya All rights reserved

Integrated Annual Report 2018 - Page 1


CONTENTS Our Chairman’s Message  Our CEO’s Message  WWF-Kenya in Brief  Organisational Overview

3 4 5 8

Our Strategic Goals

9

OUR PRIORITIES

Fresh Water  11 Wildlife  13 Marine  15 Climate and Energy 17 Spatial Planning  19 Policy and Advocacy  21 Community Natural Resource Governance 23 Sustainable Investments 25 Forest27 Research and Innovation 29 Monitoring and Evaluation 31 Our Structure and Governance  32 Board of Directors 33 Financials34

Integrated Annual Report 2018- Page 2


Our Chairman’s Message On behalf of the entire Board of Directors of WWF-Kenya it is a privilege to witness the roll out of the first Integrated Annual Report. This report is an overview of our key achievements during the reporting period, 2018. I am pleased to chair the first WWF-Kenya board, following WWF-Kenya’s elevation to a National Office status in 2016. With the transition to a locally registered organisation more founded in the Kenyan society, we are poised to address local issues that are either a direct threat or benefit to people and conservation depending on how we respond to them. Kenya’s economy is growing fast. 42% of Kenya’s Gross Domestic Product is nature based and hence direct correlation with the state of our environment and natural resources. Our country is facing rapid economic, social and environmental challenges which also present immense opportunities. The challenges which include: poverty, booming infrastructure and climate change potentially put pressure on natural capital and crucial ecosystems such as forests, rangelands, marine areas and freshwater systems. On the other hand, WWF-Kenya recognizes that, with the appropriate programmes Kenya can develop on a sustainable pathway through clearly thought through and tested plans built on sound decision support tools. We have set out an ambitious strategy that can help contribute to securing Kenya’s environment and biodiversity. On behalf of my fellow board members, I would like to thank our partners; the Kenya government, the Kenyan people, donors, civil society and the private sector for their commitment and dedication in addressing environmental challenges facing our country. Collaboration remains our strongest link to achieving greater ambitions for current and future generations.

Mr. Isaac Awuondo Board Chairman, WWF-Kenya

Integrated Annual Report 2018 - Page 3 Integrated Annual Report 2018- Page 3


Our CEO’s Message I am happy to share WWF-Kenya’s Integrated Annual Report which highlights our key achievements in 2018. The targets reported on are derived from our Strategic Plan 2015 – 2020. This strategy forms the basis and scope of our work in Kenya. This report presents our achievements and is organized on the basis of our work along the different objectives in the Strategic Plan. Through integrated fresh water resources management, together with partners, we are tackling water challenges in the Lake Naivasha and Mau-Mara-Serengeti Landscapes to support livelihoods, biodiversity and businesses. Our Wildlife Programme has delivered in increasing space for wildlife through conservancies, reducing human wildlife conflict and supporting conservation of endangered species. We have worked with communities in the Mara to reduce human elephant conflicts. Our African elephant and black rhino work continues to support government investments in protecting these species. Our coastal Kenya teams are working with communities to protect sacred kaya forests, mangroves and other coastal forests. They are also working with government agencies and fishermen to manage the marine ecosystem for the benefit of local people and nature. Sustainable energy holds the key to resolving the two major challenges of our time: poverty and climate change. Through our energy programme, we have made strides in supporting local communities install solar energy in their homesteads for lighting and to reduce human-wildlife conflict. We are working with communities to reduce their vulnerability to climate change through appropriate adaptation mechanisms. Our work with County governments to secure critical ecosystems has seen the development of spatial plans kicked off in three counties, a key step towards sustainable management of natural resources. Our Sustainable Investments Programme has supported the development of the Green Economy Strategy and Implementation Plan. It is used as a guide in the Implementation of the Kenya Vision 2030 Medium Term Plan III and also as a basis for the Kenya Green Bond Programme. Our engagement and collaboration with the Government through the relevant ministries of Environment and Forestry, Ministry of Wildlife and Tourism, and other related Ministries contribute to development of relevant policies for natural resources management; a win for people and nature in Kenya. At the center of our work are committed staff and partners that WWF-Kenya relies on to deliver on its goals - Together for Nature.

Mr. Mohamed Awer CEO, WWF-Kenya

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WWF-Kenya in Brief World Wide Fund for Nature- Kenya (WWF-Kenya) is a locally registered non-governmental conservation organisation. An affiliate of World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) - one of the world’s largest independent conservation organisation with an active network in over 100 countries. For over 56 years, we have been striving to improve the lives of the people and wildlife that call Kenya home.

© WWF-Kenya

Our Mission To stop degradation of our planet’s natural environment, and build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature.

Our Vision: A healthy natural environment supporting people and growth in Kenya.

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56 years of supporting people and growth in Kenya WWF has been working in Kenya since 1962 alongside the government, civil society, private sector organisations and local communities to contribute towards providing an enabling environment for the achievement of sustainable natural resource management. Kenya’s natural resources are diminishing fast, while the human footprint is increasing. The root causes include, but are not limited to: increasing human population, increasing consumption, large scale infrastructure development, rampant illegal wildlife trade, expanding agriculture, investments in extractive industries and climate change.

Freshwater - Integrated Water Resource Management

Oceans - Management of marine resources

Markets- Promoting sustainable consumption and production in the horticulture industry

Our Focus Areas

GovernanceInfluencing environmental policies at global, regional, national and county levels as well as pushing for sound environmental governance that supports sustainable management of natural resources and equitable benefit sharing

Climate Change and Energy Tackling of climate change and promotion of clean energy initiative by encouraging use of renewable energy

Finance -Redirecting financial flows to support conservation and sustainable ecosystem management

Forests - Conservation and restoration of disappearing forests

Wildlife Conservation protecting Kenya’s most ecologically important places and wildlife species

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Š WWF-Kenya

Together We see possibility and strive to inspire. We believe in the power of people. People working harmoniously together; in respect, appreciation and in preservation of nature. We are taking action to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature.

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Organisational Overview WWF – Kenya office locations

82

Number of Employees

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Our Strategic Goals The link between people, nature and the economy defines our conservation goal across Kenya’s unique habitats, species in forests, rangelands, freshwater, coastal and marine ecosystems. Conservation Goal: By 2020, The ecological integrity of priority areas and natural resources in Kenya are secured for people, nature and the economy.

Strategic conservation objectives:

Key policy and legal Frameworks create an enabling environment for sustainable management of natural resources.

Large scale infrastructure developments are minimise adverse environmental and social impacts.

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Agricultural and systems are based on environmentally and socially sustainable practices

Key fresh water, marine and terrestrial ecosystems are secured and populations of wildlife species in target places are stable and/ or increasing.


Bringing our Work to Life Our strength to effect change, lies in our collaboration and we know, as WWF-Kenya we cannot do it alone - Together for Nature! From communities who are the pillars of conservation, to policy and decision makers at national and county governments, civil society organizations, private sector and young people, we work across Kenya and beyond towards a world where people and nature live in harmony. We are safeguarding our vital natural resources: Marine, Wildlife, Forests and Freshwater as well as addressing Climate Change and Energy. We are working to influence drivers of natural resource loss through Governance, Markets and Finance systems.

Fresh water

Climate & energy

Marine

Wildlife

Forest

WWF-Kenya, implements programs and projects within and outside protected areas, by enhancing protected areas management and Community Natural Resource Management (CBNRM), Sustainable Investments, Spatial Planning, Research, Policy and Advocacy among others.

Governance Finance Markets

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FRESH WATER Through integrated water resources management, together with partners, we are tackling water challenges in the Lake Naivasha basin and Mau-Mara-Serengeti Landscape to support livelihoods, biodiversity and businesses.

© WWF / Simon Rawles

Water allocation

Reducing farming water impacts

Tackling water pollution

Mara Water allocation plan developed and used to guide water use and securing environmental flows.

2,500 people and 140 Micro Small and Medium Enterprises reduce negative farming impacts on water resources.

11 businesses in the Mara basin tackle water pollution.

Achieved:

Achieved:

Draft Water allocation plan for the Mara River Kenya Sub basin developed.

2,678 people adopted conservation agriculture under payment for ecosystem agriculture in the Mara and Naivasha basins.

.

190 Micro Small and Medium Enterprises trained on sustainable consumption and production practices.

20 farmers embraced different components of Sustainable Consumption and Production practices.

Target:

Target:

Integrated Annual Report 2018 - Page 11

Target:

Achieved: Waste water management plans developed by 11 Hotels and lodges in the Mara. Implementation is underway.


Promoting Green Growth

Š WWF-Kenya

Naivasha is characterised as water scarce just like the rest of Kenya despite the fact that it is home to one of the biggest freshwater lakes in the country. While its residents appreciate that water is life, inappropriate land use continues to be one of the biggest threats to water quality and quantity, threatening the existence of the largest freshwater lake in the Rift Valley, which forms part of the Aberdares - one of Kenya’s major water towers. The economy of the Lake Naivasha basin is anchored on horticultural sector which hosts over 50 large-scale horticultural farms and over 30,000 smallholder farms.. The sector employs over 50,000 people directly and indirectly. Unsustainable agriculture, pollution and encroachment on riparian reserves, are a risk to the existence of the wetland which was declared a Ramsar Site in 1995. Through the European Union Switch Africa Green phase II funded Green Horticulture in Lake Naivasha (GOALAN) project, WWF-Kenya is contributing towards a shift to a green economy by influencing a large uptake of sustainable consumption and production practices along the supply chain, reducing water stress and risks in the basin and supporting sustainable livelihoods. The project is working to empower 140 Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs) with 30% youth representation. Through the project, the youth are in particular being empowered to participate.

What can you do?

Be a water Steward www.wwfkenya.org/our_work_new_/fresh_water/ Integrated Annual Report 2018- Page 12


WILDLIFE Wildlife conservation is not just about our love for nature. Wildlife support our LIVES and drive our ECONOMY.

Š Greg Armfield / WWF-UK

Livelihoods

Flagship Species

Human wildlife conflict

Target:

Target:

Target:

By 2020, 30% of households in target areas are benefiting from effective wildlife management.

Achieved:

Community based natural resource management implemented with over 20% of the communities in Siana and Oloisukut reporting improved well-being as a result of sustainable wildlife management.

Population of flagship and priority species stable and growing in priority landscapes, by 2020: Elephants = 36000, Rhinos = 888, Lions = 2000

By 2020, Implement innovative methods to Reduce human wildlife conflict incidents caused by target species by 50%.

Achieved:

Achieved:

2018 national census indicate an increase in population as follows : Elephants = 35500, Rhinos = 757. National lion census to validate population in Kenya ongoing.

Integrated Annual Report 2018 - Page 13

15 % reduction in human wildlife conflict cases reported in the Mara landscape. Narok Safe System Strategy to mitigate human wildlife conflict finalized.


Where Bees and Livestock boost Elephant conservation In Oloisukut Conservancy in Narok county, WWF-Kenya pioneered a livelihood improvement programme for its members through a grant scheme to the conservancy to purchase better livestock breeds, while in Siana Oloisukut and Nyakweri Forest Community Trust we facilitated a bee keeping training for 40 landowners as an alternative livelihood improvement scheme. The goal is to improve the livelihoods of communities and maintain pristineness in the conservancy and further help reduce human wildlife conflict in the area. 69 year old William Njapit who has been keeping bees for decades, affirms to having witnessed reduction in elephants activities around his homestead. Njapit who has been keeping bees using traditional methods hopes to improve productivity with the advanced beehives donated by WWF-Kenya. “Using the traditional hives, I harvest an average of 3 kilograms of honey per hive a year, however with this advanced hives I am projecting to harvest 12 kilograms, quarterly.”he added Studies by Dr. Lucy King have shown that integrating beekeeping into elephant conservation in the long run leads to reduced human-elephant conflict and maintained ecological integrity of critical wildlife habitats. © naturepl.com / Anup Shah / WWF

Habitats Target:

200 km2 of habitat (forests, rangeland) cover secured for wildlife in identified priority places by 2020.

Achieved:

50 km2 secured by end of 2017.

Illegal Wildlife Crime Target: By 2020, Poaching levels have reduced by 5% in priority landscapes.

Achieved: Rhino and Elephant poaching decreased to less than 1% nationally.

Policy Target: 3 Key policy and legal frameworks are influenced to create an enabling environment for sustainable management of natural resources by 2020.

Achieved: •

Wildlife Act: sections on fines, benefit sharing structures defined;conservancy policy/ guidelines reviewed and in place.

Wildlife policy developed, to be launched by the ministry of Tourism and Wildlife.

National wildlife strategy 2030 finalized and is being implemented

What can you do?

Conserve our natural heritage. Wildlife supports our lives and drives our economy. www.wwfkenya.org/our_work_new_/wildlife/ Integrated Annual Report 2018- Page 14


MARINE Together, we are contributing towards solving challenges facing Kenya’s marine environment.

© WWF-Kenya

Fisheries Improvement

Target: Lobster fisheries in Lamu undergoes a Fisheries Improvement Project (FIP) to achieve Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certification. Achieved: •

The Benchmarking & Tracking Tool (BMT) score has improved from 0.65 baseline in 2016 to BMT score 0.85 in 2018.

Lobster fishery demonstrated improved levels in sustainable management, stock status and ecosystem health as measured by Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) Benchmarking & Tracking Tool (BMT).

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Linking Communities to Markets

Target: Improved livelihood for coastal communities.

Achieved: One business plan focusing on fish (tuna and lobsters) value chain developed and under implementation. The business plan involved identification of critical interest group (fish traders) in the fish value chain who would ensure market linkages and high prices for sustainably sourced fish in Lamu.

Sea turtles Conservation

Target: Increased nesting success and population of flagship marine species (Sea turtles). Achieved: Through the review and implementation of the National sea turtles conservation action plan, we have managed to increase the area under collaborative sea turtle surveillance and protection from the current 250 km2 (in Lamu area) to the entire coastline. Through the sea turtles satellite tagging work, we have been able to map sea turtles movement, and habitat use as well as collect data on a range of parameters such as temperature, depth, dive profiles and swim speed.


Together for Turtles

Š Judy Kosgei / WWF-Kenya

For nearly 20 years, we’ve been working closely with local communities in Lamu seascape to monitor and safeguard key marine turtle nesting sites. Community-based patrols have enabled us to collect a wealth of information about the turtles that come to nest on the beaches, thanks to the community centric marine turtle monitoring and conservation programme in partnership with Kenya Wildlife service. Long-term monitoring will provide insights into marine turtle population dynamics and evaluation the of effectiveness of conservation activities through monitoring of nesting activity and strandings on key beaches to relocation of nests that were established in unsuitable or risky locations and flipper/satellite tagging. Data collected shows that nesting activity occurs year round, but 74% of nests were recorded between March and July, with the highest number (21%) recorded in May.

What can you do? Plastics will choke our environment and eventually us! #StopPlasticPollution www.wwfkenya.org/stop_plastic_pollution.cfm

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CLIMATE AND ENERGY Sustainable energy holds the key to resolving the two major challenges of our time: poverty and climate change.

© John Kabubu / WWF

Greening of industries

Climate change mainstreaming

Blue carbon

Target:

Target:

Target:

Establish three private sector partnerships for greening of Kenya’s industrial sector towards sustainable production systems. Achieved

Mainstreaming of climate adaptation and mitigation into national and county planning processes including Medium Term Plans (MTPs) and County Integrated Development Plans (CIDPs).

Achieved

Mapping and carbon stocks assessment of Lamu mangroves - 60% of Kenya’s mangroves to document carbon stocks and support the development of strategies for minimizing trade offs between climate, conservation and coastal community development goals.

Achieved:

Partnered with Kenya Tea Development Agency (KTDA) to explore the use of clean energy in industrial heating and move away from use of wood fuel. Supported the 2018 Energy Management Awards (Energy Innovation category), to spur and encourage member organisations of Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM) to enhance industrial energy resource efficiency and sustainable energy uptake through the application of modern energy management principles and practices.

Integrated Annual Report 2018 - Page 17

Partnered with Ministry of Environment and supported mainstreaming of climate change by government sectors into Medium Term Plans III a key component in the implementation of Kenya’s vision 2030. Supported development of Narok county climate change policy, now mainstreamed into its County Integrated Development Plan.

Influenced the inclusion of blue carbon into the National Climate Change Action Plan 2018-2022.

Patterned with Kenya Marine Fisheries and Research Institute to draft a scientific publication on blue carbon.


Maasai Lion Lights: Keeping the Peace With more than 70% of Wildlife in Kenya living outside protected areas, many community members often find themselves at the mercy of predators. Pastoral communities are forced to be on guard all night to protect their livestock. In many cases the predators still kill people or injure them and kill their livestock. In turn people retaliate killing wildlife like lions as a precautionary measure. This is the situation in Kajiado county, home to the Maasai, a community characterised by their unique pastoralist way of life, in open extensive grasslands, where they coexist with wildlife. Towards the end of 2014, WWF-Kenya in partnership with The Wildlife Foundation (TWF) started distribution of solar powered predator deterrent lights, popularly known as the lion lights, to mitigate human wildlife conflict as well as provide sustainable energy solutions by powering homes. The technology consisting of flashing LED lights which mimic movement of people, scare away and interfere with night vision of predators. Through a cost sharing agreement community members contributed Ksh.10,000 for the house lighting system upon which they received a complimentary Boma predator deterrent lights worth Ksh. 24,000 from WWF-Kenya. Though the system was working, there were some challenges on maintenance of the closed system which relied on one power source to power all predator deterrent lights in the homestead. If a short-circuit occurred or the system was tampered with, the effectiveness of the system was compromised. This in turn led to frequent costly maintenance. Due to this challenge, a plug and play kit was developed by TWF through a loan for scale up from WWF Switzerland Impact Ventures, a WWF global program that supports the development of conservation businesses through capacity building and investment. The improved stand alone kit, is efficient with each light powered from its own power source. This means if one light is damaged, the remaining ones will continue operating optimally. Four young people have been employed in the venture. A win for people, a win for wildlife!

© WWF-Kenya

Oil and gas

Sustainable energy

Target :

Target:

Oil and gas exploration in Lamu and waste handling in Turkana are based on Environmental Impact Assessment and adhere to environmental and social safeguards.

Increased energy access for productive use and human-wildlife conflict mitigation for 100 households.

Achieved:

One women group (25 members) and three additional households adopted solar water pumping technology for agricultural production in Kwale in partnership with SunCulture Company.

50 households in the Maasai Mara benefited from predator deterrent solar lighting systems (Lion lights) leading to zero predation and solar lanterns for house lighting.

One primary school in Kwale benefited from solar Photovoltaic (PV) installations, contributing to improved KCPE mean score from 208.90 in 2016 to 248 in 2017.

Successfully advocated with local CSOs for compliance of proper oil waste management services in Turkana in accordance to National Environmental Management Authority guidelines. Influenced the adoption of environmental concerns and priorities into the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) for the petroleum sector to avoid natural resource degradation. With local CSOs we successfully advocated for health and safety concerns to be incorporated in the Turkana Early Oil Pilot Scheme transport.

Achieved:

What can you do?

Shine a light on climate action and power the shift to renewables. www.wwfkenya.org/our_work_new_/climate____energy/ Integrated Annual Report 2018- Page 18


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County Spatial Plans

Target: Lamu, Kwale, Bomet and Narok Counties developed, resourced and launched County Spatial Plans. Achieved: •

Lamu County: Spatial plan developed, launched and being implemented by county.

Bomet County: Spatial plan gazetted for public input.

Kwale County: situational analysis completed and county spatial plan under development.

Integrated Annual Report 2018 - Page 19

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Knowledge management

Target: Information Communication Technology (ICT) leveraged to facilitate effective communication, knowledge management and decision making. Achieved: • Knowledge management system (Centre of Excellence -CoE) set up, field data collection and tools dashboard in place and in use. •

Research supported by Centre of Excellence - Land degradation modeling tool tested and applied in the Mara River Basin, Climate change vulnerability assessment in Greater Mara supported).

COE tools supported marine spatial planning training for CSOs and staff in: Mozambique, Madagascar, Comoros and Mauritius, as part of knowledge management.

725000 .000000

740000 .000000

755000 .000000

Research and Innovation

Target: Research work and innovation informs conservation work and evidence-based advocacy. Achieved: • Development of the Lamu Port-South Sudan-Ethiopia-Transport (LAPSSET) Corridor Master planning in Lamu mapped in partnership with Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute and Kenya Forest Service. •

Study on mangrove carbon stocks in Lamu undertaken with partners, to inform policy on Kenya’s Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC).

Climate change vulnerability assessment for development of climate adaptation projects in the Mara undertaken.

770000 .000000


Planning for People and Nature

© Alex Kuabasu / WWF-Kenya

The County Government of Lamu through the support of WWF – Kenya, was the first county to develop and launch a County Spatial Plan in July 2017 as per the regulations and guidelines laid down by the National Land Commission and provided for under the County Government Act 2012. The purpose of the plan is to indicate the desired pattern of land use within the county. A spatial plan is a tool for enhanced achievement of the development goals outlined in the national development blueprint - Kenya’s Vision 2030. This will provide a basis for harnessing the county’s development potentials and opportunities and addressing the challenges which include among others; rapid population growth, poverty, high rates of unemployment, environmental degradation, unbalanced/ skewed development and unplanned urbanisation. All priorities were incorporated in the plan making the Lamu County Spatial Plan pro-people as well as pro-conservation. WWF-Kenya provided strategic guidance and support in respect to location and nature of development with set out basic guidelines on land use management system, designated conservation and recreation areas as well as identifying development programs and projects within the county. The plan was prepared through a rigorous data collection exercise. Geo-spatial data of all natural assets was gathered through digitisation from high resolution satellite and aerial imagery procured for the county as well as terrestrial data collection using handheld Global Positioning Systems (GPS), digital cameras, from old scanned and georeferenced topographic maps and by the administration of structured data collection tools among populations. This played a key role in developing maps for human settlements and conservation priorities. This data is stored in a fully-fledged geographic information system (GIS) lab for manipulation and use in other planning exercises in the County. Implementation of the plan is key in ensuring that development in Lamu is conducted in a sustainable manner.

What can you do? Influence how your tax is spent, track your county’s development blue print by asking your governor to develop and implement a County Spatial Plan. www.wwf kenya.org/spatial_planning.cfm

Integrated Annual Report 2018- Page 20


POLICY AND ADVOCACY For sustainable development to be achieved progress has to be made in four key areas: political consensus, policies and legislations, economic development and social progress. WWF-Kenya contributes to shaping of Natural Resource Management Legislations.

© Alex Kuabasu / WWF-Kenya

Movement building Target : Build a strong civil society movement in Kenya capable of advocating for favourable policies and legislations in the natural resource sector. Achieved: We continued to expand our partnership base for policy and advocacy on natural resource governance. We ventured into working with non-traditional partners such as: •

The Inter Religious Council of Kenya (IRCK) on the issue of Coal power Plant in Lamu.

Kenya Pediatrics Association to link health and environmental management.

Integrated Annual Report 2018 - Page 21


A big policy win - Climate Change Action Plan

© WWF-Kenya

WWF-Kenya successfully contributed to shaping of Natural Resource Management Legislations. Working with and through partners we have been instrumental in influencing the content of the policies, legislations or guidelines. A major win came in the National Climate Change Action Plan 2018-2022 Climate Change is a big threat to WWF Kenya’s conservation work. The Climate Change Action Plan for the period 2013-2018 came to an end without much to report on in terms of progress or advancing the climate agenda in the country. In 2017, WWF-Kenya was appointed to the national taskforce for the review and development of the National Climate Change Action Plan (NCCAP) 2018-2022. This gave us an excellent opportunity to engage closely with the policy makers and to influence the content of the Plan. Major WWF-Kenya asks and contributions which have been captured in the document include priority actions around the following: •

Expansion and protection of mangrove forest cover (for coastal adaptation and carbon absorption from the atmosphere) including implementation of the National Mangrove Ecosystem Management Plan. This action did not form part of the first NCCAP 2013-2017.

2,405 Mega Watts of new climate resilient renewables developed, to include Geothermal (prioritized as base-load generation), biomass/co-generation, hydro, solar and wind. It should be noted that coal has been excluded from the next five-year energy plans. At the same time, 3 thermal (diesel-operated) plants will be decommissioned by 2022.

20% of dispersal areas and migratory pathways secured for wildlife that have been identified in the National Wildlife Dispersal Corridor Report.

The Plan addresses the pressures on biodiversity especially through climate change mitigation and specific actions towards protection of mangroves. Mangroves which are known carbon warriors are salt-tolerant trees and shrubs and are known to lock away far greater amounts of atmospheric carbon – almost four times more than rain forests yet they remain one of the world’s most unappreciated ecosystems. This is therefore a key win for conservation when implemented.

What can you do? Get to know what the policies say, get engaged, push for implementation www.wwfkenya.org/policy_and_advocacy_work.cfm Integrated Annual Report 2018- Page 22


COMMUNITY BASED NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT We champion for a developmental approach anchored in policies and legislations which prioritises the interests of citizens and their rights, promotes good governance in the natural resource sector and sustainable natural resource management.

Š Greg Armfield / WWF-UK

National Strategy Target: Support development of a national Community Based Natural Resource Management strategy. Achieved: Influenced the establishment of a Community Based Natural Resource Management desk hosted at the Ministry of Environment and Forestry. The process of recruiting a desk coordinator is ongoing. This will facilitate coordination of activities by actors from various sectors, with the goal of coming up with a strategy which will harmonise the natural resource management approach in Kenya.

Integrated Annual Report 2018 - Page 23


Where people and Wildlife Coexist

Š naturepl.com / Anup Shah / WWF

In Maasai Mara wildlife range, more than 60% of wild animals are found outside the national reserve; they are either on private or community land. Protecting and conserving these areas means, land owners must derive tangible benefits from wildlife roaming freely on their land. Siana conservancy located to the south eastern side of Maasai Mara National reserve is a success story. It connects the reserve to the dispersal areas, making it critical for healthy existence of wildlife. Land owners came together and established conservancies for the purposes of wildlife conservation. In return, they are compensated by the Tourist operators who have set up lodges and camps- they share benefits accruing from tourism with the land owners. We facilitated the mobilization of tourist partners and land owners and through legally binding agreements, they resolved to work together. During this period we continued to support the conservancy’s operations working with the landowners and the management company that brings together landowners and tourism partners. In the last financial year, more than Ksh. 9 million was distributed to over 800 land owners. The figure is expected to rise in subsequent years. In addition to this, the conservancy has provided employment to 18 members of the community while the lodges and camps within the conservancy provide employment to the local community as well. Annually, more than 30 million shillings is distributed among 3000 land owners who own plots measuring 6.5 acres each. The area also hosts other camps and lodges which share benefits with a few land owners directly. Since the establishment of this conservancy, land is effectively managed and this has supported natural regeneration of pasture that is utilized by livestock and wildlife, an effective way to cushion pastoralists from drought related losses. To strike a balance, grazing rules were developed in a participatory manner by the community and are being implemented. This ensures more than 2000 heads of cattle per day graze in the conservancy.

What can you do?

Nature has no voice, but its wrath is severe. Be nature’s voice www.wwfkenya.org/our_work_new_/_natural_resource_governance_/ Integrated Annual Report 2018- Page 24


SUSTAINABLE INVESTMENTS If we invest sustainably, we invest in a better future for people and nature in Kenya.

Š Judy Kosgei Ekwam / WWF-Kenya

Policy Review

Target: Review of the Environmental Impact Assessment and Audit Regulations 2003. Achieved: Supported the National Environmental Management Authority (NEMA) in the review and now have draft Strategic Assessment, Integrated Impact Assessment and Audit Regulations 2019. Integrating Strategic assessment as a tool for decision making in plans, policies and programmes ongoing.

Kenya Green Bonds Programme

Target: Support the Development and implementation of the Kenya Green Bonds Programme Achieved: Identified a Ksh 87 billion potential through the Green Finance Demand studies in the Agriculture, Manufacturing and Transport Sectors in Kenya alongside creating awareness among parliament and the Green Bond Stakeholders on the French Sovereign Bond issuance.

Bilateral agreements

Target: Influence bilateral agreements for Sustainable investments Achieved: Coordinated Africa position on Forum on China Africa Cooperation 2018 supporting strong involvement of African Union and stronger Sustainable Development considerations within the FOCAC 2018 Action plan.

Green Economy Target: Develop Green Economy Strategy and Implementation Plan for Kenya Achieved: Green Economy Plan approved and under implementation in Kenya. The strategy is guiding the implementation of the Kenya Vision 2030 Medium Term Plan-MTP III and a basis for the Kenya Green Bond Programme, as well as an ongoing national and county government programmes like the green growth, green jobs, Switch Africa Green programmes among others. Integrated Annual Report 2018 - Page 25


Supporting the Green bonds programme - Kenya The East Africa Sustainable Investments (RSI) Programme is implemented in three Eastern Africa countries: Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique. In Kenya, we focus on three key drivers: Governance, Finance and markets besides six conservation goals: Wildlife, Forests, Oceans, Fresh water and Climate and energy. We aim to influence policy and regulation, financial markets, trade and investment decisions such that crucial ecosystem services and socio-economic benefits are enhanced and are accruing for communities. The programme supports the Green Bonds Programme - Kenya Launched in March 2017, the Program is expected to accelerate the take up of green bonds as a tool to tap into international and domestic capital markets to finance green projects and assets. The programme is endorsed by the Central Bank of Kenya (CBK), the Capital Market Authority (CMA) and the National Treasury. WWF- Kenya facilitated a lesson sharing opportunity for government and the green bond partners* by WWF France on the successful issuance of the French government Sovereign Green bond, alongside providing an opportunity for a side event in Bonn Germany on the progress made by Kenya on the issuance of Green bonds, during the Paris climate Conference of Parties (CoP) in November 2017. Some of the programme’s proposed work streams to realize its goals include researching on the potential of Kenya Green Bonds programme issuance in Kenya and developing a pipeline of green investments. During the same period, Green Bonds Program - Kenya in partnership with WWF -Kenya commissioned a study which sought to quantify the investment opportunity for green investments in Kenya, to identify barriers to the issuance of green bonds and to propose solutions for creating bankable projects. *Kenya Green Bonds programme partners: Kenya Bankers Association (KBA), Nairobi Securities Exchange (NSE), Climate Bonds Initiative (CBI), Financial Sector Deepening (FSD) Africa and the Dutch Development Bank (FMO).

What can you do? Commit to a green growth agenda for a sustainable future www.wwfkenya.org/sustainable_investments.cfm Integrated Annual Report 2018- Page 26


FOREST Our work in forest management is aimed at averting the worrying trend towards rapid forest encroachment, unsustainable utilization of forest resources, deteriorating river water quality, disruption of flow regimes in rivers and skewed distribution of benefits.

© Anthony Diang’a / WWF-Kenya

© Austine Okande / WWF-Kenya

© Anthony Diang’a / WWF-Kenya

© Austine Okande / WWF-Kenya

© Austine Okande / WWF-Kenya

© Anthony Diang’a / WWF-Kenya

Integrated Annual Report 2018 - Page 27

© Austine Okande / WWF-Kenya

© Austine Okande / WWF-Kenya

© Anthony Diang’a / WWF-Kenya


#KeepKenyaBreathing

© Austine Okande / WWF-Kenya

In March 2018, WWF-Kenya launched a national environmental campaign, dubbed KEEP KENYA BREATHING. The campaign provides an open platform and invitation to all stakeholders; government, the Kenyan public, corporates and peer organizations to take positive action in restoring Kenya’s 10% forest cover, by planting and growing trees. Tree cover is key towards safeguarding critical water sources that support high yielding agricultural zones, wildlife habitats and mitigates against negative impacts of climate change. Forests are critical water towers in Kenya; the Mau complex, Mount Kenya, Aberdares, Cherangani Hills and Mt Elgon forests are the backbone of the country’s economy providing 75% of its renewable water resources. Our country is estimated to have 3.5 million hectares of forest cover of which 700,000 hectares is primary forest, equivalent to about 1.2% of the country. It is further estimated that forests contribute about 7 billion shillings to the Kenyan economy and are responsible for the direct employment of 50,000 people and indirect employment of 300,000. In order to bring back our green, WWF-Kenya encourages each Kenyan to plant at least 25 trees. This will add up to the goal of 1 billion trees that will contribute towards realization of the vision 2030 target of 10% forest cover.

What can you do?

To bring back our green each Kenyan needs to plant and ensure the growth of 25 trees. To plant and grow a tree costs Ksh. 700 up to maturity. #KeepKenyaBreathing www.wwfkenya.org/our_campaigns_1/keep_kenya_breathing_2/

Integrated Annual Report 2018- Page 28


RESEARCH AND INNOVATION

Moving from Research to Practice: Increasingly our work is being informed by research and continuous Innovation

© WWF-Kenya

Blue carbon

Research and Innovation

Evidence base for inclusion of blue carbon to support the need for investment in mangrove forest protection, because mangroves support climate change adaptation and they also absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Research work and continuous innovation informs conservation work and evidence-based advocacy .

Achievement:

First fully commissioned research on Blue Carbon in Kenya which was conducted in Lamu county that hosts 70% of all mangroves in the country. The Data collected informed Kenya’s National Climate Change action plan 2018-2022.

Study on mangrove carbon stocks in Lamu undertaken with partners, to inform policy on Kenya’s Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC).

Climate change vulnerability assessment for development of climate adaptation projects in the Mara undertaken.

Target:

Integrated Annual Report 2018 - Page 29

Target:

Achievement:


Meet the Mangrove Carbon Credit Warriors of Gazi Bay

© WWF-Kenya

Did you know mangroves store 50 times more carbon in their soils by surface area compared to tropical forests, and ten times more than temperate forests. This phenomenon makes the conservation of the coastal trees a must win in a bid to combat global warming and climate change. The science of carbon sequestration flies over the heads of many, but for a community in two remote villages of Gazi and Makongeni in Kwale County in Kenya’s South Coast, ‘kaa hewa’ as carbon credit is usually referred to in their local Swahili dialect is slowly and steadily transforming their livelihoods. Since its inception in 2014, Mikoko Pamoja Community Based Organisation has been able to ensure conservation of 117 hectares of mangroves in Gazi bay. In addition, the group through the technical support from Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute (KMFRI) and WWF-Kenya has established new mangrove forests covering 10 hectares. In return, the community has received a total of Ksh. 2.6 million shillings over the past two years, proceeds whose impact has breathed life into the two villages and put it back on a growth trajectory rekindling hopes of a better tomorrow for future generations. The deliberate steps spearheaded by the community to conserve mangroves, are indeed paying off “As a community, we are now so well educated about mangroves. After the first year, we received a total of Ksh.1.3M, we used our share to install water in the entire village.” Mama Hafsa - Resident Gazi Bay. The children of Gazi have equally benefited, after they received textbooks from the earnings of the second proceeds of the carbon trade.

What can you do?

Mangroves absorbs four times the carbon than any other forest. Safeguard mangroves, a win for people, a win for nature #KeepKenyaBreathing www.wwfkenya.org/?229310/Mikoko-Pamoja-in-Gazi-å-County

Integrated Annual Report 2018- Page 30


Monitoring and Evaluation Our Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning framework is anchored in and aligned to the comprehensive WWF network standards such as the Project and Programme Management Standards. We mainstream our strategic plan activities into the day to day operations of WWF-Kenya and link them to our performance targets. Annual work plans are well aligned to the strategic plan and are reviewed regularly. We continuously support programmes and projects to ensure compliance to Project Performance Monitoring System (PPMS), and have all projects develop and submit their technical reports in time.

5 Share

• • • •

4 Analyse/Adapt • • • •

Incoming data Results & assumptions Operational functions Plans & budgets

Lessons Formal Products Feedback & evaluation Learning culture

1 Define • • • •

Initial team Scope & vision Targets Context & stakeholders

WWF’s Conservation Project/Programme 2 Design Cycle

• Action plan: goals, objectives & activities. • Monitoring plan • Operational plan

3 Implement

• Budgets • Fund raising capacity building • Partnerships

All due project and programme mid-term evaluations were carried out and detailed reports shared with all stakeholders. 80% of the project staff were sensitized and capacity built on web Knowledge Management platform (Center of Excellence-CoE) to ensure timely and centralised information management. Access to our knowledge hub here: wwfke-giscoe.wwfkenya.org/portal/home/index.html

Integrated Annual Report 2018 - Page 31


Together, we deliver on WWF-Kenya’s ambitious goals for people and nature

We believe in creating an environment where people debate vigorously in search of the best answers yet unify behind decisions.

We limit our growth based on our ability to attract enough of the right people. For us the old adage ‘people are your most important asset’ is wrong. The right people are.

WWF-Kenya relies on its people to deliver on its ambitious strategy that harnesses the strengths of the WWF network in a shared vision.

Our Structure and Governance

Board of Directors WWF-Kenya Board Chair Audit & Risk Committee

General Purpose Committee

Conservation Committee

CEO

Senior Management Team

Chief Financial Officer

HR & Administration Manager

Audit, Risk & Compliance Manager

Conservation Director

Director, Business Development & Communications

Organisation Development Manager

Integrated Annual Report 2018- Page 32


Board of Directors The WWF-Kenya board of directors is our highest governance structure and provides strategic and governance direction to our organisation.

Ms. Saadia Karimbux

Mrs. Mary Kimonye

Ms. Caroline Okong’o

Dr. Ibrahim Ali

Mr. Andrew Reicher

Dr. Richard Kaguamba

Ms.Agnes Odhiambo

Mr.Joe Otin

Mr. Ravinder Sikand

Mr. Darshan Chandaria

Mr.Isaac Awuondo

Mr. Mohamed Awer

Integrated Annual Report 2018 - Page 33


Financials Overall Income Distribution - 2018

95% Restricted income

5% Unrestricted income 95% of total funding is restricted and is channeled to program implementation.

Expenditure distribution by program area - 2018 34% Policy, Research and Innovation (PRI) 25% Species

10%

18% Coastal Kenya Program (CKP)

13% Organisational Development (OD) Resources under wildlife contribute towards supporting the growth of species numbers and habitats through working with government and communities. The Policy, Research and Innovation program supports Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique in the sustainable investments workstream. This policy work mainly addresses drivers of biodiversity loss and pushes for systemic change. Resources for Coastal Kenya Programme support work in marine and terrestrial resources while the Africa Rift Lakes focuses on forestry restoration and integrated freshwater resource management. Resources under organisational development support financial sustainability efforts and broader organisational health issues. Integrated Integrated Annual Annual Report Report 2018 2018-- Page 34


JOIN THE

Be a Change maker. Influence Change. Embrace change. Be part of the movement that will ensure we live in harmony with nature. Join the WWF-Kenya Family. There is lots you can do! #TogetherForNature

www.wwfkenya.org/join_us/

Integrated Annual Report 2018 - Page 35

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PANDA FAMILY

A WWF-Kenya production Design: Anthony Dianga/WWF-Kenya Editors: Nashipae Orumoy/WWF-Kenya

Judy Kosgei Ekwam/WWF-Kenya

Published in May 2019 by World Wide Fund for Nature -Kenya (WWF-Kenya). Any reproduction in full or in part must mention the title and credit the above mentioned publisher as the copyright owner. © 2019 WWF-Kenya All rights reserved

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Integrated Annual Report 2018- Page 36


Engage with us via: Email, our website and social media platforms.

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WWF Kenya .:|:. The Mvuli, Mvuli Road off Wayaki Way Nairobi, Kenya .P.O. Box 62440 - 00200, Tel +254 20 387 7355 .:|:. info@wwfkenya.org .:|:. wwfkenya.org/

Integrated Annual Report 2018 - Page 37

WWF-Kenya hosts two regional programmes: East Africa Sustainable Investments programme and Illegal Wildlife Trade.

WWW.WWFKENYA.ORG

Why we are here. To stop the degradation of the planet’s natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature.

WWF-Kenya has Four programmes: Wildlife, Policy Research & Innovation, Africa Rift Lakes and Coastal Kenya Programme.

WWF-KENYA INTEGRATED ANNUAL REPORT 2018

WWF has been working in Kenya since 1962 and was registered as a local NGO in 2016.

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Annual Report 2018  

We are delighted to share our Inaugural Annual Report, 2018 - a summary of our concerted effort towards nature and people thriving in Kenya...

Annual Report 2018  

We are delighted to share our Inaugural Annual Report, 2018 - a summary of our concerted effort towards nature and people thriving in Kenya...

Profile for wwfkenya