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TheReview

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Serving Washburn Universit y since 1873

WWW.WASHBURNREVIEW.ORG • (785) 670-2506

volume 138, Issue 4 • wednesday, September 14, 2011

1700 S.W. College • topeka, kan. 66621


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The Sideliner

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Sideliner Staff Editor Sam Sayler Graphic Editor Maggie Pilcher Copy Editors Josh Rouse Richard Kelly Photo Editor Mike Goehring Writers Rob Burkett Tanner Ballengee Michelle Boltz Jordan Chilcote Angela Connell Mariauna Hernandez Jordan Loomis Ivy Marcus Ashley Murrell Patricia Peterson Sam Sayler Photographers Kelly Andrews Rob Burkett Jessica DeJager Tesa DeForest Jordan Loomis Josh Rouse Stephanie Wilhelm Advertising Manager Elisa Gayle Advertising Staff Melissa Bylsma Autumn Kitchner Anne Poulsen Business Manager Scott Moser Print Editor-in-Chief Robert Burkett Online Editor-in-Chief Brian Dulle Assistant Online Editor Bryce Grammer Adviser Regina Cassell The Sideliner is published two times throughout the academic year, at the start of each sports season. Copies are free for students, faculty and staff and can be found at numerous locations around the campus of Washburn University. Subscriptions to the Washburn Review, the parent newspaper of The Sideliner, are available at the following rates: 15 issues for $40 or 26 issues for $55. For more information, please visit our Web site at www.washburnreview.org or call (785) 670-2506.

Contact Us Phone: (785) 670-2506 Fax: (785) 670-1131 www.washburnreview.org Front cover by Maggie Pilcher

© The Washburn Review Copyright 2011

WU builds off last season, dominates early Jordan Loomis

WASHBURN REVIEW

Touchdown after touchdown, the Washburn Ichabods took control last Thursday night at home against the Lincoln University Tigers—senior running back Justin Cooper and redshirtfreshman running back Sean McPherson made sure of that. And as the second win of the season, head coach Craig Schurig is noticing some distinctive changes between this season and the last. “Last year we felt like we had a really good team,” said Schurig. “The beginning of the season didn’t go as well as we had planned, we lost some really tight games, but then our seniors and team got together and we played very well the second half of the season. I felt like we played as well as anybody in the country at our level.” Schurig said he’s been impressed with the offense so far. “Dane Simoneau, our senior quarterback, had a really strong year as a junior,” said Schurig. “Anytime you have an offense you know your quarterback has to distribute the ball to various play makers. Dane has made great decisions in the past, as well as now,” said Schurig. So far this season, Simoneau has gone 33-for-48, thrown a record 452 yards against Sioux Falls, and 80 yards with one touchdown against Lincoln. “We also had other players on our offense line that did really well last season,” said Schurig. “Joe Hastings, for example, was one of the top receivers in the country. Now, he’s on the practice squad with the San Francisco 49ers.” This season, like the last, has similar expectations with Coach Schurig. “I think we really have a talented team again this year

Photo by Jordan Loomis, Washburn Review

Avalanche: Greg Schoenberg, senior fullback rushes for a touchdown during Washburn’s 66-26 victory over Lincoln University. Washburn goes on the road to Missouri Southern Saturday. and really strong senior leadership on the offensive side,” said Schurig. “Dane is back and we have a number of receivers that will share the wealth with him.” WU’s main strength, according to Schurig, is its offensive line. “Those players really control the game,” said Schurig. “Brian Folkerts, for example, is a senior [offensive lineman]—he will be outstanding this year as a senior player.”

Schurig said starting off strong against Sioux Falls helped the Ichabods get off to a strong pace against Lincoln. He hopes the Bods can continue their explosiveness in the future, starting with Missouri Southern State University this Saturday. “We got off to a very fast start on the road,” said Schurig. “We took the game to the opponent and we only a couple of missed assignments and had a

strong second half,” said Schurig. “Overall, we had a great start.” With two wins under his belt, Schurig said there’s only one thing to focus on. “Now, I can only hope that we can get off to the same kind of start in our upcoming games and get the crowd into it early,” said Schurig. “I believe we really play well, but we’re always looking for improvement between games—that’s our goal this season.” Jordan Loomis is a freshman mass media major. Reach her at jordan. loomis@washburn.edu.

REMAINING 2011 WASHBURN FOOTBALL OPPONENTS September 17 6 p.m. Joplin, Mo.

September 22 7 p.m. Topeka, Kan.

October 22 2 p.m. Maryville, Mo.

October 1 1 p.m. Emporia, Kan.

October 29 1 p.m. Topeka, Kan.

October 8 2 p.m. Kirksville, Mo.

November 5 2 p.m. Pittsburg, Kan.

October 15 1 p.m. Topeka, Kan.

November 12 1 p.m. Topeka, Kan.


Wednesday, September 14, 2011

The Sideliner

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Simoneau excels as quarterback Jordan Loomis

football. He was named MIAA Offensive Student Athlete of the Week after his record-setting As children we tend to be performance against the Sioux certain of our future aspirations Falls Cougars, when he threw for and strive to achieve them by fol- a school-record 452 yards. lowing the necessary path. “It was pretty cool, but most Many can admit that with importantly we got the win,” age and time, perceptions begin said Simoneau. “The offensive to change and paths veer in other line did a great job giving me directions. Then there are those time back there, the receivers rare cases where a few of those ran great routes and they looked young children persevere the good out there. It was just overall journey to fulfill their childhood a good effort.” dream later in adulthood. Witnessing Simoneau’s loud Growing up in the small presence on the field would lead town of Salina, Kan., with a one to think it would carry over population of a little more than into the lockeroom or in the 45,000, the first encounter with classroom, but surprisingly it’s a football for Washburn senior quite the contrary. quarterback Dane Simoneau was “I’m a pretty quiet guy,” during a game of flag football as said Simoneau. “I don’t talk a second grader. This much, but when the event would forever time comes I’ll be PLAYER be engraved in his vocal if I have to. FEATURE mind, foreshadowing I’m not a ‘ra-ra’ kind his destiny in the world of foot- of guy. I’m more of a keep everyball. one calm and focused guy. When “I loved football grow- things are going bad I keep eving up,” said Simoneau. “I also erybody up and when things are played baseball and basketball.” going good I let everyone know This record breaking quar- that we can’t let up.” terback has taken his talents not The heavy scheduling deonly to the football field, but the mands of camp accompanied by baseball mound and the hard- intense workout sessions make wood. As a senior at Sacred Heart the work of a student athlete High School, Simoneau earned seem nearly impossible to finish, first team all-state and second but fortunately he knows how to team all-state, all-class in foot- enjoy his time off the field. ball and became a 2007 Shrine “I love watching sports,” Bowl participant. With the many said Simoneau. “I love golfing accolades and honors that Simo- and just hanging out with my neau has achieved in every sport friends.” that he’s touched, some may be Often, the path we take in surprised to discover that he may life is credited to those whose have been a baller on the basket- lives or decisions we’ve mirball court instead. rored. It’s in these moments that “I really enjoyed basketball, people reflect on the reasons why but I was grateful that Washburn they idolize the individuals they took a chance and recruited me,” do. said Simoneau. “I’ve had a blast “I like Aaron Rodgers right ever since.” now,” said Simoneau. “He’s very From the launch of his ar- humble and I like the way he rival at Washburn University, plays and carries himself. He’s a Simoneau has earned MIAA good leader and he’s very good at honorable mention for three con- what he does.” secutive years in baseball and The approach of a student’s currently holds 20 school career final collegiate year is one causand single season records in ing an array of mixed emotions WASHBURN REVIEW

Photo by Jordan Loomis, Washburn Review

Great Dane: Senior quarterback Dane Simoneau has been impressive so far this season, throwing for a school record 452 passing yards against Sioux Falls in the season opener. He was named MIAA Player of the Week. and thoughts. Sentiments of uncertainty and sadness begin to take form as the date draws nearer. Simoneau’s walk across the stage will be a moment full of pride and joy, but also bittersweet. “I’m going to miss everyone,” said Simoneau. “I believe

we have a great coaching staff here and I get along with every one of them. They’re great guys who genuinely care about their players, unlike some other schools who don’t necessarily care about a player’s personal life, but our coaches take care of everything.

“They’re there to talk to you if you need them. I’ll miss the players too. I have some best friends on this team that I’ll keep for life. It’s been a good time and a fun ride.” Jordan Loomis is a freshman mass media major. Reach her at jordan.loomis@washburn.edu.

www.washburnreview.org


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The Sideliner

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Fantasy football options to replace injured, ineffective players Josh Rouse WASHBURN REVIEW After the fiasco that was Week 1 for many fantasy owners, I’d first like to offer my apologies for suggesting last week to pick up Sam Bradford to replace Peyton Manning. I had no way of knowing he’d get injured. However, for those of you who took my advice and picked up Ryan Fitzpatrick, Jay Cutler or Chad Henne, you’re welcome. The first week of football brought a lot of injuries to big name players, including Bradford, Steven Jackson, Eric Berry and Nate Kaeding. For Week 2, there are a few players I would focus my efforts on acquiring. TE Scott Chandler, Buffalo Bills–For those who picked up Tennessee Titans tight end Jared

Cook, I still think he will have a good year despite bad numbers early on. However, Chandler has quickly become a favorite target of Ryan Fitzpatrick this season and has shown early that he has great hands in the redzone, an area where Buffalo has looked to improve since last season. Not only is he a great target in the endzone, he also packs on the yardage and was the most targeted receiver in Week 1 for the Bills. If you have the space, bench Cook for now. If not, drop Cook and grab this guy. You’ll be glad you did. RB Carnell Williams, St. Louis Rams–Word out of St. Louis is that Steven Jackson will not be playing Monday night, so the best replacement would naturally be his backup. Williams ran for 91 yards in Jackson’s absence and had six receptions for 49

yards, showing he can put up a he’s still available, get him. lot of fantasy points. Even if you WR Nate Burleson, Dedon’t have Jackson and need a troit Lions–Matthew Stafford quality running back next week, has shown that he is a good quarexpect him to put up at least 20 terback when he is healthy. Repoints this week. ceiver Calvin Johnson is his No. RB Mike Tolbert, San Di- 1 guy, but Stafford likes to move ego Chargers–He had three the ball around and the second touchdowns against a Minne- best option on this squad is Bursota Vikings leson. He was defense that is targeted often built to stop the (five receptions, running back. I 60 yards) and understand that will get some Ryan Matthews touchdowns is the “starting” this season. Graphic by Josh Rouse, Washburn Review running back, Worth picking but the fact is up if you are in they share the carries 50-50 and desperate need of a receiver. Tolbert is a huge player in the QB Ryan Fitzpatrick, Bufpassing game, he had nine recep- falo Bills–I’ve been preaching tions for 58 yards and two touch- about this guy since last year, downs. He is the goal line back and I won’t stop now. Fitzpatrick and so the majority of the rush- had a huge game Sunday against ing touchdowns will go to him. If the Chiefs and should do just as

Fantasy Football

good this week against the Raiders. He is consistent, is very intelligent (he is a Harvard grad) and most importantly, he makes his teammates better. Stevie Johnson was unknown last year, and Chandler was unknown until the Chiefs game. Both will continue to have success in this dynamic passing game and receive help from a great core of running backs. Fitzpatrick is also a better option this week than Cam Newton, who after a big game against an iffy Cardinals secondary, will now have to face a defense that led Green Bay to a Super Bowl victory last year. He’s not likely to have a repeat performance this week, though he might be impressive later on. Josh Rouse is a senior mass media major. Reach him at josh.rouse@ washburn.edu.

Week Three

the staff

w e i v e Staff Pick ‘Em R e Th

the games

Slayer

Washburn vs Missouri Southern State

MSSU

Washburn

Washburn

Washburn

Washburn

Washburn

Washburn

Washburn

ESU

UCM

UCM

UCM

ESU

ESU

UCM

UCM

Georgia Tech

KU

KU

Georgia Tech

KU

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech

KU

Kent State

K-State

K-State

K-State

K-State

K-State

K-State

K-State

Florida

FSU

OU

OU

OU

OU

OU

OU

Tennessee

Florida

Florida

Tennessee

Tennessee

Florida

Florida

Tennessee

Kansas City Chiefs vs Detroit Lions

Lions

Lions

Lions

Lions

Chiefs

Lions

Lions

Lions

Tampa Bay Buccaneers vs Minnesota Vikings

Bucs

Bucs

Bucs

Bucs

Vikings

Vikings

Bucs

Vikings

San Diego Chargers vs New England Patriots

Pats

Pats

Pats

Chargers

Pats

Pats

Pats Cowboys

Pats

Indiana State vs Western Kentucky

ISU

WKU

WKU

ISU

WKU

ISU

WKU

WKU

Last Week Record

7-3

6-4

6-4

6-4

7-3

7-3

5-5

7-3

OVERALL RECORDS

13-7

15-5

12-8

14-6

10-10

14-6

11-9

13-7

Emporia State vs Central Missouri @ Kansas vs Georgia Tech Kansas State vs Kent State Oklahoma vs Florida State Tennessee vs Florida

Roboto

Magellan

Dickie D. Hashbrown Billy Noble

The Review Staff Pick ‘Em is a weekly feature where we pick the winners of college and pro football games around the country. Check back weekly to see our standings!

Fried Bryce Roose Juice


Wednesday, September 14, 2011

The Sideliner

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Full strength Lady Blues look to take down MIAA Jordan Loomis

Emporia State Lady Hornets. During the season Washburn split the two closely contested games The changing of leaves and against the Lady Hornets with the steady drumbeat of balls a total of eight points separatbouncing signals the Washburn ing the two teams in both games Lady Blues season is fast ap- combined. proaching. The team is more than The Lady Blues received the ready for it. number four seed in the NCAA Overall, the Lady Blues had South Regional Tournament. an impressive 2010-2011 season Although the Lady Blues lost with 22 wins, but also had their in the first round by a point, that obstacles as well. Coming into doesn’t mean that the Lady Blues the year Lady Blues Head Coach won’t succeed again this coming Ron McHenry thought their sea- season. son would be marked by noticeThe Lady Blues have a lot in able depth. store for their upcoming season. Junior forward Sierra “We have a lot of new freshMoeller went down early in the men and transfer students this year with an injury while other year,� said Moeller. “One of the players dealt with naggoals for this season ging injuries throughis to win the NCAA LADY out the year. Tournament. With BLUES “People thought the newest addition [the younger players BASKETBALL of assistant coach Jim on the team] wouldn’t Biggs, everything is do well in the season, but they did possible, even if it’s just one step a great job,� said Moeller. “They at a time.� stepped up to the plate to make it Biggs was hired in July successful. [Junior guard] Laura 2011, taking over for Toni Gross, Kinderknecht did an excellent who left to pursue other opporPreserve fondest job of stepping in to assist the the tunities. This memories will be Washburn team for our success.� of your college Head Coach Ron$15 McHenry’s years for by Kinderknecht finished last 12th season. your copyBlues of the season third on the teampre-ordering in scorThe Lady will begin ing, averaging 10.7 points per the new season in Anaheim, Ca2011-12 today! game while also averaging 3.3 Kaw lif., Yearbook where they will play in the assists per game. 2011 Disney Tip-Off Classic, Name ___________________________ Some of the Lady Blues Nov. 4-6. Before their first home highlights for the 2010-2011 sea- game on Nov. 14 against Tabor Phone (____)College, ____-_________ son included most points scored they will be playing in a game with 95 against Mis- against Kansas State University Email ___________________________ souri Western. on Nov. 8. Among the standout play“We’re really excited for Address #_____ ers on last season’s team, Cassie________________ the season, ourApt fans, and for Lombardino was a force patrol- what our season has to offer,� StateMoeller. _____ Zip __________ ling the paint finishing City______ the year said in the top five of most categories Please check one Pay byand cash Pay by check with 15 points, 5.8 rebounds 1.7 blocks per game respectively. One of the biggest highlights for the past season were the Lady Jordan Loomis is a freshman mass Blues taking first place in the media major. Reach her at jordan. MIAA Conference against rival loomis@washburn.edu. WASHBURN REVIEW

Pre-order your Kaw Yearbook!

Photos by Mike Goehring, Washburn Review

Ready to roll: The Lady Blues are preparing to take on the 2011-2012 slate of opponents this year with players returning from injury and transfer students joining the ranks of familiar faces. The season begins November 4.

How to pre-order:

Don’t forget to have your picture taken for the Kaw Yearbook —Sept. 22: 3 p.m. (before the faculty meeting)

—Oct. 27: 2 to 5 p.m.

—Oct. 24: 7 to 10 p.m.

—Oct. 29: TBA

                          

          

2009-10 Kaw Yearbook


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The Sideliner

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Game day eating means more than wings Michelle Boltz

WASHBURN REVIEW

Although sports fans may have their own dining preferences before going to the game, here are three restaurants that come highly recommended for your culinary pleasure. Buffalo Wild Wings are famous for their wings, and have 14 varieties of sauces that range from as mild, “Sweet BBQ,” to the screaming hot, “Blazin’. They also offer a plethora of scrumptious appetizers and entrees that are reasonably priced and provide a kicked back atmosphere with prompt service. “Traditional boneless wings are our most popular item to order,” said Robbie Eisenhut, server at Buffalo Wild Wings. Eisenhut is a Washburn student, a junior biology major. Other popular items ordered are their burger slammers, buffalo chips, and potato wedges. Wings specials can fit any budget. Tuesdays, traditional wings are only 45 cents each, and Thursdays, boneless are 60 cents each. Drink specials are also available. Unique to Buffalo Wild Wings is its “Blazin’ Challenge.” A contestant purchases “Blazin’” traditional wings, and if they can successfully eat 12 in six minutes, they win a free T-shirt and get their photo taken to put on their Wall of Fame. Three flat-screens on the patio show current games, as well as a large number inside. Nowhere is there an empty space, so no matter what game is the favorite, it won’t be missed at Buffalo Wild Wings. Henry T’s is a great place to come in before or after the game, and has catering, tailgating and par-

ty packs available for parties on the go. It is recommended to call a half hour in advance to have it ready when it’s time to pick up the order. Henry T’s also has a kidfriendly menu to please even the most finicky eater. There are several ways to customize your burger, which include chicken, turkey, tuna or veggie. Henry T’s has 14 complimentary toppings, eight cheeses and more. Some of their signature items available are their Chipotle fish tacos, chicken strips, and pepperjack nachos. Fried Twinkies served with a scoop of vanilla ice cream make a wonderful dessert. Henry T’s have a variety of large-creened televisions with different games featured at the same time. College Hill Tavern is another hot spot for great food and is conveniently located just across from Washburn campus at 17th and College. College Hill offers everything from burgers to taco salad. In addition to their burgers, College Hill has salmon or veggie burgers for a delicious alternative. One of College Hill’s favorite ordered items are their crab rangoon. “People order Chinese food elsewhere, but get their crab rangoon from here,” said Luke Dwyer, bartender and server at College Hill. Another popular item is the Hangover, which is a brisket sandwich on Texas toast with cheese and a fried egg. College Hill gets their meat locally from Herman’s Meat Market. “Everything we make is made to order and hand made,” said Paige Dickeson, owner of College Hill

Tavern. College Hill offers a Bloody Mary Bar that offers many ingredients that make anyone’s Bloody Mary unique to their own individual tastes: black and green olives, hot pickles, celery, artichokes, horseradish and beyond. “People pick what they want, give it to the bartender, and they blend it just the way they like it,” said Dwyer. “There’s no wrong way to make a Bloody Mary.” Specials include all-you-can-eat wings from 6-9 p.m., and 99 cent sliders on Mondays. Saturdays have tacos at 75 cents each, and honor all drink specials on Sundays, including the Bloody Mary bar. There will be new items added in mid-end September. Their outdoor patio is a popular place to have private parties, and have a separate bar for those special occasions. College Hill Tavern offers the largest gaming sports packages in town, and has nine games on all at once, including the Sunday NFL ticket. For more information on these businesses check out www. washurnreview.com. Michelle Boltz is a junior mass media major. Reach her at michelle.boltz@washburn.edu.

Get the best buzz for your buck! Sunday

Bull Frogs Live

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Photo by Tricia Peterson, Washburn Review

In Topeka and Lawrence: With locations at 21st and Washburn in Topeka, and 3250 West 6th in Lawrence, Henry T’s is a great place for pre- and postgame festivities. They also offer a kid-friendly menu.

Wild Horse Lazy Toad

k’s

c e p

S

Photo by Tricia Peterson, Washburn Review

Get wild: Buffalo Wild Wings offers 14 different varieties of wings. Other popular items include their burger slammers, buffalo chips and potato wedges.

Photos by Tricia Peterson, Washburn Review

Just across campus: Located at 17th and College, the College Hill Tavern offers the largest gaming sports packages in town. Crab rangoon is one of the most popular items on their menu.

Ichabod Laundra Bar

- Bloody Marys $3 -Pitchers of Bud & Bud Light $6

- Big Domestics $3 -Wells $2

-Wells $2 -Longnecks $2

-Bud, Bud Light & Bud Select 12oz Drafts $1.50 24oz $3 - Captain Morgan, Revel Stoke and Jack Daniels Singles $2.50

Monday

Tuesday Wednesday Thursday

- Bottles of -Pitchers $6 Coors Light, -24oz Draws of Coors Light Miller Lite, Bud & Bud Light $2 and Miller -Import/Micro Lite $2 Pints $2 -Wells $2 -Wells $2

- Bottles $1 off -Washington Apple Shots $3

- Wells $2 -Pint Draws $1 off -Sex on the Beach Shots $2

-24oz draws of Coors Light & Miller Lite $2 -Import/Micro pints $2 - Wells $2

- UV SingleDrinks $2.50 -Boulevard Bottles $2.75 -Kamikaze Shots $2

- Domestic draws $1 -Wells $2 -Jello Shots $2 (live side only) -No cover with Student ID!

Closed but remember no cover for ladies all week!

-Wells $2 -Longnecks $2

-Domestic 12oz -Domestic 12oz Drafts $1.50, Drafts $1.50, 25oz $2 25oz $2 -Single Wells $2 -Single Wells $2 -Double Wells -Double Wells $4 $4

-Domestic 12oz Drafts $1.50, 25oz $2 -Single Wells $2 -Double Wells $4

-Micro/Imports 12oz Drafts $2 25oz $3 - Captain Morgan, Revel Stoke and Jack Daniels Singles $2.50

- Bourbon & Cola $2.50 -Pitchers $6

- Headaches $3.25 -Bloody Marys $3

- Domestic 12 oz Bottles $2 -Premium Drinks $3.75 -Imports $3

Saturday

- UV Drinks - 24oz draws of Coors Light $3 & Miller -24oz draws Lite $3 of Bud & Bud -UV Drinks $3 Light $3

- Double - Double Wells -Captain $3.50 Calls $4 Morgan $2.50 -Domestic Pint -Big Domes-Domestic Draws $2.50 tic Draws $3 Buckets $12 -Cake Shots -Bombs $ 3.50 -Vegas Bombs $3 $2.50

- Headaches $3.25 -Bloody Marys $3

- Mugs $2.50 -Bloody Mary $3

Friday

-Wells $2 -Longnecks $2.50 -Long Island $3 -Jager Bombs $4

-Wells $2 -Longnecks $2.50 -Long Island $3 -Jager Bombs $4

-Domestic 12oz Drafts $1.50, 25oz $3 -Absolute Vodka Singles $3

-Domestic 12oz Drafts $1.50, 25oz $3

- Mugs $2.50

-Gin and Tonic $2 -UV Drinks $3

- Mugs $2.50

- Rum & Cola $2.50 -Pitchers $6

- Wells $2.50

- Headaches $3.25 -Wells $3 -Crown $4

- 22oz Bottles/ Deuces $3.50 -Margaritas $3 -Pitchers $5.50

- Headaches $3.50 -Wells $3 -Imports $3 -Prairie Fire Shots $1

- Headaches $3 -Tuaca&Jager Bombs $4.50 -Coronas&Dos Equis $2.50 -Skyy Vodka Drinks $3

- 10oz Draws Natural Light $1 -22oz Bottles /Duces $3.25 -Wells $3


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The Sideliner

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Photo of the Week

Photo by Jordan Loomis, Washburn Review

Kicking into gear: The Lady Blues scrimmage prior to the beginning of the season. The team has started out slow losing four out of its first five games.

Soccer team sets goals Ivy Marcus WASHBURN REVIEW With the new season starting up for Washburn Women’s Soccer, it’s time to look forward to the things ahead and take a look at the season left behind. “It was a good season- it had its ups and downs,” said Kelsey Raiman, a senior center right defender. “We didn’t do as well as we have in the past...but I think overall it was a pretty good season.” Coach Tim Collins said that the season overall was not “the winningest” the team had played, but he still believes they played well consistently, even against strong opponents. Collins said that the team played especially well defensively throughout the entirety of last season. Raiman recalled a game played well on the offense side, in which the Lady Blues played most of the game down by a

goal, then scored two consecutive goals within the last few minutes of the game, pulling ahead and earning a victory. She mentioned that she didn’t think the season was difficult because the team was not playing at their best, rather because both they and their opponents consistently brought everything they had to the field- it was just a matter of outlasting each other, and sometimes they didn’t last as long as the opponent. “I think that some of our toughest games last year were against Omaha and Central Missouri,” said Collins. While the team played well, during the season there were also developments in the way of injuries. “We had a lot of injuries last year, more than almost any season in the history of the program. There even reached a point where several people would have to sit out of practice.” said Collins.

“I think we had about four or five people that were sitting out of practice, and just playing in games,” said Raiman. “There were a lot of injuries.” The Lady Blues have set a few goals for this season as a team. One of their big ones, according to Collins, was to make the conference tournament. Raiman said her personal goals were to shoot for some shut-out games and score some goals this season- something she doesn’t have much opportunity to do as a defensive player. The Lady Blues’ overall record for last season was five wins, nine losses and four ties. They are keeping a positive outlook for this year and planning to play hard.

Photo by Josh Rouse, Washburn Review

Sprawled Out: Topekans gathered at Yager Stadiums Sept. 13 for the second annual Shawnee County’s Largest Workout. The event attracted 843 participants.

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Ivy Marcus is a Freshman English major. Reach her at ivy. marcus@washburn.edu

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Cameron Hughes is a junior art major. Reach him at cameron.hughes@washburn.edu.


Tailgating on a budget

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

The Sideliner

9

Tricia Peterson

WASHBURN REVIEW

As students, there is a limit on how much to spend for certain things, including tailgating. It’s part of being a college student, but it can also get expensive quickly. There are many popular choices for what to cook while tailgating and it matters on the preference of the people there. It could be as simple as hotdogs and hamburgers or as extravagant as baby back ribs that have been smoked all night. Also a question of equipment is prevalent and adds even more expense to a fun tailgating experience. Grilling always comes to mind when thinking about tailgating and grills usually don’t come cheap. Walmart offers a variety of small charcoal grills ranging in price from $7.99 to $30 and these are brand new. Electric and gas grills run $80 and up, but are cleaner than charcoal, and there won’t be leftover charcoals to dispose of. Coolers are needed and those can be pricey as well, but shopping around might reveal an awesome deal. There are many types and styles that range in size, color, weight and accessories. Food and drinks need to be kept cool, and depending on the number of people attending this tailgating party, also depends on the size of the cooler. The simplest cooler found at K-Mart is $3.69, but it’s a oneuse cooler because it’s Styrofoam and will at least get the job done. With a larger budg e t there a r e

Jordan Chilcote

WASHBURN REVIEW

Photo by Josh Rouse, Washburn Review

Sizzlin’: Washburn students can find deals throughout Topeka for supplies ranging from meat to sauces and marinades. coolers that have wheels on them for easy portability, or just handles. On to the food – the most important part of tailgating. Assuming there is a small budget, the best route to go would be hotdogs and hamburgers. There are frozen patties available at the local Dillons or Walmart ranging from $5.99 for a small package of 20 to $20 for a box full with 50 frozen patties. There is always ground chuck you can buy by the pound, which varies in cost as well as the percentage of fat per pound. With burgers comes buns and those are pretty cheap for the store brand, and can get expensive for name brands. The store brands are usually $1 to $1.50, same for hot dog buns. Hot dogs can also be bought for as cheap as $1.50 for a package of eight, which is convenient because the buns come in packs of eight as well, so there will be no waste. Sides are a whole new story and favorties include potato salad, macaroni salad, baked beans and coleslaw. At Walmart, these items are available in small or large containers which cost $1.98 to $2.98 There is also the deli, where it’s made fresh daily can be bought by the pound. The cheapest in town was found at Dillon’s for $2.09 per pound.

Graphic by Cameron Hughes, Washburn Review

“We see a lot of wing trays, boneless and bone-in,” said Angela Gamino, Dillon’s deli clerk. “Our potato salad and fried chicken are also [popular] selections, as well as party trays in general.” Other popular hot items for tailgating are chicken wings, fried chicken and barbeque chicken. These come ready and available at both Dillon’s and Walmart for a reasonable price, especially because the food is ready to eat, and no cooking is necessary, therefore no grills or coolers needed. “[The most] popular is the wings, wingdings, and it also depends on the day,” said Nellie Sutherland, Walmart deli associate. “Honey barbeque and sweet and sour chicken are ordered a lot. Our general’s chicken is popular, sweet with a bite.” The cheapest way to go is to pool resources and do this as a group. It saves cash, creates variety and is always more fun that way. Designate certain people to bring certain things, and volunteer to buy the burgers if someone else will bring the sides. Tailgating is always fun with friends, and the more the merrier. Tricia Peterson is a junior mass media major. Reach her at patricia.peterson@washburn.edu

As winter is slowly getting closer it will become too cold to mini golf outside. Take a look at mini golf’s new psychedelic friend, Lunar Golf - it provides all the fun of mini golf but it’s inside and glow-in-the-dark. With the use of black lights, everything glows while golfing here. They also sell glow in the dark items and assessories such as basketballs, soccer balls, bracelets, necklaces, golf balls, toy swords and many other fun items. To golf it costs $8 a person and children five years or younger get in for only $6. This may seem pricey, but a movie at Hollywood Theatre 14 is $9.50. Included in the price for Lunar Golf is three rounds of glow-inthe-dark golf. “I really liked it,” said Jayde Boyer, a college student from Fort Hayes. “It was fun, but what made it fun was the people I was with.” Lunar Golf also has a birthday party pack. It costs $80 for the entire package, which allows 10 people, unlimited golf for 90 minutes, free use of the Party

Zone, one shot at the prize hole for each player as well free glow in the dark necklaces per player. Don’t forget to set up a reservation. “My family has actually been to one at the mall in Wichita a couple times,” said Washburn student Caitlin Reimerl. “But that one isn’t anything terribly exciting, but it’s still fun.” By going to the Lunar Golf it will give students something different to do in the winter when there is snow on the ground, and there is not much of anything else to do. Lunar Golf is located inside Westridge Mall on the lower level by Macy’s. Lunar golf is open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 6 p.m. on Sundays. For reservations or questions call 785-228-8950. There is also a website where they provide you with customer reviews and more information.

Jordan Chilcote is a sophomore history major. Reach her at jordan.chilcote-santoro@ washburn.edu


10

The Sideliner

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Sports lead to great American tales onscreen Sam Sayler

WASHBURN REVIEW As Americans, sports are embedded into our culture. There is an art to the fans that tailgate before each game, paint their faces and chests and give their favorite teams the spirit to soldier on. Unfortunately for them, their favorite sports are only on so much each year. For years, Hollywood has capitalized on the emptiness in American hearts and brought great struggles of athletic ability and triumph to screens big and small.

Friday Night Lights

Without a doubt, “FNL” is the single greatest sports program to appear on TV. More so than anywhere else in the country, Texas takes its football seriously, especially at the highschool level. The show begins by following Eric Taylor, played by Kyle Chandler, as the new head coach of the Dillon Panthers. The show deals with the special treatment given to star athletes and the pressures placed on the team and coaches to perform exceptionally and succeed on the field. Players are injured and fall off the right path, but Coach Taylor is always there to serve as

an inspiration. Over its five-year run, “FNL” naturally had characters graduate and move on while new classes of characters were brought in, but Taylor and his family are always anchoring the show and reaching new heights in serial storytelling.

Slap Shot

Hockey may not have taken off as the most popular sport in the states, but it is still fertile ground for cinematic entertainment. Just inching out “MVP: Most Valuable Primate” and “D2: the Mighty Ducks,” Paul Newman’s turn in “Slap Shot” is at the top of the list for great hockey movies. Newman stars as Reggie Dunlop, player-coach for the Charlestown Chiefs, a washed-up team losing money and games. Dunlop is forced to bring in thought-to-be goons the Hanson brothers, out of obligation. Once the Hansons start playing, things start to turn around for the Chiefs. The brothers’ unconventionally brutal style of play is adopted by Dunlop and the team. The Chiefs have a major turnaround and start winning games, but not every player is pleased with the new mission statement. Primarily known for roles

Sports in

Hollywood as a man’s man and tough guy, Paul Newman easily makes the transition to comedy while still keeping the drama intact without missing a beat.

The Wrestler

Director Darren Aronofsky resurrected Mickey Rourke’s career with the yarn of has-been pro wrestler Randy “the Ram” Robinson. “The Wrestler” shows

Robinson years after his heyday in the 1980s when he suffers a debilitating heart attack. Robinson eschews medical advice and mounts his big comeback on the anniversary of his most famous match. While Robinson portrays the tough hero, in real life he needs a hearing aid and glasses, falls madly in love with a stripper and struggles to

Graphic by Maggie Pilcher, Washburn Review

reconnect with his estranged daughter. Aside from all the awards and nominations, “The Wrestler” still exceed Hulk Hogan’s turn in “No Holds Barred.” Sam Sayler is a sophomore English major. Reach him at samuel. sayler@washburn.edu.

Jock Jams provide athletes, fans music to get pumped up Jordan Loomis

WASHBURN REVIEW Many athletes would agree, music is one of the only things that has the potential to get their adrenaline pumping before a game. With the fall sports athletes already in play this year, the spring athletes are practicing tentatively in the gyms. With hours of practice and schoolwork waiting for them every day during the season, music fuels these athletes. Gene Cassell, Washburn University’s sports information director, said the teams have the chance to pick the music they wish to listen to during the game warm-up and then give a CD of music to the sports department office.

“We then have the right to toss songs based on content, wording or suggestive lyrics,” said Cassell. “We will then give the CD back to the teams to make new selections.” Should the team’s second CD have another list of inappropriate music, the sports department then has the right to choose the final song list that will be played before games. Leah Talley, junior captain of the soccer team, said on behalf of the other two senior captains that the soccer team’s music for practice sessions and game warm-ups is usually picked out by team DJ, junior Bri Ament. “A couple of my favorite artists to listen to before games are Eminem and Lil Wayne,” said

Talley, “but mostly any hip-hop or rap is what pumps me up personally.” The soccer team, said Talley, is usually very good at pumping each other up before the games.

Graphic by Cameron Hughes, Washburn Review

“None of us are really shy or afraid to dance around—we just love to rock out,” said Talley. “It really builds team chemistry to have that comfort with one another.” Junior men’s basketball captain William McNeil spoke of the

team’s favorite artist. “Usually the team artists kind of vary, like Rick Ross and maybe a little Eminem here and there, but mostly this season the guys have been listening to Lil Wayne,” said McNeil. “Lil Wayne has a huge part in getting the team pumped up—he’s a well-known artist and some of his music has a special beat that will get you into the flow of things. People will rock back and forth and get into it.” Courtney Wallman, senior captain of the volleyball team, said that similar to the soccer team, they also had the music for their practice session and game warm-ups picked out by a teammate—junior Sami McHenry. Some artists from McHenry’s mix include Justin Bieber, Lady Gaga and the Spice Girls.

“Before games, the team meets in the locker room to do a pre-game ritual,” said Wallman. “It’s not really a superstition, but it and the music really help us get pumped up and focused.” Justin Cooper, one of the senior football captains, said the football team—just like the volleyball and soccer teams—have a designated player who makes the team’s mix. “Everyone has their own preferences for their music, but we listen to one mix together that will get us pumped up,” Cooper said. “Personally, I like to read my Bible before a game and then give a little speech of encouraging words to the team.” Jordan Loomis is a freshman mass media major. Reach her at jordan.loomis@washburn.edu.


Wednesday, September 14, 2011

The Sideliner

11

Athletes: Strength through wellness Tanner Ballangee WASHBURN REVIEW

Gr aph ic b yM agg ie P i lc a sh ,W he r bu rn Re v ie w

Maintaining a healthy and balanced diet can be a challenging project by itself, but throw in a couple hours of running, lifting and strenuous exercise several times a week, and eating right suddenly becomes quite a task. Athletes, no matter what sport they play, need to treat their body like a temple in order for it to be able to withstand the stress that they force on it. In order to do so, athletes must adhere to specialized diets that have been fitted to their bodily needs required by their respective sports. These athletes’ diets can vary greatly, some barely differing from a non-athlete’s diet, and some being drastically over-the-top (i.e. Michael Phelps’ diet).

“What’s important for athletes is what they eat before, during and after an event,” said Diane Werner, a registered and licensed dietitian and board certified specialist in sports dietetics. Werner graduated from Washburn University in 2001 and has been an adjunct instructor in the kinesiology and nursing departments at Washburn for approximately 10 years. She is also a consultant dietitian for those who are interested in starting a specific eating regiment. When it comes to sports diets, Werner said the top nutrients athletes need to be ingesting are carbohydrates. Carbs, such as starches, pasta, bread, cereal, grains, etc., help to replenish energy in the athlete’s body that is burned during exercise or game play. Along with carbs, athletes also need to take in ample amounts of fluids like water or Gatorade, as well as proteins for repairing muscles and foods with sodium to replace the salts lost in sweat. Not only do athletes need to eat the right stuff, they also need to eat the right amounts. Being

physically active burns calories, but one must first have those calories to burn. The suggested number of calories an athlete should consume can vary from person to person, but normally requires more than that of an average non-athlete diet. “It’s not a one-size-fits-all,” said Werner. “It depends on the resting metabolic rate and how active a person is.” An athlete’s daily calorie intake could range anywhere from a typical 2,000 to an extreme consumption of 12,000 per day like Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps claims to ingest. For Washburn football player Marty Pfannenstiel, sometimes getting that many calories down can pose a challenge. “We are told to eat more mainly because we are expending so many calories throughout the week, that you must eat more to maintain,” said Pfannenstiel. “This is sometimes hard to do with such a busy schedule, but is something that is stressed throughout the season.” Pfannenstiel, a senior accounting major, said he has to be conscious of what he eats during football season because

the diet of an athlete plays a major role in his or her performance. For this reason he avoids eating fast food and other greasy substances that are hard on the body. In order to meet the recommended daily intake of calories, athletes like Pfannenstiel eat frequent meals and snacks throughout each day, take supplements and/or drink nutrient shakes. Generally, eating right and getting what the body needs takes work. Luckily, teams have consultant dietitians like Diane Werner to help. Werner emphasizes that not only do diets differentiate between sports, but more importantly, between people. Werner states that a person’s diet must be individualized to their needs and specifications, whether an athlete or not. Maintaining a balanced diet may have its restrictions, but that doesn’t mean cutting out favorite foods entirely. “Tell me what you want and I’ll work it in,” said Werner. Tanner Ballangee is a senior English major. Reach him at tanner.ballangee@washburn.edu.

‘Runners ready for season opener Richard Kelly WASHBURN REVIEW The Topeka RoadRunners have a lot of new faces in the lineup this fall. Fortunately, fans need not worry. The team has already shown they’re prepared to compete. Their first opportunity to put that competitive mentality to the test in a regular season match will be tonight as they play the Fresno Monsters in the 2011 North American Hockey League Showcase at 8:15. Last Thursday, in a preseason game versus the Amarillo Bulls, the RoadRunners showed resiliency. Tied late in the contest, returning forward Brian Christie scored a short-handed gamewinning goal with 10.6 seconds remaining as Topeka won 3-2. Topeka dropped its Wednesday

contest 5-4 In each game, there was a pre-planned shootout following regulation. Topeka won Thursday’s shootout 3-0 and lost Wednesday’s shootout 2-1. “To be on the road in that environment, the guys learned to play through it,” said Scott Langer, Topeka head coach. While Langer acknowledged improving points in the Amarillo contest, he was mostly satisfied with his team’s effort. Topeka also had two home exhibition games against the University of Central Oklahoma Bronchos Sept. 3-4, winning 4-0 and 11-0. “We’ve seen a good progression since we played Central Oklahoma,” said Langer. “We played a real good first game against Amarillo, we just couldn’t score. I think we learned how to respond in night two and

we had a great effort.” Following Fresno, Topeka will play the Port Huron Falcons, Chicago Hitmen and Jamestown Ironmen on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, respectively. “We’re just going to play our game,” said Langer. “I think it’s about us executing our game plan no matter what and making the in-game adjustments—I think our guys are smart enough to do that.” Rookie forward Robbie Davis agrees that his team is ready for the season. “We’ve been doing a lot of training and I think we’re definitely prepared and ready to go,” said Davis. “We’re ready to hit the ice running.” Richard Kelly is a senior mass media and social work major. Reach him at richard.kelly@washburn.edu

Photo by Richard Kelly, Washburn Review

Dedication: Dan Dupell (top) and Ryan White (bottom) are returners this season for the Topeka RoadRunners. The new season begins Wednesday.


12

The Sideliner

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Fantasy football gets new meaning lions of people run fantasy teams where success is practically measured by their ability to objectify At first glance most sports professional athletes. Players are fans scoff at the Lingerie Foot- traded back and forth faster than ball League and write it off as a a public library copy of "Breakgimmick, but those who delve a ing Dawn (The Twilight Saga)" bit deeper can see that it is much the month after it’s released. Heck, baseball cards printed more than scantily clad women giggling while playing a light- with the likeness of athletes have hearted game of two-hand touch. been around for about a cenThe LFL started out as The tury and are passed around with all the fanfare of a Lingerie Bowl, a Twinkie in a grade single event played OPINION school lunchroom. at halftime of the SuIt’s easier for me to see how per Bowl on pay-per-view. Back in 2009 the LFL was established some could think the league is and began playing a regular sea- demeaning to women but I would guess that the women playing in son schedule with 10 teams. Now in its third season the the league don’t feel that way. In an interview on "8th Man league has expanded to 12 teams and usually plays one game each Radio," a webcast dedicated to week with all games being broad- LFL, one player spoke out on cast on MTV2. The 20-week sea- why she wanted to play. “I decided to join the LFL son culminates in the Lingerie Bowl that still takes place on Su- because I wanted people to understand it’s more than the per Bowl Sunday. Since its inception the LFL name,” said Liz Gorman, wide has drawn criticism from orga- receiver/safety for the Tampa nizations and individuals who Breeze. "We can be beautiful and think that the LFL demeans and intelligent but still hit you like objectifies women. It’s undeni- Ray Lewis.” I realized just how tough able that the league is using sex as one of its major selling points these women are. They play allbut don’t all professional sports out, jaw crushing, concussion inleagues objectify their athlete’s ducing, full-contact football. You see intensity in their eyes as they in one way or another? Look at fantasy sports. mil- play football with enough feroc-

Bryce Grammer WASHBURN REVIEW

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ity and passion to rival any male league. I would even argue that they are tougher than most NFL players because not only are they tough, but they have to be tough while wearing lingerie. Just try to name one NFL player who would have the guts to do that…. I rest my case.

Bryce Grammer is a senior mass media major. Reach him at bryce.grammer@ washburn.edu

Photo courtesy of Lingerie Football League

Taking it seriously: Players in the Lingerie Football League play more than just powder puff games. The young women take their games as seriously as any other athlete.


2011-12 Issue 4